Posts by Category: Bimota

Bimota November 30, 2019 posted by

Underappreciated: 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

This Bimota YB11 Superleggera isn’t just a sportbike, or even an exotic sportbike. It’s a high-performance boutique motorcycle, one of just 650 ever built. Of course, that’s pretty much mass production by Bimota standards. It doesn’t have quite the cachet of Honda’s limited-production homologation superbikes, but consider that Honda made almost 5,000 Honda RC30s, compared to just 650 YB11s. It’s still incredibly rare and plenty fast and, as a bonus, you can take your significant other with you on your high-performance boutique motorcycle: this was one of very few Bimotas ever built with passenger accommodations, although they’re about as comfortable as you’d expect. Still, it’s great to have that spare seat, in case of emergencies…

The “Superleggera” part of Bimota YB11 Superleggera refers to the focus on lightweight construction that allowed huge performance from an existing engine, along with the agile handling you’d expect. At the time, the bike weighed 403lbs dry, a full 80lbs less than the Yamaha YZF1000R that donated its 1002cc five-valve Genesis engine and five-speed transmission. Power was rated at 145hp, with an impressive 80lb-ft of torque that allowed the five-speed box to be fitted to the open-class superbike in the first place, a characteristic it shared with Suzuki’s rival GSX-R1100. The light weight and power were enough to push the bike to nearly 170mph. All the way back in 1997.

Somehow, because of their hand-built nature and flaws, it doesn’t seem all that criminal to modify or improve Bimota’s 1990s motorcycles if it helps sort some of their more annoying quirks: a YZF750R six-speed can replace the original five-speed found in the YB11, and I’m sure somebody can figure out how to fit a stand-alone fuel-injection system to replace the carburetors. This example luckily has the earlier gauges that should hopefully prove more reliable than the later style, while looking better to boot.

It can be tricky to tell if we’ve posted a particular YB11 on the site previously: they all came in the same colors, have low miles, and are generally well cared-for. It’s even trickier when the seller refers to the bike as both a 1997 and a 1998 and appears to have “borrowed” some content from RSBFS in their description… Other than the occasional Termignoni system, aftermarket exhausts and accessories are virtually unheard of, and bolt-on farkles are generally considered undesirable. There appear to have been a few different exhaust hangers used, with and without passenger pegs, although it’s also possible those were fabbed up by the owners when new.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

One of only 650 produced

1998 Bimota 1,002cc YB11 Superleggera 

Frame no. ZESYB1100TR00047

A Rimini-based manufacturer of ducting for heating and ventilation, Bimota soon turned to their first love of motorcycles. Founders Guiseppe Morri and Massimo Tamburrini began manufacturing in the early 1970s and have since built a reputation of exclusive and limited with inimitable Italian styling machines of performance. Using the best cycle parts and an array of the best outside manufacturers’ powerplants, the Bimota was always an uncompromised and expensive foray in to exclusive motorcycling. 

Powered by Yamaha’s superb Thunderace engine, the Superleggera YB11 was Bimota’s last word in Italian exotica of the 1990s. The 131bhp ‘four’ in stock form breathed through a Bimota-designed exhaust system, which could squeeze out a little more power. It was shrouded by the firm’s trademark aluminum beam frame and complemented by some of the finest cycle parts available, including fully adjustable Paioli 51mm forks, fully adjustable Paioli shock, Brembo brakes, 17” Antera wheels and carbon fiber-abound. At 403lbs, the YB11 Superleggera weighed some 80lbs less than the donor bike and its handling and performance were in a different league altogether; as was the price, which at about $20,000, was a staggering 50% more than the Yamaha.

In the late 1990s Bimota went through one of its periodic financial convulsions and production of the YB11 ended in 1999, although a second batch of bikes was completed later using stocks of existing parts. 

The bike offered, an early 1997 example, the 46th built, is presented in excellent condition throughout. With an indicated 8,700 miles, racked up in the first decade of use, the bike has been on static display since 2007, though regularly maintained. A fresh service was performed to ready the bike for sale and no back-fees are due to a California buyer, as the last registration was due over ten years ago.

With only 650 machines produced, this represents a perfect combination of Italian exotica, Japanese reliability, ease of maintenance and power and with such qualifications, is bound to be a future classic.

For additional information, photos, etc. please visit ClassicAvenue.com

Look, the Bimota YB11 is a flawed motorcycle. And maybe the flaws would be unacceptable in a bike that originally sold for the equivalent of $47,000 in today’s money, but they don’t cost that much currently: this one is being offered at $9,900. That seems to be a little bit on the high-side for a 90s Bimota currently, although I doubt that will still be the case in the future. For that kind of money, you’re getting a hell of a lot of exclusivity and performance that will still peel your face back, even today.

-tad

Underappreciated: 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale
Bimota October 21, 2019 posted by

From the Cape: 1998 Bimota SB6R

Bimota is known for taking the road less traveled – in order to travel that road faster and with more exclusivity. And while Bimota has had some brilliant successes and failures, it was the SB6R that promised mainstream potential. Housing a GSX-R1100 powerplant magically wrapped in aluminum and fiberglass, the SB6R weighed less than the Suzuki donor bike that gave up the engine and trans. Fast, powerful and looking like it was built to break speed limits everywhere, the SB6R is among the most approachable of the Bimota set, and always worth a closer look.

1998 Bimota SB6R for sale on eBay

While you would be forgiven to lust after a more exotic Bimota – say a VDue or Tesi – the SB6R is a work of art in its own right. Look closely at the details and let the fun begin. Where to start? How about that asymmetrical swing arm, complete with BIMOTA stamped out in raised lettering. Light, trick and very indicative of the level of workmanship. Check out the under tail exhaust poking out shotgun style over the rear wheel. Look at the solo saddle. No passengers on this ride, and there is no faux solo seat cover to confuse the issue. This is a rider’s bike. Check out the Bimota-logo instruments and spend some time on those lovely triple clamps. Yes, those started life out as billet blocks. Even the non-Bimota stuff is gorgeous: the rear Ohlins shock and placement, the right side up Paioli fork with carbon covering and quick release, and the Brembo binders all work together to create art.

From the seller:
On offer is this mint condition Bimota SB6R.
Corse exhausts.
Low mileage, well maintained and serviced recently.
I have also included an additional original rear wheel.
This prime example would make a great addition to any motorcycle collection.
Worldwide shipping is available at competitive rates.

In a sad twist of irony, it was the more exotic Bimota VDue that sealed the fate of the SB6R. With the recalls of the two-stroke machine pushing Bimota into bankruptcy, a mere 600 SB6Rs were produced – far fewer than anticipated. That makes this particular bike a bit rare. Unfortunately in this case rare does not immediately equate to expensive. While this was priced above $30,000 when new, these are laregely sub $10k machines today. And that makes them well worth the purchase. Where else can you find the exclusivity and panache that only a Bimota can give you – not to mention the handling and performance – for that kind of dosh? Sure, maintenance is a bit tough on many of these models due to the tight tolerances between the engine, frame and bodywork, but thankfully the Suzuki mill is well neigh bulletproof. Check it out here, as this one is looking for an opening ask of $9,900. That is more than many we have seen recently, but not out of the range of reason by any means. Good Luck!!

MI

From the Cape: 1998 Bimota SB6R
Bimota October 16, 2019 posted by

A Good Fit – 1987 Bimota YB5

Even Bimota was not immune to the siren call of Yamaha’s 130 hp FJ1200, producing one of their only biposto models.  This example has been carefully preserved in South Africa.

1987 Bimota YB5 ( South Africa ) for sale on eBay

Yamaha had recently given their air/oil-cooled four a big displacement bump and tuned it for a torque band that made shifting almost unnecessary.  The massive lump was narrower than usual since the alternator was placed behind the cylinders rather than at the end of the crank.  At the front of the interesting cradle and spar chassis, Marzocchi supplied 42mm forks, and Bimota fabricated their own swingarm.  Wheels were eighteens front and rear, more of a GT solution, along with 280mm Brembo brakes.  The body-color pillion cover is easily removable should a volunteer turn up.

This owner has a couple of other very collectible bikes at auction, all looking excellent though a long boat or plane ride away.  Close-up photos show the finishes to be unblemished, with just under 10,000 miles the paint almost looks wet.  From the eBay auction:

Number 18 out of 208 units ever produced. 
Bimota YB5’s do not come up for sale often, so this is the perfect opportunity to add a prime example of one to your collection. 
She handles surprisingly well considering a dry weight of 210 Kg.
Apart from the turn signals, mirrors and windscreen everything else is still original. Even the factory paintwork has been preserved.
The YB5 has been part of my private collection for the past five years in which time the vehicle only accumulated less than 500 Km.
The tires were replaced about two years ago and a full service, including replacing the brake pads and the battery was completed three weeks ago.

Bimota couldn’t do much about the mass of that gorgeous drivetrain, though they reduced the dry weight to just under 500 lbs., and balanced the package to neutralize handling.  The YB5’s rake and trail numbers are substantially less than the donor FJ, lightening the handling and stipulating a steering damper.  Low profile tires were specified for the bike, which reduced the gyroscopic effect of the larger wheels.  The “skinny” 1200 slips into the sleek fairing and can take two for a wicked sporty ride.

-donn

A Good Fit – 1987 Bimota YB5
Bimota September 18, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2007 Bimota DB6 Delirio for Sale

Please note the seller has opted to enable comments so interested parties can ask questions. Thanks! -dc

Bimota went in a strangely practical direction in the late 1990s, perhaps realizing that the well-heeled riders that could afford their machines cared more about quality and style than the did about lap times: even the fabled Tesi ended up with an air-cooled version of the Ducati v-twin engine, handlebars, and a set of risers. This DB6 Delirio might be their most practical bike to date, next to the… visually challenged Mantra, so “delirious” might be a strange way to describe such an eminently usable exotic. In concept, it’s a blinged-up Monster, but that’s no bad thing, assuming cost is no object for you.

So why buy one, compared to a Monster at half the price? You might prefer the looks of Ducati’s everyman exotic from a distance, but the cost-cutting measures required for mass-production can be found all over the place, once you start to look closer. The DB6 is a strikingly detailed bike, and I’ve long maintained that, if you’re not keen on the styling from twenty feet, just walk up to it and start looking at the craftsmanship on display: there are billet brackets for cables and hoses, and Bimota’s frame is a masterpiece of machined aluminum frame plates combined with gorgeous steel trellis components paired with a swingarm with a matching design. The result is exceedingly light, at 375lbs with oil but no fuel.

Horsepower junkies might be disappointed by the motive unit. Power comes from Ducati’s 1000DS “Dual Spark” engine with two valves and two spark plugs per cylinder. With just 92hp on tap, it isn’t a screamer, with power tailing off well before the engine’s safe rev ceiling, but it’s a blast to blat through the strong midrange, short-shifting up the box while enjoying the deep note from the Zard exhaust with distinctive, trapezoidal openings. It’s a bit of an oxymoron: a functional and perfectly usable Bimota. A fun bike.

The black frame is apparently very rare, one of just a couple here in the States. The specification of this example has also been updated to match the DB6R, with improved braking components that should make it even easier to stand this lightweight roadster on its nose. This also appears to have the earlier tachometer: others I’ve seen have a very functional Koso unit with a neat ring of light-up blocks that chase the needle around the dial, but I prefer the bespoke looks of this one. Honestly, given the engine’s characteristics, the gauge is pretty much superfluous anyway.

From the Seller: 2007 Bimota DB6 Delirio for Sale

2007 Bimota DB6 Delirio – Rare exotic. You will not see another one of these at bike night! This exact bike was the Bimota display bike at the 2007 Los Angeles Motorcycle Show. One of two DB6s in the US with a black frame. Bought from and serviced by Bimota Spirit in Raleigh, NC. If you know about these bikes, you know that Bimota Spirit is the “GO TO” company for anything Bimota-related. Only 3121 miles.

  • Custom Alcantara suede seat with embroidered Bimota logo
  • Ducati-powered, 1000cc
  • Slipper clutch
  • New battery installed on May 29, 2019
  • CRG bar end mirrors
  • Rizoma grips
  • Billet Aluminum Bimota brake and clutch levers – beautiful!
  • Zard carbon fiber exhaust
  • Bimota cover included

Carbon fiber pieces added:

  • Front & rear fenders
  • Solo seat cowl
  • Bimota clutch cover
  • License plate bracket
  • Side covers
  • Belt cover
  • Chain guard

Controls completely upgraded to DB6-R specs, all work performed by Bimota Spirit

  • 1 BREMBO radial clutch master cylinder
  • 1 BREMBO radial brake master cylinder
  • 507111010 1 DB6R clutch hose
  • 507180010 1 DB6R brake hose assembly
  • 507011010 1 clutch lever
  • 507080010 1 brake lever
  • 507080030 2 pin
  • 507080020 2 adjuster knob
  • 507080040 1 switch pin
  • 506482010 1 racing throttle
  • 507182010 1 throttle cable
  • OBERON 1 slave cylinder
  • RIZOMA 1 reservoir

Belt service will be done prior to sale to new owner.

Clear title. $15,900 obo. Bike is in Raleigh, NC. 919-844-5888. Ask for Michael.

With just 3,000 on it, this is basically a brand-new motorcycle! Obviously, looking at the $15,900 asking price, there are plenty of other bikes out there that offer more bang for your buck. But that’s really never been the point with Bimotas and the DB6 might be the perfect bike for the rider with limited space in their garage, or just an interest in an exotic that can be ridden daily and easily maintained. Seller is open to reasonable offers.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2007 Bimota DB6 Delirio for Sale
Bimota September 5, 2019 posted by

If It Ain’t Broke: 1994 Bimota YB8 for Sale

Many of the Yamaha-powered Bimotas like today’s YB8 look suspiciously similar, and while I’m sure there are physical differences in the frames and fairings, I’d also bet that many parts are interchangeable between them. The YB8 used an updated YB6 frame, along with Yamaha’s 1002cc, five-valve inline-four and EXUP exhaust system from the FZR1000. During this period, the 750cc-powered YB4 was homologated to win races in WSBK, while the YB8 was a more road-oriented “unlimited class” sportbike.

Of course, being a Bimota, it used lightweight bodywork designed to come apart easily and allow access to the oily bits sandwiched between the gorgeous, aluminum frame spars. Wisely, Bimota borrowed more than just the FZR1000’s engine and gearbox: it also uses their wiring harness and gauges, as well as other assorted bits, to help put “Italian reliability” jokes and concerns to bed. The Bimota YB8 weighed a claimed 396lbs dry, a whopping 52lbs lighter than the FZR1000 and an obvious benefit of the bike’s single-minded design and construction. I’ve no doubt Japan could have built something similarly light at the time, but they seemed to be obsessed with silly things like “versatility” and “durability” when designing their roadbikes.

Power was up significantly from the FZR’s claimed 125hp as well to 149hp, although that was largely down to the Japanese manufacturers’ “gentleman’s agreement” to limit horsepower and top speeds. A few Japanese performance cars were suspiciously fast for having just “276hp,” so I’ve no idea how “de-restricted” the YB8 actually is, but just dropping 50lbs from an otherwise stock FZR would provide a huge boost to performance, and tuning wasn’t really Bimota’s strong point anyway.

Handling and looks were the goal and the YB8 delivered, with a claimed top speed of 173mph. 150hp is still pretty stout by today’s standards, and the 86lb-ft of torque, combined with the wide, flexible powerband of the 20-valve EXUP motor mean the bike should still be real-world fast. Adjustable Marzocchi components at both ends mean very stable handling, while Brembo calipers and 320mm floating discs up front combine with the bike’s light weight to offer nearly modern levels of stopping power.

Just 252 were built between 1990-1991. The bike was upgraded in 1993 to the YB8E that replaced the original 38mm Mikuni CV carburetors with fuel injection, although this example is dated from 1994 and appears to retain the original carburetors. Roll with it: we’re talking about Bimota here. Maybe 1994 is when it was first registered?

From the original eBay listing: 1994 Bimota YB8 for Sale

Rare and gorgeous Bimota YB8 with 6,000 miles

Carburetor version

This bike origin France has known only one owner. It has just been revised from top to bottom after a few years of inactivity. All consumables and fluids are new.

Original paint, very rare option or shock absorber and Öhlins fork.

Sold with the documentation of time, tools, certificate of conformity. French registration, can ship worldwide.

Located in Vitrolles, France.

The asking price is for this very clean looking YB8 is $13,900. Plus shipping and handling, of course. Bimotas of the era seem to trade for a good bit less when they show up for sale here in the USA, although this one appears to be nearly perfect and is ready to roll after a refresh. If you’re looking for a classic Bimota, the extra cost might pay off, assuming the bike is as good as it looks.

-tad

If It Ain’t Broke: 1994 Bimota YB8 for Sale
Bimota August 16, 2019 posted by

Thoroughly Italian: 1986 Bimota DB1 for Sale

The DB1 wasn’t Bimota’s first bike, but it perfectly embodies the company’s philosophy of taking a well-developed engine from an outside manufacturer and putting it into a package that was lighter, sleeker, and better-handling. That wasn’t really all that difficult to do when you’re looking at beasts like the Suzuki GSX1100: just take the good stuff and ditch the rest, then replace it with better, stronger, lighter components. But Ducati’s bikes were already a good bit lighter and more agile to begin with. They had to be, with smaller engines and fewer cylinders.

The DB1 was Bimota’s first Ducati-powered model, and used the two-valve, air and oil-cooled Pantah engine that included a pair of toothed rubber belts to drive the single overhead cams. The arrangement that was still pretty unusual at the time, since most bikes were still using traditional chains in 1985. A 352lb dry weight was claimed, which is pretty outrageously light for a sportbike of the era. Marzocchi suspension meant the light, compact machine would handle and 16″ wheels at both ends that exaggerated the already large front brakes to nearly pie-plate dimensions that were clamped by four-piston Brembo calipers.

Bimotas are famously hard to work on, with the frames so closely wrapped around the mechanicals to save weight, centralize mass, and improve aerodynamics: everything is optimized for performance. The SB3 actually had a frame that unbolted and separated into two sections to free the drivetrain for servicing! Jokes about Italian reliability aside, every single motorcycle will need regular servicing, and removing the fairings of a sportbike is often needlessly tedious. But they make up for that by at least being easy to strip clean of bodywork. Note that the entire tank cover and tail section is just one piece, held in place by just a few fasteners!

So was it really better than the Ducati F1 that donated its engine and five-speed transmission? Probably not, unless you were going racing. As with more modern Bimotas, it was much more expensive with minimal benefits for the average rider, compared to the donor bikes. But the DB1 was impossibly compact and futuristic, with the incredible detailing that Bimota has always been known for. I particularly love the brake and clutch reservoirs incorporated into the tops of the fork tubes.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Bimota DB1 for Sale

1986 Bimota DB1, 5 miles AS New, Very rare-one of 400

First Ducati powered Bimota.

This spectacular DB1 has 5 miles from new, these miles could be factory dyno or road test miles as the bike is new and in brand new condition. Everything is original and untouched, bike has always been in heated storage and shows almost no signs of aging.

This DB1 is nearly flawless, the only flaws I could find is a slight rub mark on the rear of the solo cowl near the tail light (see pic). Second flaw is a super small green paint dot on top of the solo cowl (see pic), this looks like a factory flaw. Other than that the bike is perfect and new.

I am the second owner.

For an indication or reference of value see last picture. That bike had mileage and has been slightly restored. 

This bike is number 203 of 400 produced.

There are no bids yet at the $25,000 opening bid, and there’s a long way to go before the $32,000 asking price. The original listing includes an ad from Bimota Spirit for a similar bike with price of $29,000 and it appears the seller is assuming or hoping that the much lower mileage of his bike will bring a higher price. Unfortunately, although bikes like the DB1 and the original Tesi are rare and desirable, Bimota values in general have remained pretty flat and it looks like the seller may be jumping the gun here slightly, given the overall lack of interest.

-tad

Thoroughly Italian: 1986 Bimota DB1 for Sale
Bimota August 7, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Zero-mile 1997 Bimota VDue time capsule

CMG Motorcycles has two motorcycles on RSBFS right now, a 0 mile VDue and a brand new Bimota Tesi! Check them both out! -dc

There is no more tantalizing bike on the planet for me than the Bimota VDue. A bespoke Italian chassis from the finest boutique bike maker on the planet, draped with exotic suspension and prodigious brakes with fuel injection, the waistline of a ballerina and 110 or so two-stroke horsepower. A dream machine for the ages, it was supposed to kick Bimota into a new market segment in a cloud of sweet-smelling blue smoke. Instead, the dream went up like a Persian Gulf oil field and took the iconic nameplate down with it. 

Bad power delivery, seizing pistons, oil leaks plagued the first couple hundred VDues, and most owners returned them. Fixing the issues, which meant sticking carburetors on and invalidating the bikes for street use, ruined Bimota’s finances. Eventually, an engineer on the team that put the idea together bought the leftovers and fixed them. He sold about 120 that put out more than 120 street-legal two-stroke ponies, but by that point the toothpaste was out of the tube. 

This 1997 Bimota VDue never experienced any of those issues, because it has racked up exactly zero miles in its 22-year life. It is a literal museum piece in absolutely flawless cosmetic condition. Given the likelihood that its mechanicals are absolutely useless, both by design and from sitting, this thing is perfect for a collector who needs the finishing touch on a prestigious collection. 

Having never moved under its own power, it wears its original tires, which are now shiny from sitting around vulcanizing for a couple decades. But that’s no matter. When else will you get the chance to own a bike that is original and untouched down to the protective film on the windscreen? The thing we love most is that this bike is in its best state: an unblemished embodiment of bold vision and faith in engineering. It deserves to stay that way.

It is available in Christchurch, New Zealand for $48,990 USD and requests and inquiries can be sent to Brad by email  – here –.

Featured Listing: Zero-mile 1997 Bimota VDue time capsule
Bimota August 7, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1991 Bimota Tesi 1D

CMG Motorcycles has two motorcycles on RSBFS right now, a 0 mile VDue and a brand new Bimota Tesi! Check them both out! -dc

1990 saw the designer who succeeded founder Massimo Tamburini depart, and a new engineer arrive. Pierluigi Marconi presented a clean sheet design with inherent anti-dive and the 904cc Ducati desmoquatro. This piece of Bimota history is offered with zero miles and ready to display.

Inside the Omega-shaped alloy frame, the water cooled L-twin pumped 113 hp via a six-speed transmission and chain drive.  Outside the frame were two similar swingarms, with hub-center steering in front, suspension and steering mechanically separate, and brakes could be applied without drastically affecting the tire loading and balance.  Typical Bimota appointments included top Marzocchi dampers and Brembo brakes.  Peculiar looking when bare, the Tesi 1D has a not-so-unusual monoposto fairing and riding position.

Coming from the client side of a New Zealand multi-line dealer, this Tesi has been on display since new.  For a fan, it seems like too many appear without even break-in miles, but an unridden creampuff is great for the buyer.  Transport from Oceana will have to be considered by the new owner, but is worth the effort in this case.

With all the CNC machined parts and pull-rod controls, the Tesi was expensive to build and many prospective buyers couldn’t accept the radical looks.  Only a few hundred were built and many had just a short ride before retirement.  And though two successive generations were introduced in the 2000’s, the 1D Tesi makes the original statement.  CMG Motorcycles asks $43,990 USD for this example, and requests inquiries be sent to Brad by email  – here –.

-donn

Featured Listing – 1991 Bimota Tesi 1D