Posts by Category: MV Agusta

MV Agusta May 21, 2019 posted by

Fulsome – 1977 MV Agusta 750S / 850SS America

The mid-seventies saw MV Agusta floundering after the founder’s death, and about to accept an offer they couldn’t refuse from the Italian government.  U.S. importers persuaded the company to try and revive their fortunes with a special 750, a monoposto bristling with premium parts.  This rare example returned to Italy for a mid-stream model upgrade before sale.

1977 MV Agusta 750S / 850SS America for sale on eBay

Before almost every big bike was an inline four, MV Agusta had a history of air-cooled DOHC Grand Prix machines.  For the 750S, displacement was increased to 788cc’s, heads re-designed and 26mm Dell’Orto carburetors were specified.  Though the cams are driven by a gear train between cylinders two and three, the alternator is behind, resulting in a trim crankcase.  Shaft drive indicating its more GT purpose, most MV 750’s came with front discs and a drum rear brake.

Not enough to be one of 500 or so, this MV was upgraded by the factory to an 850SS, which the factory did to just a few dozen leftover machines to make them more enticing.  A little history from the eBay auction:

750S to 850SS conversion: Factory records during this period in MV history can be inconsistent. 1977 was the final year of factory-produced MV Agusta motorcycles, and the factory was fast and loose with some things, including specifications from bike to bike. They were also having a hard time selling new 750S Americas in a crowded field of ever larger and more powerful Japanese machines, which could be had for a fraction of the MV’s $6500 sticker price. So, an uprated variant of the 750S, the 850SS, was cooked up as a way to move leftover or unsold 750S machines. In late 1976, MV recalled 19 unsold new 750S machines (including this bike) for conversion from distributor stock.

They also instructed dealers/distributors in how to convert other 750S machines to 850SS spec. Fortunately, this bike’s journey is well-described in both factory and distributor documents. The bike is first described in documents from 1975 and early 1976, as a “1976 model 750cc ‘S’ America”. Later documents from 1977 list it (by serial number) among 19 bikes that were recalled in late-1976 to the MV factory in Italy for conversion to “850S” specification. Additional documents from 1977 pertain to the re-importation of the bike by the US distributor, Garville, now as an “850S” with “86hp” (vs 75hp in standard 750S trim), and allocation to Champion Motorcycles in Costa Mesa, California.

The bike has 750S sidecover emblems; these may have been left on the bike at the factory or re-installed later. It has the factory optional and 850SS-correct EPM cast alloy wheels with triple Brembo calipers. 850SSs typically used 27mm carbs unless bound for the US, like this one, which then used the standard 26mm Dellorto carbs of the 750S America. All original documents relating to this bike are included in the sale, both when it was a “1976 750S” and after conversion to 1977 850SS (see pix), with the exception of the document listing this bike among the 19 recalled to the factory for 850SS conversion. That particular document belongs to the records of another of my MVs, but I will provide a copy/scan of that original document to the new owner as well. 

42 years on, the 850SS shows no particular wear, but chips and aging paint and plating of a real classic.  Despite the outstanding components from Ceriani, Tomaselli, and Brembo, the factory thought having the LaFranconi mufflers black would be sporty.

Already playing catch-up to the new Japanese imports, Agusta didn’t have the time or resources to engineer a new lightweight model.  At over 500 lbs. dry, the 750 and 850S reviewed as a better ride for moderate speeds but did so in style.  The factory wound down shortly and was offline for ten years before being revived by Cagiva.  Seeming more appropriate for a white glove auction than online, this 850S is a history lesson in 1970’s design and manufacturing.

-donn

Fulsome – 1977 MV Agusta 750S / 850SS America
MV Agusta April 20, 2019 posted by

Hypothesis: 1976 MV Agusta 350 Ipotesi

In the way cool archives of rare bikes there are undoubtedly some weird and wonderful ones. There are always surprises and bikes not many people have heard of, and there are always some real gems hiding behind the uber popular homologation crowd. Today’s find, a 1976 MV Agusta 350 is the perfect of example of the weird and wonderful. Looking a bit like a single (it’s a twin), a bit like a two stroke (it’s a 4-cycle) and a bit like a much larger bike, it is clear that this MV Agusta is all Italian by the “nothing extra is needed here” style.

1976 MV Agusta 350 Ipotesi for sale on eBay

The Ipotesi is a small scale parallel twin. It has an overhead cam (only one) to operate the two valves per cylinder. A pair of small Dellortos handle the intake side of things, while a pair of chrome pipes take care of the exhaust. At 350cc this is hardly a powerhouse. but with air cooling and appropriately sized components, it is hardly a heavyweight. With 30-ish HP on tap (comparing reasonably to the current crop of small-bore bikes), the little 350cc engine is pushing only 350 pounds of bike. Brakes look tiny (those are 220mm rotors all around), but with less weight and speed comes less need for larger, heavier hardware. Clip ons are low and tight; perfect to practice that aerodynamic tuck!

From the seller:
This 1976 MV Agusta 350 Ipotesi was purchased by me from the original owner in the U.K. in the late 1990’s. It has about 6,500 km on it but not long ago I had the speedometer repaired and it was reset to zero km. The current speedometer reading of 394 km is from my riding of the bike after the repaired speedometer was returned to me. This motorcycle has a California title and current California registration. The bike is an easy kick starter and I ride it frequently around San Francisco and the Bay Area. The bike is fully sorted and needs nothing: you can get on it and ride it and enjoy it! The motorcycle is entirely correct and original and unrestored. There are some minor paint touch up areas on the tail section behind the seat. The most noticeable paint flaw is the touched-up area on the rear edge of the front fender, shown in one of the photos. I wanted to keep all of the paint on this motorcycle original, so I did not repaint the entire front fender. Some of the paint on the instrument panel is worn, but I wanted to keep that paint original and have not touched it up. There is a photo attached of the instruments and the surrounding panel. Other than these paint issues, the bike is in extremely good original condition. The Heidenau tires are nearly new, but they are the correct size per original. You won’t find a better Ipotesi for sale in the US or another Ipotesi for sale in the US: MV Agusta 350 Ipotesi motorcycles were never officially imported to the U.S. so any here now would have been privately imported. Therefore, there are very few here. Of the few MV Agusta 350 Ipotesi motorcycles in the US, I doubt too many are fully sorted and have current registration and are being ridden such as this one is.

We don’t see many pre-F4 MV Agustas in the States, much less anything that displaces less than 500cc. This Ipotesi is a fantastic looking motorcycle. It seems impossibly narrow, yet retains the classic proportions of a much larger bike. The paintwork shines in the sun, and the odd elements of what make up this little 350 blend together to make something special. It’s far from museum perfect, but it still looks great anyway. Value? Too rare in the US to really put a number on it; we simply have no historical data on which to base an assumption. The seller is asking for $11k OBO – that might seem high for a 350 scoot, but not a lot of dosh for a very unique MV Agusta. Check it out here, and then jump to the Comments section and share your thoughts on this cool little bike. Good Luck!!

MI

Hypothesis:  1976 MV Agusta 350 Ipotesi
Featured Listing April 19, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 MV Agusta 750 S America

Check out all of Joe’s bikes for sale on RSBFS! Many thanks for choosing us to help move your collection! -dc

Back in 1974, there was no other bike to have, really. Regardless of what you were able to shop for, the MV Agusta 750S America was the bike you wanted. First of all, it was Italian, and red, which meant it had that little something extra that nobody else had. Temperamental, yes, and expensive to be sure, and perhaps not even the fastest thing on two wheels, but none of that mattered. It would more or less keep pace with the cruder, brawnier two strokes, and it would go around corners without killing you. Then there was the noise.

Whether you’re listening to a Colombo V-12 at full song, or the rorty throb of a Lancia Fulvia’s V4, or the percussive pop and rattle of a Ducati 900 SS/SP, the Italians long ago mastered the art of the proper internal combustion sound. The 750 S America may have them all beat, with a rhythmic, tachycardic and slightly uneven throbbing at idle cracking into a full-chested wail at higher revs. It’s quite the song and dance for 90 horsepower, but in its day the MV’s voice was the siren song of speed.

This 1974 MV Agusta 750S America is in magnificent shape, and appears to be all or almost all-original. The classic red-and-gold livery is without blemishes, and the bike’s numerous nooks and crannies appear to be clean enough to eat off of. The condition is thanks in large part to a fastidious seller, who has kept the bike stored in a heated facility and made sure that it remains ready to run.

From the seller:

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection.  I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection.  These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles ‘70s, ‘80s, and ‘90s.  Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one.  These motorcycles were targeted for by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best was available and that is what I purchased.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the ‘70s and ‘80s are the future Ferrari’s of motorcycle collecting.   We all know what has happened to Ferraris.

For many people the MV Augusta American is like the Ferrari of motorcycles.  It is a typically great Italian design that when new cost an unthinkable amount of money and has been held in the highest esteem since it was produced.

In the world of motorcycle collecting it is one of the most prestigious Italian bikes that you can have in your collection.   This bike, as far as we know, is entirely original.  It runs perfectly, and, is, without question, one of the best sounding motorcycle that were ever made and yes, it is kept in fully heated storage when not in use.   It is always kept on a trickle charger. It is ready to travel 500 miles on the first day.

If you ever heard of Ferrari GTO run through the gears you will know that the 1974 Augusta MV 750 S America has a very similar melodic sound of authority which is just music to the ears.

This is a very expensive bike for serious collectors.  It is a very limited production bike.  By searching the Internet, you can read all the accolades that have accumulated over time for this particular breed, this is for serious future collectors.

They are only original once.

I would suggest that you check out the other rare cycles that I am offering for sale by clicking on “other items for sale” in the upper right corner to see the other bikes being offered from my collection.

Prefer phone calls 847-774-4857

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

Back in ’74, these things were the most expensive bikes on the street, with a raft of super-expensive parts keeping them out of the hands of you average grocery bagger. With just 550 or so MV Agusta 750S Americas built, the story is more or less the same today. If you have the means …

Featured Listing: 1974 MV Agusta 750 S America
MV Agusta April 3, 2019 posted by

Meccanica Verghera: 2009 MV Agusta F4 1078 312RR

Originally conceived as an aviation company, famed motorcycle marque MV Augusta turned to the two-wheeled world after World War II in a move to survive European post war economics. With transportation being a key element and need, the firm began at the small end of the spectrum and only grew from there. From transportation to bikes with more sporting intent to reaching the very pinnacle of the racing scene, MV Agusta has long been a powerhouse in the motorcycling community. And it is a community; many of the early employees of MV Agusta were from the family aviation business. And let’s not forget Claudio Castiglioni’s involvement in the firm, having been at the helm during more than one of the corporate turnarounds. It is the latter incarnations of the company that produced the F4 (the world’s most beautiful motorcycle according to some) and from that F4 spawned many special models. One such rarity was the hyper 312RR.

2009 MV Agusta F4 1078 312RR for sale on eBay

If speed is king, the MV Agusta F4 312RR set out to become the ruler of the land. The name of the bike – 312 – refers to the top speed in kilometers per hour. That equates to about 194 MPH in Americanese. The 312RR started life out as a F4 1000 R model, and MV-A engineers played with internals to pile on the horsepower. The original 312R (2007 – only a single R) offered a stout 9 HP increase over the already-over-the-top standard R bike. The second generation model (2009 – two Rs in the name) offered the 1078cc engine and 190 horses – another 7+ over the previous gen. By 2010 the top speed party was all over, the final version of the bike being mechanically the same Gen II machine, but with “312 RR Edizione Finale” graphics and exclusivity generated by only 30 units total.

From the seller:
Very Rare 2009 Mv Agusta F4 1078 312RR in perfect condition, Priced to sell fast as im moving, only 1799 miles, bike is from North Carolina Dealership and has a North Carolina title and the bill of sale, bike is hand made in Italy engine was made by Ferrari 190 hp fast is a understatement best handling bike ever. I didn’t like the original seat so a changed it to red black and silver suede and leather , looks great and feels better. Too much to say I’m selling my baby and a few others in my collection New tires on it and just serviced needs nothing and in Brand new condition never in rain.. Serious buyers please, questions please ask. bike will sell. The bike comes with the stand all keys books, alarm, gps, charger and cover. Can arrange shipping for a extra fee. Bike is located in Miami Florida. North Carolina Clear Title.

The 312RR is undoubtedly rare-ish out in the real world. Part of this is due to the low volume production of MV Agusta, and the limited number of units bestowed upon the various editions. The other part if it is that these were simply horrendously expensive motorcycles to begin with. Often branded as the Ferrari or Lamborghini of motorcycles, F4 Limited Edition models had sticker prices 4x or more when compared to the more readily available (and serviceable) Japanese cutting-edge sport bikes. That kept ownership numbers low, and exclusivity high. The downside is that several MV Agusta models have not really translated that exclusivity into resale dollars. While stronger than contemporary Japanese peers on the resale side, the ratio has certainly dropped. This is true for the base F4 models as well as some of the lesser special editions – although the Senna, CC, and Claudio continue to hold value (or appreciate).

This particular 312RR looks very, very good. Mileage is low, and at least from the pictures there are no major red flags. The opening bid is a very fair (low?) $8k, which means that you could be riding away on an iconic Italian machine for a song. Sure, the 312RR will be eclipsed by more modern machinery (time has a way of putting everything in its place), but this is still a damn fine motorcycle that will exceed the limits of most riders – and looks 200 MPH even when sitting still. We will ignore the controversy regarding the actual top speed of the bike given the majority of our readers are in the US where limits are much, much lower. Check it out here, and then jump back to the comments and share your thoughts on the F4. Any 312R or RR owners out there? Share your stories. Good Luck!!

MI

Meccanica Verghera: 2009 MV Agusta F4 1078 312RR
MV Agusta February 25, 2019 posted by

Legendary: 2002 MV Agusta F4 Senna 750

An MV Agusta F4 Senna 750 is enough by itself to justify a modifier like “legendary,” but this one carries around a couple extra big names to back it up. Not only does it bear the name of The Man Himself, the bike wears 10-time GP World Champion Giacomo Agostini’s signature and was first owned by NHL legend Sergei Fedorov.

2002 MV Agusta F4 Senna for sale on eBay

If you’re not a fan of the Detroit Red Wings, or you don’t remember the early 1990s, Fedorov’s name likely doesn’t mean much to you. But the dude won three Stanley Cups with the ‘Wings, after a gutsy defection to the United States after an international game. Look him up.

Setting aside the signatures and ownership of famous men, the 2002 MV Agusta Senna 750 is a force to be reckoned with. The 750cc inline four was designed with the help of Ferrari, and in the Senna managed about 140 horsepower. They’re serious machines, but there are a raft of cheaper bikes that went faster. The Senna is one you buy, because, well, look at it.

This is number 192 of a worldwide production run of 300, and it looks to be in very good shape, commensurate with its scant 3,500 miles. The pictures don’t tell us much, and the description doesn’t go into huge detail either.

From the eBay listing:

Extremely rare and beautiful. Part of a small collection of bikes purchased new by NHL Hall of Famer Sergei Fedorov. Bike has been personally signed by legendary MV Agusta rider/ champion Giacomo Agostini! This bike is number 192 of 300 built for worldwide production. MV reported that only 50 of these bikes were imported to North America. Inline 4 cylinder engine designed with cooperation from Ferrari produces 136hp at 13900 rpms. 0 – 60mph in 2.9 seconds. Quarter mile in 10.7 at 136mph. Lightweight and extremely fast. These bikes are legendary not only for performance and handling but for design and collectability!

This bike is in excellent cosmetic, running and riding condition at 3500 miles. The sale includes original owner’s manual, spare key, spark plug tool, and factory red rear wheel bike stand.

This bike is currently for sale locally as well.

With a starting bid of ten grand, and no word on the reserve, we’ll be interested to see where this one will go. Will the whiff of fame and provenance drive the value above similar bikes? Let us know what you think in the comments!

Legendary: 2002 MV Agusta F4 Senna 750
MV Agusta February 4, 2019 posted by

Distinguished – 2008 MV Agusta F4 312R

MV’s 312R was introduced midway through the F4’s lifespan when top speed, rather than 0-60 or a 1/4-mile was the goal.  In its alternative (not red and silver) livery, this Scottsdale example looks cared for with just 4,500 miles.

2008 MV Agusta F4 312R for sale on eBay

The F4 were built around the powerplant, and the 312R had revised heads with 30mm titanium intake valves, 48mm throttle bodies and longer intake horns to help make 183 hp at a lofty 12,400 rpm.  In the shiney-side-up department, 50mm Marzocchi forks are nitrided with carbon to reduce stiction, and the Sachs rear monoshock has low and high-speed adjustments.  312 kmh eventually has to end, and the Brembo P4/34 brakes are some of their finest.  The bodywork is at once trim, complex, and aggressive, and the stuff dreams are made of.

Not much to tell about a minty example with low miles, but there has been a sprocket change, maybe an additional tooth out back to trade a little top speed for sub-sonic convenience.  Pearlescent white over carbon looks so classy a tux might be good riding gear.  The owner relates recent maintenance in the eBay auction:

If you know sport bikes, you know MV Augusta is Motorcycle Art! This 200 mph F4 is in mint condition; stored for years as part of an MV collection. Beautiful paint, 2 tone pearl white and pearl black. This bike is completely stock, except for sprockets upgrade. New Metzler M5 tires. Recent oil service and coolant service…

The 312R was MV’s pinnacle for a bit, superceded by the RR and then very special Castiglioni tributes.  The air slips over this veritable work of art, with premium appointments adding up to a $30K MSRP, making the current ask seem almost reasonable.  The same folks who said you’d be just as quick and a lot more sensible on any of the Pacific flagships are still on duty, but now saving you just a few thousand instead of the huge when-new dollars.  In this case the big step to a real exotic isn’t such a leap !

-donn

Distinguished – 2008 MV Agusta F4 312R
MV Agusta December 1, 2018 posted by

Understated bruiser: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750S

When Massimo Tamburini was done laying waste to the sportbike world with the sinewy beauty and kneecap shattering performance of the Ducati 916, he wasted no time in returning to the Cagiva Research Center to one-up himself. The resulting MV Agusta F4 series plucked heart strings and squeezed adrenal glands in a totally different way, but its 20-year run as a pinup, racer and peerless track toy are evidence that Tamburini was a man whose talents knew no ceiling.

2002 MV Agusta F4S for sale on eBay

This 2002 MV Agusta F4S has the ’02 evolution engine, which pushed out nearly 140 horsepower at the crank, up from just shy of 130 in the earlier bikes. This one is as bog-standard as MV Agusta F4s get, with no special packages or limited-edition packages. It is just a simple, classy Italian rocketship in its purest form. Down to the fantastic, classy and stone-simple livery, everything about these turn of the century MVs is classy.

The seller says this example is basically in showroom condition, and the digital dash shows fewer than 3,000 miles. From the photos, the bike looks very clean and well kept, with one or two little exceptions. The lovely stock exhaust has been replaced with a set of carbon fiber jobs that have been relieved of their emblems. The seller spends the description gushing about F4s in general and doesn’t mention who made the pipes or what happened to the stock ones.

From the eBay listing:

One of the most beautiful motorcycles ever produced and a testament to Tamburini’s engineering skills. Buy an MV and you really do get your own personal slice of the legend. An F4 to look at, to polish…and to admire.
An incredible slice of Italian exotica.
Mechanically reliable with a build quality that rivals any manufacturer, the MV Augusta F4 750 S is as stunning to ride as it is to look at.

With an engine derived from a Ferrari F1 engine, the 750S rides as good as it looks.

As an objet d’art, an icon, a talisman, F4S is peerless. As a modern high-end sportbike its performance is legendary.

Through fast, sweeping corners, the F4’s slot-car stability, grippy Pirellis and effectively limitless cornering clearance permit as much speed and lean
angle as your skill and personal sphincter calibration can tolerate. If cornering speed is the name of the game, you’re looking at a major player. Still, this is a
motorcycle that goes fast on its own rules, not yours. Carve your way through corners. No flicking. The F4 responds best to firm input, and not just through the bars. Weight that inside peg. Push the fuel tank with your outside knee. Relative to the average Japanese sportbike, it’s like learning a new instrument. The tighter the road, the more effort it takes to make beautiful music together.

This 2002 750S is as clean as you’ll ever find. Virtually flawless in near-showroom condition with only 2817 miles.

Marin Speed Shop is the San Francisco Bay Area’s premier Ducati, Triumph and Vespa dealer. We also specialize in rare and vintage and custom motorbikes.

All of our pre-owned inventory had been through a thorough multi-point inspection and comes with a 30 day warranty.

Extended warranties are available on most models

We can provide financing from one of our many lenders and can also arrange shipping.

Email us for more details

The $8,400 asking price is probably on the optimistic side even for such a low-mile F4S, but I won’t be shocked if it grabs every bit of it.

Understated bruiser: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750S
MV Agusta December 1, 2018 posted by

Classic Italian Superbike: 1975 MV Agusta 750S America for Sale

I’m sure everyone who bought F4s, back when seemingly every version of that bike was a limited edition of one kind or another, was hoping to capture a bit of what  the MV Agusta 750S America offered: exclusivity, collectiblity, and ever-increasing values. It didn’t necessarily offer class leading performance because, while MV was famous for its racetrack successes, their roadbike was relatively tame: power was average and the bike was fairly heavy, with performance-sapping shaft-drive.

Shaft-drive was a viable, and far more reliable alternative to chain-and-sprocket setups back in the 1970s, and both the Moto Guzzi LeMans and BMW R90S managed to be competitive machines in spite of the performance handicap of shaft drive. But MV supposedly included shaft-drive on their roadbike specifically to limit performance, so privateers couldn’t simply buy a 750S and compete against MV’s factory efforts. The new bike really embodied a shift in the motorcycle market, away from the practical, small-displacement machines MV was producing for road use in the 1950s and towards more powerful, expensive four-cylinder machines exemplified by the Honda CB750 and Kawasaki Z1.

The complete 750S was relatively heavy and engine was designed to be durable, to suit the bike’s more grand touring mission statement. But its racing heritage shone through and the powerplant was pretty narrow, with gear-driven cams, exotic-looking sand-cast engine cases, and a complete lack of any filtration for the quartet of Dellorto carburetors. The original version displaced 742cc, made 69hp, and had drum brakes to haul the 560lbs wet machine down from the 130mph top speed. That sounds pretty unimpressive now, but was par for the course at the time among four-cylinder superbikes.

The 750S America that followed, known as the 800 Super America in parts of Europe, increased displacement to 787cc for a bump in horsepower and torque. It also moved the gearshift to the left-hand side in an effort to appeal to the US buyers, which makes sense considering it was marketed as the “America.” This later version was still burdened with that heavy driveshaft, but Arturo Magni, who worked with MV Agusta’s racing team during their heyday, manufactured a chain-drive conversion for the 750S. Magni is still in business, and maybe they can be persuaded to whip up another one for you, if you’re so inclined.

From the original eBay listing: 1975 MV Agusta 750S America

Most of you know the history of MV Agusta, with their 37 world championships with the likes of Read, Surtees and Agostini. The story of this bike is that it was conceived by the U.S. importer, Chris Garville, as a limited-edition (200 for the 1975 model year) sport bike for the American market based on the existing 750 Sport; that bike became known as the 750S America.

This 1975 750S America was one of the earliest models imported into the US, with engine number 221012 and frame number 221009.

First of only two owners was the importer, Garville Corporation, where it was used in displays, shows and magazine tests: as featured in Cycle, Big Bike and Motor Cycle World to name a few. Ownership was then transferred to Peter Garville (brother of importer Chris) in where it stayed in his possession until 1990.

Included with the motorcycle is a large collection of: Factory correspondence to support its provenance, magazine articles specific to this particular motorcycle, period brochures, and spare parts.

For further information please see the recently featured May/June 2018 edition of the American magazine Motorcycle Classics –

https://www.motorcycleclassics.com/classic-italian-motorcycles/classic-mv-agusta-motorcycles/1975-mv-agusta-750s-america-zmwz18mjzhur

As second owner, I acquired the bike from Garville in 1990 by way of famed restorer Perry Bushong (one of the first MV Agusta dealers in the US). Perry and I have had a life long friendship and working relationship. When he heard that this bike was coming up for sale he knew that this bike was for me. When I heard the sound of the 4 into 4 exhaust I was hooked and that is when it became mine. In 1994 I had the opportunity to meet John Surtees at Daytona and he was kind enough to autograph the fuel tank. After that the bike was ridden sporadically, mostly at bike events, rallys and shows until 2014 when I took it back to Perry to ask him to do the restoration, which was completed in the Fall of 2016. We added the curved racing exhaust built by Dave Kay in England, something I had always wanted to do as it looks fantastic and sounds like no other motorcycle on the road!

Sadly in 2017 both Perry and Mr. Surtees passed away within one week of each other.

The 750S was $6,500 when new, the equivalent of around $40,000 in today’s dollars. The starting bid for this one is $75,000 with no bids as yet, but plenty of time left on the auction. Fortunately, this machine has gracefully curved four-into-four exhaust pipes instead of the straight megaphones seen on earlier bikes that look good and sound better. There’s a reason Yamaha’s cross-plane crank has made such a big splash in recent years: traditional flat-plane crank inline fours are powerful, but can be a bit bland. But if you’re expecting the sanitary rustle of a modern four here, you’ll be shocked by the 750S America’s shrieking exhaust note and the bike has thoroughbred handling to match, in spite of the weight.

-tad

Classic Italian Superbike: 1975 MV Agusta 750S America for Sale
MV Agusta October 28, 2018 posted by

Rare Colors: 2005 MV Agusta F4 1000 for Sale

Prices for the Massimo Tamburini-styled MV Agusta F4 are currently at a low point, so if you can put up with the bike’s limitations and sometimes frustrating quirks, you can have what is arguably the best-looking sportbike of all time in your garage for the price of a used Suzuki. Most early F4 1000s you’ll find are the classic MV Agusta red-and-silver, but occasionally, you’ll see one of these silver-and-blue ones for sale.

It is a factory color combination, although you only rarely see them. I have a soft spot for this particular design, since the very first MV Agusta I had the opportunity to ride was in these colors. And, although everything you’ve heard about them is true, I was still smitten.

Issues with the first-generation F4 are well known: they’re hideously uncomfortable and they run hot, especially in traffic, the rear hub is very sensitive to overtightening and can fail catastrophically if not properly adjusted. Or even if it is. The fuel injection is crude, and obviously parts can be a problem for a bike that’s long been discontinued and was never produced in great numbers.

But if you’re willing to take the plunge on an older MV, you can update the radiator and fans, a more robust hub kit is available, and when the injection is properly sorted with a Power Commander or stand-alone system, the 998cc inline four pulls like a freight train and the F4 handles like you’d expect of a thoroughbred Italian superbike. There’s not a whole lot you can do to sort the cruel ergonomics, but adjustable rearsets and clipons might make it bearable, depending on your particular physique…

From the original eBay listing: 2005 MV Agusta F4 1000 for Sale

2005 Mv Agusta F4 1+1 well maintained super bike (recipients available) 

Unique and rare motorcycle for enthusiasts with great power and beautiful design.

Always garaged and adult owned, please let me know if you have any questions.

Thank you

*update please note a small dent on the tank (see last picture)

If you want an icon in your garage and have limited cash, or just want to convince strangers you’ve got more money and taste than you actually do, here’s your ride. The seller is asking just $6,900 for this one. Honestly, that’s a sharp price, assuming it’s been well maintained and doesn’t have any history of mechanical problems: the F4 is generally pretty robust, aside from the aforementioned issues, but the electrics can be fickle and a neglected MV will be a nightmare to put right. The seller doesn’t include much information in the listing, but claims it’s been well cared-for, and the photos suggest it’s a clean bike. The fact that he points out the small dent in the tank suggest that he’s probably pretty meticulous…

-tad

Rare Colors: 2005 MV Agusta F4 1000 for Sale