Posts by Category: Bimota

Bimota May 10, 2020 posted by

Phoenix Rising – 1994 Bimota DB2

Looks like this one found a buyer outside of eBay, but so rare it’s still worth a peek…  -donn

Bimota DB2’s make only an occasional appearance on RSBFS, expected with total production of just over 400.  The Tricolore is much more rare, and this rejuvenated example is in particularly nice shape.

1994 Bimota DB2 for sale on eBay

Bimota’s second cooperation with Ducati used their 904cc desmodue, good for 86 air-cooled hp.  Showing their usual fabrication skills, Rimini whipped up a lovely chrom-moly lattice frame and similar swingarm.  Nothing if not light, the chassis helped the DB2 stay under 375 lbs. dry.  Generously sized 320mm Brembo brakes seem to fill the 17-inch front wheel, hung in 41mm Paoli forks.  Out back the Öhlins shock does it without a complex linkage, relying on a progressive rate spring for control as forces increase.  Fiberglass fairings revealed more than the DB1, and kept things easy to get to plus light.

Sounds like this DB2 was on ice for a while and returned to service last fall.  The tail tidy looks good and retains most of the protection from the swingarm-mounted fender.  Not so sure about the lack of turn signals but they should be easy enough to replace if the new owner desires.  New master cylinders for brakes and clutch are a nice touch.  I’m almost thinking repaint but there’s no comment on such in the eBay auction:

Properly stored (fluids drained, cylinders fogged, etc.) here in the dry desert in Phoenix since 2013. This past fall, I decided to go through it and get it ready for our winter riding season. I had new timing belts installed and a valve adjustment performed by the well-known Tom Hull Ducati (Tom is a former Ducati race mechanic). I had Tom pull the top end for inspection and he replaced one intake valve and guide and pronounced everything else in top shape. I did a compression check once all was back together and my gauge says 160psi in both cylinders so very good compression. I also replaced the rear master cylinder with a stock Brembo unit as the old unit was in need of a rebuild, and it wasn’t much more to just buy a new one. Brake and clutch fluids are new (lines flushed) and a complete oil and filter change performed. Carbs were rebuilt with new diaphragms, needles, seats, etc. I also installed a new battery. Then I ruptured a disc in my back and have been unable to ride the bike comfortably since, so it’s time for it to go.  

The bike is mostly stock with a few tasteful and functional upgrades. These include radial Brembo master cylinders for the clutch and front brake along with billet reservoirs and Kevlar lines. The engine was treated to a vented clutch cover and carbon timing belt covers. Bimota offered carbon mufflers as an upgrade option, and I believe this bike came with them from the factory (they were there when I got it). Rear view mirrors were replaced with carbon look ones (a pair of stock ones that I sourced are included) and the rear fender/license plate assembly was replaced with a rear fender eliminator “kit” (both done before my ownership). The front and rear turn signals had also been removed but the wiring and connectors for them are still there if you want to add some back (I do not have the originals). 

The bike comes with its original Bimota keys for ignition, gas cap and seat lock. It also comes with its Bimota tool kit, Factory Owner’s Manual and factory rear stand (with both original thru pin and beautiful custom stainless side pins. I have copies of the original service and parts manuals for the bike as well. I also have a few spares including an extra headlight, an extra new K&N oil filter, and some miscellaneous bits and pieces. 

As with all Bimotas that are actually ridden, there is some minor spider webbing around some of the fastener points. There is also a small crack in the gelcoat next to the gas cap, but it is not structural and does not go through the fiberglass. (It got dinged when I had the tank/seat cover unit off for service.) If I were to keep it, I would replace the tires as they are the same ones it came with when I bought it some years ago. Other than that, the bike is “press the button, ready to go” and currently registered here in Arizona. It looks great and runs better! 

Early Bimotas are being snatched up now that there’s a ( green ) way forward, and seller references a 2016 DB2 auction which brought $17K and Bonham’s website confirms.  More important, you can ride this DB2, any worthy Ducati indy can work on it, and parts availability should only improve.  Reviewers praised the light weight, available torque, and rake of 23.5 degrees which made it a quick handler ( and required a steering damper ).  If the condition checks out it looks to be a very rare and nicely maintained winner.

-donn

 

Phoenix Rising – 1994 Bimota DB2
Bimota April 27, 2020 posted by

Hangar Queen – 2000 Bimota SB8R with just 1,560 miles !

Bimota’s SB8R combined Suzuki TL1000 power with a hybrid alloy/carbon chassis, and presented the company with a WSBK win in 2000.  This example was parked in an aircraft hangar for many years but shows none the worse for it.

2000 Bimota SB8R for sale on eBay

Bimota saw the potential in Suzuki’s liter twin and worked their now-typical magic of better handling and lighter weight.  The 996cc mill is canted slightly further forward and equipped with Marelli fuel injection and 59mm throttle bodies.  Along with Bimota’s own exhaust, the package rates 134 hp.  The chassis uses carbon frame connectors and alloy spars, with a self-supporting carbon seat console.  After Paoli 46mm forks were installed in an adjustable headstock, Bimota found room for a more conventional Öhlins shock on the right side of the engine, with a healthy linkage.  Weight was below 400 lbs. dry, and despite the bulbous looks from the front was quite narrow.

Back in a corner behind the King Air or turbine single ( looks like it’s in a real toy shop now ) this Bimota waited for a break in the action that came too late.  Still it was protected from the elements, and shows like a virtually new bike.  The all metal cam drive could deal with the waiting, but all new expendables will be required.  After a thorough going over, the next owner will have real time machine.  Details from the eBay auction:

Stored in a private collection the last 10 years, 1,560 miles from new, $7k in upgrades including Arrow carbon fiber exhaust system, many billet pieces, upgrades to fuel system, new battery, workshop manual, factory cover, we have factory exhaust. Receipts for all upgrades. Bike sounds incredible. When first bought no expense was spared to make this Bimota supersonic and address any factory issues, many racing spec parts were sourced and installed. Look over the receipts for specifics. Bike has sat in a hanger for 10 years – it’s not detailed it will clean up as new.

Bimota dialed in every target where the TL-1000R had missed the mark, though it cost just about double.  Racing helped the road bike, as the exhaust was re-designed after endurance race failures.  The new owner will have to peek around the big carbon fresh air ducts until the thumbs memorize the switchgear, but big torque will make pulling out to pass a memorable experience.

-donn

Hangar Queen – 2000 Bimota SB8R with just 1,560 miles !
Bimota April 19, 2020 posted by

Brooklyn Charmer – 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera with 5,516 Miles !

As the sun gets ready to shine on another riding season in the northeast, a nice example of a liter Bimota has become available.  Looks like this YB11 has undergone a careful riding restoration over the past few years.

1997 Bimota YB11 for sale on eBay

Bimota took a shine to Yamaha’s twenty-valve 1000 early on, and had a nice success with the YB6 and YB8.  With Bimota’s airbox and exhaust, the new ThunderAce engine was good for 145 hp and had a fueled weight in the mid-400’s.  The chassis was twin alloy beams connected with some of the nicest CNC machinings anywhere, with outsized 51mm Paoli forks with accompanying monoshock.  Brembo supplied their typically excellent 320mm brakes, and the exhaust on this example has been updated to an Arrow.

This owner caught the Bimota bug a few years ago, and went through their YB11 with an eye on the future.  The fuel system was refreshed from the filter to carburetors, and the forks got new seals.  The glass bodywork was reinforced and re-finished, and my favorite mod of replacing every appropriate fastener with stainless ensures that service will be easier next time.  From the eBay auction:

Summary of maintenance/upgrades

  • Paioli forks fully serviced
  • Fairing restored and ALL screw holes strengthened with Carbon Fiber backing to prevent future spider cracks
  • All original screws are replaced with hi grade Pro-Bolt Black stainless steel and 318 grade Stainless steel bolts
  • New Spark plugs
  • Carburetors rebuilt and Dynojet Stage 1 kit installed
  • New Fuel filter
  • New Fuel Pump
  • Rear turn signals replaced with sleek and super bright LED blinkers
  • Radiator replaced
  • New Radiator cap
  • New water pump
  • New OEM Yamaha hoses
  • Spiegler Steel Braided brake and clutch lines replaced original rubber lines
  • New brake pads
  • New brake/clutch reservoirs with billet covers
  • Beautiful billet levers with larger range of adjustments replaced original cheap levers
  • Bikes comes with both rear seat cowl and the rear seat
  • Arrows CF Exhaust

The YB11 reviewed as responsive for a big Yamaha, and almost cushy for a Bimota.  This one has been updated and maintained for the long haul, or a brilliant long weekend.  Just plan extra time for a little Q&A at every stop.

-donn

Brooklyn Charmer – 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera with 5,516 Miles !
Bimota March 13, 2020 posted by

Extra, EXTRA Exclusive: 1984 Bimota SB4S for Sale

This Bimota SB4S is the epitome of an Italian exotic: long, low, lean, and fast, stuffed full of the best componentry and radical thinking available at the time. Imagine it sitting next to nearly any other early 1980s machine and it’s almost like a MotoGP bike just dropped by your local bike night. Note the one-piece tank and tail section attached by just a few fasteners to help simplify maintenance, the quick-release axles, high-spec suspension, eccentric chain adjuster, and lightweight 16″ wheels that were fitted with then-rare radial tires. Most SB4s used modular units similar to Honda’s Comstar wheels, but this example is fitted with beautiful Campagnolo hoops.

Bimota’s reputation was built around their race-inspired frames, and the SB4’s is no exception. The chrome-moly trellis unit with machined aluminum side-plates is a gorgeous piece of engineering, once the lightweight bodywork is removed, and wrapped around the utterly massive 1074cc powerplant borrowed from Suzuki’s GSX1100. Air-cooled, with four valves per cylinder and Suzuki’s Twin Swirl Combustion Chamber technology, it was left largely stock in this application because the main performance advantage of the SB4 came from a reduction in weight: the Bimota came in at a claimed 405lbs, 130lbs less than the 535lb GSX1100!

Significantly, the SB4 was available with both three-quarter and full fairings. Looks are subjective, but the three-quarter design is probably the better bet if you plan to regularly use your Bimota: the full fairing apparently traps lots of heat, and the air-cooled mill has a hard time managing the resulting elevated temperatures. That being said, this example has 15,000 miles on the odometer, so previous owners have either ridden it fast enough to keep temps down, or spent a lot of time rolling it around their garages…

I’ve seen a number of different directional indicators, or even no indicators fitted to the SB4. I’m assuming that none were originally included, because Italy, but different solutions were found to suit the requirements of different markets. These flush indicators seem to work as well as any, and are a damn sight less obnoxious than the DOT-approved bits fitted to many later motorcycles. I’d fit some bar-end signals and get rid of these barnacle-looking things, but that might just be me.

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Bimota SB4S for Sale

1984 Bimota SB4S, 1 of only 34 produced

Bimota’s significant reputation was forged in the creation of fast, exclusive motorcycles oozing with Italian style. That reputation began in the 1970s when founders Giuseppe Morri and Massimo Tamburini shifted their successful heating and ventilation firm’s focus to that of their passion – motorcycles. 

Japan’s offerings of the time often consisted of a wonderfully smooth, powerful engine mounted in a frame of limited performance. Moto Martin of France, Bakker of Holland, and Harris and Spondon of England, all saw the potential of these engines. But Bimota exploited the situation with Italian flair, building exotic, exclusive, innovative machines in very limited numbers. Technical innovation too has long been a Bimota hallmark, as exemplified by the hub centre-steered Tesi models, while on the world’s racetracks Bimota-framed machines have won hundreds of races and numerous championships. 

Utilizing the Suzuki GSX1100 powerplant, the Bimota SB4 was priced at approximately $11,000, making it one of the world’s most expensive motorcycles. And one of the most exclusive with only 272 built, 34 of which were the even-more-exclusive SB4S models with full fairing. And one of these SB4S is on offer here. In perfectly original condition, the bike has covered a little more than 15,000 miles from new. Having been on static display for several years, the bike was recently re-commissioned and serviced, and now starts easily and rides perfectly. Brakes work well and all electrical systems function as they should.

This is a perfect opportunity to add an exclusive, very limited production Italian exotic with the ease of ownership and outright power and pace of a Japanese superbike.

For further information, video of the bike running, and additional photos, please visit ClassicAvenue.com

The SB4S is extremely rare, rare enough it’s hard to find actual pictures of one. Just 34 were built, and I’m not sure how consistent they were in terms of specifications. It supposedly differs from the “regular” SB4 with its four-into-one exhaust, oil-cooler, and other details. This example has the standard dual exhaust, and I can’t tell if there’s an oil-cooler hiding behind the full fairing. I’m also curious about the adapters that apparently allow larger, four-piston front brake calipers to be fitted. They appear to be a period-correct update, so I’d love to know more: did the bike come this way from Bimota? Was it modified when new? We’ve featured this particular bike a couple times in the past, but this is a heavily revised listing with much nicer photos, so it seemed a good time to revisit it. The seller is asking $21,900 this time around, so maybe the third time is the charm?

-tad

Extra, EXTRA Exclusive: 1984 Bimota SB4S for Sale
Bimota March 9, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: Bimota YB11 Superleggera

Update 3.12.2020: This bike has SOLD in 3 days! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Bimota has had a long standing history of offering up sublime rocket ships crafted with ingenuity and Italian flair. Throughout the years Bimotas have been powered my many different engine combinations, including all of the Japanese Big Four. Of those, the Yamaha YB series just might be the most interesting on offer, spanning 250cc through 1200cc variants. Today’s Featured Listing is a YB11 Superleggera, the last in the YB line of Bimotas and motivated by Yamaha YZF1000R Thunderace power.

Featured Listing: Bimota YB11 Superleggera

In Italian Superleggera literally translates to Super Light – which is pretty descriptive of the YB11. A full 30+ pounds lighter than the Thunderace that donated it’s guts, the YB11 tips the scales at well neigh 400 pounds. And although the YZF1000R mill remains in stock form, Bimota claims the larger airbox (with cold air intake) and modified exhaust provide more than the 145 HP stated by Yamaha. Light weight and big horsepower has always been the recipe for going fast – in a straight line. But if you know anything at all about Bimota, you will know that cornering is where the Rimini madmen excel. Utilizing a stout perimeter frame that efficiently ties in the steering head with the rear swing arm pivot, the aluminum chassis on the YB11 is as beautiful as it is effective. This is actually an evolution of the chassis developed for the YB6, but made more rigid in key locations to aid in stability. Substantial 51mm conventional forks anchor the front end, while a Paioli shock tunes out the bumps fed through the sculpted swing arm.

From the seller:
Thank you for looking at my 1996 Bimota YB11. If you are looking for one in mint condition, that’s completely stock, this is the one. It has less than 2000 original miles, never down, abused, it the rain, cold, pollen you name it. It’s had a very sheltered life in a temperature-controlled garage, hooked up to a battery tender, with Stabil mixed in the fuel. In 1986 Bimota’s were much more than just eye candy, make no mistake the detail along with fit and finish are amazing to look at. However, YB11’s weighed substantially less and produced more power than the Yamaha R1 it’s derived from, making it an all around better performer.

I’m a sixty-year-old collector that is very particular, I’m told that I treat my bikes better than I treat myself. I looked for this one for a long time as I wanted one as close to new as possible. It’s amazing for a thirty-four-year-old bike. The only imperfection anywhere are a couple of very small chips on the left side of the swing are, see pictures. Other than these it’s museum quality, ready to be ridden or collected. If the new owner wanted to ride it I would suggest cleaning the carburetors as even though it has Stabile in the fuel ethanol still gums things up. I would also put on new tires as they are original. Other than that it’s ready to ride, no leaks, issues, fire right up. If it were to be put in a collection, I’d drain the fuel, take out the battery, fog the engine and put it away.

The only reason I’m selling it is over time I find myself only riding on the track, rarely on the street. I’m happy to answer any questions you may have. As I’m thinning the herd I am not interested in any trades. Scott

Asking Price: $9,750.

Detail accents abound on this bike. Stare at any one picture long enough, and you will start to see what I mean. The frame side plates are CNC milled in a jeweled fashion. Cap screws replace traditional fasteners and provide an upscale appearance. The rear wheel adjuster is a classic slider, but implemented so cleanly that it is noteworthy. The carbon accents on the fork mesh nicely with the carbon front mudguard, which contains aerodynamic elements to aid in brake cooling. And all this is with the bodywork on. Undress a Bimota and be prepared to be amazed by the concept of mass centralization and packaging.

Yamaha-powered Bimotas are currently the bargain of the hand built exclusive super bike set. These bikes offer bulletproof Yamaha 20-valve motors and transmissions, exquisite handling thanks to light weight, good suspension and top-shelf Brembos, and the cachet of exclusivity that comes from being only 1 of 600-ish examples ever made worldwide. This particular YB11 SuperLeggera shows less than 2,000 miles and looks absolutely top-notch. The pricing is right in the ballpark for YB11s, if not a tad low for the condition and miles. Check it out, and then give Scott a shout – with Bimota being acquired by Kawasaki these amazing Yamaha-powered models are likely to never come around again. Good Luck!!

Featured Listing: Bimota YB11 Superleggera
Bimota February 28, 2020 posted by

A fork in the road: 1992 Bimota Tesi 1D 904

One of the most interesting and promising areas of modern motorcycle development has been with suspension systems. At the rear, bikes went from hard tail to twin shocks, and then stagnated for decades until the rising rate single shock came to vogue – as it continues today. The front of the motorcycle has explored a variety of suspension systems, with the telescoping fork emerging in the 1930s and remaining as the dominant suspension mechanism to this day. However the fork is not without issue, as it simultaneously must handle vertical loads, as well as thrust vectors under braking and lateral movements imparted by the road surface to the tire – all while remaining lightweight enough to offer manageable steering. That is a lot to ask from a piece of hardware, and designers developed the hub-center steering mechanism as the motorcycling future’s new mousetrap. Offering the ability to isolate individual loads to specific components and pathways, the front swing arm is (on paper) a superior solution to the problem at hand. Unfortunately, it has utterly failed to capture the marketplace, making examples such as this unfired, zero mile 1992 Bimota Tesi 1D a rare find.

1992 Bimota Tesi 1D 904 for sale on eBay

There have been several attempts to commercialize the alternate front end. BMW tried the hardest with their telelever and duolever equipped bikes, but have moved back to conventional forks for many models. Yamaha adapted the Radd-Parker design to the weighty GTS (which remains a hidden gem), but it failed to sell and was quickly discontinued. Part of the problem is that the complexity and weight introduced by the alternate front suspension components did not offer any real life performance gains over the humble front fork. They also required innovative chassis changes, which are very evident in the “C” section frame on this bike. Bimota toyed with a variety of designs over the years in the Tesi series, but all were low production and very expensive bikes best suited to the collector. Today’s example is just that – a collector.

From the seller:
Anyone who is seriously looking at buying a Bimota Tesi 1D-904 for their bike collection will know what is on offer here and how rare it is. Add to that the NOS condition and you have a very unique opportunity.

This is Bimota’s earliest limited-to-20-bikes high performance edition of the Tesi. It is new, it has never been started and it has never had its hydraulic systems filled. The protective yellow-zinc plating is still as new on all 3 Brembo cast iron rotors. The bike has always been stored in a UV-free, climate controlled environment, resulting the excellent condition of all its individual parts to this day, including the paintwork, exposed metal surfaces and of course all the rubber and plastic components.

Clear Arizona title, based on the original Bimota MCO (also called MSO) and of course stating zero miles. Complete history since it was delivered new by the factory and a copy of the Arizona title are available on request to seriously interested parties.

From the seller:
According to the Vin this is the very first of the 20 Bimota Tesi 1D-904‘s built, the rarest of all Tesi 1D bikes. Its drivetrain is based on Ducati’s 888 SP engine with the volume upped to 904cc via a longer stroke crankshaft. These 904cc engines were specifically build and tuned by Ducati and provided to Bimota with their own Engine number sequence including the Bimota logo. In street trim this model produced around 115 h.p. and with the race components approximately 137 h.p. was possible. A couple of these 1D-904s were raced in Italian privateers racing series in the early 1990-ies.

This Tesi has 0 Miles and was specifically set up when new for long term storage and display. It has never been started and has always been used as a show piece in a comprehensive classic bike collection. Original Pirelli Dragon Slick racing tyres, comprehensive original Tesi specific toolkit, owners manual, keys with fobs, workshop manual, parts manual plus the super rare extra NOS Weber-Marelli racing electronics and a Km/h as well as an mph dash board come with the bike. The correct early Bimota rear stand are also included.

While the Tesi 1D is rare and the hub steering is a big story, let’s not overlook the fact that this is essentially a brand new Bimota Tesi 1D 904. For although technically this bike is 28 years old, it was pickled when new, wears NO miles and has never been titled, started, ridden or dropped. It is likely that this is a bike that will never run in anger which is a shame, but on the other hand there are so few perfect examples of rare models today it is nice to know that some will survive for future viewers. If you are in a place to offer this amazing piece of rolling artwork a suitable throne room equal to its status, check out the auction here. Get ready to raid your rainy night fund, the kids’ college saving plans, borrow against your 401k, cash in your bitcoin or go rob a bank – because at nearly $50k iconic perfection does not come cheaply. What is your favorite funny front end motorycle? Is it a Tesi? Let us know in the comments. Good Luck!!

MI

A fork in the road:  1992 Bimota Tesi 1D 904
Bimota February 3, 2020 posted by

Shogun in an Italian suit: 2000 Bimota SB8R

Taking Italian suspension, style and bespoke build quality know-how and shoving it full of deadnuts-reliable and prodigious power from the other side of the Atlantic, or in this case the Pacific, is a time-honored tradition. In the ’60s, the likes of Bizzarrini and Iso executed the formula to devastating effect in cars. But Bimota ported the practice over to bikes with racing success to back it up.

2000 Bimota SB8R for sale on eBay

In this case, the Italians hung a handbuilt frame and handmade carbon fiber bodywork around a Suzuki TL1000R engine, then threw Paioli springy bits at it to give it Bimota’s signature refinement. Before they were done, Bimota tweaked the big v-twin to push out just south of 140 horsepower at the crank. The result was a piece of industrial art that was made for race tracks but was almost too pretty to ride in anger.

This one, located at Speedart in Miami, Florida, has covered just 5,100 miles, and has been kept the way you’d expect for a collector’s piece of this caliber. There isn’t a surface on it that you’d be scared to eat off of. This one has a Power Commander III that was added by the second owner, which after a tune settled down some of the fueling issues these bikes can have thanks to those massive throttle bodies. It also wears a very stylish Arrow exhaust.

From the eBay listing:

Vehicle Description
Chassis No: ZESSB8R02YR000013

Odometer: 5,105 Miles

Engine: 996cc Four Stroke, V-Twin 8-valve, Liquid Cooled DOHC

Transmission: 6-Speed Gearbox

Performance: 135 bhp @ 9,750 rpm / 77 lb-ft – 0-60 mph 3.1 sec / 170 mph

Exterior: Competition Red/White

Interior: N/A

About This Motorcycle
“The first thing you notice about the SB8R is the striking exotic looks, thanks to passionate Italian design, hand-built craftsmanship, and the advanced, for its time, use of carbon fibre.”

The name Bimota is derived from the first two letters of the names of the three founders, Bianchi, Morri, and Tamburini.

Massimo Tamburini crashed his Honda 750 at the Misano race course in 1972, breaking three ribs. Finding himself with time on his hands while recovering, he designed and constructed a tubular steel frame that would eliminate the flex and handling problems that plagued the high horsepower machines of all the large Japanese manufacturers. Bimota’s first model, the HB1, was the result of his work and vision.

Only ten of them were produced, starting when the company was formed in 1973. In the early years Bimota produced mainly racing frames, then began manufacturing complete high performance machines as well as ones in “kit” form. When the now legendary KB1 was developed, the company was assured of commercial success. Bimota continued to be at the very leading edge of extremely high performance motorcycle design throughout the 80’s, 90’s and into the new millennia on both the track and the street.

Now more than forty five years after the firm’s founding, Bimotas of any era are sought after throughout the world because of their beauty, technological superiority and exclusivity.

The SB8R was the first production bike to use carbon fibre in the frame. There is plenty more additional carbon fibre elements, including the unusual but effective air intake system integrated into the front fairing, tail assembly and more. Bimota used engines from other manufacturers and constructed their own frame and body work to give it less weight and improved handling over the “donor bike”.

The Bimota SB8R uses a Suzuki TL-1000 motor, with Bimota’s own fuel and exhuast system that resulted in 135 hp. The motor and special designed rear suspension give the bike perfect balance resulting in a machine that is a joy to ride.

Even though the SB8R was designed for the track, most owners (true in the case of this motorbike), used them sparingly, riding on nice days, and the occasional bike show. This Bimota has only 5,100 miles after 16 years of ownership.

From the total of 150 hand-built examples spanning a two year period only 69 SB8Rs were exported into the US. It is questionable of how many are still in this pristine and original condition. Upon a closer examination it is easy to attest to the claims that it’s never been tipped over or any evidence of track time.

Speedart Motorsports is pleased to present this time capsule original SB8R in the configuration it left the factory in Rimini with a couple of small modifications in order to improve the ownership experience.

The light switch was modified so the headlight can be turned off, foot-pegs were replaced with European fixed position pegs, and the fueling system was modified to make it more rideable in street configuration.The fairings have original paint, carbon fiber parts have no cracks, all lights, turn-signals are original and working, tires have little wear, although they are at least 2 years old, so may want to consider replacing.Shocks don’t show signs of needing seals, engine has no leaks, runs great, once it warms up (these are cold-blooded beasts). Brakes have plenty of wear left, recommend oil change for the engine, something I intended to do, but haven’t made time.

This bike was purchased new from Ducati Bellevue on 3/2/2002. The 1st owner was a local Seattle aerospace engineer who rarely rode the bike. The last owner purchased the bike on 2015 prior to Speedart Motorsports acquiring the Bimota.

The 1st owner made only one modification to this machine. His one mod was having a custom fuel trimmer or potentiometer made to work with the existing wiring harness. These bikes were known to have fueling issues due to the massive throttle bodies and this is where the potentiometer helps out. Unfortunately the potentiometer is old technology and the adjustment range was limited. The second owner installed a PCIII that was tuned by Nels at 2 Wheel Dyno Works in Woodinville, WA.

PCIII was installed by second owner to permanently wash out some of the fueling issues that was typical of the SB8R model and its huge throttle bodies. This bike accelerates easier through the rev range than before. The fuel trimmer that had been installed by the first owner was only finite and could not adjust or reach some of these issues in the rev range. This modification alone makes it rideable even in heavy traffic.

As previously mentioned, the first owner added an out-of-production Evoluzione SB8R fuel trimmer provided by a Bimota enthusiast in Colorado. This unit is more precisely calibrated with nearly infinite settings between 0 and 999. The Bimota trimmer has 8 positions total.

The Arrow exhaust on the bike has been cored for better performance and sound. The result is outstanding in that it essentially replicates full racing pipes with much better performance and sound.

The stock tank on these SB8R’s is an Acerbis tank. The tank that’s currently installed on the bike was sealed and lined by Russ Foy in late 2014 to prevent any tank expansion. Furthermore braided steel clutch and brake lines were fitted in lieu of the stock rubber.

The sale of this race bred super bike is accompanied by owner manuals, service books and two keys.

The fortunate new owner will receive a galore of unobtainium spare parts worth thousands of dollars and who are no longer available. Such spares include, composite full fairing skins that can be painted with the desired livery suitable for racing, extra monoposto seat, additional OEM Acerbis Tank, OEM full exhaust system with silencers, lithium battery charger, rear pit stand and more, making this acquisition the ultimate SB8R package.

Disclaimer
Whilst Speedart Motorsports, LLC. (“We”) make a sincere effort to contain information that is accurate and complete, we are aware that errors and omissions may occur. We are not able therefore, to guarantee the accuracy of that information and we do not accept liability for loss or damage arising from misleading information or for any reliance on which you may place on the information contained in this website. We highly recommend that you examine the vehicle to check the accuracy of the information supplied. If you have any queries with regard to any information on our website, please contact us at . This disclaimer does not affect your statutory rights.

The buy-it-now for this beast is set at $23,000, and there are just a couple days left on the listing. With few owners in its history and one very carefully done modification, this thing is ready to make its third owner very happy.

Shogun in an Italian suit: 2000 Bimota SB8R
Bimota November 30, 2019 posted by

Underappreciated: 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

This Bimota YB11 Superleggera isn’t just a sportbike, or even an exotic sportbike. It’s a high-performance boutique motorcycle, one of just 650 ever built. Of course, that’s pretty much mass production by Bimota standards. It doesn’t have quite the cachet of Honda’s limited-production homologation superbikes, but consider that Honda made almost 5,000 Honda RC30s, compared to just 650 YB11s. It’s still incredibly rare and plenty fast and, as a bonus, you can take your significant other with you on your high-performance boutique motorcycle: this was one of very few Bimotas ever built with passenger accommodations, although they’re about as comfortable as you’d expect. Still, it’s great to have that spare seat, in case of emergencies…

The “Superleggera” part of Bimota YB11 Superleggera refers to the focus on lightweight construction that allowed huge performance from an existing engine, along with the agile handling you’d expect. At the time, the bike weighed 403lbs dry, a full 80lbs less than the Yamaha YZF1000R that donated its 1002cc five-valve Genesis engine and five-speed transmission. Power was rated at 145hp, with an impressive 80lb-ft of torque that allowed the five-speed box to be fitted to the open-class superbike in the first place, a characteristic it shared with Suzuki’s rival GSX-R1100. The light weight and power were enough to push the bike to nearly 170mph. All the way back in 1997.

Somehow, because of their hand-built nature and flaws, it doesn’t seem all that criminal to modify or improve Bimota’s 1990s motorcycles if it helps sort some of their more annoying quirks: a YZF750R six-speed can replace the original five-speed found in the YB11, and I’m sure somebody can figure out how to fit a stand-alone fuel-injection system to replace the carburetors. This example luckily has the earlier gauges that should hopefully prove more reliable than the later style, while looking better to boot.

It can be tricky to tell if we’ve posted a particular YB11 on the site previously: they all came in the same colors, have low miles, and are generally well cared-for. It’s even trickier when the seller refers to the bike as both a 1997 and a 1998 and appears to have “borrowed” some content from RSBFS in their description… Other than the occasional Termignoni system, aftermarket exhausts and accessories are virtually unheard of, and bolt-on farkles are generally considered undesirable. There appear to have been a few different exhaust hangers used, with and without passenger pegs, although it’s also possible those were fabbed up by the owners when new.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

One of only 650 produced

1998 Bimota 1,002cc YB11 Superleggera 

Frame no. ZESYB1100TR00047

A Rimini-based manufacturer of ducting for heating and ventilation, Bimota soon turned to their first love of motorcycles. Founders Guiseppe Morri and Massimo Tamburrini began manufacturing in the early 1970s and have since built a reputation of exclusive and limited with inimitable Italian styling machines of performance. Using the best cycle parts and an array of the best outside manufacturers’ powerplants, the Bimota was always an uncompromised and expensive foray in to exclusive motorcycling. 

Powered by Yamaha’s superb Thunderace engine, the Superleggera YB11 was Bimota’s last word in Italian exotica of the 1990s. The 131bhp ‘four’ in stock form breathed through a Bimota-designed exhaust system, which could squeeze out a little more power. It was shrouded by the firm’s trademark aluminum beam frame and complemented by some of the finest cycle parts available, including fully adjustable Paioli 51mm forks, fully adjustable Paioli shock, Brembo brakes, 17” Antera wheels and carbon fiber-abound. At 403lbs, the YB11 Superleggera weighed some 80lbs less than the donor bike and its handling and performance were in a different league altogether; as was the price, which at about $20,000, was a staggering 50% more than the Yamaha.

In the late 1990s Bimota went through one of its periodic financial convulsions and production of the YB11 ended in 1999, although a second batch of bikes was completed later using stocks of existing parts. 

The bike offered, an early 1997 example, the 46th built, is presented in excellent condition throughout. With an indicated 8,700 miles, racked up in the first decade of use, the bike has been on static display since 2007, though regularly maintained. A fresh service was performed to ready the bike for sale and no back-fees are due to a California buyer, as the last registration was due over ten years ago.

With only 650 machines produced, this represents a perfect combination of Italian exotica, Japanese reliability, ease of maintenance and power and with such qualifications, is bound to be a future classic.

For additional information, photos, etc. please visit ClassicAvenue.com

Look, the Bimota YB11 is a flawed motorcycle. And maybe the flaws would be unacceptable in a bike that originally sold for the equivalent of $47,000 in today’s money, but they don’t cost that much currently: this one is being offered at $9,900. That seems to be a little bit on the high-side for a 90s Bimota currently, although I doubt that will still be the case in the future. For that kind of money, you’re getting a hell of a lot of exclusivity and performance that will still peel your face back, even today.

-tad

Underappreciated: 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale