Posts by Category: Bimota

Bimota July 26, 2020 posted by

The Purist: 1993 Bimota DB2 for Sale

The Bimota DB2 is a bit of an odd duck [pun!]: the company’s claim to fame was building high-spec, light weight, race-inspired sportbikes powered by Japanese engines. Those engines came from bikes that were overbuilt and often significantly heavy, so Bimota found a significant performance increase by building motorcycles as much as a hundred pounds lighter than the original machines that donated their powerplants. But Ducati, with a few exceptions, has always had the whole handling thing pretty much nailed, and the DB2 isn’t much lighter than the Ducati 900SS that donated its engine to the endeavor.

Bimota’s naming system flies in the face of motorcycling convention. You’d probably think a Bimota SB6 would be powered by a 600cc engine. It’s not. Instead, it’s packing 1100cc of Suzuki heat. “SB6” means the bike in question is the sixth Suzuki-powered Bimota. The number has nothing to do with displacement. Because Italy. The original Ducati-powered DB1 proved to be a big seller and, at around 600 units, qualified as nearly volume production.

Luckily, the DB2 was a bit lighter than the 900SS at a claimed 373lbs dry. The one-piece tank shroud and tail section was held in place by a few fasteners, and was wrapped around a plastic fuel cell, all of which helped keep things simple as well as light. It was powered by Ducti’s 904cc air-cooled Desmodue v-twin from the 900SS that produced 86 claimed horsepower. That charismatic engine was suspended in a trellis frame similar to the original Supersport unit, matched to a sexy tubular swingarm, with stout Paioli forks and an adjustable Öhlins shock out back.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Bimota DB2 for Sale

1993 Bimota DB2 VIN#ZES1DB21XPRZES018. 408 DB2s were manufactured and this is one of the 285 full-fairing models. I purchased this bike in 2014 and have put less than 1,000 miles on it since then. After picking it up it was fully serviced by DucPond (Ducati Winchester, VA) with valves, belts, fluids and a new clutch basket and plates. Most recently in Feb 2020 it was back for belts and fluids at DucPond. Bike has the air cooled Ducati 2 valve motor in it. This is a very light bike with remarkable handling and great brakes – only bike I have ridden with true floating front discs. Reliable, easy to work on and tons of options available for it. It runs strong and pulls very nicely.

Everything works on the bike. The low fuel level light comes on and off regardless of the fuel level – common to these bikes I think. If I was keeping it I would put fresh tires on it (the ones on it are past their shelf life); change the brake fluid again; and replace the blinker relay with an adjustable one (they blink too fast). Bike charges fine and has a newish battery in it. No warranty expressed or implied – it is 27 years old, but I would happily ride this bike anywhere. As a 27 year old bike it is not perfect and has a few flaws which I have tried to highlight in the pictures. The paint is probably as good as the factory, but has blemishes in it. Clear title in my name.

Not on the bike but included are the steering dampener and original airbox. It comes with two sets of keys and the original books. Separately I have a lot of spares for this bike, that are not included with the sale here but I will consider a good offer on them from the purchaser of the bike. Bike shows 1978 miles and if the below is correct, then total mileage would be about 5,000 miles.

Prior to my ownership what the previous owner stated (these are not my words). There is a letter in the paper work indicating acceptance of the bike as a gift.

“This motorcycle was completely restored in 2001 when it had approximately 3000 miles and donated to the Larz Anderson Transportation Museum in Boston, who elected to auction it to focus on their older collection of pre-war cars.

Enhancements performed in 2001:

“944cc big bore kit, stainless steel engine studs, carburetor jet kit, new timing belts, carbon fibre belt covers, braided brake lines, polished wheels, mufflers, intake manifolds, new chain and sprocket, adjustable brake and clutch levers, tinted windscreen, Euro headlight, new speedometer and tachometer, painted frame.”

Bike is located in Northern VA.

Bidding is very active on this example, which is no surprise considering it hasn’t even cracked $10k yet. I have to be honest: the Bimota DB2 is one of my favorite Bimotas, but I’m not a huge fan of those graphics with their dripping paint/urban camo design. I’d happily live with them though, even in the garish white/purple [?!]/white scheme that was also available. It’s one of the purest expressions of Italian motorcycling, a light, nimble machine with striking looks and just enough power to be fun. The DB2 is easy to run as well, at least as far as the two-valve Ducati engine is concerned. Don’t be put off too much by the scary Italian reputation: a well cared-for Desmodue is good for 100,000 miles or more, and servicing isn’t all that expensive, or difficult for a handy home mechanic.

-tad

The Purist: 1993 Bimota DB2 for Sale
Bimota July 9, 2020 posted by

Gives You Wings – 2007 Bimota DB6 Delirio Azzurro #4 of 23 !

In this day and age when a very limited edition can be a few thousand, here’s a Ducati-based naked with total production of 23 units !  Not perfect, this Azzurro is still very good, with one of Borgo Panigale’s best drivetrains, and livery celebrating Italy’s national football team.

2007 Bimota DB6 Delirio Azzurro for sale on eBay

Ducati provided their air cooled dual-spark to Rimini’s designers, who used the factory Marelli injection but fabricated their own exhaust, resulting in 86 available hp.  As usual, the artwork was between the headstock and pillion, a combination of chrom-moly trellis and alloy sideplates, and matching fabricated swingarm.  Typically excellent components included 50mm Marzocchi forks, 320mm Brembo brakes and gold alloys.  The tank starts out skinny but branches out to accomodate 4.2 gallons.

This Azzurro was actually featured on RSBFS in 2014, and has been ridden some 7,000 km’s since then.  Looks like an off-side tipover is in the history books, but except for some Rizoma farkles, it’s as Bimota intended.  Notes from the eBay auction:

This is a show-stopping work of naked-bike art. It’s also light, fast, and comfortable. 

Bimota created this limited edition to commemorate the Italian 2006 World Cup soccer champions (their national team is “the Azzurro”). Twelve of these motorcycles went to players. Eleven were sold to the public with a retail price of around $30,000. You’re bidding on number 4 of the 23.

This motorcycle has these extras:

Zard slip-on carbon fiber mufflers 

Rizoma mirrors

Rizoma brake and clutch reservoir mounts

Brembo RCS radial brake & clutch cylinders

New battery and trickle charger

Pirelli Rosso II tires with less than 500 mi

This motorcycle is in excellent condition. Since I purchased it in 2014, it has been faithfully maintained by M Racing, Glendora, CA. It has 13,071 km, equal to 8,122 miles. Its small scrapes are shown in the last three photos.

Designed by the late Sergio Robbiano, this Delirio Azzurra was very special when it left the factory, and is only a light rejuvenation away.  Any sharp Ducati specialist can set the valve clearances and mount new belts, and this one has several nice mods.  The reserve will be up there, but might be worth testing.

-donn

 

Gives You Wings – 2007 Bimota DB6 Delirio Azzurro #4 of 23 !
Bimota July 2, 2020 posted by

Dragon West – 1999 Bimota DB4 Tri-Colore

Bimota’s fourth Ducati used the tried-and-true ( if not overpowering ) 904cc desmodue, but was a lightweight handler.  This owner hasn’t belabored the cosmetics, but from the looks of the tires has used it as intended – on the wickedly technical Palomar Mountain Loop.

1999 Bimota DB4 Tri-Colore for sale on eBay

The DB4 design was no exception for Bimota, who typically stayed out of a factory mill and finagled their own intake and exhaust.  In this case they specified 38mm Mikuni carburetors instead of the factory fuel injection, and claimed 80 hp and 60 ft.-lbs. torque.  The race kit on this example includes flat-slide carbs and single muffler Corse exhaust.  A large part of Bimota’s art is in the alloy chassis, split between the sharp handling geometry and gorgeous CNC work and welding.  Premium components are also part of the story, with 43mm Paoli forks, Öhlins monoshock and generously-sized Brembo brakes.  Not sure if the Italo-centric livery was a special edition, but DB4’s are rarely seen without it.

The owner has a long-term relationship going here but doesn’t tell recent maintenance history.  From the overall condition and start-up – video – it might be best to factor in a valve adjustment, and of course tires.  The buy-it-now would be a lot easier to see if the seller had buffed this baby up a bit.  From the eBay auction:

1999 Bimota DB 4 with ” race kit “.
Kit consists light weight Corsa exhaust, flat slide carbs, and Ohlins rear shock. 
 
Will install new tires at Buy It Now price. 
Current tires a bit old but usable. See pics.
 
Overall good shape, with minor scrape on right lower due to lean angle. ( Was not down )
I removed lower when I rode it and put back on to sell.
 
Has been run on Palomar Mountain, but not a track since I have owned it.
Put about 1500 miles on it with a ride to L.A. and running Palomar. 

At the time, Bimota was struggling with their own engine in the V-Due, and needed every success, even with the air-cooled supersport engine.  The DB4 was that victory, and tided Rimini over to the SB8 superbike.  While this DB4 could use a little TLC, it’s from a less complicated time, when an lightweight 900 could carve a Supersport-sized niche in a legendary road.

-donn

Dragon West – 1999 Bimota DB4 Tri-Colore
Bimota June 29, 2020 posted by

Added Lightness: 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale

Bimota’s tried-and-true formula is on display in the exotic SB6: take a powerful Japanese lump, hang it from an innovative frame and top-quality suspension, and then wrap it in wildly futuristic bodywork. In this case, the “lump” was from Suzuki, the liquid-cooled 1074cc inline four and five-speed gearbox that powered the final iteration of their GSX-R1100. Straight-line performance increases came from the Bimota’s extreme weight loss program: the donor GSX-R weighed in at 487lbs dry, compared to the SB6’s 419lbs.

Aside from the swoopy, carbon-fiber bodywork, the most distinctive feature of the SB6 was the massive aluminum frame that was designed around Bimota’s “Straight Connection Technology” that, put simply, linked the steering head as directly as possible to the swingarm pivot. The concept was simple enough, but difficult in practice, since the improved chassis rigidity came at the expense of packaging: the thick aluminum spars block access to several critical components. This example appears to use a set of white-faced dials that look like the Veglia components used on contemporary Ducatis, but earlier bikes used the donor GSX-R1100’s dash and gauges.

Note that the seller’s description below refers to “batteries.” You’re not reading that wrong: the SB6 had two 6-volt batteries wired in series. I’m sure this made sense at the time, possibly to distribute the weight of heavy lead-acid batteries more efficiently, but is definitely a hassle now. Not to mention that I’ve heard from someone who used to work on them that the battery tray had a bad habit of falling out!

In addition, in true Lotus-ish fashion, anything not absolutely necessary was left off in the interest of saving weight. That means the exhaust is almost as self-supporting as the tail section and has a habit of cracking at the headers. Hey, do you want to be a Bimota owner or not? The SB6 was a pretty big hit for boutique Bimota: approximately 1200 of the first-generation bikes were built, although production of the later SB6R was unfortunately cut short, with just 600 produced.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale

1995 Bimota SB6. Rare, NO RESERVE  excellent condition, runs well, 15k original miles, new batteries, bike has been stored in a heated hanger, selling for senior owner that no longer rides. Clean California title, never laid down. Paint is excellent, rare color combo. Front windshield has minor scratch. Small mesh tear in rear fairing, super easy fix. We at buyers expense can ship worldwide. Questions 503-999-0790 bike has not been detailed, it will clean up very nice. Rare opportunity to acquire a iconic Bimota! These bikes are very undervalued and will do nothing but go up in value .

Bidding for this Italian exotic is up to around $4,200 at the time of writing. Recent examples I’m aware of have sold for shockingly low figures, although I don’t imagine that will last forever. These are relatively simple, compared to modern motorcycles, and parts to keep the Suzuki engine easy to source, but keep in mind that these low-production exotics were a bit fragile. In addition, although they embodied sound engineering concepts, they didn’t always work as well on the road as they did on paper and had a bit of a shed-built reputation in terms of build quality. None of that would deter me from buying one, but I’ve always .

-tad

Added Lightness: 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale
Bimota May 10, 2020 posted by

Phoenix Rising – 1994 Bimota DB2

Looks like this one found a buyer outside of eBay, but so rare it’s still worth a peek…  -donn

Bimota DB2’s make only an occasional appearance on RSBFS, expected with total production of just over 400.  The Tricolore is much more rare, and this rejuvenated example is in particularly nice shape.

1994 Bimota DB2 for sale on eBay

Bimota’s second cooperation with Ducati used their 904cc desmodue, good for 86 air-cooled hp.  Showing their usual fabrication skills, Rimini whipped up a lovely chrom-moly lattice frame and similar swingarm.  Nothing if not light, the chassis helped the DB2 stay under 375 lbs. dry.  Generously sized 320mm Brembo brakes seem to fill the 17-inch front wheel, hung in 41mm Paoli forks.  Out back the Öhlins shock does it without a complex linkage, relying on a progressive rate spring for control as forces increase.  Fiberglass fairings revealed more than the DB1, and kept things easy to get to plus light.

Sounds like this DB2 was on ice for a while and returned to service last fall.  The tail tidy looks good and retains most of the protection from the swingarm-mounted fender.  Not so sure about the lack of turn signals but they should be easy enough to replace if the new owner desires.  New master cylinders for brakes and clutch are a nice touch.  I’m almost thinking repaint but there’s no comment on such in the eBay auction:

Properly stored (fluids drained, cylinders fogged, etc.) here in the dry desert in Phoenix since 2013. This past fall, I decided to go through it and get it ready for our winter riding season. I had new timing belts installed and a valve adjustment performed by the well-known Tom Hull Ducati (Tom is a former Ducati race mechanic). I had Tom pull the top end for inspection and he replaced one intake valve and guide and pronounced everything else in top shape. I did a compression check once all was back together and my gauge says 160psi in both cylinders so very good compression. I also replaced the rear master cylinder with a stock Brembo unit as the old unit was in need of a rebuild, and it wasn’t much more to just buy a new one. Brake and clutch fluids are new (lines flushed) and a complete oil and filter change performed. Carbs were rebuilt with new diaphragms, needles, seats, etc. I also installed a new battery. Then I ruptured a disc in my back and have been unable to ride the bike comfortably since, so it’s time for it to go.  

The bike is mostly stock with a few tasteful and functional upgrades. These include radial Brembo master cylinders for the clutch and front brake along with billet reservoirs and Kevlar lines. The engine was treated to a vented clutch cover and carbon timing belt covers. Bimota offered carbon mufflers as an upgrade option, and I believe this bike came with them from the factory (they were there when I got it). Rear view mirrors were replaced with carbon look ones (a pair of stock ones that I sourced are included) and the rear fender/license plate assembly was replaced with a rear fender eliminator “kit” (both done before my ownership). The front and rear turn signals had also been removed but the wiring and connectors for them are still there if you want to add some back (I do not have the originals). 

The bike comes with its original Bimota keys for ignition, gas cap and seat lock. It also comes with its Bimota tool kit, Factory Owner’s Manual and factory rear stand (with both original thru pin and beautiful custom stainless side pins. I have copies of the original service and parts manuals for the bike as well. I also have a few spares including an extra headlight, an extra new K&N oil filter, and some miscellaneous bits and pieces. 

As with all Bimotas that are actually ridden, there is some minor spider webbing around some of the fastener points. There is also a small crack in the gelcoat next to the gas cap, but it is not structural and does not go through the fiberglass. (It got dinged when I had the tank/seat cover unit off for service.) If I were to keep it, I would replace the tires as they are the same ones it came with when I bought it some years ago. Other than that, the bike is “press the button, ready to go” and currently registered here in Arizona. It looks great and runs better! 

Early Bimotas are being snatched up now that there’s a ( green ) way forward, and seller references a 2016 DB2 auction which brought $17K and Bonham’s website confirms.  More important, you can ride this DB2, any worthy Ducati indy can work on it, and parts availability should only improve.  Reviewers praised the light weight, available torque, and rake of 23.5 degrees which made it a quick handler ( and required a steering damper ).  If the condition checks out it looks to be a very rare and nicely maintained winner.

-donn

 

Phoenix Rising – 1994 Bimota DB2
Bimota April 27, 2020 posted by

Hangar Queen – 2000 Bimota SB8R with just 1,560 miles !

Bimota’s SB8R combined Suzuki TL1000 power with a hybrid alloy/carbon chassis, and presented the company with a WSBK win in 2000.  This example was parked in an aircraft hangar for many years but shows none the worse for it.

2000 Bimota SB8R for sale on eBay

Bimota saw the potential in Suzuki’s liter twin and worked their now-typical magic of better handling and lighter weight.  The 996cc mill is canted slightly further forward and equipped with Marelli fuel injection and 59mm throttle bodies.  Along with Bimota’s own exhaust, the package rates 134 hp.  The chassis uses carbon frame connectors and alloy spars, with a self-supporting carbon seat console.  After Paoli 46mm forks were installed in an adjustable headstock, Bimota found room for a more conventional Öhlins shock on the right side of the engine, with a healthy linkage.  Weight was below 400 lbs. dry, and despite the bulbous looks from the front was quite narrow.

Back in a corner behind the King Air or turbine single ( looks like it’s in a real toy shop now ) this Bimota waited for a break in the action that came too late.  Still it was protected from the elements, and shows like a virtually new bike.  The all metal cam drive could deal with the waiting, but all new expendables will be required.  After a thorough going over, the next owner will have real time machine.  Details from the eBay auction:

Stored in a private collection the last 10 years, 1,560 miles from new, $7k in upgrades including Arrow carbon fiber exhaust system, many billet pieces, upgrades to fuel system, new battery, workshop manual, factory cover, we have factory exhaust. Receipts for all upgrades. Bike sounds incredible. When first bought no expense was spared to make this Bimota supersonic and address any factory issues, many racing spec parts were sourced and installed. Look over the receipts for specifics. Bike has sat in a hanger for 10 years – it’s not detailed it will clean up as new.

Bimota dialed in every target where the TL-1000R had missed the mark, though it cost just about double.  Racing helped the road bike, as the exhaust was re-designed after endurance race failures.  The new owner will have to peek around the big carbon fresh air ducts until the thumbs memorize the switchgear, but big torque will make pulling out to pass a memorable experience.

-donn

Hangar Queen – 2000 Bimota SB8R with just 1,560 miles !
Bimota April 19, 2020 posted by

Brooklyn Charmer – 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera with 5,516 Miles !

As the sun gets ready to shine on another riding season in the northeast, a nice example of a liter Bimota has become available.  Looks like this YB11 has undergone a careful riding restoration over the past few years.

1997 Bimota YB11 for sale on eBay

Bimota took a shine to Yamaha’s twenty-valve 1000 early on, and had a nice success with the YB6 and YB8.  With Bimota’s airbox and exhaust, the new ThunderAce engine was good for 145 hp and had a fueled weight in the mid-400’s.  The chassis was twin alloy beams connected with some of the nicest CNC machinings anywhere, with outsized 51mm Paoli forks with accompanying monoshock.  Brembo supplied their typically excellent 320mm brakes, and the exhaust on this example has been updated to an Arrow.

This owner caught the Bimota bug a few years ago, and went through their YB11 with an eye on the future.  The fuel system was refreshed from the filter to carburetors, and the forks got new seals.  The glass bodywork was reinforced and re-finished, and my favorite mod of replacing every appropriate fastener with stainless ensures that service will be easier next time.  From the eBay auction:

Summary of maintenance/upgrades

  • Paioli forks fully serviced
  • Fairing restored and ALL screw holes strengthened with Carbon Fiber backing to prevent future spider cracks
  • All original screws are replaced with hi grade Pro-Bolt Black stainless steel and 318 grade Stainless steel bolts
  • New Spark plugs
  • Carburetors rebuilt and Dynojet Stage 1 kit installed
  • New Fuel filter
  • New Fuel Pump
  • Rear turn signals replaced with sleek and super bright LED blinkers
  • Radiator replaced
  • New Radiator cap
  • New water pump
  • New OEM Yamaha hoses
  • Spiegler Steel Braided brake and clutch lines replaced original rubber lines
  • New brake pads
  • New brake/clutch reservoirs with billet covers
  • Beautiful billet levers with larger range of adjustments replaced original cheap levers
  • Bikes comes with both rear seat cowl and the rear seat
  • Arrows CF Exhaust

The YB11 reviewed as responsive for a big Yamaha, and almost cushy for a Bimota.  This one has been updated and maintained for the long haul, or a brilliant long weekend.  Just plan extra time for a little Q&A at every stop.

-donn

Brooklyn Charmer – 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera with 5,516 Miles !
Bimota March 13, 2020 posted by

Extra, EXTRA Exclusive: 1984 Bimota SB4S for Sale

This Bimota SB4S is the epitome of an Italian exotic: long, low, lean, and fast, stuffed full of the best componentry and radical thinking available at the time. Imagine it sitting next to nearly any other early 1980s machine and it’s almost like a MotoGP bike just dropped by your local bike night. Note the one-piece tank and tail section attached by just a few fasteners to help simplify maintenance, the quick-release axles, high-spec suspension, eccentric chain adjuster, and lightweight 16″ wheels that were fitted with then-rare radial tires. Most SB4s used modular units similar to Honda’s Comstar wheels, but this example is fitted with beautiful Campagnolo hoops.

Bimota’s reputation was built around their race-inspired frames, and the SB4’s is no exception. The chrome-moly trellis unit with machined aluminum side-plates is a gorgeous piece of engineering, once the lightweight bodywork is removed, and wrapped around the utterly massive 1074cc powerplant borrowed from Suzuki’s GSX1100. Air-cooled, with four valves per cylinder and Suzuki’s Twin Swirl Combustion Chamber technology, it was left largely stock in this application because the main performance advantage of the SB4 came from a reduction in weight: the Bimota came in at a claimed 405lbs, 130lbs less than the 535lb GSX1100!

Significantly, the SB4 was available with both three-quarter and full fairings. Looks are subjective, but the three-quarter design is probably the better bet if you plan to regularly use your Bimota: the full fairing apparently traps lots of heat, and the air-cooled mill has a hard time managing the resulting elevated temperatures. That being said, this example has 15,000 miles on the odometer, so previous owners have either ridden it fast enough to keep temps down, or spent a lot of time rolling it around their garages…

I’ve seen a number of different directional indicators, or even no indicators fitted to the SB4. I’m assuming that none were originally included, because Italy, but different solutions were found to suit the requirements of different markets. These flush indicators seem to work as well as any, and are a damn sight less obnoxious than the DOT-approved bits fitted to many later motorcycles. I’d fit some bar-end signals and get rid of these barnacle-looking things, but that might just be me.

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Bimota SB4S for Sale

1984 Bimota SB4S, 1 of only 34 produced

Bimota’s significant reputation was forged in the creation of fast, exclusive motorcycles oozing with Italian style. That reputation began in the 1970s when founders Giuseppe Morri and Massimo Tamburini shifted their successful heating and ventilation firm’s focus to that of their passion – motorcycles. 

Japan’s offerings of the time often consisted of a wonderfully smooth, powerful engine mounted in a frame of limited performance. Moto Martin of France, Bakker of Holland, and Harris and Spondon of England, all saw the potential of these engines. But Bimota exploited the situation with Italian flair, building exotic, exclusive, innovative machines in very limited numbers. Technical innovation too has long been a Bimota hallmark, as exemplified by the hub centre-steered Tesi models, while on the world’s racetracks Bimota-framed machines have won hundreds of races and numerous championships. 

Utilizing the Suzuki GSX1100 powerplant, the Bimota SB4 was priced at approximately $11,000, making it one of the world’s most expensive motorcycles. And one of the most exclusive with only 272 built, 34 of which were the even-more-exclusive SB4S models with full fairing. And one of these SB4S is on offer here. In perfectly original condition, the bike has covered a little more than 15,000 miles from new. Having been on static display for several years, the bike was recently re-commissioned and serviced, and now starts easily and rides perfectly. Brakes work well and all electrical systems function as they should.

This is a perfect opportunity to add an exclusive, very limited production Italian exotic with the ease of ownership and outright power and pace of a Japanese superbike.

For further information, video of the bike running, and additional photos, please visit ClassicAvenue.com

The SB4S is extremely rare, rare enough it’s hard to find actual pictures of one. Just 34 were built, and I’m not sure how consistent they were in terms of specifications. It supposedly differs from the “regular” SB4 with its four-into-one exhaust, oil-cooler, and other details. This example has the standard dual exhaust, and I can’t tell if there’s an oil-cooler hiding behind the full fairing. I’m also curious about the adapters that apparently allow larger, four-piston front brake calipers to be fitted. They appear to be a period-correct update, so I’d love to know more: did the bike come this way from Bimota? Was it modified when new? We’ve featured this particular bike a couple times in the past, but this is a heavily revised listing with much nicer photos, so it seemed a good time to revisit it. The seller is asking $21,900 this time around, so maybe the third time is the charm?

-tad

Extra, EXTRA Exclusive: 1984 Bimota SB4S for Sale