Posts by Category: Bimota

Bimota March 18, 2019 posted by

Factory Fresh: Zero-Mile 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

One of the things I love about Italian bikes and cars is that, no matter what, they look like the vision of one person, not a committee. Sure, there may be the occasional stylistic misstep, but oddballs like the Alfa Romeo Milano and Bimota Mantra make a statement, and you can feel the passion in their creation, even if it's sometimes misguided... Fortunately, the Bimota YB10 Dieci is one of the more timeless Bimota designs, and they obviously knew they had a good thing going, since the bodywork and frame seems to have changed very little between the YB4, YB6, YB7, YB8, and YB10.

The sleek envelope of the bodywork is the first thing you notice, but Bimotas are uncompromising sportbikes and have always been about the frame. Earlier bikes used trellis-style frames, but by the late 80s, they'd moved to lightweight aluminum beam-style designs as seen here, complete with beautiful machined details. This was the 10th Bimota that used a Yamaha engine, hence the name YB10, which has nothing to do with displacement. In this case, it was Yamaha's smooth and powerful 1002cc five-valve Genesis engine and five-speed gearbox. The package was good for 145hp and 172mph, not world-beating in today's terms, but still very, very fast. In 1991, this thing was the epitome of speed, and the embodiment of exotic.

Some readers have misunderstood my previous posts featuring Bimotas, thinking that my criticisms indicate a dislike of the brand. I'm a huge fan of Bimota, and Italian vehicles in general, but experience means I'm very familiar with their... peculiarities, their qualities both superlative and frustrating. Bikes like the YB10 embody everything I love and everything frustrating about Italian machines: they're gorgeous, fast, and full of personality, with a few hand-built details that speak to their low-volume production and some elements of their construction that indicate the clear focus on performance above all else. If you're looking for authentic race-bike details, they're easy to find here, from the exquisitely machined frame and top yoke to lightweight bodywork made up of just a few pieces, all connected with quarter-turn fasteners... But it's a fine line between "race bike" and "kit bike" and these can be frustrating for owners used to more refined machines.

These days, this limited-production, Italian dream machine can be had for relative peanuts, although this particular example calls for a few more of those peanuts, since it's never actually been registered, or turned a wheel. Personally, I like my bikes to be usable as bikes, but collectors are strange creatures, and unused examples like this usually command premium dollars.

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

Up for bid is a 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci – Rare 1 of only 224 made– Never registered, zero miles! This gorgeous super-bike is part of a collection of fine motorcycles at Formula One Motor Sports in Oakdale New York.

Bimotas are well known for their Italian style, class and over the top engineering. It has a one piece billet machined frame paired with a Yamaha FZR1000 motor, and seamless upper fairing it also comes with billet triple, classic style wheels!

The Bimota Dieci not only offers Italian Style but you get the reliability of a Japanese Motorbike. Don't miss out on a chance to bid on this museum quality bike it is a must have for any collector.

This may be a museum-quality bike, but the $21,000 the seller is asking is a museum-quality price. There are plenty of lovingly cared-for, low mileage Bimotas out there at literally half the price, so you'd really have to be one of those zero-mile obsessives to want to splash out for this one. "Plenty of" being relative, of course since, as the seller points out, just a little over 200 were made. But they do show up occasionally for sale and, to give you an idea of what they normally go for, the last one we featured had 12,000 miles and an $11,000 asking price.

-tad

 

 

Factory Fresh: Zero-Mile 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale
Bimota March 11, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1998 Bimota SB6R for Sale

Today's Featured Listing is a bit of a flashback. We posted this very clean Bimota SB6R in April of last year and, although it didn't sell at the time, the owner has been doing what you should do with an Italian exotic: enjoying it, racking up an additional 1,300 miles. That means it's still collector-bike low with just 4,250 miles in total, but the fact that the seller has been riding it should be a big selling point for anyone looking to buy a 90s Bimota. Too many of these bikes sit, admired and displayed instead of being used in anger, slowly succumbing to neglect. Sculptural they may be, but Italian bikes were meant to be ridden.

Bimota made its name building cutting-edge racebikes, but the SB6R is first and foremost a roadbike. Utilizing Suzuki’s powerful and bulletproof liquid-cooled GSX-R1100 engine that displaced 1074cc, the SB6R wasn’t really eligible for many racing classes. But it was used the very best, competition-worthy components available at the time, with triple Brembo brakes, a Paioli fork up front and an Öhlins shock fitted almost horizontally, and was built with Bimota's usual attention to detail, using  Lotus-founder Colin Chapman's philosophy: "light makes right."

With a claimed 156hp from the eminently tunable Gixxer motor pushing a claimed dry weight of just 419lbs, the SB6R is a massively capable roadbike that can easily keep up with modern machines. Keep in mind that the SB6R weighs nearly 100lbs less than the famously fast GSX-R that was powered by the same engine. The flexible powerplant is backed by Suzuki's five-speed gearbox that takes advantage of the bike’s huge midrange and 74 lb-ft of torque.

As always with a Bimota, the frame is the real star of the show, something casual observers might overlook at first, with all the curvy carbon fiber bodywork on display. But once you notice those massive aluminum spars, they become the bike's defining feature. The design utilizes Bimota’s "Straight Connection Technology" concept that prioritizes as direct a link as possible between the steering head and the swingarm pivot. It’s not the most practical way to design and build a frame, but Bimota's goal was ultimate performance, and the matching, asymmetrical swingarm even has "bimota" embossed in one side for an extra does of craftsmanship.

Make no mistake, this was one of the fastest and most exotic motorcycles of the 1990s. Just 600 were ever made, and the model’s life was cut tragically short when Suzuki discontinued the GSX-R1100, then Bimota's first bankruptcy ended any dreams of a GSX-R1000 powered follow up. It's a shame, because the earlier SB6 was one of their best-selling models and I much prefer the looks of the later SB6R. This example has serial number 000023 and includes a lightweight Corse exhaust, a very nice bonus. If you want a different exhaust for your SB6R at this point, pretty much your only other option would be something completely custom.

Featured Listing: 1998 Bimota SB6R for Sale

I have come once again to your fine forum to move a jewel. I know you have featured a few of these, so I wont go through the Bimota propaganda and just get to the meat of what I have done. The usual Bimota story, well heeled individual purchased and rode very little, used more as a object d'art, rather than a mode of transportation for the majority of its life. She is now ready for riding. This thing rips, even with my 6'4", 220 pound, Yeti-like mass aboard.

  • Equipped  with the Bimota Corse Titanium exhaust
  • Kevlar brake lines
  • Michelins
  • Rebuilt carburetors, new needle valves
  • New NGK plugs
  • Oil and filter
  • New fuel pump from Bimota Classic Parts
  • New petcock from Bimota Classic Parts
  • All new Motion Pro fuel lines
  • New fuel filters
  • Cleaned fuel tank
  • The fuel system is now up to original Bimota factory spec.
  • This bike pulls like a freight train.
  • 2 small cracks in the gauge lens
  • Ridden and on the road
  • Every system functional
  • No issues
  • All paperwork in order.
  • 2 Original Bimota keys.

Price: $11,500
Contact Chris: gsxronly@aol.com or 407-492-5854

I can’t stress enough how this one’s recent mileage is critical. Many low-mileage collector bikes have spent a lot of time sitting, and will require hefty sums to get them truly road-worthy again: seals, hoses, gaskets, o-rings, gas tanks, tires... It all adds up. That’s fine if you just want to display your exotic, and Bimotas certainly look good standing still. But these really were meant to run, and if you want a collectible you can also take out on weekends to blitz the back roads, this one’s $11,500 asking price is a relative bargain, considering that the SB6R cost a whopping $35,000 in 1998!

-tad

Featured Listing: 1998 Bimota SB6R for Sale
Bimota February 13, 2019 posted by

Mid-Winter Roundup of Featured Listings

Even though there are prodigious cold fronts trained on both coasts, planning ahead is always in season. Here's a little review of RSBFS' recent features:

Let's start with a couple of smokin' race machines -

Featured Listing: 2018 Honda NSF250R Moto 3 Race Bike For Sale

Featured Listing: 2017 Suter MMX500 for Sale

From the 1980's we have two classic supersports, plus a unique Harley-Davidson -

Sponsored Listing: Zero-mile, 1-of-25 road-going 1994 Harley-Davidson VR1000!

Sponsored Listing: 1983 Honda CB1100F

Featured Listing – 1982 Honda CB750F Super Sport

These three are more along GT lines but very sporty -

Sponsored Listing: 1994 Suzuki GSXR-1100

Featured Listing – 1995 Yamaha GTS 1000 Euro Edition

Featured Listing: 1984 Honda CX650 Turbo!

If you are a skilled track rider there are four big-displacement racers, from classic to modern -

Featured Listing: 1991 Yamaha OW01 FZR750R Race Bike

Featured Listing: 2004 Moto Guzzi MGS-01 Corsa

Featured Listing: 2000 Ducati 748RS track bike

Featured Listing: Honest-to-God 2012 Suter BMW MotoGP bike

The 1990's were a sweet sportbike spot, and we have four currently -

Sponsored Listing: 1990 Honda CBR400RR NC29 for Sale

Sponsored Listing: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

Featured Listing: 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000

Featured Listing: 1990 Yamaha FZR750R OW01

The rest are a little of this and a little of that, or more accurately a lot of this and a lot of that -

Like a naked 2003 Yamaha R1 -

Featured Listing – 2003 Yamaha FZ1 with just 661 Miles !

Here's Honda's own winning V-twin, the 2005 RC51 SP2 -

Featured Listing: 2005 Honda RC51 SP2

Or this stealthily accessorized Monster -

Featured Listing: 2006 Ducati Monster S2R 1000 build!

This '06 SportClassic is a custom using the factory Paul Smart fairing -

Featured Listing – 2006 SportClassic 1000 with Paul Smart Fairing

From just last year, here's a Kawasaki H2R with road registration -

Featured Listing: Street-Titled 2018 Kawasaki H2R for Sale

Also looking very ready for the track, this 2004 999R is an homologation special -

Featured Listing: 2004 Ducati 999R FILA

We had two MH900E's but one has sold.  This one has never been registered -

Featured Listing: 2001 Parking Space Odyssey – NEW 2001 Ducati MH900e

And our most recent feature is this '08 1098S, fully decked out in carbon and billet aluminum -

Featured Listing: 2008 Ducati 1098S for Sale

When you're not chipping the ice off something or throwing things at the weather broadcast, check the right column on RSBFS for our sponsors and friends' latest features !  Spring is just around the corner...

Donn

Mid-Winter Roundup of Featured Listings
Bimota January 3, 2019 posted by

Sponsored Listing: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

Update 3.11.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

For the money, 1990s Bimotas offer some pretty incredible bang for your buck. Obviously, a more modern machine of equal value will be faster, as well as more reliable and practical, but if the goal is to own something different, something exotic, and something with real style, not much can compete. This Bimota YB10 Dieci being offered by Iconic Motorbikes has an asking price of $11,100 which is barely a third of what an RC30 is currently worth.

Of course, there are some compromises. An RC30 from the same period represents some of Honda's very best engineering, with an almost obsessive attention to detail and few mechanical quirks. The YB10 Dieci is a rolling monument to quirk: Bimota's motorcycles of the period were really racebikes first, with concessions to practicality an afterthought at best.

The Dieci obviously has the design cues common during the 90s, with a pair of round headlamps up front, an aluminum beam frame, and sleek, fully-enclosed bodywork. If that looks overly familiar, as if Bimota was just following a trend, you've got it all backwards: Bimota basically started the trend with the race-only YB4 that debuted back in 1987, a bike that only appeared in roadgoing trim after World Superbike rules required a run of street-legal machines be sold to the public. They're mostly forgotten by everyone but us motorcycle geeks now, but Bimota was one of the original competitors in World Superbike and nearly won the inaugural event. The YB10 is an evolution of that bike, with a larger engine.

Invariably, Bimota tuned its borrowed powerplants for increased performance, although the results were often dubious and the claimed power gains generally minimal anyway. Bimota's real claim to fame was chassis design that resulted in light weight and incredible agility. In an era when Suzuki's GSX-R was using an antiquated double-cradle frame, Bimota's gorgeous aluminum beam design pointed the way forward, and a close look at the craftsmanship on display is impressive. Racy styling is easy to do, and the term "sportbike" gets thrown around pretty liberally, but the YB10 was the real deal. If you've never seen one of these without the bodywork, it's amazing how spare and minimalist it is: there's almost nothing there that isn't dedicated to speed.

Bodywork consists of just four major pieces, plus a couple inserts for the radiator vents. The tail and tank cover is one piece, there are two side panels, and the upper fairing, all held on by quarter-turn fasteners, so the bike can be naked in minutes. Which is good, since working on the bike is frustrating at best, with that gorgeous frame wrapping so closely around Yamaha's 1002cc five-valve Genesis engine and five-speed box that access can be difficult, depending on what you're trying to do.

Also guys, it's pronounced "bee-mo-tuh" not "by-mo-tuh." Just as Italian cars with two turbos like the old Maserati Biturbo are actually "bee-turbos" not "by-turbos." Just had to get that off my chest.

From the Seller: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci – Rare 1 of only 224 – Fully Serviced!

Bimotas are well known for their Italian style, class and over the top engineering.  This YB10 is no exception to the rule with its billet machined frame, its one piece (and seamless) upper fairing, billet triple, classic style wheels… so cool!

The YB10 wasn’t just eye candy either, it was tested my a few magazines and came back with a top speed of 172.9 mph which is quite respectable for 1993!

Only 224 of these were every made!

Not only do you get Italian style but you get the reliability of a Japanese motorbike with the YB10.  The power is supplied by a FZR1000 which means motor parts are never a problem to source!

This Bimota was serviced by Bob Steinberger, a very well known Bimota expert about 2 years ago with very few miles after the tune.  Service included new tires, new chain and sprockets, new battery, fresh oil, new jets, etc.

She’s in fantastic condition with only 12,885 miles and ready for a new home.

Want to see her in person, fly into LAX, we’re only 15 minutes away and ride out!  We’re right on the border of Venice beach and only a few miles from Santa Monica.

Nice to see this one's been ridden a bit, so you can actually put some time in on your new exotic without "ruining" a zero-mile museum-piece. As indicated, parts for the powertrain shouldn't be a problem, although the aforementioned tight packaging within the frame means servicing will be more time consuming and expensive than it would be on the donor Yamaha. Bodywork, on the other hand, could be a real issue, although Airtech does have Dieci panels available. I've long said that if I ever bought one of these, I'd buy a set from them, have it painted to match, and display the OEM bodywork so I could ride the bike without worrying that a patch of gravel would ruin one of the 224 ever made!

-tad

Sponsored Listing: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale
Bimota October 27, 2018 posted by

Early-Production 2009 Bimota DB7 for Sale

Bimotas are unparalleled garage ornaments: blessed with exotic components, striking looks, and wild graphics, they're two-wheeled art and look every bit the barely-tamed racebikes they're purported to be. Unfortunately, they've also been pretty hit-or-miss when it came to the actual riding, often from bike to bike. Set up for any Bimota is key and, in spite of claimed advantages in terms of power, weight, and componentry, their bikes have sometimes struggled to even match the bikes they were built to supposedly outperform. But by the time of the company's rebirth in the early 2000s, they'd gotten their act together, and today's DB7 is one of the best bikes in the company's history.

Of course, improvements in performance and quality aside, we should still at least briefly touch on the elephant in the room: cost. The Ducati 1098-powered Bimota DB7's $35,000 asking price was in no way a good value. It definitely wasn't $10,000 better than the hot-rod Ducati 1098R of the same year, a bike that made significantly more power and even weighed a couple pounds less than the "lightweight" Bimota... But if you're fixated on something like that, you're missing the entire point: Bimotas of this period are for well-heeled connoisseurs with money to burn, and they're not intended to make financial sense.

I love 90s Bimotas, but some of the details are a bit crude and they're a complete pain to work on: those gorgeous aluminum beam frames significantly limit access to the bike's oily bits, and the overall "kit-bike" quality meant the brand's reputation suffered. It didn't help that the major manufacturers had been honing their craft. When two motorcycles with the same engine have a 150lb weight difference, the lighter machine can't help but be faster. But by the late 1990s, bikes like Yamaha's R1 and the Suzuki GSX-R1000 offered the same level of performance as Bimota's creations, but with much better reliability, and at a third of the price. So Bimota focused on creating bikes like the DB7 that offered an incredible level of craftsmanship and detailing, even if they weren't any faster.

I'm not a huge fan of the stacked projector-beam headlamps, but this is the kind of machine that gets more an more impressive, the closer you get. The detailing is incredible, especially the heart of the beast, or maybe the skeleton if we're staying with the anatomical metaphor... Bimota doesn't generally build their own engines, and the bikes' claim to fame has always been their frames. They started experimenting with hybrid frames that combined multiple materials with the SB8R, the idea being to obtain different performance characteristics for different areas of the frame. In the SB8's case, it was designed to shift weight forward for better weight-distribution and handling. In the DB7, the frame is an evolution of the earlier DB5/6 that used a combination of trellis structures for the frame and swingarm, connected to stiff machined aluminum sideplates, a design similar to MV Agusta's modern roadbikes and their upcoming Moto2 machine. In the Bimota DB7, the tubular trellis is replaced by oval-section tubing, and the overall effect is similar, and the bike looks light and agile, even at rest.

Of course, improvements in performance and quality aside, we should still at least briefly touch on the elephant in the room: cost. The DB7's $35,000 asking price was in no way a good value. It definitely wasn't $10,000 better than the Ducati 1098R of the same year, a bike that made significantly more power and even weighed a couple pounds less than the "lightweight" Bimota... But if you're fixated on something like that, you're missing the entire point: Bimotas of this period are for well-heeled connoisseurs with money to burn, and they're not intended to make financial sense.

From the original eBay listing: 2009 Bimota DB7 for Sale

The DB7 was Bimota's first superbike after their rebirth in 2003, and it featured Ducati’s 1098 Testastretta Evo engine. The engine isn’t the only impressive part–in addition to Bimota’s home-brew oval tube trellis frame, this bike is packed with top-shelf components like Marzocchi forks, Brembo Monobloc calipers, and the fully adjustable ExtremeTech rear shock. But what truly makes this bike stand out is the way this bike is made.

Ugh, I know what the seller means by "home-brew" but wow, is that the wrong phrase. Bimota literally made their name developing sophisticated frames that offered significant handling advantages, compared to machines from major manufacturers, and this one, while not necessarily better than the frame that forms the basis of the 1098, is a piece industrial art. The $21,000 starting bid is pretty steep, but these are some of the best bikes Bimota ever made. Sure, you could get a decent Panigale 1199S for that money, but those things are everywhere in Southern California...

-tad

Early-Production 2009 Bimota DB7 for Sale
Bimota October 10, 2018 posted by

Master’s Thesis: 1992 Bimota Tesi for Sale

Throughout the history of the motorcycle, there have been many attempts to develop a superior suspension system, and the hub-center steered Tesi or "Thesis" was Bimota's attempt to radically alter the sportbike landscape and do something completely new, a shocking move for such a tiny company. The ubiquitous telescopic forks have a number of disadvantages, chief among them geometry changes caused by "dive" under braking: the fork tubes compress, steepening the steering. This can theoretically be used to your advantage, but the "stiction" or friction between the sets of sliding tubes certainly can't. But so far, telescopic forks have proved the best compromise and engineers clearly understand their limits, so they persist as the most common way to suspend the front end of a motorcycle.

The only manufacturer to really buck that trend recently, at least in significant volume, has been BMW. But their Telelever front end is being used less and less, owing to a different concern: radiator placement, since the front "A-arm" of the Telelever system takes up the space where one would normally reside. Bimota got around this issue by using an "Omega" frame that allowed the front swingarm pivot to be very low to the ground,  so a pair of radiators could sit easily above. The frame gets its name from the two Ω-shaped machined aluminum side plates that sandwich Ducati's liquid-cooled v-twin. Originally a stock 851 motor, it was eventually stroked to 904cc after the first batch of bikes was built.

Unfortunately, the Tesi's steering linkage was complicated and expensive to produce, and any improper adjustment or slop in those joints caused steering feel to suffer, something that seems to be an issue with alternative front ends in general. BMW's Telelever front is famously stable on the brakes, but has often been criticized for a lack of front-end feel, although a set of Öhlins shocks at both ends supposedly improves things. The Tesi had the same reputation: it was wild and exotic, and test riders could brake deeply into corners with confidence, but the bike lacked a bit of feel, even when everything was working as designed. Which took some doing, given the relatively complex system connecting the clip-on bars to the front wheel.

The other issue with the Tesi is a bit more theoretical: a swingarm front end should be much easier on front tires than a bike with a telescopic fork , allowing the Tesi to run a much softer compound tire without experiencing the same wear. But manufacturers design their tires to work with telescopic forks, so one hypothetical advantage is lost there as well, unless systems like this become more common.

But the biggest issue with the Tesi was its high cost: for practical purposes, it was just a Ducati 851 with cool bodywork. All that engineering had very little impact on performance, making it more of a stylish statement of intent than an actual improvement. The Tesi name is very apt: the original bike literally was a graduate thesis project, and was built around a Kawasaki GPz 550 engine. Bimota's prototype was built around a V4 Honda, but that proved to be too wide, so the production model went to the narrow and powerful Ducati v-twin.

From the original eBay listing: 1992 Bimota Tesi for Sale

Somewhat challenging personal circumstances are forcing us to undertake this unusual listing and one-of-a kind sale, so we are now offering this, our lovely NOS 1992 Bimota Tesi 1D904SR starting at $1 without any reserve.

To be absolutely clear, THE HIGHEST BID will purchase this very rare and exceptional motorcycle, no matter the final value.

We had hoped to hold onto this gem for a few more years and wait until the worldwide Bimota market has improved and collectors and enthusiasts alike have come to realize how rare and exceptional some of these bikes and specifically the Tesi really is. Sadly health related problems and financial issues force us to take this step now and sell his rare and unusual motorcycle, hopefully to a likeminded enthusiast.

So there is no misunderstanding, please be so kind to have your finances in order and be able to pay for this motorcycle when the auction is finished, however high or low the final value amount may be. An immediate $500 deposit is expected from the winning bidder upon winning this auction, the remaining outstanding amount due upon pickup or prior to leaving our possession no later than 14 days from end of auction. Please prepare for this request by having your paypal account balance reflect the needed amount beforehand and be ready to complete purchase of the bike in a timely manner. Thanks so much for understanding.....

There will be a flat fee charged to have this motorcycle crated professionally and shipped fully insured to any location, worldwide. Of course: If you prefer to pick this motorcycle up in person, or have it picked up by any professional service or freight forwarder of your choice at our location here in Basel, in Switzerland, the entire packing and shipping fee will be waved.

Please look at the shipping details for more information. All else is explained in the description below in detail.

NOS motorcycle, never ridden, never run and properly prepared for long term storage on a pedestal when new in 1992. Specifically ordered and delivered from the factory in this condition. Original in every way as it was in 1992.

Pictured with and without bodywork mounted to show that the exceptional condition throughout is not just skin-deep.

All 3 cast iron Brembo rotors still have the yellow zink plating on the rotor-surfaces to protect the rotors from oxidation while sitting. This coating wears off on the first mile ridden and when the first contact of the rotor with the brake pads occurs.

Hydraulic system, cooling system and the original battery have never been filled with any fluids. The engine is filled with a light oil to preserve internals, seals and bearings. This motorcycle was kept in a climate controlled environment without UV light exposure its entire life, so there has been no deterioration of any rubber pieces nor any age related discoloration of any other parts

This Bimota comes with the original owners manual, warranty booklet, copies of the parts manual and workshop manual and 2 sets of the complete and original Tesi 1D toolkit. This Tesi also comes with both the mph dashboard and the km/h dashboard, both were ordered with the bike in 1992. The original early Bimota Tesi rear stand is also included with the bike

Please only bid if you are serious in your intent to purchase this motorcycle at the end of the 7 day bidding period. Obviously any taxes or duties the buyer has to pay upon importing this vehicle into the country of their choice is solely the responsibility of said buyer

This motorcycle is over 25 years old and hence is fully legal to import into most countries including the USA (EPA and DOT excemptions apply to vehicles over 25 years of age) as of last year!

The bike is currently located in Switzerland, but I'd guess anyone buying this is looking to collect and display, not actually ride this Tesi: it's a museum-piece, but what a museum-piece! Happily, the seller has provided plenty of pics of the bike for us to drool over, since most of us won't be owning or riding one of these anytime soon: less than 200 of the 1D model seen here were built before the updated SR version was introduced. Even better, the bike is shown sans the fully-enclosed fairing that really only allows hints of the weirdness within to peek out, something rectified on the minimalist styling of the current bike.

-tad

Master’s Thesis: 1992 Bimota Tesi for Sale