Posts by Category: Honda

Featured Listing August 21, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1986 Honda VFR750F

Even legends have parents. They don’t often get lauded for their offspring’s exploits, but their influence is indelible, and without their genes, what would our heroes be? The 1986 Honda VFR750F is a minor legend in its own right, but its offspring — the Honda RC30 and RC45, are the beasts everyone remembers. But in 1986, Honda was hungry to catapult itself past the other Japanese marques in the sportbike arms race, and to cure its new V4s reputation for weak valve trains.

The VFR750F delivered. Under Fred Merkel, Wayne Rainey and Bubba Shobert, the bikes cleaned up in AMA. And under a crew from Cycle World that included Nick Ienatsch and a motley crew of racers and journalists, blew the ’86 Suzuki GSXR750’s 24-hour speed record out of the water by nearly 20 mph. Follow the link to that story at the end of this writeup. You won’t regret it. The red-white-and-blue beasts achieved the feat thanks to an improved 105-horsepower 750cc V4 that represented a 20-horsepower gain over the Magnas and fixed reliability questions. The bikes were also something like 40 pounds lighter than the previous model.

Coupled with a roadrace-worthy suspension and wide, sticky tires, the VFR had the goods to take it to Yamaha and Suzuki.

This 1986 Honda VFR750F is in impeccable, low-mile shape, with a long list of recent mods and maintenance to make it even tastier. It sports a Yoshimura exhaust and an RC30-style front fender, among other improvements. Seller Joe spent a long time on his description, so we’ll let him take it away:

1986 Honda VFR750F

Honda collector for over 30 years. My recent focus has been V4 bikes of the 80s/90s, including both RC30/RC45. This is my second 1986 VFR750F, which I purchased in 2016. I bought this bike because of its low mileage and overall survivor condition. Plus, I really wanted one with a pipe. The videos don’t do the sound of this Yosh pipe justice. The bike has 11,357 miles. As you can see from the title, I’ve put less than 100 miles on the bike while freshening up a few things. I have over 20 bikes and like to work on them, but I don’t ride them enough, so it’s time for someone else to enjoy it.Upgrades – all done within the last 18 months: New Honda fuel pump (specific to this bike and $200 for part alone); New fuel filter; New choke cable; New Yuasa AGM battery; New Honda grips; New Metzeler rear tire (Metzeler front matches but older – see code); New DID x-ring chain with rivet; re-zinc’d rear sprocket; Cut down front fender to match race bikes/RC30, and painted to match (includes uncut stock front fender); Valve adjustment and carbs disassembled and ultrasonic cleaned and sync’d (see video – work done by Joe Nelson of VFR Dreams); Fresh oil and filter; New brake fluid front and rear; New clutch master fluid; Known blemishes: 20-25 tank “pimples”appeared over this last winter. Odd, because always stored in a heated garage. Scrapes on left rear cowl/tail. A few very small scratches on windscreen. Hairline crack on LH fairing (3/4”). Normal cracking on mirror arm. Clear title in my name. Includes factory shop manual. I do not have factory owners manual. 2 keys, including original stamped key and a Honda duplicate. Multiple videos show carb sync, cold start, fast idle, fast idle warm up with two other of my bikes. Asking $4000. Contact Joe:joexray77@icloud.com

Cell 414-232-5077

Located in Milwaukee, WI 53207

Shipping is solely the buyer’s responsibility. I can assist with the shipper of your choice. I have used Haulbikes.com and JJ Bagwell Shipping.

VFR750F 24-hour world record recap: https://www.motorcyclistonline.com/hondas-1986-vfr750f-interceptor/

While later sport-touring RC36 VFRs don’t command the same coin (somehow) as the earlier bikes, VFRs are still a bargain compared to a slab-side Gixxer in similar shape. For such a jewel of a machine in such gorgeous condition, the $4,000 asking price is almost a no-brainer.

Featured Listing: 1986 Honda VFR750F
Featured Listing August 20, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo!

In 1982 Honda fired a technological missile, the implications which were heard and felt around the world. Overnight Honda had changed the game (again), offering the promise of liter power in a mid-sized package with the first full factory Turbo motorcycle. With futuristic styling, wild colors and TURBO emblems screaming mystical propulsion methods, the CX500 Turbo made a bold statement before the key was even turned. Once the bike fired up, there became an interesting dichotomy between the low boost tractability and comfort of the Dr. Jekyll side around town, and the wild Mr. Hyde nature of the bike on boost. In 1982 this was the most technically advanced motorcycle you could purchase, and despite the performance it was built with typical Honda quality and reliability.

Featured Listing: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo!

Starting with the rather pedestrian CX500 standard/cruiser power plant, Honda introduce forged pistons into the the Moto-Guzzi like transverse vee. Unlike most vee configurations, this one splayed 80 degrees rather than the usual 90. This engine already had liquid cooling and four valve heads (operated by pushrods), and was already at that time known for being overbuilt. The chassis was sturdy and equipped with shaft drive and monoshock rear suspension. It was an easy – if not overly inspired – choice to be the foundation for something much, much greater. The basic engine package was beefed up, Honda bumped the compression slightly, and then bolted on an IHI turbocharger built to Honda specifications. At it’s peak, the turbocharger pumps out 19 psi before the wastegate opens to slow the party down.

Simply bolting on a Turbo is not enough to engineer a working, reliable motorcycle. So Honda introduced digital (programmed) fuel injection – a world’s first for motorcycles. This system contained redundancy to protect the engine; fail safe circuits ensured fuel delivery while a separate ignition system protected the more highly stressed engine from potential meltdown. Rarely utilized or needed, these fail safe measures show the level of planning that Honda put into the CX500 Turbo. Management of these redundant systems was completely automatic, the rider being made aware of any potential failures via a comprehensive and well-laid out instrument panel. “Cockpit” might be a better description for the gauge cluster, as in addition to the usual tach, speedo, fuel and temp gauges there also exist a number of warning lights, a fuel system failure warning light, and of course a centrally located TURBO BOOST indicator.

From the seller:
In 1977 Honda began their Turbo powered motorcycle project…which would become the world’s 1st ever, from the ground up…purposeful built, turbocharged motorcycle and Honda’s 1st fuel injected bike. When finally released in 1982 it was described as “a technological tour de force”…”a milestone in motorcycle history”…”one of the most futuristic motorcycles of it’s time”…”one of the most influential motorcycles of the decade”. Now some 37 years later all that still rings true!

The project was a combined effort of Honda’s R&D folks, IHI Turbo America and Italian automotive stylist, Giovanni Michelotti, one of the most prolific & influential designers of the 20th century. Michelotti created the innovative and curvaceous fairing and body work.

Two years pre-production, in 1980… Honda in a bold and unprecedented move…put their CX500TC/Turbo on display at the Cologne International Motorcycle Show. This was probably no more than a “finger wag” at Yamaha…as the 2 giants, from the Land of the Rising Sun, were in a fierce battle for market supremacy. “Turbo Wars” soon followed.

Honda’s platform would be their tried and true…bullet-proof V-Twin / 4-Valve / CX500 motor. Every aspect of the bike was considered. Not only designing a motor that would be capable of handling the rigors of turbocharging but a frame to work with the stresses and a suspension to complement it all. Block castings were made thicker. A stronger crankshaft, connecting rods and clutch were employed. Honda’s first specific forged pistons were used. Larger end & main bearings installed. Over 200 new patents were created to build this motorcycle.

An improved futuristic liquid-cooled / digitally fuel injected motor…pushing those (up to) 82 ponies through a modern shaft drive to the rear wheel…with TRAC Anti-Dive forks up front and a Pro-Link rear suspension handling duties at the rear…twin piston brake calipers in place to haul it down…beautiful redesigned gold Comstar wheels fore & aft…a comprehensive dashboard…all that wrapped in a wind tunnel designed Michelotti fairing & body panels. A motorcycle with superb ergonomics & smoothness. A rolling piece of art!

More from the seller:
This example has been well cared for with only 16,904 miles. A fine example of this rare, 1 year only production, motorcycle at this price point. Three known owners…with the last 2 being in their late 60’s. Private collection offering. All pictures are recent and more are available as needed. I do have quite a number of pictures showing the cleanliness of the undercarriage.

A new stator & stator connector had been installed along with cam seals & water pump seals and all associated O-rings, seals & gaskets (previous owner). All this is called a “Triple Bypass”. An excellent factory spec re-spray of the body and motor was done also at that time. This bike shows quite well! Runs and shifts as it should. Turnkey bike w/no known issues.

> Matching Dunlop D404T tires are in excellent condition
> Battery was replaced and is excellent
> Seat was recovered to factory spec
> A “Visual Instruments Inc” voltmeter has been added
> Brakes are excellent
> Coolant flushed & replaced
> Castrol 4T/Full synthetic oil & WIX filter done @ 16,830 miles
> Rear shaft spline & ring gear correctly lubricated
> Stock tool kit & owner’s manual with bike
> Factory Shop Manual with bike
> Extra set of keys

Your chance to own a rare example of “Motorcycle History”! These rarely come up for sale. Be the only person w/one of these at your local cycle rally or cruise-in! Located near Binghamton NY


Asking Price: $6,750

Contact Joe: jshuta@hotmail.com or 607-343-9019 (9am to 9pm EST)
Live calls only, please – no text messages

Nestled between some truly interesting hardware in the Honda showroom – including the CB1100R, the GL1100 GoldWing, the CBX, the VF750 and the simple FT500 Ascot – the CX500T was competing for attention and customer wallet share. And it required a bigger share of the customer’s wallet than most of the bikes on the floor (MSRP $4,898). As a result, not many of these one year only models were sold. With sportish-touring bodywork, a wide seat and higher bars, the CX500T is a comfortable place to rack up the miles. Roll on torque – the real strong suit of the Honda Turbos – fits nicely into the highway cruiser persona. At 550+ pounds these were never destined to be racers, however they are fabulous riders and far more reliable than a 37 year old technological wonder has a right to be.

This bike looks to be absolutely gorgeous. With 16,000+ miles on the clock it has been ridden, but we all know that nothing deteriorates faster than a hangar queen. Regular use is positive for the mechanicals, the seals, the electrics and the turbo system. This one has the right number of miles to be carefully used, without being beaten up or at the end of its service life. History has proven that these Honda Turbo bikes have very few weaknesses – the key being the stator. The fact that this one has been changed is a real plus, as there are another estimated 20k-25k miles to be enjoyed before this should become a concern. Otherwise all of the pieces are here, and the general handling shows the care that went into the stewardship of this rare factory Turbo; it is not often that we see such a clean first-year example. Located in New York, this one is going for a very reasonable asking price. Give Joe a call (607-343-9019 – no texts please) or drop him an email and start the conversation. It only takes one experience on boost to know that Turbo ownership is worth everything that was promised. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo!
Featured Listing August 19, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Tyga-Bodied 1988 Honda NSR250R for Sale

Today’s Featured Listing Honda NSR250R was one of the most iconic bikes of the late 1980s and early 1990s, at least if you lived in Europe or Japan. We never really got them here in the US, at least not officially. This tiny sportbike was a technological powerhouse, with Honda’s usual obsessive attention to detail, including an advanced electronic ignition system and quality components generally found on bikes with much larger displacements.

The 1988 model year means this is the MC18 version of the NSR250R, with a slightly undersquare 54 x 54.5mm 90° liquid-cooled 249cc v-twin backed up with a six-speed cassette gearbox nestled in between the aluminum rails of the frame. Engine management was via the PGM-II version of Honda’s sophisticated digital ignition matched to a powervalve to increase midrange power, in this case ATAC, an acronym for “automatic torque amplification chamber.” Power was quoted at the “official” 45hp, but more was available with tuning.

If you’ve just looked at the pictures, you might wonder why I’m talking about the NSR250R, since they appear to show something else entirely. But what you’re looking at is a highly modified MC18 with a complete set of Tyga bodywork, decked out in the classic Rothmans Replica graphics scheme. I’ve already lost those of you who know these bikes and prize absolute originality, fans who consider that Honda knew what they were doing, and that any deviation from their template is sacrilege have. Everyone else should read on.

The Tyga fairings honestly modernize the bike and the main giveaway that this is a thirty year old bike is the relatively conventional swingarm setup, as opposed to the “gull arm” version of the MC21 and the single-sider of the MC28. It’s not for everyone, especially the squinty headlights, but the swoopy tailsection that evokes the TZR250 and the curvaceous bellypan are very nicely done, and the whole thing is painted up in the classic Rothmans graphics scheme. Under the skin, you can see the stunning expansion chambers that indicate a higher state of tune, and more information on the details of this build at the Tyga Performance website.

From the Seller: 1988 Honda NSR250R for Sale

Up for sale is a fully restored custom build Honda NSR250. My Son purchased this bike while he was in Japan for four years. After he returned to the states he brought the bike back with him and gave it to me as a gift. Pretty cool.

I am a retired ex motorcycle guy and thought I was done with motorcycles. At any rate there were a few items that needed attention so I started to do some basic stuff. I installed a new rear YSS shock as the stocker was blown. Installed a new battery and I fully went through the carbs since it didn’t idle very well. During this time I had been looking at bikes on Moto2 Imports who specializes in two strokes like this and started a conversation with them about really doing the bike up proper.

The bike was then shipped to Speedwerks in Dover Delaware for a major renovation.

  • Steve Long is the master at Speedwerks who did all of the work on the bike.
  • First off the bike was the first MC18 to be fitted with the all new Tyga GP-T full fairing kit.
  • The bike was custom painted in Rothman’s livery and the paint is stunning in person.
  • While there the carburetors were fully gone through, the bike was de-restricted and dyno tuned.
  • The rear wheel was replaced with a 17” rear wheel from a MC21. Both wheels were cleaned, powder coated and now have new Michelin Power RS tires.
  • The bike has Tyga stainless steel expansion chambers and is equipped with their new shorty carbon silencers.
  • All of the wheel bearings were replaced and the front forks were resprung and fitted with new seals.
  • Both sprockets and drive chain are brand new and the battery was replaced since it was in the shop for a fair amount of time.
  • Both brakes have new pads and fresh brake fluid.

The bike was featured as the Tyga Bike of the Month and I will include the link for that article describing the build. The link below will detail the work that was done on the bike. The last thing is that Steve let me know there was some minor scuffing in the cylinders so they installed a full Tyga OEM top end on both cylinders.

As I mentioned I thought I was done with motorcycles as I am now retired but this was a really fun project to see it go from wow that’s cool, a NSR, to something that is now a museum quality build. I have ridden the bike about 15 miles since it was finished. I am too old to ride a sport bike anymore and hate to see it just sit so have decided to put it up for sale.

Price is $9500 OBO
Contact Cameron Kline: cmrnkline@gmail.com or +1 (817) 734-9201

This is a one-of-a-kind motorcycle, a very nicely prepared “restomod” that will hopefully find the right buyer, and the asking price should help that happen. It almost seems too nice to actually ride, but it’s been built to perform, should the new owner choose to put some miles on it. Honestly, it be even more a crime to just display it.

-tad

Featured Listing: Tyga-Bodied 1988 Honda NSR250R for Sale
Featured Listing August 5, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1990 Honda VFR750R / RC30

Update 8.1.2019: Joe has renewed his Featured Listings. Check out all of Joe’s bikes for sale on RSBFS! Many thanks for choosing us to help move your collection! -dc

Even if not fans, RSBFS readers will acknowledge Honda’s long history of success in motorcycle production and racing.  These days, Honda seems to have the engineering chops ( and resources ) to do almost whatever they put their minds to – witness their Formula 1 winning V6’s for Williams and McLaren, several years as CART’s engine of choice, and more recently the HondaJet aircraft ( with turbofans developed by Honda and GE ).

The VFR750R/RC30 from 1987-1990 is just one more example, where engineers and designers pulled a winning concept together, and the manufacturing side of the company executed beautifully, about 3,000 times.  As testament, the factory team won the inaugural WSBK season in 1988.  This rare example has been in a collector’s display since new, and occasionally exercised, turning under 1,200 miles.

As their homologation special for the Superbike World Championship, the RC30 really was the mythical race bike with lights.  From the sharp-steering alloy chassis to the 296mm front disks to the single-sided Pro-Link swingarm, the RC30 provided the racers what they needed.  Shocks and forks on the single seater were only adjustable for preload, since the race teams would be putting their own special parts.  The compact V-4 looked similar to the preceding VFR750F, but shared almost no internal parts.  Even the exhaust note with the new 360-degree crank was specific to the RC30.

Resting in the motorcycle wing of a large auto collection, this RC30 has received excellent care and not even break-in miles.  The pictures show an apparently new machine, even though a generation has passed since it was built.  The owner tells of a mid-life cosmetic refurbishment:

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari.

An exception would have to be my super low (under 1,200) miles, almost perfectly like-new 1990 Honda RC30.

Yes, there are a few exceptions to what I call my Italian collecting rule and one of those would be the 1990 Honda RC30. This 1990 Honda RC30 needs no introduction or explanation by me as it is such a famous Honda, that the only thing you need to know about an RC30 is if you are getting a good one or a really great one or one of the very best.

The RC30 in this listing was purchased for the collection several years ago and is an extremely low mileage bike. It was absolutely 99% perfect, however, some of the detail parts that were white rubber or painted white had become slightly discolored. At that time, almost ten years ago, Honda was still had these parts in stock and we purchased each and every part to bring the cosmetic looks of the bike back to 99%. This 1990 Honda RC30 has not been raced or abused or messed with in any way. It currently looks like new, runs just as it should and is kept on a trickle charger and is exercised thoroughly during the spring, summer, and fall; and again it has never been raced or abused (most have been!).

As you may already know, there is nothing more exciting nor handles better than the Honda RC30. The looks, graphics, and colors of the bike need no apology either. They are absolutely a stand-out in any crowd of motorcycles. Most RC30s were extensively raced and it is very hard to find one that has not been modified or raced. You are looking at one that has not been abused in that way shape or form. This bike is always kept on a trickle charge and ready take a trip to any bike show at a moment’s notice. This is truly a bike for a serious collection and it would be a shame to abuse it. Oh yes, it comes with a new Honda rear wheel stand still in the box.

All my bikes are kept in climate controlled storage and on trickle chargers when not in use so they are always ready to take a day’s ride at a moment’s notice.

Honda might be accused of an obsession with the V-4, which brought it multiple WSBK titles along with TT and endurance racing wins.  After Superbike rulesmakers made a short dalliance with the V-twin an offer they couldn’t refuse, Honda returned to the four with the RC212V.  But for road riders, the RC30 was a moment when you could buy something very special from the local dealer, even though it cost twice as much as the nearest competitor.  That moment is reflected in recent asking prices even for fairly well-used examples.  But in this case, we have an RC30 that has been in a collector’s hands from day one, without damage history and in impeccable shape.  Please contact Joe for more information at 847-774-4857.

-donn

Featured Listing – 1990 Honda VFR750R / RC30
Honda August 1, 2019 posted by

Just Hop on and Rip: 1993 Honda CBR900RR for Sale

Performance is a moving target. In the 1970s, the Norton Commando was a “beast” with 750cc, around 60hp, and a 115mph top speed. These days, many entry-level machines can match those performance targets, and you can pick up bikes with engines as large as 2500cc and power north of 200hp. But at the time, Honda’s CBR900RR “Fireblade” was a revelation. With 111hp on tap, power wasn’t eye-opening on its own, but the new CBR packed big-bike power into a compact, light package that weighed just a couple pounds more than the company’s own CBR600.

Many sportbikes are built with racing in mind, and those compromises sometimes make for sacrifices for street riders. But the CBR900RR was envisioned as a pure sporting streetbike, and some of the odd choices were made to improve subjective feel, instead of lap times. The right-way-up fork? Lighter than an upside-down unit at the time. The odd displacement kept the bike as narrow as possible, and gave the flexible response and torque desirable for a streetbike. The only real misstep was the 16″ front wheel intended to speed up the steering, something it did only too well. It also means limited tire choice then and now.

At 893cc, the Fireblade was obviously too big for superbike racing and it gave up a significant displacement advantage to bikes like the GSX-R1100 and FZR1000. Bore and stroke were uncharacteristically long-stroke for a pure sportbike at 70x58mm, compared to the 78x59mm of a GSX-R1100K. That makes sense since the CBR engine was basically a stroked 750. It still could rev, obviously, but the long-stroke motor was more compact than something with bigger bores would be and also gave the motor a big spread of torque that was perfect on the road, both priorities for the new sportbike.

The result of this unconventional thinking was one of the all time great sportbikes of all time, and was loved by street racers and hooligans then, and remembered fondly by the ones that managed to survive into middle age. Like many Japanese sportbikes, they were thrashed and crashed, but the CBR900RR was always a little bit special, and many solid examples can still be found if you look. This particular example isn’t pristine, but it looks like a solid survivor. However, the seller’s suggestion that you “Hop on and RIP!” doesn’t inspire much confidence that the bike hasn’t been abused just a little over the years…

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Honda CBR900RR for Sale

1993 Honda CBR900RR Fireblade SC28, Honda’s Original Superbike. Chain-Driven MONSTER! Red White Blue Edition! Independent Dual Headlights. Excellent condition – starts instantly. Oil changed this season. New Tires. What a ride. This bike has been lovingly maintained for 19 years. Regularly ridden – not sitting in a corner, being polished and stared at… Hop on and RIP! Pulls like a CBR Fireblade should. RARE FIND! PRIVATE PARTY TRANSACTION. Personal, Private Collector. Actual miles are 32K. I have over 50 hi-res photos of the bike. If you’re interested – call me and I’ll forward via email – 847-971-8487. Two Brothers Exhaust. LOOK Seat. Brand New – Original-Style Side Mirrors (not installed). Meticulously maintained.

PRIVATE SALE – NOT A DEALER TRANSACTION

Mileage discrepancy – 22K on ODO, Actual mileage is 32K.

  • Two Brothers exhaust
  • LOOK Seat
  • Brand new, original-style side mirrors (not installed)
  • Meticulously maintained
  • Excellent condition – starts instantly
  • Oil changed this season
  • New tiresAsking $5,500, OBO.

I can arrange shipping, should you require. You can also fly in and drive it home! I’m located 12 miles north of O’Hare Intl. Airport (ORD).

Specs:
CBR900RR (893cc) SC28
The first generation CBR900RR was introduced in 1992 with an 893 cc (54.5 cu in) inline-four engine. It set a precedent for light weight in the super bike class, being much lighter than other large-displacement bikes of the time. The CBR900RR was based on an advanced research stage model known within Honda as the “CBR750RR”. 

With the objective of equaling the acceleration of competitors’ flagship sport bikes, Honda increased the stroke of its inline 4-cylinder engine, raising the displacement to 893cc. Complementing its power performance were the bike’s dry weight of just 185 kg, wheelbase of 1,405 mm and a body almost identical to that of the advanced research stage model. 

Let’s start with the bad: there’s a small ding in the tank, a few cracks in the fairings, the brake light lens is aftermarket, the blue aftermarket seat doesn’t really match the paint, the mirrors are tomahawk-y, the rear fender and signals have been, ahem, eliminated… The less said about the lazer-cut chain guard the better. And the Two Brothers exhaust has been chopped significantly. That being said, the $5,500 price isn’t horrible, considering the demand for really clean examples. Maybe a rolling restoration project? Assuming it’s been as carefully maintained as the seller claims, you can start trolling eBay for clean OEM fairings, or have a set painted to match. Track down a nice period-correct end-can… In the meantime, you can just hop on and RIP!

-tad

Just Hop on and Rip: 1993 Honda CBR900RR for Sale
Featured Listing July 31, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1994 Honda NSR250R MC28 for Sale

Update 7.31.2019: This NSR250R is available for $12,500 and interested parties can contact Mark at mark@sloanvalley.com or 250-588-8775. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

If you’re a fan of four-stroke motorcycles, two-strokes like this Featured Listing Honda NSR250R MC28 can be a little… underwhelming, the first time you see, and especially hear one. I mean, even with aftermarket pipes, they make an oddly weedy sort of zing as they rev, and generally sound like you’ve strapped a couple of leaf-blowers with fueling issues to your bike. But fans know that’s the sound of a pure, simple, and utterly focused bike that emphasizes handling over brute power. And the MC28 was probably the most sophisticated of the breed and, until recently, very hard to get a hold of here in the USA.

The mechanics of a two-stroke are inherently primitive, and not very eco-friendly, since lubricant is mixed with the air and fuel in a constant-loss system that will spew heavy, oil-rich smoke from the tiny exhaust cans. But that simplicity means a two-stroke engine is incredibly light weight, and makes pretty spectacular power for a given displacement. If you come from a four-stroke mentality, a 250cc sportbike sounds very unimpressive, but bikes in the class weighed in at around 300lbs and could make as much as 55hp at the wheel when properly tuned, or even a bit more if you didn’t mind the occasional engine seizure…

The original NSR250R MC16 was introduced in 1987 and laid down the pattern the others would follow, with a 249cc 90° v-twin that featured an RC powervalve, and PGM electronic ignition, and a six-speed gearbox, wrapped by an aluminum beam frame. The final MC28 version of the bike seen here debuted in 1993 and added a slick ELF-designed Pro-Arm single-sided swingarm and trick PGM-IV electronic ignition system to the mix, making it one of the most advanced sportbikes of any displacement available at the time.

Today’s example has incredibly low miles and has had the wheels painted white to match the bodywork for an extra dash of 90s style. It’s currently located in British Columbia, but shouldn’t be too hard to register here in the US, depending on where you live. California residents, as always, should visit their local DMV with a sack of unmarked, non-sequential bills and a bottle of good scotch…

From the Seller: 1994 Honda NSR250R MC28 for Sale

Up for sale is a beautiful 1994 Honda NSR250R MC28 with only 1,000km  (622 miles). Bike is almost in mint condition. It had a stress crack on the right upper cowling around the blinker that has been professionally repaired. You can see the repair from the inside of the fairing but the outside looks perfect. All fairings are genuine Honda 100%. Bike is completely stock, like it was on the Japanese dealership floor in 1994. No dents on the tank (the tank itself was professionally cleaned and rust-proofed in 2018), one tiny chip in the paint. Wheels were professionally refurbished in 2018 and converted from red to white, which as a personal preference, was a game changer for how the bike looks. A brand new OEM rubber chain guide is included in the sale. Only a few handling marks not worth mentioning. Bike looks awesome. Just serviced with new fork seals (2017), new battery (2018), new engine fluids (2019), and Dunlop Sportmax Q-14’s installed front and rear in 2017. Runs like the day it was new.

This NSR was purchased from a dealer in USA in 2017 and can easily be returned to the USA market. I’m happy to deliver this bike to Blaine, WA 98230 to provide an easy loading point for any USA-based buyer. Bike is currently titled as a streetbike for road use in BC, and had similar title in USA. Thank You For Looking. Call 250-588-8775 for more photos or questions.

Price: $12,500
Contact Mark: mark@sloanvalley.com or 250-588-8775

Well, the completely stock condition might mean you’re stuck with Japan’s government-mandated 45hp, but the MC28 version is much harder to de-restrict than earlier versions and originally required a hard-to-obtain HRC ignition card to unleash the full power. For collectors, it means that the stock electronics and wiring harness haven’t been monkeyed with, and 45hp is still plenty of fun in a 300lb package, if the new owner plans to ride it. Aside from the minor fairing damage the seller describes and the non-original paint on the wheels, this thing should be immaculate, given the mileage.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1994 Honda NSR250R MC28 for Sale
Featured Listing July 25, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1992 Honda VFR400R NC30

Update 7.24.2019: Paul has renewed his Featured Listing for this NC30 and dropped the price to $9,700. He also notes mileage has gone up slightly as he does ride it once a week. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Often considered the baby brother to the RC30, the 400cc NC30 deservedly stands proud on its own right. The V-4 with ultra-precise gear driven cams delivers a powerful 60 horsepower soundtrack that is unique to this model – especially when the tach swings up toward the 14,500 RPM redline. This is partly thanks to the NC30s 360 degree crank, creating a “big bang” motor when compared to the NC21 or NC24 predecessors. With a race-bred twin spar aluminum frame, endurance-bred single sided swing arm, four-into-one exhaust and adjustable suspension, the underpinnings of the VFR400R were anything but cheap. Drape the whole package in a glorious shape that is as iconic as any of the sport bikes we hold in high esteem (RC30, 851, 916, F4), throw in typical Honda build quality and reliability and you have the NC30 in a nutshell.

Featured Listing: 1992 Honda VFR400R NC30

The seller knows quite a bit about this bike, and I’ll let him share detail on this example.

From the seller:
1992 Honda VFR400R NC30
Currently has 11’558 Km that’s about 7,100 miles, will go up as I do ride it at least once a week.
I just put on new tires front and rear, new brake pads front and rear, flushed and bled front and rear brakes. Had the rims powder coated as the original paint was peeling. I also noticed some of the smaller pieces were looking their age so I had them powder coated black also, instrument stay, Misc cable guides, fairing stays.

More from the seller:
I just serviced the forks, new seals and fluid, Valve check, replaced all o-rings in the carbs, they were starting to leak, flushed and replaced the coolant I got the bike 3 years ago from the original owner’s estate, he passed away. Prior to his passing he was doing a full restoration and had removed the original body work. He ended up getting Dementia and that was as far as he got. Over the years the original body work got lost. I wanted to keep this bike original so after much searching I managed to find Honda body work that had been in an accident. I had the crash damage repaired and repainted. It looks really nice. The bike runs amazing, starts easily cold or warm, smooth, powerful and quiet. It is the best handling bike I have ever ridden. I’ve owned it for about 3 years now I’m 6’1″ and 220 pounds. This bike was designed for someone 5’04” and 145 so as I am getting older I can only ride it for about 10 minutes due to the full racer tuck.

More from the seller:
The bike is not perfect but really nice and would make a perfect weekend canyon rider. If I were to keep it I would do the following:

– Paint the lower fork housings and the rear subframe
– remove all body work and detail the engine and frame.

Bike is located in Lake Havasu City, AZ. I have a clean and clear Arizona title with current registration till April 2020.

Asking Price: $9,700 (will consider reasonable offers)
Contact: baldyy@aol.com

I really like this seller’s approach to the bike; it is not a perfect zero-mile statue, but a well-cared for and maintained rider. After all, these 400cc rockets are meant to be enjoyed in their element (which had better include lots of corners). Parts of the bike have been selectively restored, reconditioned or updated which is what you would expect from a fawned-over 27 year old motorcycle. Devoid of the hyper-focused attention bestowed upon the bigger RC30, the NC30 is a bike you can ride and enjoy for what it is. Not so expensive to be an unaffordable collector, and not so rare and finicky not to be a regular rider – provided you fit. As the seller notes, this is definitely not a spacious and airy bagger; the crop of 400cc grey bikes definitely cater to a slightly smaller set. If you do fit, there are few bikes that collect the handling accolades of a VFR400R. With a jewel of an engine that purrs at low revs and snarls & shrieks through 14,500 RPM, the NC30 is positive proof against those who say Hondas lack soul. This example is clean and fully operational, and priced fairly for today’s market. If you think you are in the market for the gem known as the NC30, contact Paul for more information. We typically don’t see these bikes last very long in the market; act quickly before it’s gone!

MI

Featured Listing: 1992 Honda VFR400R NC30
Honda July 18, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2001 Honda RC51

Update 7.28.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Dennis has 3 very low mileage bikes listed right now:

Thank you for supporting the site, Dennis, and good luck to buyers! -dc

Honda has always been an engineering company. Often times it would appear that Honda would release a new model with a new configuration just to prove to the world that it could. Sometimes it was difficult to determine why Honda decided to make a substantial change. But in the case of the RVT1000R – better known as the RC51 – the reason was clear. You see, Honda enjoyed tremendous success on the racetrack with their four-cylinder, 750cc RC30 and RC45 machines. But when rules changed in World Superbike racing to allow a displacement advantage to twins and Ducati started winning, Honda took notice. Casting the V-4 machines aside for a twin, Honda created the 1000cc V-twin RC51 – and picked right back up with their winning ways. And while in some ways overshadowed by the collector status of the RC30 and RC45, the RC51 was arguably more successful in the intended theater of the racetrack thanks to the efforts of Colin Edwards (WSBK) and Nicky Hayden (AMA Superbike).

Featured Listing: 2001 Honda RC51

While badged as an RVT1000R, the RC51 actually displaces 999cc to allow it to squeak under the rule book cut off on swept volume. The Ducati killer’s short-stroke motor was built to rev, producing 133 HP . And while Honda copied Ducati in the use of the 90 degree vee configuration, they skipped on the desmo-drama and fitted the four-valve heads with conventional valve-train components. But don’t think that Honda simply phoned in a fake Duc replacement here; the aluminum perimeter beam chassis, the high-mount exhaust pipes, the aero bodywork complete with high-pressure intake, and the unique side-mounted radiators are all Honda tech. Built for the public at a fraction of the price of the Italian machine, the RC51 was a bit porkier in most dimensions (including weight). On the racetrack this was negated by minimum weight rules. On the street, the difference is negligible – until you sit in the cockpit. Unlike the Ducati- which demands rider conformity to a narrow, sharp and stretched position, the Honda is regarded as, well, comfortable. As a streetbike, the RC51 just works – and performs with the metronomic reliability you would expect from Big Red.

From the seller:
2001 Honda RC51 (RVT1000R) (PHX)
VIN: JH2SC45471M100004

Price: $9,000

I purchased this motorcycle in San Jose, CA, new in 2000 and rode it 286 miles and then parked it. I’m turning 80 years old in the next month and the time has come to find it a new, younger owner, hopefully someone that is a collector of motorcycles and that would appreciate the fact that it is 99.9% original (new batteries only and still on original tires), has been ridden 286 miles and has been in a climate-controlled environment from the very first day that it was bought and has had the best of care.

As always, RSBFS finds you the best of what is out there. And in this case, that means a basically NEW 2001 Honda RC51 with fewer than 300 miles. This bike is amazingly immaculate, and is completely original as new with the exception of a new battery. Drool over some of these pictures, and realize that the RC51 is the bike you really need, versus simply want. This is a do it all machine that can carve corners better than the best (unless you know better than Colin Edwards), has more than enough grunt to get most jobs done quickly, is comfortable enough to spend some time on, and has built-in legendary Honda reliability. Did I mention it sounds glorious? Seriously, what more could you want! Devoid of today’s game console electronic gadgetry, this is bike that expects you to ride it – and in exchange it will provide you with miles and miles of smiles.

If you are thinking that the latter SP-2 variant of the RC51 in Nicky Hayden livery is the most collectible of the lot, you wouldn’t be wrong. But when pen hits paper, it is what you can find that means the most. And in a model like this, where the “rarer” bike is essentially a sticker kit, the differences are not great. It is the difference in the condition of the bike that will contribute the most to the overall value in the near term, and likely well beyond that. And I would challenge you to find a cleaner, low mileage RC51 on the market today. Jump quickly before this twin-cylinder rocket is gone in a booming howl. Good Luck!

MI

Featured Listing: 2001 Honda RC51