Posts by Category: Honda

Featured Listing April 16, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1990 Honda VFR750R RC30

Often considered the darling of the collector world, the RC30 reigns supreme as being one of the most approachable of the highly sought-after rare bikes of the 80s & 90s. Volumes of research are readily available for these fascinating machines, and values remain strong with steady and continued appreciation. In short, the RC30 contains everything that RSBFS readers crave: A fantastic sport bike with racing DNA; A gorgeous silhouette that is THE iconic shape of the era; A mythical soundtrack that matches the good looks; A limited numbers homologation bike... and a good investment. There may be haters out there, but they are vastly outnumbered by those who understand what the RC30 brings to the table.

Featured Listing: 1990 Honda VFR750R RC30

Officially known as the VFR750R, the RC30 differs from the more pedestrian and economical VFR750F in more ways than the similarities. Both bikes have VFR in the title and both utilize a V4 engine arrangement. Apart from the Honda badge on the tank, that is where it ends and where the RC30 takes off. Throwing off the chain-driven engine internals of the previous VF series, the RC30 makes use of a gear-driven DOHC architecture which provides for ultra-precise valve timing and control. This is the piece that contributes to the characteristic whine of these VFR motors. And while the newer VFR-F models also utilized gear driven cams, the motor internals of the RC30 were decidedly more racy. Connecting rods were made of titanium to reduce reciprocating weight and raise the redline. The crank timing was changed to a 360 degree "big bang" sequence instead of the F-bikes 180 degree crank (the latter being smoother for street riding). The transmission was configured for racing - meaning a close-ratio box - and a slipper clutch was fitted. The twin spar chassis was all aluminum, including the revolutionary single sided swing arm. Suspension was all top line offerings from Showa. Devised for endurance racing and facilitating quick wheel/tire changes, even the front of the RC30 has quick-change hardware to minimize pit lane delays. And that is what the RC30 was built to be: a race bike with lights made available to the public. A total of 3,000 units were built.

From the seller:
1990 Honda RC30 For Sale

This beautiful motorcycle is for sale after 18 years of ownership. Its owner is selling his collection of desirable motorcycles due to health issues. It is complete, runs like it should, and has never been down. The bike has been ridden approximately 400 miles under its current owner. In its time it was never raced or abused, and always stored indoors in a dry and temperate climate.

More from the seller:

Because the bike has seen very limited road use over the past few years it received a total carb cleaning and synching within the past few months. At the time, while the carbs were removed, the fuel petcock was also dismantled and thoroughly cleaned by a former Honda mechanic.

The RC30 comes with its original factory tool roll, and the rear swing arm stand.

If you’re reading this post you already know this bike’s legacy both in Honda’s history, and in racing history. The bike was purchased from a collection in Georgia, and imported it into Canada after taking delivery there. It has been licensed in Ontario since that time, and has a clear ownership (title) in the province of Ontario. There are no warranties expressed or implied.

More from the seller:

Please feel free to email the seller at: v3powered@gmail.com if you have any inquiries about the bike.

Price: $28,000 (USD) or $35,000 (CDN)

The bike is located east of Toronto, Ontario. For you U.S. readers, importing a bike from Canada to the U.S. shouldn’t be anymore trying than it was to bring it to Canada. Filling out the appropriate forms, and having a bit of patience is all you really need. The owner can assist in shipping, but all planning and costs are the responsibility of the buyer.

This RC30 is in amazing condition, having traveled only some 2,200 miles in it's lifetime. This is helped by the limited ownership; RC30s tend to be coveted and kept in collections for longer periods of time than other machines. This one is no different, and has been fawned over for nearly two decades. These are the types of bikes you hang on to for as long as you can, and those fortunate enough to own one have realized significant gains in valuation. Year after year, this is about as reliable a sure thing that one can find when it comes to collecting motorcycles. And even if you are more into riding than collecting, the RC30 has much to offer. There are those who ride these bikes regularly, which is really how it should be. These bikes were built to go racing, and while they look fantastic as a static display they are much more beautiful at full song.

This particular bike is located in Canada, although it looks to have been a US bike originally. The clocks are in MPH and it has already been federalized. That should help with bringing it back over the border (that, and the fact it is more than 25 years old). This bike comes with some cool RC30 extras, and has been recommissioned to boot. Check out the pictures - feel free to drool a little - and then
give Barry a shout. At $28k USD this RC30 is priced to sell in the real world. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1990 Honda VFR750R RC30
Honda April 16, 2019 posted by

De-Stabilization – 1983 Honda CB1000F

This Florida owner shows a few other classic -80's machines behind, but this unrestored CB1000F might be the one to cut away from the herd !

1983 Honda CB1100F for sale on eBay

Honda's was looking deep into the corner and the vee-four 750 was brand new, but before the carburetted inline four left the sport category, displacement was increased to 1,062 cc's and 38mm carbs delivered 110 hp.  Just oversquare 69mm stroke kept torque up there at 72 ft.-lbs.  Though still a typical twin-downtube, the chassis was beefed up and sported 39mm forks and a box-section swingarm.  Dampers were premium with air-adjustable anti-dive forks and adjustable twin rear shocks.  More UJM than sport, the 18-inch front and 17-inch rear wheel kept seat height low.  Brakes reflected the 543 lbs. dry weight with three 296mm disks.

Obviously a fan from the looks of the garage, this owner has taken nice care of his reference CB1100F.  The preservation of the deep blue paint and black engine finish is as rare as the factory black chrome exhaust.  Just a few rubs tell of its 21,000 miles.  The owner is correct that at this age, most have been disassembled, restored, and altered.  From the eBay auction:

Original bodywork with original paint and factory original 4-2 black chrome exhaust. All in excellent condition with only minor imperfections. Tank is dent free with no trace of rust inside original key opens all the locks, tool kit and original owners manual included,  seat is perfect, no nicks or anything. I put 3000 miles on it last year, just put on new tires, all carburetor O-rings have been changed, then carbs synced, only ethanol free gas used. new o-ring chain, old one was fine, but old is all, This bike is 100% ready to ride and enjoy, no modifications, just stock and original.

As you can see in the pictures, this bike is in excellent condition. hard to find one that has not been apart, repainted or screwed with especially in the awesome blue paint scheme. one minor scuff on right fairing, hard to get to show up in pics some oxidation under aluminum clear coat in spots as well, but a really nice bike, always get compliments. Tires are new Dunlops in original factory sizes.

Honda tweaked the CB1100F until it did pretty much everything well - it got high marks for usable power, stable handling, and comfortable cockpit.  Answering the escalating power competition, it ran a quarter in just over 11 seconds, and Honda quality insured popularity.  Starting out at a reasonable $4,900, this example should do better - last January a red one with less miles brought $9,350 at Mecum in Vegas.  Sure to be a hit at a show or cruise night, this CB1100F marks a sweet spot in Honda history and owner care.

-donn

De-Stabilization – 1983 Honda CB1000F
Featured Listing April 5, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1992 Honda VFR400R NC30

Often considered the baby brother to the RC30, the 400cc NC30 deservedly stands proud on its own right. The V-4 with ultra-precise gear driven cams delivers a powerful 60 horsepower soundtrack that is unique to this model - especially when the tach swings up toward the 14,500 RPM redline. This is partly thanks to the NC30s 360 degree crank, creating a "big bang" motor when compared to the NC21 or NC24 predecessors. With a race-bred twin spar aluminum frame, endurance-bred single sided swing arm, four-into-one exhaust and adjustable suspension, the underpinnings of the VFR400R were anything but cheap. Drape the whole package in a glorious shape that is as iconic as any of the sport bikes we hold in high esteem (RC30, 851, 916, F4), throw in typical Honda build quality and reliability and you have the NC30 in a nutshell.

Featured Listing: 1992 Honda VFR400R NC30

The seller knows quite a bit about this bike, and I'll let him share detail on this example.

From the seller:
1992 Honda VFR400R NC30
Currently has 11'558 Km that's about 7,100 miles, will go up as I do ride it at least once a week.
I just put on new tires front and rear, new brake pads front and rear, flushed and bled front and rear brakes. Had the rims powder coated as the original paint was peeling. I also noticed some of the smaller pieces were looking their age so I had them powder coated black also, instrument stay, Misc cable guides, fairing stays.

More from the seller:
I just serviced the forks, new seals and fluid, Valve check, replaced all o-rings in the carbs, they were starting to leak, flushed and replaced the coolant I got the bike 3 years ago from the original owner's estate, he passed away. Prior to his passing he was doing a full restoration and had removed the original body work. He ended up getting Dementia and that was as far as he got. Over the years the original body work got lost. I wanted to keep this bike original so after much searching I managed to find Honda body work that had been in an accident. I had the crash damage repaired and repainted. It looks really nice. The bike runs amazing, starts easily cold or warm, smooth, powerful and quiet. It is the best handling bike I have ever ridden. I've owned it for about 3 years now I'm 6'1" and 220 pounds. This bike was designed for someone 5'04" and 145 so as I am getting older I can only ride it for about 10 minutes due to the full racer tuck.

More from the seller:
The bike is not perfect but really nice and would make a perfect weekend canyon rider. If I were to keep it I would do the following:

- Paint the lower fork housings and the rear subframe
- remove all body work and detail the engine and frame.

Bike is located in Lake Havasu City, AZ. I have a clean and clear Arizona title with current registration till April 2020.

Asking Price: $10,500 (will consider reasonable offers)
Contact: baldyy@aol.com

I really like this seller's approach to the bike; it is not a perfect zero-mile statue, but a well-cared for and maintained rider. After all, these 400cc rockets are meant to be enjoyed in their element (which had better include lots of corners). Parts of the bike have been selectively restored, reconditioned or updated which is what you would expect from a fawned-over 27 year old motorcycle. Devoid of the hyper-focused attention bestowed upon the bigger RC30, the NC30 is a bike you can ride and enjoy for what it is. Not so expensive to be an unaffordable collector, and not so rare and finicky not to be a regular rider - provided you fit. As the seller notes, this is definitely not a spacious and airy bagger; the crop of 400cc grey bikes definitely cater to a slightly smaller set. If you do fit, there are few bikes that collect the handling accolades of a VFR400R. With a jewel of an engine that purrs at low revs and snarls & shrieks through 14,500 RPM, the NC30 is positive proof against those who say Hondas lack soul. This example is clean and fully operational, and priced fairly for today's market. If you think you are in the market for the gem known as the NC30, contact Paul for more information. We typically don't see these bikes last very long in the market; act quickly before it's gone!

MI

Featured Listing: 1992 Honda VFR400R NC30
Honda April 2, 2019 posted by

Tropical Depression: 1988 Honda CBR250R

Deep in the vaults of exotic hardware purposely kept from the shores of America include examples such as this magnificent 1988 Honda CBR250R. There were extremely rare in the US during the late 1980s and 1990s - which is amusing since the venerable 250 Ninja was imported during the same period of time. But the CBR250R was the far sharper of the two, and was destined for the small-cube crazy home market of Japan where quarter liter racers dominate. The US had to make due with a relatively tame parallel twin that practically shrieked "entry-level-economy." But in the collector market today, the CBR250R has become easier to find, as evidenced by the number listed on these pages over the years. Still, they should be considered to be quite rare and finding one in good condition is the same thrill as with any other unique bike.

1988 Honda CBR250R for sale on eBay

The CBR250R does some shrieking of its own, but that is largely due to the sheer number of revs this bike requires in order to produce forward movement. A liquid cooled inline four cylinder with four valves per pot and a 11.5:1 compression ratio, the CBR250R relies on a 18,000(!) redline to achieve a respectable 40 - 45 horsepower. With full sport bodywork, twin headlamps and a single, beefy front disk (certainly enough to stop this 330 pounds dry machine), the CBR250R was marketed as part of the Hurricane lineup in some European markets. Given that the Hurricane model range scaled up to the mighty 1000F, you might think of this as more of a squall.

From the seller:
This very rare MC19 CBR250R is the 963rd bike produced for the 1988 production run. It was purchased about a year ago with 318km on the speedometer (about 190 original miles). It was imported by a dealer in UT and purchased in running condition. It still had the original 1987 date code tires on it, which were badly cracked, so a new set of Avon tires were installed. The carburetors were removed, re-jetted and installed on new OEM intake manifolds. The rear sprocket was changed from 54 to 52 and finally to 50 teeth, in order to reduce highway cruising rpms by about 1,000.

These bikes weigh 350lbs wet and are rated at 45 horsepower at 14,500rpms. The redline is at 18k rpms and the engine will run up to redline quite willingly. With stock gearing the bikes were rated at 110 mph top speeds.

This bike sat in Japan for 30 years, perhaps at a dealership or in a personal collection. It has a fair amount of patina on alloy parts and in little nooks and crannies in the engine bay area. If you love to polish aluminum, you can make this bike really shine again. The frame is aluminum.

These bikes were never imported/sold in the US and only after they are 25 years old can they be brought into the country and legally registered in CA and elsewhere. Yes, the bike IS registered with its 11 digit serial number!

I do have PDF files of the service manual in English and there are a few spare parts, including the rear sprockets. The oil filter is a common Honda part. The thermostat was replaced with a 180 degree unit, which keeps the little engine cooler than when they have the stock 190 degree unit installed.

A new choke cable was installed. These bikes have electric fuel pumps and inline filters.

A few paint scratches are evident here and there. The original OEM factory windscreen is checked but not cracked. One of the forward fairing tabs is broken, but held in place with the original modified nut-plate.

Riding these bikes is an unreal experience, especially when you rev it up past 14k rpms. You can easily imagine yourself as being Mike Hailwood at the IOM races, with the little four screaming out unimaginable rpms through the gears.

Due to recent ankle surgery, I am no longer able to ride the bike as before, so sadly must let it go to an appreciative new owner. Current miles are about 2,995 km, which is about 1,800 miles. This is one of my favorite bikes of all times... and I have owned hundreds of Hondas of all types and sizes. I will miss it dearly and will enjoy the memories that it gave me over the past year.

This particular CBR250R has an interesting history and shows how rare these bikes are... and how small our collecting community really is. This bike was sold on the pages of RSBFS a few years back, as highlighted in this post by Tad. And while the VIN number remains the same, the mileage has grown from 192 up to 1,800. What has not grown is the price - the Buy It Now figure is right at the $6k mark, just like the earlier sale. I've grabbed one of the photos from that post (above), as the current seller has not included very many. There are a few more sharp, high-res photos available via the older post - although please note they do not necessarily represent the bike as it sits today. Check out the current advert here, and then imagine what 18,000 RPM sounds like as you strafe the apexes of your favorite canyon. Good Luck!!

MI

Tropical Depression: 1988 Honda CBR250R
Honda March 30, 2019 posted by

Low Tech, Big Fun: 1997 Honda CBR600 F3 for Sale

When the original "jellymould" CBR600F Hurricane was introduced in 1987 the enclosed, sleekly aerodynamic fairing hid a dark secret: a steel frame. While racier competitors had switched to lightweight aluminum construction, the simple, effective CBR600 F3 stuck with the less expensive material until the CBR600 F4 was introduced in 1999. Although the styling was hyper-modern, it also helped Honda save money on manufacturing and development costs. Instead of a finished frame and engine cases, or carefully routed wiring and hoses, the whole functional mess could all just be hidden behind relatively cheap, sleek plastic. So while pragmatism may have driven the design and the ingredients were, on their own, not very exotic, the complete package was a world-beater when it was introduced.

Produced between 1995 and 1998, the F3 was an evolution of the earlier CBR600 F2. Compared to that bike, it offered adjustable cartridge forks, a Pro-Link rear, and and ram-air to feed the engine. The result was a few more ponies from the 599cc inline four and a 454lb wet weight. That might sound heavy for a 600, but it was just a couple pounds heavier than a ZX-6R or GSX-R600 of the same period, and actually a good bit lighter than the aluminum-framed YZF600. At a claimed 105hp, peak power wasn't best-in-class either, but the CBR offered a smooth spread of power with no real dips or flat spots, the perfect balance in a road engine and pretty handy on track as well.

The CBR600 was always pitched as a more versatile mount than competitors from Suzuki and Kawasaki, a bike that was at home in the canyons, in the city, and could even do a bit of commuting or light touring. The CBR600 was never really about the numbers, it was about the complete package, a sort of Goldilocks solution to the Supersport problem. It didn't make the most in-class horsepower. It wasn't the lightest. It didn't have much in the way of headline-stealing innovation. It didn't even have any acronyms plastered across the fairings!

It also made a perfectly good foundation for a racebike, winning multiple AMA SuperSport Championships, and didn't seem to suffer at all for its relatively ordinary underpinnings. Eventually, the entire class became more and more track focused, and led to the development of the CBR600RR that was sold alongside the CBR600 F4i as a direct alternative to the high-strung offerings from Suzuki, Kawasaki, and Yamaha. But for a while, Honda's versatile CBR meant you really could have your cake and eat it too.

This particular machine needs a bit of maintenance before it time-warps you back to your youth, but the miles are shockingly low for such a practical machine, and it looks to be in exceptional cosmetic condition. It may never be as desirable as a CBR900, but I these are certainly functional classics and much more attainable, since prices for the bigger machine are currently spiraling upwards and nice examples are hard to find.

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Honda CBR600 F3 for Sale

Hello, up for sale is my 1997 Honda CBR600F3 with 2,916 orig miles.  Clean title in hand in my name. Bought it 4 years ago and spent lots of time and money trying to make it near perfect (it's the same model, year and color as what I had in college so it was me trying to relive my youth). Sadly, my bad back in combination with it being too dangerous for a slow, fat guy like myself to ride in Vegas forces the sale.  I have all receipts and replaced parts baggies/boxes for every OEM part I put on it. I saved the old parts to prove it wasn't wrecked. Feel free to contact me to see it in person 850-five 86-38two8.  Not showroom perfect but damn nice for a 1997! PS: front chock included!

The bad: carbs need to be cleaned. Ran fine in 2014 and I did drain bowls before tear down but no luck in getting it started. Needs battery too as no point in buying one and letting it rot.

The good: over $1,000 in brand new parts. No cracked fairings at all!

  • Brand new oil and filter
  • Brand New Dunlop Q3s with not 1 mile on them - $285 mounted
  • New Ariete 90degree valve stems in gold - $29
  • Powder coated rims in gold - $175

The following all new OEM parts

  • Front lower chin - $35
  • Left side lower fairing - $374
  • Alternator cover and gasket - $69
  • Parts below over $400
  • Various OEM decals still new in OEM packing for spares - $149

The CBR600 may have been anything but exotic, but that was exactly the point: it was an everyman sportbike, and it was damn good at being that. The shape has aged pretty well I think, and the non-standard gold-painted wheels really flatter the Erion Racing-inspired colors. It's a shame that this attempt to capture the seller's youth has been put up for sale, but his loss is your gain! Can you really put a price on reliving the dreams of your youth? Apparently you can, and those dreams are going to cost you $3,950.00. That Buy It Now price is obviously on the high-end for an F3, but if this one is as nice in person as it looks in pictures, I think you'd be hard-pressed to find a better example with so few miles.

-tad

Low Tech, Big Fun: 1997 Honda CBR600 F3 for Sale
Honda March 27, 2019 posted by

Learning Curve – 1992 Honda CBR400RR

Most often Rothmans livery is seen on two-stroke race replicas, but this middleweight is a 399cc inline four.  It's a grey market import from Japan, registered in Florida and looking excellent with just under 7,000 miles.

   

1992 Honda CBR400RR for sale on eBay

 

Sometimes referred to as the "baby 'Blade", the CBR400RR was developed several years earlier, but restyled in 1992 to accompany the Fireblade to the showroom.  It was also built like a larger bike, alloy twin spars of the chassis and swingarm ready for much more than the factory 59 hp.  Faired scoops deliver fresh air to the engine, by way of four 26mm flat slide carbs.  Showa suspension all around, preload-only adjustable, leaving room for enhancements.  Grown-up dual discs are 276mm, and dry weight is just 360 lbs.

 

This CBR has low miles and is nicely presented.  Some corrosion is almost to be expected but is not readily apparent.  Expert readers will have to comment on the correctness of the fairings and livery, but it's at least complete.  No word on the reason for the sale, but from an island on Florida's west coast, this owner has an hour's slog through Fort Myers to get to some open riding.  Just a couple of comments from the eBay auction:

Beautiful NC29 1992 CBR400RR in Rothmans paint.  Low miles, runs great, very clean, new battery and chain. Florida title ready to go.  Direct Japanese grey market import.

Designer Masanori Aoki was a youngish pro when he led the CBR400RR effort, staying with Honda through the 1800cc Gold Wing, and more recently the Rune factory-custom.  Designed as junior machine for learning riders, the CBR gained a great following in the sporty grey market.  Though committee-designed and conforming to Honda's value-engineering principles, it's still a high-revving, lightweight, and beautiful package.

-donn

Learning Curve – 1992 Honda CBR400RR