Posts by Category: Bimota

Bimota August 16, 2019 posted by

Thoroughly Italian: 1986 Bimota DB1 for Sale

The DB1 wasn’t Bimota’s first bike, but it perfectly embodies the company’s philosophy of taking a well-developed engine from an outside manufacturer and putting it into a package that was lighter, sleeker, and better-handling. That wasn’t really all that difficult to do when you’re looking at beasts like the Suzuki GSX1100: just take the good stuff and ditch the rest, then replace it with better, stronger, lighter components. But Ducati’s bikes were already a good bit lighter and more agile to begin with. They had to be, with smaller engines and fewer cylinders.

The DB1 was Bimota’s first Ducati-powered model, and used the two-valve, air and oil-cooled Pantah engine that included a pair of toothed rubber belts to drive the single overhead cams. The arrangement that was still pretty unusual at the time, since most bikes were still using traditional chains in 1985. A 352lb dry weight was claimed, which is pretty outrageously light for a sportbike of the era. Marzocchi suspension meant the light, compact machine would handle and 16″ wheels at both ends that exaggerated the already large front brakes to nearly pie-plate dimensions that were clamped by four-piston Brembo calipers.

Bimotas are famously hard to work on, with the frames so closely wrapped around the mechanicals to save weight, centralize mass, and improve aerodynamics: everything is optimized for performance. The SB3 actually had a frame that unbolted and separated into two sections to free the drivetrain for servicing! Jokes about Italian reliability aside, every single motorcycle will need regular servicing, and removing the fairings of a sportbike is often needlessly tedious. But they make up for that by at least being easy to strip clean of bodywork. Note that the entire tank cover and tail section is just one piece, held in place by just a few fasteners!

So was it really better than the Ducati F1 that donated its engine and five-speed transmission? Probably not, unless you were going racing. As with more modern Bimotas, it was much more expensive with minimal benefits for the average rider, compared to the donor bikes. But the DB1 was impossibly compact and futuristic, with the incredible detailing that Bimota has always been known for. I particularly love the brake and clutch reservoirs incorporated into the tops of the fork tubes.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Bimota DB1 for Sale

1986 Bimota DB1, 5 miles AS New, Very rare-one of 400

First Ducati powered Bimota.

This spectacular DB1 has 5 miles from new, these miles could be factory dyno or road test miles as the bike is new and in brand new condition. Everything is original and untouched, bike has always been in heated storage and shows almost no signs of aging.

This DB1 is nearly flawless, the only flaws I could find is a slight rub mark on the rear of the solo cowl near the tail light (see pic). Second flaw is a super small green paint dot on top of the solo cowl (see pic), this looks like a factory flaw. Other than that the bike is perfect and new.

I am the second owner.

For an indication or reference of value see last picture. That bike had mileage and has been slightly restored. 

This bike is number 203 of 400 produced.

There are no bids yet at the $25,000 opening bid, and there’s a long way to go before the $32,000 asking price. The original listing includes an ad from Bimota Spirit for a similar bike with price of $29,000 and it appears the seller is assuming or hoping that the much lower mileage of his bike will bring a higher price. Unfortunately, although bikes like the DB1 and the original Tesi are rare and desirable, Bimota values in general have remained pretty flat and it looks like the seller may be jumping the gun here slightly, given the overall lack of interest.

-tad

Thoroughly Italian: 1986 Bimota DB1 for Sale
Bimota August 7, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Zero-mile 1997 Bimota VDue time capsule

CMG Motorcycles has two motorcycles on RSBFS right now, a 0 mile VDue and a brand new Bimota Tesi! Check them both out! -dc

There is no more tantalizing bike on the planet for me than the Bimota VDue. A bespoke Italian chassis from the finest boutique bike maker on the planet, draped with exotic suspension and prodigious brakes with fuel injection, the waistline of a ballerina and 110 or so two-stroke horsepower. A dream machine for the ages, it was supposed to kick Bimota into a new market segment in a cloud of sweet-smelling blue smoke. Instead, the dream went up like a Persian Gulf oil field and took the iconic nameplate down with it. 

Bad power delivery, seizing pistons, oil leaks plagued the first couple hundred VDues, and most owners returned them. Fixing the issues, which meant sticking carburetors on and invalidating the bikes for street use, ruined Bimota’s finances. Eventually, an engineer on the team that put the idea together bought the leftovers and fixed them. He sold about 120 that put out more than 120 street-legal two-stroke ponies, but by that point the toothpaste was out of the tube. 

This 1997 Bimota VDue never experienced any of those issues, because it has racked up exactly zero miles in its 22-year life. It is a literal museum piece in absolutely flawless cosmetic condition. Given the likelihood that its mechanicals are absolutely useless, both by design and from sitting, this thing is perfect for a collector who needs the finishing touch on a prestigious collection. 

Having never moved under its own power, it wears its original tires, which are now shiny from sitting around vulcanizing for a couple decades. But that’s no matter. When else will you get the chance to own a bike that is original and untouched down to the protective film on the windscreen? The thing we love most is that this bike is in its best state: an unblemished embodiment of bold vision and faith in engineering. It deserves to stay that way.

It is available in Christchurch, New Zealand for $48,990 USD and requests and inquiries can be sent to Brad by email  – here –.

Featured Listing: Zero-mile 1997 Bimota VDue time capsule
Bimota August 7, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1991 Bimota Tesi 1D

CMG Motorcycles has two motorcycles on RSBFS right now, a 0 mile VDue and a brand new Bimota Tesi! Check them both out! -dc

1990 saw the designer who succeeded founder Massimo Tamburini depart, and a new engineer arrive. Pierluigi Marconi presented a clean sheet design with inherent anti-dive and the 904cc Ducati desmoquatro. This piece of Bimota history is offered with zero miles and ready to display.

Inside the Omega-shaped alloy frame, the water cooled L-twin pumped 113 hp via a six-speed transmission and chain drive.  Outside the frame were two similar swingarms, with hub-center steering in front, suspension and steering mechanically separate, and brakes could be applied without drastically affecting the tire loading and balance.  Typical Bimota appointments included top Marzocchi dampers and Brembo brakes.  Peculiar looking when bare, the Tesi 1D has a not-so-unusual monoposto fairing and riding position.

Coming from the client side of a New Zealand multi-line dealer, this Tesi has been on display since new.  For a fan, it seems like too many appear without even break-in miles, but an unridden creampuff is great for the buyer.  Transport from Oceana will have to be considered by the new owner, but is worth the effort in this case.

With all the CNC machined parts and pull-rod controls, the Tesi was expensive to build and many prospective buyers couldn’t accept the radical looks.  Only a few hundred were built and many had just a short ride before retirement.  And though two successive generations were introduced in the 2000’s, the 1D Tesi makes the original statement.  CMG Motorcycles asks $43,990 USD for this example, and requests inquiries be sent to Brad by email  – here –.

-donn

Featured Listing – 1991 Bimota Tesi 1D
Bimota July 22, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1998 Bimota SB6R for Sale

Update 8.23.2019: This bike has sold to an RSBFS reader! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

I’m unreasonably fond of the Bimota SB6R, making me possibly the very best or the very worst person at RSBFS to write up this particular Featured Listing. It’s hard to explain why. It’s not the prettiest bike of the era, but somehow the bulbous styling and classic graphics and general Bimota weirdness and current low prices just make it an object of lust for me. This example was originally posted here back in 2016 when it was for sale by the previous owner (for a considerably higher price), and now the current owner wants to pass it along to a new home.

Bikes of the era represent “peak Bimota” to me: earlier machines offered perhaps more of a racing pedigree and later bikes are more refined, but the big, bruising SB6 and YB11, the fabulous but temperamental V Due, the original Tesi, even the classic DB2 all epitomize the handbuilt, race-inspired engineering that exemplifies the brand, even if inconsistent build quality and impractical construction made them frustrating to own. What do I mean? Well the formula for the SB6R was simple: take the honking big inline four from the GSX-R1100 that weighed in at nearly 550lbs full of fluids and put it into a machine weighing in almost 100lbs less. That naturally required the body and frame to be virtually shrink-wrapped around the powertrain, and that led to issues with access when servicing them.

Luckily, that engine is pretty easy to take care of, once you gain access, and the bodywork is made up of very few pieces, making it relatively simple to strip it down. You still have to work around that massive aluminum beam frame, but at least you can admire its industrial beauty while you try to adjust the carburetors… The rest of the bike is as trick as you’d expect from a Bimota: the lowers on the right-way-up Paioli forks were carbon fiber and the fully-adjustable Öhlins shock was tucked in alongside the engine, with the remote adjuster slung underneath.

With supposedly just 600 made, you probably haven’t seen one in person. I’d always loved the front but felt the tail was a bit awkward, but finally seeing one in the flesh changed my mind completely. From the pictures, this one appears to be in very nice cosmetic condition. The miles are now pretty much what they were on the bike back then, which is the only real issue here: it’s largely been sitting as part of a collection, so it will need to be gone-through if you plan to use it on the road. Or on the track, if you’re that kind of lunatic.

From the Seller: 1998 Bimota SB6R for Sale

I have a ’98 Bimota SB6R that I’d like to sell. I bought the bike from a friend who owned Austin Vintage Cycles. He bought it at the Mecum Jan. 2016 auction and has divested his interest in AVC. As such, he sold me the Bimota and a bunch of Ducati Bevel stuff. So neither of us have much info on the bike. However, I recently spoke with the previous owner who took it to Mecum. It was part of a 15 bike collection of interesting bikes all having low mileage in common. He told me he rode the bike once or twice, in 2014 or 2015 and it was ”very fast’’. He had the tank drained prior to the auction but couldn’t remember if the float bowls were drained; I’m guessing not. I’m not sure whether there’s a battery in the bike but it’s certainly dead if it’s there. The bike will therefore need a fairly extensive “going over” before being ready to ride, most likely including new tires. Currently, the bike and title are at the former site of AVC in Leander TX, just north of Austin. We will facilitate shipping with Federal, who we’ve used extensively and are comfortable with them.

  • Frame & Engine Numbers Matching: ZESSB6009WR000010
  • Only 2,505 Original Miles
  • Original Red Paint and Bimota Badges & Decals
  • Carbon Fiber Fairing Inserts and Wheel Covers (Front & Rear)
  • 5-Speed Transmission with Chain Drive
  • Electric Start with White Gauge Cluster (tachometer & speedometer)
  • Liquid Cooled 1,074cc Engine
  • Four Stroke, Transverse Four Cylinder w/DOHC (4 valves per cylinder)
  • Paoli suspension, Brembo brakes, Marchesini wheels
  • *156 bHP with 174 Top Speed (per Bimota)
  • *29.7 Seat Height and 419 lbs Dry Weight (per Bimota)

All lights and electronics work perfectly. There are blinkers and a mirrors installed so it will easily pass vehicle inspection in Texas.

Price: $8,000 $7,500

The seller is asking $7,500 for the bike, with reasonable offers considered. Obviously, it’s going to need a bit of servicing to get it running, but that’s honestly pretty common when you’re looking at a bike this old. In the plus column, it’s a Suzuki GSX-R1100 motor, so getting parts to make it roadworthy should be dead easy. In the minus column, that Suzuki motor is in a Bimota, which means that installing those parts could be a bit tricky. At the end of the day, the cosmetic condition appears to be excellent, which should be the primary concern for anyone looking to buy a Bimota, since those parts can be difficult and expensive to obtain. I love the SB6R, so hopefully the right person will pick this one up and get it running!

-tad

Featured Listing: 1998 Bimota SB6R for Sale
Bimota July 9, 2019 posted by

Classic Looks, [Nearly] Modern Performance: 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

Superleggera means “super light” in Italian, and has been applied to everything from aluminum-bodied Ferraris to modern Ducatis. For the time, the Bimota YB11 offered pretty outrageous performance, compared to mass-produced open-class superbikes. In the YB11’s case, the claimed 403lbs dry is on par with something like a modern superbike, with a bit less power. Actually, performance should be right in line with something like a Yamaha MT10, which means it’s no slouch even by modern standards and shockingly fast for a bike that’s now 22 years old.

Like nearly all Bimotas, the YB11 was powered by an existing engine from an outside supplier. In this case, the 1002cc five-valve Yamaha Genesis inline four from the YZF1000, with airbox and exhaust tweaks to up the power just a bit from 145 to 150 claimed horses. The bike uses right-way-up forks, but they’re massive 51mm Paioli units with carbon-fiber lowers, and Bimota’s signature aluminum beam frame features gorgeous machined details.

As mentioned in our previous post, it appears that the six-speed gear cluster of a YZF750R does fit within the YZF1000’s cases, making it a pretty straightforward upgrade. As fast as it was, plenty of reviews bemoan the lack of a top cog: it doesn’t really need one, the bike just seems to want one. Since Bimotas use relatively ordinary engines and transmissions for motivation, it seems like that kind of modification would be well within the spirit of

As with other Bimotas the bodywork is lightweight and consists of just a few panels. The entire tail section and tank shroud is a single piece, which is obviously great when you need to strip one for maintenance, not so great if you have a minor crash. The riding position is pretty weird, with a long, stretched out reach to the bars, and pegs set uncomfortably high. I’d imagine there’s room for improvement in both areas if you plan to use one on the street and want to play around with adjustable bars and rearsets, although finding parts to fit could be a hassle.

Interestingly, many YB11s came fitted with a passenger pad and footrests, making it one of just a handful of Bimotas that can handle date-night duties. Of course, “superleggera” construction would suggest an aluminum subframe instead of steel to support the weight of an additional person, but apparently the super-light setup was strong enough. For better or for worse, this one lacks those pillion accommodations. That’s probably academic, since almost nobody actually uses passenger seats on uncomfortable exotic Italian superbikes, but it’s always nice to have the option.

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Bimota YB11 for Sale

Up for sale is my 1997 Bimota YB11 from my collection and it is in pristine condition and is listed with an astonishing 2850 miles (yes you read that right). The bike has always stored indoors for 22 years but that a full refresh has already been completed (details below).

Bimota produced only 600 example of this fabulous creation. Named the ‘Superleggera, or Super-light, the YB11 was a tiny 183kg, a full 15kg lighter than the Yamaha YZF1000R from whence came the 11’s engine. 

The Superleggera was spoilt in many way; a sophisticated Paioli rear shock developed specifically to suit Bimota’s new swing-arm design. Paioli also supplied the lightweight carbon-fibre front forks. Although the Thunderace Yamaha engine was unchanged internally, Bimota incorporated a larger ram-air box that together with their four-into-on exhaust and reworked carbys did increase horsepower to up around 150. The Superleggera achieved a power to weight ratio that no mass-produced bike could match.

  • Bimota
  • 407 lbs
  • 150 HP at 10,200 rpm
  • 20 Valve 1000 cc inline 4 from a Yamaha YZF1000R
  • Larger airbag and exhaust system from Bimota
  • High performance suspension
  • 600 Units produced world wide
  • 87 in the Unites States
  • $30,000 MSRP in 1996
  • Key included

Refresh details

  • Flushed brakes, add stainless steel braided brake lines, rebuilt rear master cylinders
  • Lubed and adjusted throttle and clutch cables
  • Flushed cooling system
  • Torqued and checked all chassis fittings and fasteners,  check/tighten steering head bearings,
  • Replaced shock chain
  • Replaced battery, NGK spark plugs, 
  • Performed compression check and full tune, including clean and synch carbs, flush fuel tank and add 1 gallon bath metal rust remover, replace petcock assembly (leaking).  

Added engine top-end oiling kit from Daughtry Motorsports (early VF1000’s were reported to suffer top end oiling deficiency and this kit addresses that fully).  Includes oil filter with adapter for top-end oiling kit.

Replaced original tires (old and cracked) with brand new Bridgestone Battlax BT45’s.  Went to 150/70/17 rear (stock was 140) and 120/80/16 front (stock size).

Not sure where the customer got those tire sizes, since the YB11 wore very ordinary 180/55-17 and 120/70-17 tires at the rear and front, respectively. Considering he also mentions “early VF1000s” I’m assuming he’s mixed up the text from a couple different bikes he’s posting on eBay. Regardless, this looks to be in very good, original condition, with low miles. I’m still shocked that there’s virtually no interest in these bikes, but that can’t last forever, so grab one now!

-tad

Classic Looks, [Nearly] Modern Performance: 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale
Bimota June 22, 2019 posted by

A Better Italian Twin? 2000 Bimota SB8R for Sale

Update 6.20.2019: We last saw this bike in March of 2018 and bidding ended just shy of $10k. It’s back on eBay with a buy-it-now of $17,875. Links updated. -dc

Ducati has come a long way in terms of service costs and reliability. The four-valve Bologna twins have always offered good power and a bulging midrange, sure. But you really had to pay for it in the era of the 916. These days, 15,000 mile intervals between major services help keep costs down and the bikes on the road instead of in the shop but, back in the late 1990s, if you wanted a sports v-twin you could ride every weekend, you were probably looking at something like the Suzuki TL1000R. The duck-billed styling may not have appealed to everyone, the bike was a bit porky, and handling was a bit variable, owing to the rotary damper, but the engine was powerful, flexible, and made the right thumpy big-twin noises with a set of aftermarket cans fitted. That fact wasn’t lost on Bimota when they went looking to build the SB8R their own v-twin superbike, although I’d bet it was more likely that Ducati wasn’t interested in selling them any 4V twins, since I doubt Bimota was really worried much about reliability and cost…

Of course, for a while there, it seemed like the liquid-cooled, four valve, 996cc Suzuki v-twin was the small-block Chevy of the era, since it was used by Suzuki, Cagiva, and Bimota, and probably even a few others I’ve forgotten, and got stuffed into everything from sportbikes to roadsters to sport-touring bikes. Backed by a six-speed gearbox, the 138hp engine was plenty powerful and very reliable, especially compared to the charismatic, but sometimes temperamental Ducati unit. The biggest issues with the TL1000S and TL1000R were their slight weight problem and the packaging problem “solved” by an innovative but underdeveloped rotary rear damper that had a tendency to overheat and stop damping, leading to the lethal reputation of the earlier TL-S.

Bimota solved both problems. Reducing weight was pretty simple, since that’s always been Bimota’s thing anyway. It helped that the rear subframe didn’t need to be engineered with a passenger in mind, and the bike was otherwise liberally sprinkled with lightweight materials. Of course, their other thing has always been frames, and this one is deserving of the Bimota name: it’s an exotic composite unit, assembled from aluminum beam and carbon fiber elements for maximum strength and minimum weight. That new frame allowed a traditional shock to sit alongside the engine, like a Panigale, and solved the packaging issues. Styling is… different. One of the trademarks of a sports v-twin is the overall narrowness of the package, a result of having only two pistons. Sure, one of them is usually thrashing away at 4,000 feet-per-minute, pointed at your crotch, but that’s a small price to pay for for torque, aerodynamics, and character. But somehow the SB8R is positively bulbous, although it does make much better use of the original Suzuki headlamp. It’s a good-looking bike, but those intake tubes that snake over the tank from their inlets at the top edge of the fairing completely block your view of the controls, so new riders may fumble around a bit and errantly honk, cancel turn-signals, or shut the bike off until they memorize their location.

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Bimota SB8R for Sale

Limited-production track ready motorcycle. #3 of around 150 produced total. Aluminum & carbon fiber frame. 1,000cc engine producing 135hp and 5 speed manual transmission. 3,245 miles shown, but the title is mileage exempt

“1,000cc engine producing 135hp and 5 speed manual transmission. Revs kinda high on the freeway, but it’s Italian!” Obviously, this is a dealer reselling the bike, but you think they could at least get the basics right… Anyway, aside from the fact that we’re apparently missing a gear in the gearbox, it’s mostly what you’d expect from a 3,245 mile bike, and includes a set of Arrow carbon cans, along with a few anodized accessories of dubious taste. The broken turn signals are a bit of a concern, since they appear mismatched, are non-standard, and could easily have been repaired before posting the bike up. It’s a minor issue, but it suggests that maybe this bike isn’t quite as carefully preserved as it appears. Bidding is up just north of $7,000 with another day left on the auction. Mid to late 90s Bimotas are currently at a low ebb in terms of value, so if you aren’t afraid to buy a bike that might need a bit of attention to turn it into something that really performs as it should have straight from the factory, or if you’re just looking for some very cool garage jewelry on the the [relatively] cheap, now is the time to buy.

-tad

A Better Italian Twin? 2000 Bimota SB8R for Sale
Bimota June 19, 2019 posted by

10/10: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci

This 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci is back on eBay after it didn’t sell a couple of months ago. We wrote about it then, but figured we’d take another crack at it now that it’s back. When the Dieci bowed, it represented the culmination of a 10-bike collaborative effort between the Rimini firm and Yamaha, a feat the Italians celebrated with a bike that was way more than the sum of its parts.

1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for sale on eBay

By the early ‘90s, Bimota’s Japanese engine-bespoke chassis-classy suspension formula was well-established, and the Dieci employed it to textbook effect. The Yamaha FZR1000 engine was massaged by Bimota to knock on the door of 150 horsepower, and was cradled in a proprietary beam frame and suspended by fancy Marzocchi bits front and rear. It was slowed by 320mm front and 230mm rear discs. Dry weight was under 420 pounds.

Despite the terrifying numbers, the Dieci was known for being almost as comfortable and easy to live with as it was stupidly fast. For the pleasure, you had to be extremely well-heeled, as Bimota built just 225 over a three-year run and commanded the price of a nice car for the privilege.

This one sets itself apart as it has just 1.3 miles on the analog odometer, which likely means it has only been fired to move it around a parking lot. Past that, it has sat untouched in a collection. As you would expect, it is as close to flawless as a 28-year-old bike gets.

From the eBay listing:

Up for bid is a 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci – Rare 1 of only 224 made– Never Registered Zero Miles! This gorgeous Super-bike is part of a collection of fine motorcycles at Formula One Motor Sports in Oakdale New York.

Bimota’s are well known for their Italian style, class and over the top engineering. It has a one piece billet machined frame paired with a Yamaha FZR1000 motor,and seamless upper fairing it also comes with billet triple, classic style wheels!

The Bimota Dieci not offers Italian Style but you get the reliability of a Japanese Motorbike. Don’t miss out on a chance to bid on this museum quality bike it is a must have for any collector.

Also for sale 1948 Indian Chief, (2) 1942 WLA Army Bikes, 1987 XLCR, 1987 Moto Guzzi Lemans, Daytona Race Winner Ducati Bevel Head, 1995 Z1 Kawasaki, 1935 Royal Enfield, 1953 BSA-B33 and a brand new 1992 Harley Davidson Dyna Daytona Anniversary Edition 0 Miles,Ducati 851’s, F1’s, Troy Corsers (ferraci) winning 888 superbike, Superlites, Old Triumphs, Aprilla 1000’s + 50 Late model Harleys +200 Japanese Bikes, Scott Rusells 1992 Muzzy Super Bike (The one that won Daytona on 1992). Please come see it for yourself call Jack (917) 642-3152

The Buy-It-Now for this beast is set far below what even a ratty Honda RC30 commands these days, which is something of a steal, given how rare and special these bikes are.

10/10: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci
Bimota June 16, 2019 posted by

Air Male – 2008 Bimota DB5R

Happy Father’s Day to all once and future Dads !

Emerging from the shadows of bankruptcy, Bimota introduced a supersport based on Ducati’s air cooled dual-spark engine, penned by Tamburrini disciple Sergio Robbiano.  This second generation DB5R has the 1078cc engine, premium appointments, and an exciting and award-winning design.

2008 Bimota DB5R for sale on eBay

The core of the DB5R is Ducati’s 1078cc L-twin, with Marelli fuel injection tuned for Bimota’s exhaust good for 95 hp and a nice 76 ft.-lbs. torque.  The lines of the chro-moly trellis frame echo through the seat sub-frame and fabricated swingarm.  Frame connectors show off Bimota’s CNC machining as the bodywork and accessories showcase their carbon fiber technique.  Premium Öhlins and Brembo components complete the luxurious but sporty picture.

Straight out of Silicon Valley, this DB5R is engaging even with the signs of a minor low side, the seat console more easily corrected than the scratched engine case.  Not many miles but the new owner might be in for belts and tires.  The aftermarket mirrors aren’t a bad match but stock would be my choice, plus a little reflector-ectomy.  The first order of business would be more pictures.  Comments from the eBay auction:

Original owner, bought from Scuderia West SF ( no longer sells Bimota but they can service it ) and original cost was around 40K.

It’s a beautiful and great winding road machine, but selling it as I don’t have much time to ride, and feel sorry for the machine.

Only rode casually around the Saratoga Mountain.

4046.8 Miles

Ducati 1100DS engine ( any Ducati shop can service it )

Updated with STM slipper clutch, Carbon mirrors ( so you can see the back )

‘DB5R’ number plate

Minor scratches on tail cover and engine cover. Repaired areas on edge of tail cover.

‘Service Required’ indicator always on ( the dealer could not figure out how to turn it off )

Comes with the owner’s manual, racing stand, and a battery tender.

The DB5R reviewed as a fine handler even if the dual-spark 1100 wasn’t too exotic.  A pair of tank pads might be in order, as the winged tank was maybe a little too skinny for a good grip.  Each Bimota model has its place on the peacock – rhinoceros spectrum, and the DB5R seems to be right in the middle, with a very together design built on a modern but uncomplicated powertrain.  With just a few hundred sprinkled over the globe each year, you won’t see yourself coming and going.  Just right to ride to the bike show, collect a ribbon, and ride home.

-donn

Air Male – 2008 Bimota DB5R