Posts by Category: Honda

Honda April 8, 2021 posted by

Gen. 2 – 1997 Honda CBR900RR FireBlade

Mid-1990’s Honda heard footsteps and made a major update to the CBR900RR, keeping weight in check with a healthy power increase.  Here’s a Tennessee survivor that has been somebody’s baby.

1997 Honda CBR900RR for sale on eBay

One millimeter increase in bore gave the new FireBlade 918cc’s, and a claimed 80 percent new engine resulted in 130 hp.  38mm constant velocity carbs from Keihin remained, and the first four gears moved around a bit ratio-wise.   The chassis kept most dimensions but was made lighter but more rigid, leading to reviews of a solid ride.  Magnesium valve covers and lightweight alternator helped keep the pounds in check.  House forks and monoshock had internal improvements, and a noticeable rise in the bars and seat height gave riders a lighter feel.

This CBR has a light 13,414 miles and shows very well, with only one apparent blemish, maybe a trailering mishap.  Sounds like a comprehensive service was done last year, and it has new Battlaxes and newly cleaned fuel system.  Except for the exhaust, mods are hard to see.  Details from the eBay auction:

A few weeks ago I had new tires put on this bike. (Bridgestone Battlax S21 Hypersport )

Last week this bike went to Honda and had the entire fuel system cleaned including carbs. ($1,200)

I change the oil every other year and last year performed a full tune up including:

– OEM spark plugs
– OEM oil/filter
– OEM coolant
– Motul RFB brake fluid
– Ballistic EVO2 Lithium battery
– OEM choke, clutch, throttle cables

This bike has the many custom accessories including:

– Two Brothers can with fiberglass insulation wrap on the exhaust
– Stage 1 jet kit
– BMC air filter
– Custom undertail
– Galfer steel braided brake lines
– Tinted windscreen
– Valentine One Radar detector wiring with remote screen (wiring and remote screen only – radar detector is being sold with another bike)
– The brake calipers have been powercoated black

I am including the following with the purchase of this bike:

– Honda Shop Manual
– Rear stand (see pics)
– Front stand (see pics)
– Ballistic Battery Charger
– Handle bar strapping harness
– Shoei large helmet
– lots of small powder coated parts

Though its in-between engine meant it wasn’t a racebike equipped for the road, the combination of pretty good power and light weight did the FireBlade well in Formula Xtreme and Formula USA.  And won many media shootouts.  At half the cost ( or much less ) of a new sportbike, this ready-to-ride survivor might again bridge the supersport to superbike classes for a new generation, or one returning to the hobby after a long delay.

-donn

Gen. 2 – 1997 Honda CBR900RR FireBlade
Honda March 26, 2021 posted by

Performance Redefined: 1998 Honda CBR900RR

In 1992 Honda lit the world on fire with the introduction of the FireBlade. The original project was headed up by legendary designer/engineer Tadao Baba, with the design goal of reducing or removing every ounce of weight possible while also ramping up horsepower. The 900RR was to the current sport bike world what the original Suzuki GSX-R750 was during the previous decade. It redefined what a sport bike should be, sharpening all of the inputs and edges until what existed was practically a new category: the lightweight superbike. It helps to think of the FireBlade design as a scaled up 750, rather than a liter bike on a diet. Imagine adding 4 pounds and nearly 30 ponies to a CBR600F2 and you have the general idea.

1998 Honda CBR900RR for sale on eBay

From the seller:
This 98 Honda CBR900RR is in excellent condition with no signs of damage. The bike has 29K miles on it and runs great. Very strong and crazy fast! Just installed a brand new racing clutch and battery last week. Also did an oil change. The tires are both brand new. Aftermarket red C&C levers, red CBR engraved foot pegs, red chain. This bike has been very well kept. Please contact me with any questions and/or offers. Thank you!

Honda evolved the FireBlade continually during the next decade, upping the displacement and power while adhering to the hyper-light-superbike idea. Based on the year of manufacture, today’s example appears to be a 4th gen RR, making it a 919cc model (Honda continue to punch out the power plant, first to 929cc then to 954cc before debuting the 1000RR in 2000). There are not too many pictures of this bike, but the few that are posted show a clean, used bike. Legendary Honda build quality applies here, and the nearly 30k of mileage should not be a huge concern if scheduled maintenance was performed. The FireBlade was never on the collector list quite like more exclusive homologation machines, but today these are fantastic motorcycles that retain a bit of mystique. It is likely that values will appreciate in time, especially for the first-gen bikes. Check out all of the details here (such as they are) and Good Luck!!

MI

Performance Redefined: 1998 Honda CBR900RR
Honda March 17, 2021 posted by

Future Optimism: 1983 Honda CX650 Turbo

During the early 1980s, the future was a bright and amazing place to be. The world was full of optimism that technology would solve all of our problems and provide us with transportation that eclipsed the cave man cars and bikes of just a few years ago. And during this time manufacturers pulled out all of the stops to try to deliver on the promised land, including the concept of 1 liter power in a package half the size. Enter the turbocharger; all of the Big Four dabbled in the concept of atmospherically-boosted intake for better power and smaller displacement. And while all the Big Four delivered turbocharged goods, the reality was not exactly the same as the promised vision.

1983 Honda CX650 Turbo for sale on eBay

Honda offered not one but two techno sleds during this time: the original CX500 Turbo, followed by the radically remade CX650 Turbo only one year later. One year after that, the wastegate opened up and the boost party was completely over. But for those few years, Honda raised the stakes at the technological poker table to a level unmet by any other manufacturer. Utilizing the existing CX platform with a beefed up bottom end, Honda engineering computerized fuel injection and a raft of sensors to ensure that reliability was as prominent as horsepower. The Buck Rogers bodywork and paint was specific to the model, as were the multiple “Turbo” badges that festooned the final package (including the large “obruT” decal on the front of the fairing). The CX650T delivered power – and most importantly gobs of torque – just as the prophets had promised. But with that performance came complexity, weight (more than 600 lbs of it) and a high price tag. Turns out the buying public was more interested in an affordable future – and a significant number of bikes were left unsold.

From the seller:
Up for sale is a 1983 Honda CX650 Turbo. This bike was never sold by the Honda Motorcycle Company so there is NO TITLE. EBay does not have an option for “no title” so it was listed as “clean” but just to be clear there is NO TITLE for this machine. EBay does not allow a decimal point in the stated mileage category so it was listed with “2” miles, in actuality it has 2.6 miles and we show this in the photos. This bike is NEW OLD STOCK with 2.6 miles on the odometer, it has never had fuel inside the tank and has never been started.

This bike is one of 500 bikes that was donated by Honda to the Vocational trade school donation program and still has the decal showing this on the tank. It was never sold and was intended to be destroyed therefore Honda never issued a title for the bike. This bike is a true survivor in stunning condition. The only flaw I see is a small scratch in the paint on the right side tail piece by the grab bar. Total production numbers for the 1983 CX650 Turbo was 1777 worldwide. Out of the 1777 about 1025 of them were imported into the USA and only 500 were part of the vocational program through Honda.

More from the seller:
This is one of the 500, a super rare piece of Honda History. You may likely never get an opportunity to purchase a machine of this rarity or significance again in your lifetime. We obtained this bike from a museum where it was on display since 1992 after being donated to the museum by the vocational school. Before this the bike was in storage since the early ’80’s at the college, it was never used in their training program, it is an unmolested time capsule. We have the provenance documentation from the museum showing this chain of ownership and it will be conveyed to the new owner.

The sad fact is that the Honda CX650 Turbos are extremely rare today primarily because there was little interest from the buying public. Honda invested untold amounts of money to engineer a solution that did not really solve a problem that people were willing to spend money on – not when there were plenty of adequate motorcycles for less than half the cost. With little demand, Honda shut down production after only one year – and struggled to get rid of the remaining bikes. A large portion were simply donated to automotive/technical trade schools to be used as learning tools. Honda received some brand recognition, likely a significant tax deduction, AND got rid of expensive leftover inventory. These bikes were donated without title as if they had been destroyed, and were never intended to hit the road. Most of them by now have been parted out.

The valuation of Honda Turbos has definitely been on the rise, but the ascension has been gradual (to say the least). Low mile Turbos in good to excellent condition seem to have maxed out in the $10k range as of late, which is definitely an improvement to past financial performance of the model. Today’s bike, a school donated machine with fewer than 3 miles has spent its life in a museum, and looks the part (as in a never started, never ridden “new” motorcycle). In fact, it looks better than it should given its age. However in the past these “school bikes” have been the less desirable of the Honda models due to the fact that they were not intended to be titled. Perhaps being the most rare of the one-year only model will make them more popular with collectors, but we have not seen that in the past. If you have a take on this subject, please hit up the comments and share your thoughts. Regardless, the Buy It Now price is significant for a Turbo. You can check out all of the details here. Good Luck!!

MI

Future Optimism: 1983 Honda CX650 Turbo
Honda March 15, 2021 posted by

Middle Child – 2000 Honda CBR929RR

  • some lucky owner bought-it-now last night, but this CBR is still worth a look…  Donn

When the liter-bike sweepstakes heated up, Honda stuck with a small displacement increase and concentrated on weight saving and tech.  Here’s a KC example with low miles in super nice shape with a boatload of new parts.

2000 Honda CBR929RR for sale on eBay

The SC44 brought major changes, at least internally, with a more oversquare architecture, lightened hard parts and 152 hp.  Leading edge devices controlled the intake and exhaust, 50 psi fuel feeding the 40mm throttle bodies, and a trick titanium valve that tailored the size of the exhaust collector to engine speed.  Sideplates on the chassis were deleted in favor of the load bearing crankcase with a subframe to hold the swingarm and footpegs.  Inverted forks were terminated with 330mm brakes, and finally a 17-inch front wheel.  Bodywork included a triple headlight, making nighttime sorties less of a nail-biter.

Shown by the 2nd owner and friend of a FireBlade superfan, this 929 is wicked clean, and bristling with new factory components.  Maybe the RC51 wheels are lighter, but they’re all but invisible behind the brakes.  Multiple windshields and tailcones are on the list in the eBay auction:

– New Bridgestone triple compound tires 
– 2002-06 RC51 SP2 wheels powder coated gloss black w/new bearings & hardware.  These wheels look amazing on the bike!! 
– Custom HRC wheel decals 
– 520 RK Gold chain conversion with Renthal ultra light sprockets 2-up in the rear. 
– New Honda turn signal rubber stalks 
– New Honda brake pads and Core Moto stainless brake lines. 
– New Honda fuel pump 
– New Honda air filter 
– New Honda clutch & throttle cables 
– New Honda grips, levers, bar ends, and hardware. 
– New Honda rear cowl last one available super unicorn, original was scratched (2 imperfect backups included)
– New Honda windscreen last one available super unicorn + you have a zero gravity clear screen as a back up. 
– New Honda oil and filter 
– New headlight & taillight bulbs 
– Mint, stock exhaust + period correct, last available, super unicorn, Jardine bolt-on (sounds great), which is the system that factory Honda was running in superbike competition at the time. 
– Extra Honda key

Reviewers quibbled with Honda’s horsepower and weight numbers, and either way the blue R1 wasn’t coming down off its pedestal.  Competitive pricing and build quality made the CBR a safe bet, but not the winner Honda was hoping for, and engineers went right back to it and produced another update for 2002.  Almost a collectible, the CBR929RR has great potential, especially as updated and presented here.

-donn

Middle Child – 2000 Honda CBR929RR
Honda March 7, 2021 posted by

Late Comer – 1990 Honda CBR250RR

Hard to imagine Honda without a 250 in the line-up, and in any given year there might’ve been a four-stroke single, twin, inline four, plus two-stroke single and twin !  For the highest redline, go for the CBR250RR, here seen in the first year for the RR, with just 2,500-and-change miles and faithful cosmetics.

1990 Honda CBR250RR for sale on eBay

The CBR250RR was all new for 1990, though continued with the 250cc four-valve zinger, supplying 45 hp which was more determined by legislation than the 19K rpm redline.  You’d be hard pressed to fit your pinky and ring finger into one of the four Keihin carburetors, though the alloy perimeter frame looked just like the bigger CBR’s.  Suspension looked basic up front, with 37mm conventional forks, but out back the monoshock rode on an aluminum asymmetrical swingarm.  Even tire sizes increased a bit from 1989, and brakes were almost overdone for the mission, with triple cross-drilled disks – 275mm and two pistons up front.

Seeming to be privately owned, this CBR looks to be exemplary, though they come up so infrequently we’ll have to rely on our local experts on the type.  At this ask there are hardly enough pictures to justify a response, except to request more information.  Also ask about the two different odometers pictured.  Comments from the eBay auction:

If you’re looking at this you obviously know how rare these are in the US – let alone one with around 3k miles. 

This is the famous JDM CBR250RR with the 250cc inline-4 with a 19k redline. It screams like an F1 car and you’re still well within the speed limit. Great bike for learners and or advanced riders. Runs great like all Hondas.

Serious offers only as these are not being imported very often and not in this condition, let alone low mileage examples. The bike is all stock other than the rear seat (which I have for the bike) and the tank pad which is rare on these bikes. No one has molested this one!  Comes with Tyga cover.

Never offered outside the Pacific rim, the CBR250RR didn’t generate many english-language reviews, though Aussie reviewers liked what they saw in their 1996 import.  Motorcyclist looked into the subject in 2019, and came away amazed that an almost 30 year-old bike could keep pace with current small sports.  The stature of the 250RR might not suit everyone, and sometimes just learning to ride where the powerband starts at around 13,000 rpm can be a project.  Probably not any reader’s first or only Honda, this CBR is still a piece of work in its own right.

-donn

Late Comer – 1990 Honda CBR250RR
Honda March 6, 2021 posted by

Fan Favorite: 1986 Honda VF1000R

Let’s set the record straight right up front: The Honda VF1000R is not as rare as true homologation machines such as the RC30 or the RC45. It was not as hard to come by in the US as the NC30 or grey market two strokes such as the NSR250 or NSR400. Yet it still has a place on these pages as it is undeniably cool, packs a massive performance punch, and to find one in today’s condition is quite simply a treat. Interested? Read on!

1986 Honda VF1000R for sale on eBay

The VF1000R gains it’s good (if not slightly porky) looks from a long line of Honda endurance racers, and the model was meant both celebrate – as well as homologate – the gear-driven V-4 for production-based racers worldwide. The fact that the VF1000R was itself an accomplished endurance racer belies the fact that homologation never happened; the metamorphosis of the VF1000F block to accommodate gear driven cams was unusually complex – and heavy. The move to geared cams added significant weight, and the bloat did not stop there. Newly revised cylinder heads raised compression and altered the airflow into the chambers, resulting in an engine producing approximately 10 HP more than the lowly “F” model – and weighing about the same amount more.

From the seller:
Out of a Bob Weaver Collection from New York is this 1986 VF1000R classic from the past.
The was the fastest production bike of its time. This is the rare desirable 2 headlight version low VIN # and was the 23rd bike produced for this year. The pictures will state it all. This is not a clapped out old bike that you can buy for a few thousand dollars. Paint and condition is great. Most of the things you would have to mess with on an old bike has been done: New fork seals/oil, tires, brake pads, air filter, spark plugs, coolant, thermostat, brake fluids, carb rebuild, starter clutch, battery and hard to find fuel pump. Has been serviced by local dealer. Ready to ride.

This is not a beginners bike or a bike for a small person. This is big, heavy, fast bike and not for the timid.
This is a beautiful 80’s bike that is now on every sport bike collectors list and prices are climbing quickly. Get yours before its too late.

The dual-headlight VF1000R model is the last version in the line of a relatively short production run (the model launched in 1984), and really brought the Euro look to America. Remember, the early 1980s were a time that D.O.T. did not really allow two headlights on a motorcycle; by 1986 this was still a novelty. The overall livery of the bike helped to disguise some of the R model’s weight; all told you are looking at a 600+ lb sport bike. According to reviewers at the time, a lot of that weight is concentrated high up, making for some interesting riding dynamics. The seller is correct in that these are really not for the inseam or muscularly challenged. Nor is this a great first bike: With 122 HP and on tap and a 150 MPH top end, things can go wrong in a hurry.

While the VF1000R was not homologated nor offered in any sort of “Limited Edition” packaging (read: it was a mass produced Honda motorcycle), it remains relatively rare today. These were expensive in the day, and were outsold by the cheaper F model in the years they overlapped. To find one in excellent condition these days is not an every week occurrence. This particular example is far from a zero mile affair (the ad states 28K on the clocks), but does come out of a known collection. The pictures show an honest example of the breed rather than an abused rat bike. The VF1000R looks as stunning today as when it first dropped in 1984, and will continue to look great for decades to come. The Buy It Now is set at a rather high $10,750, but as these are sought after models the market may indeed go in that direction. Check out all of the details here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Fan Favorite: 1986 Honda VF1000R
Honda March 3, 2021 posted by

Class Leader – 1993 Honda CBR600F2

The second generation CBR600F2 was a giant step forward for the middleweight, with a sharp eye on the invoice’s bottom line.  This example has somehow been protected from the overuse and outdoor life of so many bargain sportbikes, with just over 12,000 miles and lovely cosmetics.

1993 Honda CBR600F2 for sale on eBay

Updates started with the engine architecture, significantly more oversquare than the F, with flatter valve angles and flow-optimised heads to claim a nice round 100 hp.  The twin-spar chassis was executed in steel tubing, holding the engine from top and rear, and containing cost.  Conventional forks had been upsized to 41mm, and the adjustable monoshock supported a Pro-Link swingarm.  Brakes were mid-sized at 276mm, with weight and yen-saving slide calipers ( dual pistons on the same side ).  Wheel sizes were also bumped up from the F, and the cast alloys were RC lookalikes.  The full fairing presented fresh if not ram air to the airbox, and was closed in the knee area, sending engine heat overboard.

Coming out of Vegas-based Eurocycle, this CBR doesn’t come with any history, but does have rarely seen turn signals, reflectors, and the tail has been tidied up just a bit.  The color saturation had me thinking re-paint, but nothing else about this bike has been updated.  A one-liner from the eBay auction:

100% FACTORY ORIGINAL AND UNDAMAGED.

The Honda 600 regularly appeared at the top of magazine review “shootouts”, and later showed up on best used bike compendiums.  With many riders thinking lighter weight and better skills, these mid-size bikes are coming into a re-newed focus.  By model number it’s not rare, but with so many run into the ground, a really nice one might be a thing.

-donn

Class Leader – 1993 Honda CBR600F2
Honda February 28, 2021 posted by

Shiny Side Up – 2003 Honda RVT1000R / RC51

Honda built the RC51 to access the displacement advantage afforded two cylinder Superbikes in the FIM World Championship, and Colin Edwards went right out and snapped it up. Here’s a lightly ridden and slightly tarted up SP2 from the mid-Atlantic area.

2003 Honda RVT1000R / RC51 for sale on eBay

Honda’s L-twin packed a real punch with 136hp, thanks to 10.8-to-1 compression and two fuel injectors looking down each 62mm intake.  Cooling air had an easier time getting to the engine bay since the water radiators were side-mounted, this also sent heated air out of the fairing.  HRC had a lot of design input on the twin spar alloy frame,  adjustable cartridge forks and Pro-Link monoshock.  Wheels and brakes are Honda’s own, 320mm front disks and light-looking 5-spoke alloys.  Form follows function on the bodywork, with room sculpted into the fuel tank for knees and bars, and the pillion all but forgotten.

This owner likes things clean, with not a mark on this RC51.  Almost got out of hand with the polishing, but the chainguard and heel guards are easily returned to stock , not so sure those are the factory wheels though.  No list is provided, but evident are a two-into-one exhaust, Corbin seat, adjustable levers, tinted Zero Gravity windscreen, new tires, low profile front turn signals, and rear turn signals in the tail light.  Just a comment or two from the eBay auction:

The bike has 9,317 miles on it. Runs strong with no problems.

RC51 has stock sprockets, heavy duty chain.  Also has a two into one exhaust pipe.

Hard to notice – Small crack in the plastic just under the seat on the right side.

While Honda won their first season with the RC51, Ducati answered with a new testastretta engine for the 996R in 2001, though it took the entire season for Troy Bayliss to clinch the championship.  Honda responded with the SP2 for 2002 and won nine out of the last ten races ( five events ) for the roses.  Honda sent their factory race yen in another direction for 2003, and returned to a four-cylinder, even though the RC51 stayed in production until 2006.  Some of these mods might not be to every fan’s liking, but the year, low miles and outstanding condition might make this bike worth looking into.

-donn

Shiny Side Up – 2003 Honda RVT1000R / RC51