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Ducati December 5, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2004 Ducati Monster S4R

The 2004 Ducati Monster S4R was the naked Italian’s coming out party, showing that the plucky little air-cooled city bike, the bike that made Bolognese beasts accessible to the rest of us, could dance with its harder-edged stablemates. To do so, it eschewed basically everything the standard Monster wore, with the exception of the single-sided swingarm, round headlight and exposed trellis frame.

Underneath those framerails was hung the liquid-cooled heart of Ducati’s recently departed 996, the wild last scion of the Tamburini designed 916. That meant somewhere around 120 horsepower hoisted skyward by Showa upside down forks, which made it handle on rails but ride like a race bike. It was, in short, one of the first naked hooligan bikes.

This lovely dark blue and white 2004 Ducati Monster S4R is a one-owner example from the Seattle area, and is being offered for the first time by our friends at Seattle Used Bikes. It’s maniacally clean, fairly low mileage, and has a scant few very tasteful modifications. A set of carbon Termignoni cans, a freer-flowing, much cleaner looking mid pipe, carbon clutch cover and aftermarket slave cylinder.

From the seller:

This is what I would consider a rare find. First reason, it’s a one owner local bike, well maintained and kept with minimal but tasteful modifications. Second reason, it is the gorgeous Blue/White color that Ducati featured as it introduced this new model to the market in 2003. We see a few tasteful upgrades like the carbon fiber open clutch cover and an upgraded clutch slave cylinder, then there are those proper high swept Termignoni carbon exhaust, along with a Spark mid pipe getting rid of the “udder”. This S4R has been mainly maintained over the years by its owner but major was done at dealer, a paper trail is provided.. We had a chance to look this one over, took care of a few items we spotted, did a bit of throttle body tuning to get it running just right, these are certainly one of our favorite Ducati Monster versions. It has not seen much use the last 5 or 6 years, our last records show 10,800 miles on it in 2013, consequently we have been enlisted to find a new home. No track days, NEVER on the ground, tool kit, manuals, code card, 2 black keys and a red key (all original) are all there along with a clean WA title.

This is a sweet S4R and if you wanted one when new but missed out, here is a chance to grab a clean one owner example.
Here are some comments from the 2004 press intro;

The Meanest Monster Ever – At the limits of the Italian coastal town of Cattolica, the road opened and stretched into the distance–and suddenly Ducati’s latest motorcycle, the Monster S4R made sense.

“I cranked the throttle for the first time, and the most powerful production Monster lunged forward almost hard enough to bend its fancy new one-piece aluminum handlebar. This thing’s fast! Seconds later the S4R is still accelerating hard past 120 mph, not surprising considering its grunt comes from the 996cc desmo that recently powered Ducati’s 996 super-sport. But you only need to glance at the single-sided swingarm and stacked mufflers to realize there’s more to this Monster than a bigger motor. The Monster concept has evolved gloriously in 10 years (with 130,000 units sold since the original M900), and the new S4R is a far more aggressive machine than all its predecessors.

The S4R’s strong in the corners, too, thanks to the typically rigid trellis frame, racy steering geometry and firm suspension that copes well with everything. Weighing just 425 pounds (claimed, dry), the Monster’s reasonably light, and its wide bar gives plenty of leverage for flicking through turns. Every time I had the opportunity to give it some stick, the S4R was brilliant fun. Those seeking a naked bike for commuter duty should consider its marginal low-speed manners and $13,495 buy-in (bikes should be available June 2003). But on the open road the S4R is far and away the best Monster yet, providing all the style, speed and Hooligan appeal required of a big, bad, naked V-twin”. – Roland Brown – Motorcyclist Magazine

Credits cards accepted, up to $150.00 documentation charge may be added.

Seattle Used Bikes
4905 Aurora Ave N.
Seattle, WA 98103
dave@seattleusedbikes.com
Closed Sun/Mon Find us on Facebook and the Web

At a dollar shy of six grand, it’s hard to argue with the value of this wild machine, which in it’s day commanded nearly $15,000. It might be a few months yet before you can enjoy it, but that shouldn’t stop you.

Suzuki December 5, 2019 posted by

Old School: 1990 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

If you wanted to hit the track or really tear up the canyons in the 80s and 90s, a 750cc machine was probably a much better choice for a rider than this Suzuki GSX-R1100. At the time, all of the Japanese manufacturers were caught up in a shooting war, homologating their 750cc machines for superbike racing, and that meant that those bikes balanced handling and power, versus outright brute force. Liter bikes of the period were more bruisingly-powerful GTs than out-and-out sportbikes and, although bikes like the Yamaha FZR1000 might have been just as fast and more refined, the allure of that extra 100cc gave the big Gixxer a swaggering air of danger.

The original GSX-R1100 is very much straddles the vintage and modern eras, with a full fairing and dual headlamps that aped endurance racers of the period and manages too look fairly modern, in spite of being matched to a set of 18″ wheels that would be out of fashion by the time the second-generation rolled around in 1989. The engine of the “L model” seen here still used Suzuki’s “oil-boiler” sixteen-valve inline four, but displacement increased from 1052cc to 1127cc. Weight was up to nearly 470lbs dry, but naturally so was power and the bike could almost touch 170mph.

I really like the style of the second-generation GSX-R1100, bridging the gap between classic and more modern superbikes. It’s big, heavy, fast, and handsome. Personally, I’m not so enamored of them that I’d hesitate to restomod or otherwise “improve” one, but that’s just me. Originality counts for collectors, and this one looks very clean and unmolested, even down to the stock exhausts.

From the original eBay listing: 1990 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

Excellent condition hard to find classic bike! 22k miles with clean title in hand. Please message me with any questions you may have. Feel free to call or text as well 512-705-3985. Unmolested motor with all factory parts including carbs and exhaust. Starts right up, runs great and excellent condition! No reserve!

The $6,500 starting bid just shows how much these have appreciated in recent years. Miles aren’t museum-piece low, but the bike appears to be in very clean condition and these engines are pretty durable. Certainly, parts to do a complete rebuild should be available, and decades of tuners have been able to squeeze plenty of power out of the oil-cooled lump, if the 140hp and 86lb-ft of torque of the factory bike don’t excite…

-tad


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Featured Listing December 2, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Pristine 1990 Gilera Saturno Bialbero with 72kms!

Update 12.2.2019: This bike is now on eBay. -dc

This is the second of four motorcycles being offered from the Stuart Parr Collection. Thank you for supporting the site and good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Looking very 80s, the Gilera Saturno Bialbero could be mistaken for some sort of custom Ducati. But Gilera, of course, should be held in the highest regard by fans of this site, as they were the first company to slot an inline four into a frame transversely, solving in one fell swoop the difficult cooling issues that previously faced four-cylinder motorcycles. This bike has just one cylinder like the original Saturno and embodies the company’s racing ethos, stressing light-weight and handling.

In the 80s, Gilera was mostly producing a line of offroad-biased singles with a 350cc capacity that were obviously a far cry from their road-racing bikes of the 1950s. At the urging of a Japanese marketing company, they developed a retro-styled sportbike, and that updated Saturno sparked some minor interest worldwide.

In most markets, the Nuovo Saturno was motivated by a liquid-cooled, 491cc version of the company’s four-valve, dual-overhead cam single, although a smaller 350 was available in Japan. In fact, the “Bialbero” designation helps to differentiate the bike from the earlier Saturno and refers to the number of camshafts: two. That engine put out a seemingly unimpressive 44hp, but the complete trellis-framed machine weighted in at a claimed 302lbs dry. That’s 250cc two-stroke territory, with the same claimed peak output and a much broader powerband. Suspension was simple but modern, with 17” Marvic wheels front and rear and a set of Brembo brakes to slow things down. The ‘box has just five speeds, owing to the package’s off-road roots, but the torquey engine should make any gaps easy to ride around.

With just 72 kilometers on the clock, this may be the lowest-mileage Saturno on the planet, and you may be waiting a long time for an example this nice, regardless of miles: these very rarely come up for sale, as Gilera collectors aren’t flavor-of-the-week types. It helps that the Nuovo Saturno was intended for collectors in Japan, and only a few made it to other countries: in 1990, just 50 were imported to the UK.  However, in spite of their rarity, they don’t sell for huge money, making them a reasonable proposition for regular folks who want something out-of-the-ordinary.

From the seller:

Imported in 2016 from Germany. Comes with original German registration and U.S. Customs and Border Protection entry form (Form 7501). This one can be registered and ridden. It is in out of the crate perfect condition.

The Gilera Saturno Bialbero 500 is a motorcycle road made the motorcycle manufacturer Gilera and marketed between 1987 and 1991.

If you’re looking for something rare, affordable, and very fun: these are extremely nimble bikes that would make perfectly lightweight track or racing machines. Iinquiries can be directed to Gregory Johnston on (631) 537-1486 or via email – here -.

-tad


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Ducati December 2, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1984 Ducati 650SL Pantah

Update 12.2.2019: This bike is now on eBay. -dc

This is the first of four motorcycles being offered from the Stuart Parr Collection. Thank you for supporting the site and good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Rare to the point where this might be the first 650SL to grace RSBFS, this 1984 model has been restored to museum condition and is ready for spotlights and close-up viewing.

1984 Ducati 650SL Pantah for sale

In an interesting turn of the rulebook, Ducati produced the 650SL to homologate the 61.5mm stroke for the planned 750cc race machine.  The extra torque provided by the lengthened stroke was a welcome addition to the originally 500cc engine, and claimed 63 hp at 8,500 rpm.  Still considered part of the first generation of Ducati belt-driven cam engines, the twin used dual 36mm Dell’Orto carburetors.  The model’s smaller-displacement origins are divulged by the 35mm Marzocchi forks and 260mm dual front disks.  The trellis frame with engine as a stressed member helped keep dry weight under 400 lbs., remarkable for the day.  The very trim monoposto fairing was retained from the 600SL, and finished in Ducati’s yellow over red race livery.

In private hands of Stuart Parr Collection, this 650SL was treated to a comprehensive restoration, and updated with a two-into-one Staintune exhaust.  Comments from the curator:

The 650 Pantah was built specifically to homologate Ducati’s TT1 750 engine which used a 61.5 mm stroke. Instead of producing a production 750 road bike, the 650SL was created with an 82mm bore and the required 61.5mm stroke, thus complying to the governing bodies homologation requirements. The 650’s bodywork is virtually identical to the 600, but it was painted in the now famous TT2 color scheme of red and yellow. Other minor differences were a different instrument layout and some other cosmetic minor changes, but it had far more torque, and that was a big improvement.

Only 288 650SL’s were ever produced; enthusiasts and collectors alike have doubled the 650’s value over the past half a decade alone, actions that have cemented this model’s security as being a sound investment for the future. This example has been restored to stunning condition with gorgeous paintwork and finishes throughout. A Staintune 2=1 exhaust system and corresponding jetting was utilized, otherwise a stock bike. Fresh tires and zero post-restoration mileage.

The 650SL can also be viewed on the collection’s website – here -.

The new two-valve desmo engine sparked the interest of the Castiglioni family, which took an ownership role at Ducati and likely saved the company.  Desmoquattro engines were just around the corner and a string of Superbike World Championships just over the horizon.  Significance and rarity off the scales, the 650SL is the Pantah for a knowledgeable fan.  The collection is selling to make way for new acquisitions.  Inquiries can be directed to Gregory Johnston on (631) 537-1486 or via email – here -.

Suzuki December 1, 2019 posted by

Chi Slamma Gamma – 1986 Suzuki RG500

Fully ten years after Barry Sheene won the GP world championship on his RG500, Suzuki had tamed the beast for the showroom.  Though the delay missed the window of opportunity in the U.S., many examples have been imported, and this looks like one of the finest.

1986 Suzuki RG500 Gamma for sale on eBay

Unthinkably complex in this day of 400cc singles, the RG was actually two 250cc twins geared to a common lay shaft, which was protected by a shock damper on the road machine.  The low-profile 28mm Mikuni carburettors and their air shared filter are wedged against the sides of the fairing, with disc induction valves underneath.  Suzuki’s Automatic Exhaust Control power valve system and expansion chambers made their way aft closer to the centerline.  Alloy chassis and cast frame connectors  are seemingly more modern than the earlier race bike, the seat fairing covering the upper exhausts and stretching all the way to the footpegs.

With just over 6,000 miles, this Chicago resident is even better looking than the odometer would suggest, with no evident runs, hits, or errors.  The owner says this in the eBay auction:

As you can see from the photos in the photo section as well as the body of the description, the machine has had absolutely no restoration performed to any part of it.  The condition is exactly what it looks like in the photos.  I looked at a quite a few of these bikes before I finally bought this one, and I’ve never seen a better original one before or since.

The paint on all of the fairings, tail section and tank is original, and have never had any type of paintwork or touchup.  The fairings have never had any type of cracks or damage.  The bike has never been in any type of accident or been dropped at any time.

The RG500 runs and rides the way you expect a machine with this type of mileage to run.  All of the mechanical components have been checked over to ensure they work properly including the clutch and brakes.  The fuel delivery system was also completely gone through this season and functions perfectly. 

Suzuki began the square four saga with two 125’s making 250cc, and offered a 400cc variant alongside the 500 in appropriate markets.  But the RG500 was the race winner, and the great powertrain was in a 340 lbs. ( dry ) package, a power-to-weight ratio that was years ahead of its time.  Bidding is quite active but hasn’t met the reserve, and we’ll be keeping an eye on this one.

-donn

 


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Bimota November 30, 2019 posted by

Underappreciated: 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

This Bimota YB11 Superleggera isn’t just a sportbike, or even an exotic sportbike. It’s a high-performance boutique motorcycle, one of just 650 ever built. Of course, that’s pretty much mass production by Bimota standards. It doesn’t have quite the cachet of Honda’s limited-production homologation superbikes, but consider that Honda made almost 5,000 Honda RC30s, compared to just 650 YB11s. It’s still incredibly rare and plenty fast and, as a bonus, you can take your significant other with you on your high-performance boutique motorcycle: this was one of very few Bimotas ever built with passenger accommodations, although they’re about as comfortable as you’d expect. Still, it’s great to have that spare seat, in case of emergencies…

The “Superleggera” part of Bimota YB11 Superleggera refers to the focus on lightweight construction that allowed huge performance from an existing engine, along with the agile handling you’d expect. At the time, the bike weighed 403lbs dry, a full 80lbs less than the Yamaha YZF1000R that donated its 1002cc five-valve Genesis engine and five-speed transmission. Power was rated at 145hp, with an impressive 80lb-ft of torque that allowed the five-speed box to be fitted to the open-class superbike in the first place, a characteristic it shared with Suzuki’s rival GSX-R1100. The light weight and power were enough to push the bike to nearly 170mph. All the way back in 1997.

Somehow, because of their hand-built nature and flaws, it doesn’t seem all that criminal to modify or improve Bimota’s 1990s motorcycles if it helps sort some of their more annoying quirks: a YZF750R six-speed can replace the original five-speed found in the YB11, and I’m sure somebody can figure out how to fit a stand-alone fuel-injection system to replace the carburetors. This example luckily has the earlier gauges that should hopefully prove more reliable than the later style, while looking better to boot.

It can be tricky to tell if we’ve posted a particular YB11 on the site previously: they all came in the same colors, have low miles, and are generally well cared-for. It’s even trickier when the seller refers to the bike as both a 1997 and a 1998 and appears to have “borrowed” some content from RSBFS in their description… Other than the occasional Termignoni system, aftermarket exhausts and accessories are virtually unheard of, and bolt-on farkles are generally considered undesirable. There appear to have been a few different exhaust hangers used, with and without passenger pegs, although it’s also possible those were fabbed up by the owners when new.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

One of only 650 produced

1998 Bimota 1,002cc YB11 Superleggera 

Frame no. ZESYB1100TR00047

A Rimini-based manufacturer of ducting for heating and ventilation, Bimota soon turned to their first love of motorcycles. Founders Guiseppe Morri and Massimo Tamburrini began manufacturing in the early 1970s and have since built a reputation of exclusive and limited with inimitable Italian styling machines of performance. Using the best cycle parts and an array of the best outside manufacturers’ powerplants, the Bimota was always an uncompromised and expensive foray in to exclusive motorcycling. 

Powered by Yamaha’s superb Thunderace engine, the Superleggera YB11 was Bimota’s last word in Italian exotica of the 1990s. The 131bhp ‘four’ in stock form breathed through a Bimota-designed exhaust system, which could squeeze out a little more power. It was shrouded by the firm’s trademark aluminum beam frame and complemented by some of the finest cycle parts available, including fully adjustable Paioli 51mm forks, fully adjustable Paioli shock, Brembo brakes, 17” Antera wheels and carbon fiber-abound. At 403lbs, the YB11 Superleggera weighed some 80lbs less than the donor bike and its handling and performance were in a different league altogether; as was the price, which at about $20,000, was a staggering 50% more than the Yamaha.

In the late 1990s Bimota went through one of its periodic financial convulsions and production of the YB11 ended in 1999, although a second batch of bikes was completed later using stocks of existing parts. 

The bike offered, an early 1997 example, the 46th built, is presented in excellent condition throughout. With an indicated 8,700 miles, racked up in the first decade of use, the bike has been on static display since 2007, though regularly maintained. A fresh service was performed to ready the bike for sale and no back-fees are due to a California buyer, as the last registration was due over ten years ago.

With only 650 machines produced, this represents a perfect combination of Italian exotica, Japanese reliability, ease of maintenance and power and with such qualifications, is bound to be a future classic.

For additional information, photos, etc. please visit ClassicAvenue.com

Look, the Bimota YB11 is a flawed motorcycle. And maybe the flaws would be unacceptable in a bike that originally sold for the equivalent of $47,000 in today’s money, but they don’t cost that much currently: this one is being offered at $9,900. That seems to be a little bit on the high-side for a 90s Bimota currently, although I doubt that will still be the case in the future. For that kind of money, you’re getting a hell of a lot of exclusivity and performance that will still peel your face back, even today.

-tad


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Featured Listing November 29, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 MV Agusta 750 S America

Update 11.20.2019: Joe’s bikes are being sold at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction. The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

Back in 1974, there was no other bike to have, really. Regardless of what you were able to shop for, the MV Agusta 750S America was the bike you wanted. First of all, it was Italian, and red, which meant it had that little something extra that nobody else had. Temperamental, yes, and expensive to be sure, and perhaps not even the fastest thing on two wheels, but none of that mattered. It would more or less keep pace with the cruder, brawnier two strokes, and it would go around corners without killing you. Then there was the noise.

Whether you’re listening to a Colombo V-12 at full song, or the rorty throb of a Lancia Fulvia’s V4, or the percussive pop and rattle of a Ducati 900 SS/SP, the Italians long ago mastered the art of the proper internal combustion sound. The 750 S America may have them all beat, with a rhythmic, tachycardic and slightly uneven throbbing at idle cracking into a full-chested wail at higher revs. It’s quite the song and dance for 90 horsepower, but in its day the MV’s voice was the siren song of speed.

This 1974 MV Agusta 750S America is in magnificent shape, and appears to be all or almost all-original. The classic red-and-gold livery is without blemishes, and the bike’s numerous nooks and crannies appear to be clean enough to eat off of. The condition is thanks in large part to a fastidious seller, who has kept the bike stored in a heated facility and made sure that it remains ready to run.

From the seller:

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection.  I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection.  These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles ‘70s, ‘80s, and ‘90s.  Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one.  These motorcycles were targeted for by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best was available and that is what I purchased.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the ‘70s and ‘80s are the future Ferrari’s of motorcycle collecting.   We all know what has happened to Ferraris.

For many people the MV Augusta American is like the Ferrari of motorcycles.  It is a typically great Italian design that when new cost an unthinkable amount of money and has been held in the highest esteem since it was produced.

In the world of motorcycle collecting it is one of the most prestigious Italian bikes that you can have in your collection.   This bike, as far as we know, is entirely original.  It runs perfectly, and, is, without question, one of the best sounding motorcycle that were ever made and yes, it is kept in fully heated storage when not in use.   It is always kept on a trickle charger. It is ready to travel 500 miles on the first day.

If you ever heard of Ferrari GTO run through the gears you will know that the 1974 Augusta MV 750 S America has a very similar melodic sound of authority which is just music to the ears.

This is a very expensive bike for serious collectors.  It is a very limited production bike.  By searching the Internet, you can read all the accolades that have accumulated over time for this particular breed, this is for serious future collectors.

They are only original once.

I would suggest that you check out the other rare cycles that I am offering for sale by clicking on “other items for sale” in the upper right corner to see the other bikes being offered from my collection.

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

Back in ’74, these things were the most expensive bikes on the street, with a raft of super-expensive parts keeping them out of the hands of you average grocery bagger. With just 550 or so MV Agusta 750S Americas built, the story is more or less the same today. If you have the means …

Honda November 28, 2019 posted by

Gym Buddy – 1992 Honda VFR400R NC30

Sport riders tend to head toward the lighter side when working on their skills or the racetrack beckons.  Now closer to thirty years of age than twenty, the NC30 is a perfect choice for a workout partner.  This grey import is even more unusual in the black / red livery.

1992 Honda VFR400R NC30 for sale on eBay

From across the four-lane it would be easy to confuse the NC30 with its 750cc sibling, but the general scale ( and 400R decals ) give it away.  The 59 hp are responsible for motivating only 364 lbs. dry, and it stays under 400 lbs. with full fuel.  Right wrist and gearbox will get exercise, since peak power is at just under 13,000 rpm.  Don’t miss shoulder day too often, since the compact package and 16-front / 18-rear wheel stagger will keep weight on the bars.  The last-gen NC30 had the 360-degree “big bang” crank, shows off the rear wheel courtesy of the left-hand muffler, and sports a 14,500 rpm redline.

A little light on pictures and description, this example calls for more information.  In the meantime we can enjoy the striking livery, new Battlaxes , and carbon muffler, and no evident damage.  From the eBay auction:

I have for sale a very rare color combination 1992 Honda VFR400R NC30, new tires , brakes, forks rebuilt, bike is in a good condition , has aftermarket exhaust , 18,000 kilometers (11,300 miles).

Comes with Vermont registration in my name which can be registered in any state.

Won’t need your headphones at this gym, just earplugs, as the gear driven cams will be music to your ears.  Reviewers advised that the NC30 had fallen off the sharp edge of the 399cc class, but the smooth power delivery, soft spring rates, and high build quality resulted in high overall ratings.  Even with its high ask, this one deserves further investigation.

-donn


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