Posts by Category: MV Agusta

MV Agusta December 1, 2018 posted by

Understated bruiser: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750S

When Massimo Tamburini was done laying waste to the sportbike world with the sinewy beauty and kneecap shattering performance of the Ducati 916, he wasted no time in returning to the Cagiva Research Center to one-up himself. The resulting MV Agusta F4 series plucked heart strings and squeezed adrenal glands in a totally different way, but its 20-year run as a pinup, racer and peerless track toy are evidence that Tamburini was a man whose talents knew no ceiling.

2002 MV Agusta F4S for sale on eBay

This 2002 MV Agusta F4S has the '02 evolution engine, which pushed out nearly 140 horsepower at the crank, up from just shy of 130 in the earlier bikes. This one is as bog-standard as MV Agusta F4s get, with no special packages or limited-edition packages. It is just a simple, classy Italian rocketship in its purest form. Down to the fantastic, classy and stone-simple livery, everything about these turn of the century MVs is classy.

The seller says this example is basically in showroom condition, and the digital dash shows fewer than 3,000 miles. From the photos, the bike looks very clean and well kept, with one or two little exceptions. The lovely stock exhaust has been replaced with a set of carbon fiber jobs that have been relieved of their emblems. The seller spends the description gushing about F4s in general and doesn't mention who made the pipes or what happened to the stock ones.

From the eBay listing:

One of the most beautiful motorcycles ever produced and a testament to Tamburini's engineering skills. Buy an MV and you really do get your own personal slice of the legend. An F4 to look at, to polish...and to admire.
An incredible slice of Italian exotica.
Mechanically reliable with a build quality that rivals any manufacturer, the MV Augusta F4 750 S is as stunning to ride as it is to look at.

With an engine derived from a Ferrari F1 engine, the 750S rides as good as it looks.

As an objet d'art, an icon, a talisman, F4S is peerless. As a modern high-end sportbike its performance is legendary.

Through fast, sweeping corners, the F4's slot-car stability, grippy Pirellis and effectively limitless cornering clearance permit as much speed and lean
angle as your skill and personal sphincter calibration can tolerate. If cornering speed is the name of the game, you're looking at a major player. Still, this is a
motorcycle that goes fast on its own rules, not yours. Carve your way through corners. No flicking. The F4 responds best to firm input, and not just through the bars. Weight that inside peg. Push the fuel tank with your outside knee. Relative to the average Japanese sportbike, it's like learning a new instrument. The tighter the road, the more effort it takes to make beautiful music together.

This 2002 750S is as clean as you’ll ever find. Virtually flawless in near-showroom condition with only 2817 miles.

Marin Speed Shop is the San Francisco Bay Area's premier Ducati, Triumph and Vespa dealer. We also specialize in rare and vintage and custom motorbikes.

All of our pre-owned inventory had been through a thorough multi-point inspection and comes with a 30 day warranty.

Extended warranties are available on most models

We can provide financing from one of our many lenders and can also arrange shipping.

Email us for more details

The $8,400 asking price is probably on the optimistic side even for such a low-mile F4S, but I won't be shocked if it grabs every bit of it.

Understated bruiser: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750S
MV Agusta December 1, 2018 posted by

Classic Italian Superbike: 1975 MV Agusta 750S America for Sale

I'm sure everyone who bought F4s, back when seemingly every version of that bike was a limited edition of one kind or another, was hoping to capture a bit of what  the MV Agusta 750S America offered: exclusivity, collectiblity, and ever-increasing values. It didn't necessarily offer class leading performance because, while MV was famous for its racetrack successes, their roadbike was relatively tame: power was average and the bike was fairly heavy, with performance-sapping shaft-drive.

Shaft-drive was a viable, and far more reliable alternative to chain-and-sprocket setups back in the 1970s, and both the Moto Guzzi LeMans and BMW R90S managed to be competitive machines in spite of the performance handicap of shaft drive. But MV supposedly included shaft-drive on their roadbike specifically to limit performance, so privateers couldn't simply buy a 750S and compete against MV's factory efforts. The new bike really embodied a shift in the motorcycle market, away from the practical, small-displacement machines MV was producing for road use in the 1950s and towards more powerful, expensive four-cylinder machines exemplified by the Honda CB750 and Kawasaki Z1.

The complete 750S was relatively heavy and engine was designed to be durable, to suit the bike's more grand touring mission statement. But its racing heritage shone through and the powerplant was pretty narrow, with gear-driven cams, exotic-looking sand-cast engine cases, and a complete lack of any filtration for the quartet of Dellorto carburetors. The original version displaced 742cc, made 69hp, and had drum brakes to haul the 560lbs wet machine down from the 130mph top speed. That sounds pretty unimpressive now, but was par for the course at the time among four-cylinder superbikes.

The 750S America that followed, known as the 800 Super America in parts of Europe, increased displacement to 787cc for a bump in horsepower and torque. It also moved the gearshift to the left-hand side in an effort to appeal to the US buyers, which makes sense considering it was marketed as the "America." This later version was still burdened with that heavy driveshaft, but Arturo Magni, who worked with MV Agusta's racing team during their heyday, manufactured a chain-drive conversion for the 750S. Magni is still in business, and maybe they can be persuaded to whip up another one for you, if you're so inclined.

From the original eBay listing: 1975 MV Agusta 750S America

Most of you know the history of MV Agusta, with their 37 world championships with the likes of Read, Surtees and Agostini. The story of this bike is that it was conceived by the U.S. importer, Chris Garville, as a limited-edition (200 for the 1975 model year) sport bike for the American market based on the existing 750 Sport; that bike became known as the 750S America.

This 1975 750S America was one of the earliest models imported into the US, with engine number 221012 and frame number 221009.

First of only two owners was the importer, Garville Corporation, where it was used in displays, shows and magazine tests: as featured in Cycle, Big Bike and Motor Cycle World to name a few. Ownership was then transferred to Peter Garville (brother of importer Chris) in where it stayed in his possession until 1990.

Included with the motorcycle is a large collection of: Factory correspondence to support its provenance, magazine articles specific to this particular motorcycle, period brochures, and spare parts.

For further information please see the recently featured May/June 2018 edition of the American magazine Motorcycle Classics -

https://www.motorcycleclassics.com/classic-italian-motorcycles/classic-mv-agusta-motorcycles/1975-mv-agusta-750s-america-zmwz18mjzhur

As second owner, I acquired the bike from Garville in 1990 by way of famed restorer Perry Bushong (one of the first MV Agusta dealers in the US). Perry and I have had a life long friendship and working relationship. When he heard that this bike was coming up for sale he knew that this bike was for me. When I heard the sound of the 4 into 4 exhaust I was hooked and that is when it became mine. In 1994 I had the opportunity to meet John Surtees at Daytona and he was kind enough to autograph the fuel tank. After that the bike was ridden sporadically, mostly at bike events, rallys and shows until 2014 when I took it back to Perry to ask him to do the restoration, which was completed in the Fall of 2016. We added the curved racing exhaust built by Dave Kay in England, something I had always wanted to do as it looks fantastic and sounds like no other motorcycle on the road!

Sadly in 2017 both Perry and Mr. Surtees passed away within one week of each other.

The 750S was $6,500 when new, the equivalent of around $40,000 in today's dollars. The starting bid for this one is $75,000 with no bids as yet, but plenty of time left on the auction. Fortunately, this machine has gracefully curved four-into-four exhaust pipes instead of the straight megaphones seen on earlier bikes that look good and sound better. There's a reason Yamaha's cross-plane crank has made such a big splash in recent years: traditional flat-plane crank inline fours are powerful, but can be a bit bland. But if you're expecting the sanitary rustle of a modern four here, you'll be shocked by the 750S America's shrieking exhaust note and the bike has thoroughbred handling to match, in spite of the weight.

-tad

Classic Italian Superbike: 1975 MV Agusta 750S America for Sale
MV Agusta October 28, 2018 posted by

Rare Colors: 2005 MV Agusta F4 1000 for Sale

Prices for the Massimo Tamburini-styled MV Agusta F4 are currently at a low point, so if you can put up with the bike's limitations and sometimes frustrating quirks, you can have what is arguably the best-looking sportbike of all time in your garage for the price of a used Suzuki. Most early F4 1000s you'll find are the classic MV Agusta red-and-silver, but occasionally, you'll see one of these silver-and-blue ones for sale.

It is a factory color combination, although you only rarely see them. I have a soft spot for this particular design, since the very first MV Agusta I had the opportunity to ride was in these colors. And, although everything you've heard about them is true, I was still smitten.

Issues with the first-generation F4 are well known: they're hideously uncomfortable and they run hot, especially in traffic, the rear hub is very sensitive to overtightening and can fail catastrophically if not properly adjusted. Or even if it is. The fuel injection is crude, and obviously parts can be a problem for a bike that's long been discontinued and was never produced in great numbers.

But if you're willing to take the plunge on an older MV, you can update the radiator and fans, a more robust hub kit is available, and when the injection is properly sorted with a Power Commander or stand-alone system, the 998cc inline four pulls like a freight train and the F4 handles like you'd expect of a thoroughbred Italian superbike. There's not a whole lot you can do to sort the cruel ergonomics, but adjustable rearsets and clipons might make it bearable, depending on your particular physique...

From the original eBay listing: 2005 MV Agusta F4 1000 for Sale

2005 Mv Agusta F4 1+1 well maintained super bike (recipients available) 

Unique and rare motorcycle for enthusiasts with great power and beautiful design.

Always garaged and adult owned, please let me know if you have any questions.

Thank you

*update please note a small dent on the tank (see last picture)

If you want an icon in your garage and have limited cash, or just want to convince strangers you've got more money and taste than you actually do, here's your ride. The seller is asking just $6,900 for this one. Honestly, that's a sharp price, assuming it's been well maintained and doesn't have any history of mechanical problems: the F4 is generally pretty robust, aside from the aforementioned issues, but the electrics can be fickle and a neglected MV will be a nightmare to put right. The seller doesn't include much information in the listing, but claims it's been well cared-for, and the photos suggest it's a clean bike. The fact that he points out the small dent in the tank suggest that he's probably pretty meticulous...

-tad

Rare Colors: 2005 MV Agusta F4 1000 for Sale
MV Agusta October 12, 2018 posted by

Mileage Discount: 2005 MV Agusta F4 1000

MVs are known for many wonderful things. They make fabulous noises, handle on rails, have astounding power almost everywhere, there is more than enough lore around the brand, and they're sexy as hell and exclusive to top it off. But in true Italian fashion, they are not generally known for being the world's most reliable machines. Maintenance is paramount, and neglect is a deadly sin with these bikes.

2005 MV Agusta F41000 for sale on eBay

Clearly, the owner of this 2005 MV Agusta F4 1000 took those lessons to heart, and has racked up nearly 17,000 miles during his ownership. Even well-sorted and road-ready machines are generally lower mileage than this. Still, there's a good list of new parts and flushed fluids, so there's no real reason this thing won't be ready for another 17k under its next owner.

From the eBay listing:

very nice clean bike near perfect condition with 16,997 miles bike is priced already a grand below book value second owner recently changed all fluids, air filter,front tire nearly new back one still good melotti led rear turn signals has aftermarket exhaust and will also come with the stock pipes,have red rear tire hugger thats not installed will be included, bike stand shown in pic included

At the $6,250 asking price, this thing is worth getting hold of sight-unseen, though we certainly would give it a good once over after it's dropped off.

Mileage Discount: 2005 MV Agusta F4 1000
MV Agusta September 26, 2018 posted by

Teppista – 2012 MV Agusta Brutale 1090RR

Naked-sports wouldn't want to be left out of the absurd-power sweepstakes, and MV Agusta showed how it's done with the Brutale 1090RR.  While the theoretical top speed is more fun to discuss, the torque available from the big four is what makes it a joy on the road.  This example is nicely accessorized and offered by Miami's MV Agusta dealer.

2012 MV Agusta Brutale 1090RR for sale on eBay

 

While it is the largest engine in the MV Agusta range, the 1090 is actually a 1078cc, with the company's usual ( but amazing ) radial valve arrangement.  Plumbing is more evident on the near side, with the coolant and headers vying for room under the chro-moly trellis frame.  Appointments are outstanding, with 50mm Öhlins forks, Sachs monoshock with high and low speed damping adjustments, and Brembo's monobloc brakes which have four-piston calipers front and rear.  With 158hp you'll want nanny along, in the form of eight-level traction control.  Radiator shrouds are integrated into the design, making the RR more of a superbike with very small fairings.

 

Having logged but 666 miles, it's not your average used bike.  The suede parts of the seat look to have had the worst time over the years, with just a smudge here and there.  Otherwise the paint and metals are pretty mint, with the normally black wheels having been brightened at the powder-coating shop.  Notes from the eBay classified:

Features:
CRG ARROW BAR END MIRRORS
RIZOMA TURN SIGNALS
AFTERMARKET REARSET
SILVER RESERVOIR CAPS
CARBON FIBER UPPER CHAIN GUARD
CARBON FIBER KEY GUARD
CARBON FIBER REAR HUGGER
SILVER POWDER COATED RIMS
EVOTECH TAIL ELIMINATOR
MV AGUSTA RACE HEADERS WITH STOCK MUFFLERS

 

Seeming to have found the secret to paying the rent on sales of an exclusive line of sportbikes, MV Agusta's closely-held parent company bought back their outstanding shares at the end of last year.  They are even planning to return to MotoGP in the 600cc Moto2 class next season.  Offerings from Varese are regularly reviewed as a singular experience, the avant-garde design and premium build speaking to MV's long history on two wheels.  The 1090RR is on Agusta's un-faired pinnacle, though peculiarly the model no longer appears on the Euro-side website.  The eBay offering is a classified without the distraction of an auction or make offer button, and seems to be a nice bargain at just over half the MSRP...

-donn

 

Teppista – 2012 MV Agusta Brutale 1090RR
Bimota September 24, 2018 posted by

Unobtainum alert: 2011 Bimota DB8 Oro Nero with 5 miles

2011 Bimota Oro Nero with 5 miles on ebay

Back in the early days on RSBFS there was an ongoing debate about what made a bike a true rare sportbike and  was mostly centered around Bimota models such as the SB6 which seemed to be available on eBay pretty much constantly.  Some  claimed that any bike that was readily available couldn't be a rare sportbike while the other side claimed availability wasn't as big an issue as factors such as technology or condition.   While I can't remember who got the final word, a set of criteria did result that I often use to evaluate whether a bike is truly a rare sportbike.  These criteria are

► extremely low availability/production numbers
► technological or historical significance 
► location 
► desirability 
► condition
► high original price, especially compared to other models in the same manufacturers lineup

Obviously not every bike posted on RSBFS has all these criteria but the more of these criteria that a bike has the more it seems to qualify as a rare sportbike.  Perhaps most importantly, if a bike has ALL the criteria listed above then its considered to be "unobtanium" and definitely worth a post.  Today's post is a 2011 Bimota DB8 Oro Nero, a bike that seems to meet all the unobtainum criteria.

Let's run through the criteria starting with availability.  According to Wikipedia, only 10 Oro Nero were built.  The seller indicates this Bimota Oro Nero is #11 of 11 produced which seems odd at first but the seller has a plausible explanation for this which can be read on the Bimota forum (link here) and anyone who has dealt with the Italian manufacturers knows how a few extra models tend to appear here and there based on supplies.

As for technology, the Bimota Oro Nero wasn't just a pretty carbon-fiber face; it was actually  the first production bike to offer the combination of a carbon fiber frame, subframe and swingarm.

Location?   It's currently located in California, the heart of sportbike country in the USA.

Desirability?  Well if you are like me and you like the pure carbon fiber look then damn this thing is sexy.   The pics provided by the seller aren't the best (they seem to  indoors and don't give a full walk around on the bike) so I reached out to the seller and they were kind enough to share some additional video links along with pictures on the ebay listing, see below

Vid 1 - coming home in the sun

Pic 1 - Upper frame in carbon

Video 2 - Walkaround

Pic 2 - Rear swingarm in carbon

Video 3 - rolling it into the garage

As for condition/maintenance, with 5 miles since new there isn't a lot to talk about on this one.   The pics the seller includes on the ebay listing do seem to show recent maintenance (not sure where/when this was done though) and I think I spot a new tire sticker in the last video.  The fluid in the brake reservoir does look its due for a change though.

The last criteria for being a rare sportbike is OEM price.  The Oro Nero was originally offered for $80,000 USD so the sellers Buy-It-Now price of $91,000 USD isn't as outrageous as it might first seem (and the ebay auction indicates that offers will be considered).

Now that we have reviewed this bike's unobtanium qualifications we arrive at the final question - is this this bike something to put on your collection list?  $80,000 USD is still a fair chunk of change for a bike that has a plastic gas tank cover and what appears to be a phantom pillion seat pad (no footrests for a passenger).  Also the full carbon look isn't really exclusive to the Oro Nero; other options include the Aprilia Nera, the Kawasaki H2 carbon or if money is really no object there is the MV Agusta F4cc.

Even though the Oro Nero is definitely worthy of a post here on RSBFS it doesn't seem likely it will appreciate much in the near future.   It seems like its more of a long term investment that will appeal to a deep pocketed and patient collector or perhaps to a Bimota collector looking to complete their lineup.   While it will probably never ellicit a reaction like an RC30 or Desmosedici whomever buys it will be able take comfort in the fact that have something that even the famous Barber and Solvang museums don't have.

Martin G/Dallaslavowner

Unobtainum alert:  2011 Bimota DB8 Oro Nero with 5 miles