Posts by Category: MV Agusta

MV Agusta September 7, 2019 posted by

Fargo: 2000 MV Agusta F4

The MV Agusta F4 750S was the mass production model of the ultra rare Oro Edition – the model that re-launched MV Agusta into the mainstream market. Designed by Massimo Tamburini and the CRC design center, the F4 was – in many ways – what the Ducati 999 should have been. It is an evolution of the very successful 916/996/998 design language that set the world alight way back in 1994, and has been incrementally improving ever since. With the single sided swing arm, distinctive under seat shotgun exhaust and star-spoke wheels, the F4 is truly distinctive in the MV Agusta colors of silver and red.

2000 MV Agusta F4 for sale on eBay

Patterned after the Oro, the 750 Strada (street) model shared the same inline, four cylinder power plant. With technology adopted from Ferrari Formula 1 engineers, the F4 utilized radially splayed valves for the ideal combustion chamber shape. Intake trumpets were variable length to help spread the torque curve over more of the power band (rather than just up at the top of the range), with horsepower peaking at 126. Whereas the Oro (gold in Italian) was produced utilizing anodized magnesium, the standard model made due with aluminum. This not only brought the cost of materials down, but also the cost of manufacturing. With plastics in place of carbon fiber for the body, the 750S model is slightly heavier than the Oro, but otherwise looks identical.

From the seller:
2000 MV Agusta F4 750 for sale with 6200 miles (still riding so may go up). Great condition, adult owned, and includes extras. The bike is mechanically perfect and is in excellent working condition. Rear tire is at 50-60% and front is at 75%. Bike comes with carbon fiber Silmoto exhaust($1000) and also the currently mounted stock Arrow exhaust that was fitted for display in a recent motorcycle show(Both exhausts pictured). Bike has been professionally dyno’d and tuned and runs very cool. As you can see by the vin this is a very early bike and was only the 18th MV F4s to come out of the factory. Also included is the factory rear stand, service manual, and all paperwork passed along from previous owner.

MV Agusta relaunched to great fanfare in 1999. Bikes were initially very exclusive, and they were also very expensive. The Oro was nearly $40,000 USD, and all 300 sold out. The standard Strada model was cheaper, but far from cheap at $18,999. Today, these bikes are trading for much, much less. The rarest of the models are sure to appreciate, with the more mass produced examples following slowly behind. That is a good thing, as it makes fantastic bikes like this F4 750S affordable to us mere mortals. This is a bike that you can ride today and decades later it will still look fresh and purposeful. Located in Fargo, North Dakota and offered with a starting bid of just $5,300, this one still has a few days to go on eBay. Check it out here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Fargo:  2000 MV Agusta F4
Featured Listing August 8, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1977 MV Agusta 750S / 850SS America

Update 8.8.2019: This seller has decided to upgrade to a Featured Listing and is also available on eBay. Thanks for supporting the site, Jamie, and good luck to buyers! -dc

The mid-seventies saw MV Agusta floundering after the founder’s death, and about to accept an offer they couldn’t refuse from the Italian government.  U.S. importers persuaded the company to try and revive their fortunes with a special 750, a monoposto bristling with premium parts.  This rare example returned to Italy for a mid-stream model upgrade before sale.

1977 MV Agusta 750S / 850SS America for sale on eBay

Before almost every big bike was an inline four, MV Agusta had a history of air-cooled DOHC Grand Prix machines.  For the 750S, displacement was increased to 788cc’s, heads re-designed and 26mm Dell’Orto carburetors were specified.  Though the cams are driven by a gear train between cylinders two and three, the alternator is behind, resulting in a trim crankcase.  Shaft drive indicating its more GT purpose, most MV 750’s came with front discs and a drum rear brake.

Not enough to be one of 500 or so, this MV was upgraded by the factory to an 850SS, which the factory did to just a few dozen leftover machines to make them more enticing.  A little history from the eBay auction:

“The Ferrari of Motorcycles”

Up for sale is a stunning 1977 MV Agusta 850SS. This is pretty much the quintessential late-70s Italian sport bike and the last, highest spec iteration of MV’s factory-built four cylinder sport bikes. Less than 500 Americas were made from 1975-77, and this 750S-to-850SS factory conversion is one of just 19 (or 27, or 35, or 42, depending on your source) total 850SSs made. Just to be clear, all MV Agusta 850SSs were conversions from 750S machines; some were done by the factory, some were done by dealers based on instructions from the factory.

The bike in question is a 2800-mile example in excellent overall condition. It features factory-optional cast wheels, Lafranconi exhaust, and its original suede covered seat. Frame and engine numbers match; not all do. There are a few nicks here and there, as you would expect from any 40+ year old machine, and the finish on the front edge of the instrument binnacle is separating (see photos), but the bike is whole and has obviously never seen any hard use. It has a wonderful, honest overall appearance. It starts, run, shifts, and stops, but with such low mileage and limited use in the last few years, it could probably benefit from a more fulsome recommissioning, including carb tuning/cleaning, before any serious road riding. A video of the bike in action can be sent upon request.

750S to 850SS conversion: Factory records during this period in MV history can be inconsistent, if they are available at all. 1977 was the final year of factory-produced MV Agusta motorcycles, and the factory was fast and loose with some things, including specifications from bike to bike. They were also having a hard time selling new 750S Americas in a crowded field of ever larger and more powerful Japanese machines, which could be had for a fraction of the MV’s $6500 sticker price. So, an uprated variant of the 750S, the 850SS, was cooked up as a way to move leftover or unsold 750S machines. In late 1976, MV recalled 19 unsold new 750S machines from distributor stock (including this bike) back to the factory in Italy for conversion to 850-spec. They also instructed dealers/distributors in how to convert other 750S machines to 850SS spec. Fortunately, this bike’s journey is well-described in both factory and distributor documents. The bike is first described in factory documents from 1975 and early 1976, as a “1976 model 750cc ‘S’ America”. Later documents from 1977 list it (by serial number) among 19 bikes that were recalled in late-1976 to the MV factory in Italy for conversion to “850S” specification. Additional documents from 1977 pertain to the re-importation of the bike by the US distributor, Garville, now as an “850S” with “86hp” (vs 75hp in standard 750S trim), and allocation to Champion Motorcycles in Costa Mesa, California. The bike has 750S sidecover emblems; these may have been left on the bike at the factory or re-installed later during a refinish (easily remedied by removal of the emblem and replacement with an “MV” decal, which is what the factory did on some 850SS machines). It has the factory optional and 850SS-correct EPM cast alloy wheels with triple disks and Brembo calipers. 850SSs typically used 27mm carbs unless bound for the US, like this one, which then used the standard 26mm Dellorto carbs of the 750S America.

All original documents relating to this bike are included in the sale, both when it was a “1976 750S” and after conversion to 1977 850SS (see pix), with the exception of the document listing this bike among the 19 recalled to the factory for 850SS conversion. That particular document belongs to the records of another of my MVs, but I will provide a copy/scan of that original document to the new owner as well. The sale also includes a commissioned hardcover photo-book of this particular machine, by Ian Falloon.

Values on these bikes are hard to pin down…but at much less than the price of a 1974 Ducati 750SS “Green Frame”, which was produced in significantly greater numbers than the MV 850SS and by a manufacturer of less racing pedigree than MV Agusta, values of the late-spec MV classics seem destined to close the gap to their Italian brethren. Imagine this red stunner in your garage/mancave/lair next to your 275GTB or 365 GTB/4 Daytona or 365BB! These bikes rarely come up for sale, outside of major auctions, where buyer and seller can be expected to pay as much as 12-20% in combined fees on top of the hammer price. Consider this bike instead.

42 years on, the 850SS shows no particular wear, but chips and aging paint and plating of a real classic.  Despite the outstanding components from Ceriani, Tomaselli, and Brembo, the factory thought having the LaFranconi mufflers black would be sporty.

Already playing catch-up to the new Japanese imports, Agusta didn’t have the time or resources to engineer a new lightweight model.  At over 500 lbs. dry, the 750 and 850S reviewed as a better ride for moderate speeds but did so in style.  The factory wound down shortly and was offline for ten years before being revived by Cagiva.  Seeming more appropriate for a white glove auction than online, this 850S is a history lesson in 1970’s design and manufacturing.

-donn

Featured Listing: 1977 MV Agusta 750S / 850SS America
MV Agusta August 8, 2019 posted by

Brussels Sprout: 2006 MV Agusta F4 1000 Senna Edition

Located in Belgium, today’s find is the second of the MV Agusta Senna tribute bikes (the first being based on the original 750cc F4). The first thing to know about Senna tribute models is that part of the original proceeds went to Senna’s favorite charity – caring for needy children in his home country of Brazil. The second thing to know is that these are reasonably rare; each of the MV Agusta Senna tribute models are serialized and limited to only 300 units world wide. This particular example currently calls Belgium home.

2006 MV Agusta F4 1000 Senna Edition for sale on eBay

The basis of the Senna edition was the very capable F4 1000 R model. Well known for the radial valve technology (a development from the Ferrari Formula 1 technical team) and variable length intake runners, the 998cc engine was good for 174 HP. Stylistically, the 1000cc edition followed with the same livery as the earlier 750 Senna machine, with subtle differences in accent color. The wheels, for example, were special Marchesini units in silver – rather than the red star pattern offered on the 750. Front brakes were exclusive to the model; calipers were Brembo Racing “Serie Oro” gold four piston radial units. Other minor cosmetic changes included the front forks (black titanium nitride coated), and a special seat was fitted. The Senna could be considered a R+ model with star power.

From the seller:
Very special engine (limited serie 300 pieces)Has traces of use that you can expect from a second-hand.But in very nice condition

(Translated via Google)
Am the first owner
I added a lot of options.
RG3 Exhaust, Titanium Collector and Custom Ignition Board
MV Agusta Veltro footrest and selectors (only 99 pieces manufactured)
Color wheels Champange (Marchesini)
Dark windshield
Xenon headlight (all)
Integrated indicators on the back
A duo seat, but always the mono and seated frame (see photo) in reserve.
Foldable Handles
Metal fans
I still spared it, brake levers, etc., are included
a lot of carbon
The engine is 43,000 km long and has always been done by an authorized dealer.

The bit that should jump out at you here is that this special edition, collectible model MV Agusta has been used. A lot. 43,000 KM equates to nearly 27,000 miles. Bravo to the seller for enjoying such a magnificent motorcycle! This must surely be the highest mileage Senna edition we have seen on these pages. And yet the bike shows well. There does appear to be some hazing or spiderweb cracking in places on the bodywork (i.e. where the kickstand tucks in), but overall you would be hard pressed to guess at the number of miles this bike has traveled based on first look. It is also a testament to MG Agusta and modern engineering & manufacturing practices – while a hyper superbike, these remain resilient and reliable rides.

Price wise, the Senna model has held up pretty well over the years. We have seen some wild swings in asking price depending upon condition and mileage, including a nearly never been run example offered at $29k. More reasonable examples have been trading in the $15-18k range as of late, with exceptional specimens a bit higher. This one is being offered for $15,000, with the seller open to other offers. Look through the pictures, and then check out all of the details here. This might be a great find for RSBFS readers on the continent. Good Luck!!

MI

Brussels Sprout: 2006 MV Agusta F4 1000 Senna Edition
Featured Listing August 1, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 MV Agusta 750 S America

Update 8.1.2019: Joe has renewed his Featured Listings. Check out all of Joe’s bikes for sale on RSBFS! Many thanks for choosing us to help move your collection! -dc

Back in 1974, there was no other bike to have, really. Regardless of what you were able to shop for, the MV Agusta 750S America was the bike you wanted. First of all, it was Italian, and red, which meant it had that little something extra that nobody else had. Temperamental, yes, and expensive to be sure, and perhaps not even the fastest thing on two wheels, but none of that mattered. It would more or less keep pace with the cruder, brawnier two strokes, and it would go around corners without killing you. Then there was the noise.

Whether you’re listening to a Colombo V-12 at full song, or the rorty throb of a Lancia Fulvia’s V4, or the percussive pop and rattle of a Ducati 900 SS/SP, the Italians long ago mastered the art of the proper internal combustion sound. The 750 S America may have them all beat, with a rhythmic, tachycardic and slightly uneven throbbing at idle cracking into a full-chested wail at higher revs. It’s quite the song and dance for 90 horsepower, but in its day the MV’s voice was the siren song of speed.

This 1974 MV Agusta 750S America is in magnificent shape, and appears to be all or almost all-original. The classic red-and-gold livery is without blemishes, and the bike’s numerous nooks and crannies appear to be clean enough to eat off of. The condition is thanks in large part to a fastidious seller, who has kept the bike stored in a heated facility and made sure that it remains ready to run.

From the seller:

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection.  I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection.  These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles ‘70s, ‘80s, and ‘90s.  Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one.  These motorcycles were targeted for by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best was available and that is what I purchased.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the ‘70s and ‘80s are the future Ferrari’s of motorcycle collecting.   We all know what has happened to Ferraris.

For many people the MV Augusta American is like the Ferrari of motorcycles.  It is a typically great Italian design that when new cost an unthinkable amount of money and has been held in the highest esteem since it was produced.

In the world of motorcycle collecting it is one of the most prestigious Italian bikes that you can have in your collection.   This bike, as far as we know, is entirely original.  It runs perfectly, and, is, without question, one of the best sounding motorcycle that were ever made and yes, it is kept in fully heated storage when not in use.   It is always kept on a trickle charger. It is ready to travel 500 miles on the first day.

If you ever heard of Ferrari GTO run through the gears you will know that the 1974 Augusta MV 750 S America has a very similar melodic sound of authority which is just music to the ears.

This is a very expensive bike for serious collectors.  It is a very limited production bike.  By searching the Internet, you can read all the accolades that have accumulated over time for this particular breed, this is for serious future collectors.

They are only original once.

I would suggest that you check out the other rare cycles that I am offering for sale by clicking on “other items for sale” in the upper right corner to see the other bikes being offered from my collection.

Prefer phone calls 847-774-4857

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

Back in ’74, these things were the most expensive bikes on the street, with a raft of super-expensive parts keeping them out of the hands of you average grocery bagger. With just 550 or so MV Agusta 750S Americas built, the story is more or less the same today. If you have the means …

Featured Listing: 1974 MV Agusta 750 S America
MV Agusta July 3, 2019 posted by

Respect the GOAT: 2005 MV Agusta F4 AGO #75/300

MV Agusta. Giacomo Agostini. Greatest of all time? Individually, these are storied names with a rich and successful history of racing at the top level. Together, they were an unstoppable force – allowing MV Agusta to exit the racing scene while still on top, and providing Agostini the platform on which to rack up an incredible number of wins and record number of championships. This bike – the 20005 MV Agusta F4 AGO series – was the first of the 1000cc F4 models to be produced, and it was released in very limited numbers. Today there are a lot of fake AGOs with the #1 number plate on the side (i.e. sticker), but these are not true collector models. The real AGOs are serially numbered as proof of authenticity, complete with the signature of the great one himself.

2005 MV Agusta F4 AGO #75 for sale on eBay

The F4 was the reboot of the famed MV Agusta brand in 1999. Initially released as a 750cc model, a punched-out 1 liter was offered by 2005. Utilizing the same hemispherical radial valve head and variable trumpet style intake (as designed by Ferrari F1 racing engineers), the bigger bike was burlier in most dimensions: 40 additional horsepower and 20 lbs of additional weight over the original F4 750 Oro – a known lightweight machine. When compared to the standard 750S model, the F4 AGO actually weighs *less* than the 750! Front forks are Marzocchi units, while the rear shock was originally a Sachs model – however this has been swapped out by the previous owner (see below). The rest of the AGO is pure graphics and the serialized number plate. Only 300 of these models were originally produced and distributed.

From the seller:
I am downsizing my motorcycle collection and this beautiful Italian stallion is up for sale. I’m sad to see it go but bikes like this are meant to be ridden and this one has spent the last few years being admired for its beauty more than appreciated for its performance. This is your chance to own a piece of MV Agusta history and motorcycle racing history as this bike celebrates the racing career of Giacomo Agostini. Google him if you don’t know who he is.

I obtained this motorcycle from Guy Webster of the Guy Webster Italian Motorcycle Museum in Ojai, CA after he started to liquidate the museums inventory. This bike was on display in Guy’s museum for many years. His “motoguy” sticker is still on the tank and can be easily removed, but in honor of the late motorcycle enthusiast I had decided to leave it in place. Guy had fitted an Ohlins rear shock. The original Sachs shock comes with the bike. The original red paddock stand is included. Certificate of authenticity is included. Comes with 2 keys. Bike is registered to me in the state of California, and is current and has a clear title. With 10,936 adult ridden miles the bike has been well cared for. Still has the original RG3 Arrow exhaust which sounds magnificent. Tires are in good shape.

Bike will also come with a Berzig center stand fitted specifically for this bike. Main oil pan gasket likely needs to be changed and one will be included with the bike. I will also include an oil filter and oil for your first oil change.

The rebirth of MV Agusta brought some fantastic Italian hardware to our shores. And while the numbers of units shipped did increase a fair amount, F4 models are still less plentiful than similar Ducati models, for example. That makes the F4 reasonably rare. The AGO model is known as a 300 unit production only – making it a rare model. Perhaps the most rare of all? This bike has over 10k on the clocks, meaning it is not a garage queen museum piece but an actual rider. It is not often we see these bikes with actual miles on the odometer, and it has nothing to do with the reliability or longevity of the bike. These are modern and well-engineered machines with top quality components throughout – and can take the miles and a fair bit of abuse. But given the cost, many see these as a bike to protect and save, rather than collect miles. This one was saved from that fate, but there is some regular wear apparent on the tank and fairing.

Located on the Central Coast of California, this F4 managed to get out on its fair share of sunny days. Devoid of snowfall or significant inclement weather, it looks like this bike lived where it could be used as intended. The problem is that makes a difference in resale value. An AGO model F4 1000 didn’t start out life as a cheap bike. The upside for collectors is that AGOs have not really made the turn in terms of value appreciate as of yet. And while a very low mileage museum dweller might set you back about $23k or more these days (still way below original MSRP, by the way), this slightly more used example is priced at a more reasonable $15k. Now that price is probably more in line with a nearly new base model F4 – but for the dosh you get the cachet of the rarer AGO model. In the long run the AGO is certainly in a better position to rise in value, just based on the numbers and historical fact. Check it out here, and then be sure and share your thoughts on MV Agusta F4s, and the pull of the AGO commemorative model. Good Luck!!

MI

Respect the GOAT: 2005 MV Agusta F4 AGO #75/300
MV Agusta June 4, 2019 posted by

Aged Art: 1978 MV Agusta 850 Monza

Let’s close out the recent spate of very beautiful MV Agusta models we’ve been posting in the last week or so with this beautiful example of the old school art. Designed before the days of Tamburini involvement, this classic 850 Monza has a look all its own, without the #metoo styling that seems more common today. This was the stuff of legends, the scoot of choice for riders such as Phil Read and Giacomo Augustini. Alas the glorious MV Agusta factory was already in financial free fall when this beauty was built, and plans were in play to exit the motorcycle space entirely. That makes the model among the last of the original MV Agusta line to be built. It took until 1980 for the last of the inventory to go, and with it went the hopes and dreams of the Agusta family. MV Agusta lay in dormant slumber until 1991, when Cagiva swooped in on trademark ownership rights, and set out to revive it with a bang – the new F4 models being introduced fully 20 years after this 850 Monza made its swan song.

1978 MV Agusta 850 Monza for sale on eBay

From the seller:
MV AGUSTA 850S MONZA 1978, ONE OF THE LAST 27X TO BE BUILT BEFORE THE FACTORY CEASED PRODUCTION OF MOTORCYCLES. ORIGINAL FULL FACTORY FAIRING. BIKE FULLY RESTORED 9 YEARS AGO WITH VERY LITTLE MILES SINCE. BEAUTIFUL CONDITION. COMES WITH ORIGINAL OWNERS MANUAL AND FULL DOCUMENTATION OF AUTHENTICITY

Powered by an 837cc air-cooled, inline four cylinder engine with DOHC, the Monza had but two valves per cylinder (while the Japanese competition offered four). The cylinder block was situated atop sand-cast cases that also housed the 5 speed transmission. Final drive was via shaft – a novelty in the sport bike world. Power was estimated to be in the 80-ish range, while weight was approximately 570 lbs. Perhaps the most interesting part about the 850 Monza is the last-gasp aspect of the design. History shows that the Monza bikes were actually unsold Americas which were tuned and and fitted with optional extras in order to move them. Originally based around the 750cc base design (check out the serial number), the Monza was also sold as an 832cc. Only the final 27 bikes carried the 850 moniker. Nomenclature also varied, as these were known as Boxers in the UK, and Super Daytonas in Germany, while being referred to as Monzas in the rest of the world. From an auction perspective Monzas are rare and valuable. The 832 variants are reliable high five digit sellers. This 850 Monza – the last of the original breed – is located in Australia and bidding begins at $110,000. That is very strong money, but considering this is one of 27 of the final model line, it just might be worth checking out. Pictures are few and with low resolution it is difficult to make out detail; serious bidders might want to request additional images. A fitting close to the flood of MV Agustas posted as of late, this is a nice example of old school art done right. Good Luck!!

MI

Aged Art: 1978 MV Agusta 850 Monza
MV Agusta June 3, 2019 posted by

Italian Stallion: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750

After designing the Ducati 916, Massimo Tamburini could have quite justifiably turned in his pen and waltzed into retirement with a professional accomplishment under his belt that few people will ever be blessed enough to match. But Tamburini, apparently, wanted to make sure, so he set about resurrecting an iconic Italian brand with a bike so good that it would see a 20-year production run.

2002 MV Agusta F4 750 for sale on eBay

This 2002 example is a fairly early example of the result of Tamburini’s efforts at the Cagiva Research Center to resuscitate MV. With a screaming inline four, those unmistakable four-barrel exhaust pipes and the unique star wheels, the F4 750 is everything a sportbike should be. It’s flashy, almost to the point of being gaudy. It’s fast to the point that 95% of people who ever touch the starter button will be entirely overmatched. And, most importantly, it is proudly, ferociously and unapologetically Italian.

This 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 has done 17,000 miles, and looks to have aged gracefully. There appears to be some dirt and wear here and there, but the bike is still in absolutely lovely condition. After a good checking over for maintenance, this bike would make a great summer rider.

From the eBay listing:

Now is your chance to own a very unique, historic bike, and at this price, you can afford to ride it every day. This design is known by everyone that really knows bikes, and appreciated everywhere. I get comments on this bike wherever I go- by real bike people, not teenagers at the mall.

This bike has been maintained very well, and only has 17,000 miles on it. Excellent condition! Comes with a rear service stand and a sexy MV custom bike cover. It’s got raised clip ons for a more comfortable seating position, and a license plate/turn signal eliminator kit.

When it was new, the F4 750 carried around astounding numbers, with 130 horsepower on tap and a near-170 mph top speed, numbers that are still pretty damned impressive. Today, it stands as a collectible, but usably modern sportbike. To the untrained, it’s impressive. To motorcycle fanatics, you will be the subject of envy.

Italian Stallion: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750
MV Agusta June 1, 2019 posted by

More Art: 2008 MV Agusta F4 312R

It seems like we are seeing quite a few newer generation MV Agusta models crossing the block as of late. This sets up an interesting study of values and comparisons. It also highlights the feast/famine nature of the rare sport bike segment. The market is currently flooded with a variety of F4 machines, so if you are interested in an example from the storied MV Agusta brand you have a good opportunity to find a clean, low mileage bike across a number of price ranges – such as this 2008 MV Agusta F4 312R.

2008 MV Agusta F4 312R for sale on eBay

The F4 1000 lineup – comprising several different models – essentially all share the same engine configuration and primary chassis. That is a seriously stout foundation for any bike, as seen in the 166 HP base model F4 S. But the 312R is more. Much more, in fact. The 312R is two performance steps above the base S model, given that it is built upon the F4 R – which itself has a bump in HP to 174, and improved brakes and suspension. Take that F4 R, add another 9 ponies and special graphics, and you come to the 312R. Named after the bike’s target top speed of 312 kph (approximately 190 mph), the original 1000cc 312R was a limited edition offering. Today its performance is eclipsed by several more modern bikes – and it may get lost in all of the “Limited Edition this and Limited Edition that” MV Agusta noise, but is still a beautiful and respectable powerhouse with some real cachet.

From the seller:
Time to sell my beautiful 2008 MV Agusta F4 312R. Second owner. I bought this MV to use as a piece of ‘art’ in my man cave. I have never ridden it. The bike has never been down. The original owner rode it for a year, then displayed it in his house until my purchase in 2016. I am moving into a smaller house and will not have the space to show the bike, hence the reason for its sale. It has 2881 miles on the odometer. All fluids, except the brake and clutch, were drained in preparation for display. The battery was also removed. The prior owner upgraded the front Brembo calipers to a better spec Brembo caliper, he also upgraded the Brembo brake and clutch levers, added Rizoma grips and swapped the plastic trim pieces for OEM MV Agusta carbon fiber ones. The bike comes with all the goodies supplied by MV for the 312 owner, including the bike cover, tool kit and owner’s manual.

Created by the father of both Bimota and the Ducati 916 (and 996/998), it is hard to call the F4 anything other than gorgeous. The seller obviously thinks so, as this bike has adorned his man cave since purchased and has not turned a wheel since. I can’t tell if Count Giovanni Agusta – original founder of MV Agusta way back in 1923 – would be rolling in his grave, or proud that his humble motorcycles have transcended the plane of mere transportation. Either way, one cannot help but admit that a bike of this caliber would look stunning in any room of the house, provided that one’s spouse were on board with the concept. Prepped for the indoor motorcycle mannequin gig, this bike was drained of fluids and the battery has been removed. As a result, there are no “powered on” shots of the odometer – but the ad states the original owner put 2,881 miles on the bike before it was acquired by the seller.

The 312R was a homologation machine in the US with a mere 150 units imported to meet AMA regs. And while I doubt that the first owner ran that slick for 2,800+ miles, it does wear racing rubber properly and proudly. This is a rare sub model of a relatively rare machine; MV Agusta did not produce many bikes in the early years of the comeback, and they all carried a premium over peer bikes of the time. Thus, even a base F4 is a sight not often seen, and the other LE models even less so. The 312R is probably not the most rare – nor the most pricey – but stands out as one of the rarer examples of the MV Agusta offering set. That has not helped it out much at the checkout stand as of late; this beautiful example is being offered for a relatively scant $12,500. That is right in the money for other 312R models on the market, but well below the original MSRP. That could be a good thing, as predictive analytics indicate that the bike could be reaching the bottom of the curve. Nearly all bikes that are collector status today were available for less $$ at some point in their lives; nearly everything goes through a dip. The 190 mph question is if this is such a bike. The 312R is rare enough, and this example is in clean enough condition to ride that wave should it develop. Check it out here, and then check your crystal ball. Good Luck!!

MI

More Art: 2008 MV Agusta F4 312R