Posts by Category: Ducati

Ducati May 5, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1990 Ducati 851 SP3

Our luck that Ducati was compelled to prove that their WSBK race machines weren’t too special, and a few hundred were made as homologation specials and offered to the cogniscenti.  This 1990 851 SP3 can be displayed immediately, and shows just over 2,500 miles.

New owners Cagiva opened their checkbook wide for development of a 4-valve desmo engine, nicely oversquare with 11:1 compression, it claimed 111 hp from 888cc’s.  Weber injection sprayed down 50mm intakes, and the fairing hides an oil cooler and water radiator.  The classic white trellis frame shows Öhlins front and rear, and black wheels are a departure, but go well with the carbon mudguards.

Owned by a collector, this rare bird has been on the dais from early on.  A previous owner selected a more vintage-looking exhaust, but otherwise it appears as delivered.  It has been selected by RSBFS contributors as early as 2011, and sold at a Bonham’s auction in 2014, looking museum ready whenever it’s seen.  With only 500 made, demand from insiders with connections to the brand makes one wonder if this might be the only stateside example.

From the seller:

1990 Ducati 851 SP3

Up for sale from my collection is a rare 1991 Ducati 851/888 SP3 #467 of 534!

The 851 is an iconic bike not only for Ducati, but World Superbike! The 851 helped to start the modern history of Ducati in World Superbike!

The 851 SP3 appeared in 1991. In addition to an increased motor capacity to 888cc and close ratio gearbox, it featured higher compression pistons, a forced air intake, which contributed to a slight power increase, Desmo 4 valve cylinder heads, fuel injection and water cooled, which amounted to 111hp at 10,500 rpm. The 1991 SP3 also featured stronger crankcases and updated clutch.

The Brembo wheels were painted black and the brake and clutch master cylinders included remotely mounted fluid reservoirs. Front and rear suspension feature Ohlins race proven technology.

Upgrades are minimal, brake lines, aluminum sub frame (around front by instruments by Jimmy Adamo), spaghetti exhaust with RARE Verlicchi megaphones and updated cylinder head studs.

This SP3 has been ridden very little with just 3823km (2375 miles) on the odometer. This is a rare low mileage investment piece!

Overall cosmetic condition is excellent, with work performed by Advanced Motorsports before I purchased it.

If this bike looks familiar, it was featured with a number of rare Ducati’s and sold at the 2014 Bonhams Las Vegas auction for $25,300.
Values continue to climb!

https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/21389/lot/377/
The bike was previously part of the Silverman Museum Collection.

Although a video was taken after delivery of the SP3 after I purchased it, it has been sitting in my collection. If interested in riding the bike, I would recommend preventative service before riding.

Bike is complete with original owners manual and clear Colorado title!

If looking for a desirable, investment quality Ducati SP3, this is one to consider!

Please contact Lee for more information at (425) 830-4300 or lee@hotlasers.com

Lee offers two videos of number 467, a walk around and a one with the engine running:

The 851 was the beginning of Ducati’s long-running appreciation for the proving ground and advertising venue that the Superbike World Championship provides.  Two series wins with 888 power followed the 851, and then the 916 entered the picture.  This SP3 is testimony to that great era, and though it likely won’t get the chance, could provide proof on the tarmac.  Lee welcomes offers and questions on 425-830-4300 or by email – here –.

-donn

Featured Listing – 1990 Ducati 851 SP3
Ducati May 2, 2019 posted by

Simple Pleasures: 1996 Ducati 900SS SP for Sale

Ducati’s two-valve “Desmodue” may not be the most powerful engine, or the lowest-maintenance, but there’s a reason it’s stuck around from the 1980 Pantah all the way through to today. Besides the obvious budgetary reasons: some of that tooling is probably long paid off… Joking aside, today’s Desmodue is heavily evolved, compared to the original version, now punched out to 1100cc and packing dual plugs per cylinder and modern electronics. But the qualities of the original are still there, and make for a very entertaining ride. Ducati’s mid-90s 900SS SP may not have been a powerhouse and was handily outclassed by every Japanese sportbike available at the time, but the aging thoroughbred still offered stable handling, good brakes for the period, a punchy midrange, and plenty of dry clutch rattle.

At the time, the 916 was making headlines for its ferocious performance on and off track, but the Supersport of the same period was a much better motorcycle to actually live with. Compared to the painfully focused 916, the 900SS almost felt like a sport-tourer. Along with the Monster it gave Ducati a range of bikes with real racing heritage, but without the expensive maintenance, high-strung histrionics, and performance most riders didn’t really need anyway, especially on the road.

By 1996, the 900SS was available in two flavors: the cost-cutting 900SS CR that generally came with a stylish half-fairing, and the higher-spec 900SS SP seen here. The engines were the same, but the CR used non-adjustable forks from either Showa or Marzocchi on later machines, while the SP had a carbon front fender and three-way adjustable suspension up front and at the rear. There were other minor details as well, like a narrower 4.5″ rear wheel on the CR, versus a 5.0″ hoop on the SP. If you’ve got a CR, don’t despair: suspension swaps between models and even years is pretty simple, and upgraded valving kits for the Showa forks are available. Unfortunately, the famously horrible Marzocchi units on the later CR models are pretty much best abandoned in the wilds to be savaged by wild dogs.

Ownership isn’t necessarily as much of a headache as you’d expect. In spite of their reputation, the two-valve Ducatis are generally pretty bomb-proof, and you’ve got to be riding like a bit of an idiot to overrev one. First of all, no valve springs means no valve float! And second of all, in spite of an indicated 9000rpm redline, any remotely standard carbureted 904cc Ducati engine runs out of puff way before that. Power was a claimed 80hp with a pair of Mikuni CV carbs, and 75hp at the wheel from a strong example. More is available via head work and tuning, since these were originally built to race, although performance gains won’t be particularly cheap.

As for Ducati’s infamous lack of reliability: the valves do require regular maintenance, although they tend to stay in spec after the first couple adjustments. The toothed rubber timing belts require biennial replacement to prevent an expensive transformation from motive force to paperweight, but many competent home mechanics find these tasks aren’t too difficult to tackle. Italian bike electrical components, however, generally deserve their poor reputation, and it’s worth regularly checking connections and using a bit of dielectric grease to make sure your lights light and your starter starts.

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Ducati 900SS SP for Sale

Excellent Condition, always well cared for, Ducati Limited Edition  500 SS SP SUPERLIGHT.  Low production number 47 of 500 made.

Full fairing, floating cast iron rotors and original factory oil temp gauge. New tires, carbon fiber mufflers. Includes owners and shop manuals, Hand written previous Owner records of services dating back to 8/12/97 with 2363 miles. 

Fresh timing belt, starter relay. Runs excellent sounds even better. Also have stock pipes to go with sale. This is a beautiful , air cooled, dependable, dry clutch classic example that will put a smile on your face.

Bike is currently on consignment at local Dealer in S.F. Paperwork to be  handled by them upon sale. 

The 900SS used to be an amazingly affordable entry into Italian bike ownership, especially if you’re fairly handy with basic tools. The only cheaper Ducatis are the original Monsters, but both have started to climb in value, especially for nice, low-mileage examples. This one has 13k or so on the clock which, if it’s been maintained by the book, means it’s barely broken in. Higher-resolution pictures would be nice but, from what I can see, it looks to be a very clean example. Get one now, while they’re still fairly cheap, since clean examples are getting hard to find.

-tad

Simple Pleasures: 1996 Ducati 900SS SP for Sale
Ducati April 30, 2019 posted by

A New York Minute: 1997 Ducati 916 Monoposto

If there is a bike that needs no introduction, it must certainly be the Ducati 916. Raising the performance game to a level not seen by manufacturers before, Ducati created a powerhouse that punched like Mike Tyson, had the speed of Usain Bolt, and the looks of Kate Moss. As gorgeous as it was functional, the 916 knocked the world on its collective ear, and World SuperBike trophies followed in droves.

1997 Ducati 916 Monoposto for sale on eBay

Engine wise, the 916 was an evolution of the 851/888 SP series of bikes. That means a liquid-cooled v-twin with 4-valve heads activated by desmodromic gymnastics for better high-RPM power – 114 horses at 9,000 revs, to be exact. Anything over 100 HP was considered pretty stout in the day, and the 916 had the kind of power that repli-racers could only dream about. It wasn’t just the power either, but the stunning torque of the v-twin that won fans with riders. All of this performance did not result in a fragile power plant; with significant testing and actual use in the 888 SP0 series, the 916 motor has shown itself to be well neigh bulletproof.

From the seller:
1997 Ducati 916 monoposto with 5224 original miles in unmolested condition that came out of a collection. All OEM takeoff parts are included in the sale which will be boxed up and included in the sale should the purchaser desire to return this to bone stock. Recent $2300 full recommission and 6,000 mile service by Ducati master tech which includes a detailed invoice, plus a dyno sheet. This is an appreciating classic which is difficult to find in this condition and one of the most important motorcycles of the 90’s. All original stickers in place. No cracks on bodywork tabs. Paint on wheels is intact. Vent screens on rear tail are intact. All electrics are 100% functional. Mechanically perfect. Clean transferrable New York State title.

More from the seller:
Currently fitted with period correct aftermarket Corbin seat, Ferracci carbon fiber slip-ons, Ducati Performance chip, braided steel lines, carbon hugger and front fender, (2) carbon tank guards (in boxes), and Helibar risers. The seat and bars make this extremely comfortable in comparison to the stock setup. This includes OEM front fender, clip-on’s, seat, mid-pipes, slip-on exhaust, brake lines, chainguard and body panel below the radiator. This bike wants for absolutely nothing and is ready to go. The only flaws are two scratches. One is on the rear tail section and one is on the tank which are visible in photos. It is not a museum piece, but it’s a very clean example with very low mileage. A bike is only original once, so I decided not to respray these pieces. I am selling it because I am shuffling my collection around focusing on 2 older air cooled Ducati’s. All service questions can be answered by the invoices from ECS which I have supplied photos of. My motorcycles are well-maintained and only serviced by the best in the business.

Values on the 916 are certainly on the rise, but they are also all over the place. Condition and mileage play a part here, just the same as with any collector bike. But more importantly is the actual model. In the case of the 916, it was introduced in 1994, and ran through 1998 before being replaced by the 996. The earliest of the 916s are the most coveted, with certain specific 1995 models assembled in Varese being the rarest and most valuable of the early set. As the years passed, factory capacity grew, and latter model year 916s grew more populous. Still, even these later models are growing in collector value. This particular example, showing just over 5,000 miles, looks to be in pretty good shape. There are some tasty aftermarket bolt-on pieces included (including that gorgeous carbon fender and FBF pipes), but for the purist the sale will also come with key OEM bits to revert the bike back to stock. All in all, there is a lot of very cool motorcycle here for $8,500 OBO. It’s not perfect, but with the parts and the services performed it should be in the running.

Sure, the Varese bikes will be nearly double the cost, but passing eyes would be unable to distinguish the difference between the two 916s. This 1997 model has all the same great looks and great performance with a price tag that is only half-sized; this Ducati 916 offers RSBFS readers some great bargain riding and collecting! Check it out here, and Good Luck!!

MI

A New York Minute: 1997 Ducati 916 Monoposto
Ducati April 27, 2019 posted by

Good Things In Small Packages: 2004 Ducati 749R for Sale

With the general level of competence from modern sportbikes, along with rules that don’t seem to favor limited-production homologation bikes, it’s easy to forget just how special some of them are. Bikes like the Yamaha OW01 might have looked nearly identical to the regular production machines from ten feet, but were often hand-built to a much higher quality, with high-performance engine internals, hand-welded frames, and other small changes that were intended to help the bikes perform in production-based racing clases. Ducati’s 749R is one such machine, and its superficial similarity to the regular production 749 and 749S belies just how much of a hot rod it was.

Not to say that the 749S wasn’t a good motorcycle. It was, and carried on Ducati’s less is more trend that started with their sweet-handling 748 that had just the right amount of power and superior agility, compared to the bigger 916/996/998. Much of that was down to the narrower 180-section rear tire, but it was a bit lighter as well, and the 916’s midrange torque made the bike faster than it looked on paper and race versions like the SPS could be a bit overwhelming.

Why was the 749R so trick? Well it was out of necessity: the 999 competed in various Superbike championships that generally allowed a degree of latitude in modifying the road platform for racing. The smaller 749 was destined for World Supersport against 600cc inline fours. Intended as a much more entry-level class, the rules were very strict to keep costs carefully controlled and allowed very limited modifications: even OEM wheels were required!

Basically, in WSS, if you wanted it on your racebike, you pretty much needed it on your roadbike. And to compete in terms of power output with a grid full of screaming fours, Ducati had to throw the whole catalog of performance updates at the 749R. Built between 2003 and 2006, the 749R had bigger valves made of titanium, high-compression pistons, a lightweight crank, and magnesium cam covers. Bore was up from 90 to 94mm and stroke was down to 56 from 71mm for a total of 749.5cc, with power climbing from 108hp to an eye-opening 121hp, although it’s obviously going to cost a bit more to service.

As you’d expect, suspension was top of the line Öhlins at both ends, and radial Brembo brakes offered the best available stopping power and feel. A slipper clutch was included for rapid downshifts free of drama and the bike uses a double-sided swingarm patterned after the World Superbike 999’s stiff, lightweight unit. Other details included a set of lightweight Marchesini wheels, an adjustable steering head, and carbon-fiber bodywork on the early bikes. All were solo-seat models, and so had adjustable ergonomics. But the R had a smaller range of adjustments, as the larger-diameter race exhaust took up some of the available space and, as previously mentioned, rules specified very minimal changes to the roadbikes, so the roadbike subframe needed to match the racebike’s.

From the original eBay listing: 2004 Ducati 749R for Sale

This is your chance to have one of the ultra limited collectible Ducati Superbikes for a fraction of what it cost new.
The bike is a 2004 Ducati 749R. Only 2348 miles
Almost all original including the stock tires. If you want to ride the bike you will need to replace the tires.
I just had the belts and fluids changed from a Ducati Master Tech. Bike has a new battery. Bike hasn’t been used at all since service was done. I only changed everything to make sure nothing would be needed other than tires if someone wanted to ride bike.
One small blemish on left lower fairing that has been touched up so really hard to see in photos but is there. Could easily be repaired and bike would show nearly perfect. Rear swing arm has small flaws from rear stand rubbing on black paint. The seat is doing the normal thing where the cover sticks to the base and looks a little weird. Normal on this generation of Superbikes.
Bike has no owners manual.
Has red key and one black key

There’s an $8,500 starting bid with no takers yet and plenty of time left on the auction. The 749/999 may be the least desirable Ducati superbikes, but they’re still Ducati superbikes, with all the performance, heritage, and style you would expect, and the 749R is one of the most collectible versions. This example looks bone-stock and very clean, with less than 2,400 miles on it. These were pretty trick bikes, straight from the factory, and would probably cost a small fortune to duplicate if you planned to build your own, so why not just pick this up, and save yourself the trouble?

-tad

Good Things In Small Packages: 2004 Ducati 749R for Sale
Ducati April 25, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1992 Ducati 851 Strada

Update 4.27.2019: Sold in just two days to an RSBFS reader. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

The Ducati 851 is the father of modern Ducatis, from the world-changing 916 to the astonishing Panigale V4R. Without this boxy, lithe very red machine, those bikes would not be. The 851 arrived in 1987, with a very hopped up version of Ducati’s venerated Pantah engine. The air-cooled 90-degree, two-valve twin in the Pantah was updated with liquid cooling, four-valve heads and fuel injection for the 851, and Ducati shot back to the top of racing leaderboards.

Spitting out 93 horsepower and gobs of torque in a 430-pound chassis, the 851 was a statement that Ducati could use its agricultural engine tech to devastating effect. In 1990, the bike took home the World Superbike title, among a raft of other accolades over its five-year run.

This 1992 Ducati 851 Strada is from the last year before the 888 broke cover, and it has been kept largely unridden in a climate-controlled storage facility. Though it hasn’t crossed 3,000 miles since it was purchased as a leftover in 1995, all the major services have been done on a strict interval. Aside from the Fast by Feracci carbon cans, it is a stock machine.

From the seller:

This is a rare find, super low miles, Ducati 851 Superbike. This bike was purchased used from Bellevue Suzuki Ducati in 1995, at the time it was under 1000 miles on the clock. It has not seen much more use by its current owner as it was purchased to round out the collection of Ducati Superbikes, the 851/888/916. All three bikes have remained in owners collection until recently when he let the 888 go up for sale. Now we have been asked to find proper homes for the 851 and 916 still in his possession. Both the 851 and 916 have been kept serviced and stored in a heated shop/garage space. Run from time to time, oil changed and belts replaced at regular intervals. Other than the ever popular Fast by Ferracci carbon exhaust and a tank protector this beauty is all original. Ducati 851’s rarely come up for sale as it is, let alone one as clean as this one. Hurry, it will not last long. We have it scheduled for complete safety inspection and a 2-year service which will include oil, filter, hydraulics, coolant along with new timing belts. The owner has kindly provided some service records as well. It does have a clear WA title, all original keys and manuals included.

Here is some of the early press about these;

Ducati came of age in the late 80s, using ideas that the Far East thought as antiquated and as such not worth pursuing, the Italians enjoyed staggering race successes, and with it many sales to the public, motorcycling hasn’t been quite the same since. Chris Pearson samples the bike at the beginning of it all

Based upon the 1978 Pantah bottom end, the design was the first real modern day Ducati Superbike and successfully bridged the gap until the arrival of the 916 some seven years later. The first sight of the all-new Ducati road bike was caught at the Milan show in the autumn of 1987 although the prototype race bikes had provided more than their fair share of clues and insights into what was waiting just around the corner. Developed as a direct descendant of the Daytona winning twin from 1987, the production version of the 851 differed little from that prototype race machine. Ducati’s intentions for the new model were clear from the outset being offered in both Strada (road going) and Kit (race track) specification, for those wishing to put their 851’s directly on to the track. 200 examples of the latter were hurriedly assembled to satisfy the homologation required for the inaugural 1988 World Superbike championship, a roadster based race series that Ducati were more than keen to be a part of.

The basis of the 1987 spec Ducati 851 lived on until the end of 1993, gradually growing in capacity up to the 888cc model of 1992, proving so dominant on the rack that the planned update, the iconic 916 series, was held over for more than a year finally making its debut towards the end of 93 ready for its full onslaught in 1994.

Credits cards accepted, up to $150.00 documentation charge may be added.

You’d be hard pressed to find another 1992 Ducati 851 in this kind of shape anywhere for any price. At $9,200, we have a low-mileage perfectly-preserved example of the superbike that put Ducati back in the conversation.

Featured Listing: 1992 Ducati 851 Strada
Ducati April 25, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1995 Ducati 916

Update 4.27.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Some of the most collectible bikes at the moment have only recently come into their own. You see there is a direct link to a bike’s age and how hot it might be for collectors. Only the rarest of the rare bikes appreciate in value on the showroom floor; elements such as original public reaction, total number of units produced, in-country availability when originally released, current condition, age and mileage all complicate the formula. Nostalgia is a pretty reliable condition, and if all other criteria are met then you can bet somewhere between 20 and 25 years on a motorcycle that was hot when introduced and still in good condition will pique the interest of fans and collectors again. Such is the case with the Ducati 916 – a bombshell of a motorcycle if there ever was one. As potent and fast as it was beautiful and unapologetic, the 916 was more of an assault than a revolution. Accolades from the press followed – as did the WSBK trophies.

Featured Listing: 1995 Ducati 916

Introduced in 1994, the bikes imported into the US were officially 1995 model year units. And if launching a groundbreaking new model is not stressful enough for a small company, imagine if your Bologna-based manufacturing line caught fire and burned to the ground just as you were getting up and running. That is exactly what happened to Ducati – right as demand for their gorgeous new powerhouse was at its peak. Ducati was forced to set up a new temporary production line for the 916, basing it on the grounds of MV Agusta’s plant in Varese, Italy. Bikes from this production line – while technically identical to those of later production back at home in the Bologna factory – are interesting and rare artifacts and known as “Varese” bikes. How can you tell? The year is the first clue. The second is in the VIN number. If you look at the VIN, the character 11th from left (or 7th from right) is the manufacturing plant code. Most Ducatis have a “B” in this space, for Bologna. The early models built in the MV Agusta factory have a “V” for Varese.

From the seller:
1995 Ducati 916
VIN Number: ZDM1SB8S2SV000849

This iconic Ducati 916 was purchased new in October 1994 from the Brother’s Powersports in Bremerton, WA and has only had one owner. The 916 in original condition, paint is in fantastic condition, no fading, no corrosion or oxidation to be found anywhere. Some popular upgrades include Fast By Ferracci carbon exhaust with upgraded fuel chip, Cycle Cat adjustable rear sets and handlebars The original clip on’s and foot pegs were provided. This 916 is in excellent cosmetic condition it has absolutely shows no signs of ever been dropped or tipped over. It has been loved since it came out if it’s crate Always stored in temperature controlled garage when not in use and often serviced with new fluids and belts for good measure and joy of ownership. We have it scheduled for complete safety inspection and a 2-year service which will include oil, filter, hydraulics, coolant along with new timing belts. The owner has kindly provided some service records as well. It does have a clear WA title, all original keys and manuals included.

Only 2,266 original miles!

Price: $17,999.00
Contact: dave@seattleusedbikes.com

It is estimated that approximately 2,663 Ducati 916s were assembled at the Varese factory, before full-scale production was renewed in Bologna. And while there is no technical difference in Varese bikes, there is a lot of anecdotal evidence that these bikes received greater attention in that they were assembled more by hand as the production line in Varese was temporary. Regardless, Varese bikes are the most rare of the base model 916, and provides a further interesting story into this exotic and hyper twin.

This particular 916 Varese is a one owner machine, having traveled fewer than 2,300 miles in its 24 years of existence. It is being offered by well-known friend of RSBFS, Dave of Seattle’s Used Bikes. This example is not totally stock, yet many of the stock bits come with the sale, allowing collectors to return it back to original glory if desired. The Fast by Ferracci pipes are nearly a requisite change over stock, and with a fuel chip, rear sets and handlebar upgrade, this is a bike that is made for riding. The bike has been serviced throughout its life, and the seller is offering up a 2-year service to ensure that this bike is up to snuff for whatever lies ahead; be it straightaway, decreasing radius left hander, or just a parking place on a pedestal somewhere indoors with an audience. Check out the pics, and then drop Dave a line. This is one good looking and authentic bike – and early 916s are riding the wave of interest and appreciation. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1995 Ducati 916
Ducati April 23, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE for Sale

After the flak generated by the controversial 999, the Sport Classic line was a definite win for motorcycle designer Pierre Terblanche, and the bikes effectively combined modern technology with vintage design cues. But although the performance wasn’t up to the standards set by the very best sportbikes of the period, the Sport Classics weren’t aimed at that market. First and foremost, they were meant to look good. And the Paul Smart 1000LE, as seen in today’s Featured Listing, definitely did that, with a blue-green frame and silver bodywork to evoke Ducati’s first v-twin racebikes, one of which won Imola in 1972 with the eponymous Paul Smart at the controls.

But although the Paul Smart looks like it’d be best for posing, it’s almost as if Ducati couldn’t help themselves, and this stylish machine has the handling goods to run with the best. Pricey Öhlins bits adorn both ends, and the traditional trellis frame is wrapped around their proven two-valve, air-cooled Desmo twin, here with two plugs per cylinder in their “Dual Spark” configuration, since apparently Alfa Romeo already trademarked “Twin Spark…” Twin plug heads are especially useful for a v-twin like this, since the two plugs allow more even combustion across the surface of the large pistons.

The quoted output is underwhelming on paper, but the flexible, torque-rich powerband is the perfect choice for a road bike. And keep in mind, the 92hp may have been modest, even by the long, long ago standards of 2006, but the bike is a development of the classic, race-bred Pantah engine that predated the four-valve Desmoquattro. It’s fun, tunable, and surprisingly reliable when properly cared for. Modest power aside, there were some other concessions to style: the spoked wheels aren’t as light as cast or forged items would be, even though they look plenty evocative, and the Phantom tires were designed specifically by Pirelli to complete the classic look with that very vintage tread design. They’re supposedly reasonably competent tires, but you can find stickier rubber for much cheaper.

Of course, the owner of this Featured Listing isn’t worried about tire choice. Or oil or gas. Or even registration. This immaculate machine has turned only three miles since new, making it a time-capsule example of a modern classic Ducati, like an insect perfectly preserved in amber.

From the Seller: 2006 Ducati SportClassic Paul Smart 1000LE for Sale

This gorgeous Paul Smart has only 3 miles and is in perfect stock condition. Comes with both style fairings a $2000. dollar option. All three keys. Never registered. Certificate of origin from the purchasing Ducati Dealer – Eastern Cycle Ducati, Located in Beverly, MA. This bike has been inside my house since purchasing it in 2006. Periodically pushed in gear to keep engine moving and cylinders fogged for lubrication. No fuel inside gas tank. No dents, dings, or scratches. Ready to be a new piece of art in your collection or ridden.

An instant classic and one of the most collectible motorcycles of the last 15 years.

“Want it for Paul’s achievement, want it for Ducati’s heritage, want it for how it looks”. Bike magazine. This Paul Smart 1000 Limited Edition Ducati has never been ridden, and is in excellent condition. It has spent its whole life pampered inside!

Smart’s famous victory in the 1972 Imola 200 riding what would become the 750SS was instrumental in establishing Ducati as a high-performance brand for the modern era. So what better way to celebrate the Bologna marque’s heritage than a limited edition model in the spirit of the iconic, bevel-drive, ‘green frame’ 750SS? And why not duplicate the rest of the original bevel-drive twins line up while you’re about it? That was Ducati’s reasoning behind the launch of its new ‘Sport Classic’ range in 2005. However, none of the three models Paul Smart 1000 LE, Sport 1000 and GT1000 – is in any way a ‘replica’; all are thoroughly modern motorcycles with only the styling and color scheme(s) acknowledging the past. 

The Paul Smart 1000 LE uses the belt drive, desmo, air-cooled, fuel injected, electronic ignition 1000DS (dual spark) 90-degree v-twin engine 992cc, two-valves, a quoted 92bhp at 8,000rpm and enough torque to surprise its four-valve superbike brethren – as found in a number of other Ducatis. All this modern technology is housed in the Italian firm’s trademark trellis frame in a striking shade of ‘green frame’ green – the latter complemented by some top-quality Öhlins suspension, Brembo brakes, a wet clutch, a six-speed gearbox, a curvaceous two pipe exhaust on the right side in black, and wire-spoke wheels beneath a swoopy silver half-fairing and tail hump. ‘After 20 miles I was totally sold on the bike, as I had been after five minutes of looking at it. Exclusivity, style, power, handling… what else could I want?’ queried Bike magazine’s tester at the PS 1000 LE’s launch. A production run of only 2,000 units was planned and few motorcycles of modern times have become as instantly collectible.

As the seller mentions: the entire first run of Sport Classics became instantly collectible, and all of them command shocking prices on the used market, especially when you compare them to Ducati’s 1098 of the same era, a bike that offers far more performance. But obviously, the nods to Ducati’s racing history struck a chord, and values remain high. The asking price for this showroom-quality example? $39,000. There’s obviously not much of a service history to discuss. In fact, there isn’t any service history at all, since the bike has never turned a wheel in anger. This bike is pretty much bone-stock, excepting the lower fairing. The original bike had a half-fairing that matched Ducati’s production 750SS, but the full-fairing was a popular modification and suits the lines of the bike, although it does seem a bit of a shame to cover up that classic, air-cooled engine. Contact Kris with your interest here: knopfkris@yahoo.com

-tad

Featured Listing: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE for Sale
Ducati April 20, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1977 Ducati 900SS

Check out all of Joe’s bikes for sale on RSBFS! Many thanks for choosing us to help move your collection! -dc

Update 5.7.2019: Now on eBay. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

We’re on a roll over here with rare Italian beauties from our buddy Joe, and this 1977 Ducati 900SS is no exception. It might not quite carry the provenance of his MV Agusta 750S America, but a ‘77 900SS is absolutely nobody’s idea of plain.

The Ducati Super Sports entered the market just as Ducati had finished establishing itself as a maker of world-beating race bikes. Paul Smart won the Imola 200 aboard a Ducati Super Sport in 1972, after which the 90-degree v-twins became synonymous with Italian racing prowess. The early SS bikes had right-side shift and almost no provisions for DOT-legal street equipment. Such as, you know, turn signals.

Fast forward to 1977, and Ducati decided that the American market was primed for its desmodromic-valved beasts, and the 1977 Ducati 900SS made its way to our shores in extremely limited numbers. Just 137 of the featherweight, 80-horsepower repli-racers landed here that year, but they had an immediate and forceful impact.

This Ducati 900SS has been restored completely with gorgeous paintwork.

From the seller:

1977 Ducati Super Sport

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large and important motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. These motorcycles were targeted by me for adding to my collection many years ago when the best of the best were available and that is exactly what I purchased.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari.

It doesn’t take much introduction to talk about a 1977 Ducati 900 SS. They seldom come up for sale and when they do they generally look like they have been ridden hard and put away wet.

This particular bike was restored in Chicago and definitely under the supervision of the famous Dr. Desmo. It is kept on a trickle charger and exercised regularly during the warm weather. Restored to perfection and still makes an outstanding presence and performance at any show and is equally prepared to go on any extended ride and tour at a moment’s notice.

We all know what’s happened to the prices of the Ducati 750 SS’s and the 900 SS’s are not far behind. If you want the best just take a look at the pictures of this bike. You will see that it is the best of the best and then some. If you want technical information about the bike just check the Internet. It is loaded with that and plenty of road tests shortly after the bike was introduced to the public. As I have mentioned in some of the other bike ads for bikes coming out of our collection there is not question that the 900SS is the Ferrari of the future for motorcycles.

This bike is always kept in climate controlled storage and kept on a trickle charger and ready for a 500-mile trip on a moment’s notice. Check out the pictures and you will be impressed!

Most everyone would agree that the 750SS and the 900SS are the epitome of motorcycle design.

I would suggest that you check out the other rare cycles that I am offering for sale by clicking on “other items for sale” in the upper right corner to see the other bikes being offered from my collection.

Prefer phone calls 847-774-4857

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

Given its rarity, condition and position as the spiritual birth of the American Ducati market, you’re not going to get this one for a steal. But the cash outlay will well be worth it to have this gem in your collection.

Featured Listing: 1977 Ducati 900SS
Ducati April 19, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1985 Ducati Mike Hailwood Replica

Check out all of Joe’s bikes for sale on RSBFS! Many thanks for choosing us to help move your collection! -dc

Update 5.7.2019: Now on eBay. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

In 1978 Mike Hailwood won the Isle of Man TT riding a Ducati. This was 11 years after his last motorcycle race, the previous period during which he was firmly on the Honda payroll. Everything about the event spelled disaster – an old timer long past his glory years on a make of bike nobody really associated him with – and nobody believed he would be competitive. But this was the stuff of heroes; and heroes always win. Hailwood went on to win what can only be considered the comeback of the century. This cemented the legend of Mike “the Bike” Hailwood’s connection with Ducati, and provided for some wonderful bikes. Today’s Featured Listing – a 1985 Ducati MHR – is one such factory offering that celebrated the success of Mike Hailwood.

For Sale on eBay: 1985 Ducati Mike Hailwood Replica!

The Ducati MHR is a bike built in the tradition of homage; it was built to celebrate the famous TT win. But given that the TT was for street-based machinery, the factory replica was not simply a graphics package. Yes, Hailwood won in 1978. Yes, the Pantah (which introduced the next generation belt-driven cams vs. bevel-driven) was introduced way back in 1980. Then why, you might ask, was a MHR being built in 1985 and based on the older hardware? The answer is that Ducati, still a relatively small company, focused on bevel drive for the big bikes (750 – 1000cc), while the Pantah was initially offered in 600cc and below variants. The bevel-drive motors were still very much in the forefront during this time, even though they may seem slightly archaic today. So the MHR is based on the “square case” 900SS of the day – which was a capable machine in its own right. But why still offer a homage bike in 1985 when Hailwood won the TT back in 1978? Simple: the public demanded it. While the MHR was a very limited edition, it was a tremendously successful marketing effort and a strong model for Ducati. Today’s seller has some good details about this bike, so I will let him take it over from here:

From the seller:
1985 Ducati Hailwood Replica

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. These motorcycles were targeted by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best were available and that is what I purchased.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari.

More from the seller:
The Ducati Hailwood Millie shown here was made in two series. The first one being a short fairing and only 900 cc with a kick starter and this model, the Hailwood Millie (1000 cc) with the electric starter and the large fairing; one is one of the most beautifully designed fairings ever. It is a big bike not meant for the meek. Of course, it has the electric starter and exhaust note that will thrill any motorcycle enthusiast. It is in absolutely near perfect condition. It is always on a trickle charger and ready to give you a thrill of a lifetime as you wind through the gears and open it up on an open road. This is another Italian bike that, in our opinion, can be classified as the Ferrari of bikes of the future.

This is certainly a bike for the serious collectors. For those that don’t know all the details, the internet is just loaded with information. I can only suggest that you scrutinize the pictures and decide for yourself if this is another rare Italian collector bike that will eventually become as iconic as a Ferrari. Ten years ago, I spent a long time looking for the best Hailwood Millie and believe me this was the beat of the best, hands down.

Prefer phone calls 847-774-4857. Thanks for looking at one of the best!

These second generation MHR machines are truly beautiful motorcycles. Whereas the original offering utilizes a fiberglass cover over a stock SS tank, the latter bikes use a tank that is unique to the model. The rest of the bodywork is all MHE, evoking the spirit (and the livery) of the racer. And while the underpinnings are SS items, some performance items such as the Conti exhausts are model specific. The solo seat is a non-race item; in reality it is a rear pillion cover, making this a two-seater and enhancing the usefulness of the bike. But people who lust after a MHR are not concerned with practicality – they want the booming V-twin soundtrack and the waves of torque that have made Ducati victorious and famous. You may not be able to ride with the effortless agility of Mike Hailwood, but you can still rock the livery and the sound while paying homage to the great man with this stunning 1985 Ducati Mike Hailwood Replica. Interested parties should give Joe a call at 847-774-4857. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1985 Ducati Mike Hailwood Replica