Posts by Category: Laverda

Featured Listing November 7, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1999 Laverda 750S Formula for Sale

Sort of an homologation special for a company that wasn't planning to actually go racing, the Laverda 750S Formula used premium components to upgrade the company's existing fully-faired sportbike. After falling on hard times in the 1980s, Laverda was resurrected in the 1990s, with production centered in the town of Zanè, so you'll sometimes see these referred to as "Zane-era Laverdas" to differentiate them from the 1970s classics. The revitalized company managed to make very nice sports motorcycles with limited resources, and the Formula took their  750S and added some of the very best components available at the time to create something they hoped would give them the kind of reputation and attention Ducati enjoyed with their Tamburini-designed superbikes.

Laverdas of the period used either a steel trellis or an aluminum beam frame that apparently shared the same geometry, which was a very good thing. The Nico Bakker-designed beam frame, polished as seen here on the Formula, gave the 750S an excellent foundation, and Paioli suspension kit at both ends just sweetened the deal: every period review I've seen raved about the bike's handling. Unfortunately, they also noted the bike's performance deficit, compared to the Ducati 748.

These days, parallel twins can be made to be very smooth and refined with balance shafts and other trickery, but at the time, the only real reason Laverda chose that configuration was practicality: they already had one. Dating back to the 1970s Alpino, the existing air-cooled 500cc unit had its carburetors replaced with Weber-Marelli fuel injection for more modern performance, and was enlarged to 668cc, then again to 747cc. Along the way, it gained liquid cooling, although you can still see the cooling fins once the fairings are off.

Claimed peak power was on par with the competing Ducati 748, but the reality was that, although handling was possibly even superior to the Ducati, the engine was not. It was peaky, a bit thrashy, and it loved to rev, although you really had to work the six-speed gearbox to keep up with a 748. That shouldn't bother prospective buyers today: either bike would get murdered by a modern 600. And while the 748 is a design classic, it's almost too familiar, a cliché. The Formula, on the other hand, is a very exclusive machine, with around 600 examples built. It's also more comfortable, if you care about that, and while the Formula is not as pretty as the 748, it is very striking in these black-and-orange colors.

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Laverda 750S Formula for Sale

1999 Laverda 750 Formula S. 750CC  (6790 ORIGINAL MILES)  $12,500

Contact the seller here: sennaducati79@gmail.com

This is a 2 owner bike, part of a very rare large collection now being offered for the first time via the web. Current owner is an avid collector of pure, rare Automotive and motorcycles. This concourse conditioned bike has all the correct lightweight carbon parts and pieces. Never been on a track, abused or laid down. In a private heated collection, never seen rain. This investment will only increase over time and you will be very hard pressed to ever see another one, clearly not like this with these miles.

Laverda’s Formula S is essentially a factory built special edition of the basic Formula, with extensive engine tuning and even more special chassis componentry. The original Formula was a 650, built in 1996, with the Formula 750 following a year later in 1997.

The engine work was more extensive than most factory specials, and took the Formula almost to a race tune straight from the showroom. Updated cams, revised fuel injection settings and carbon fiber Termignoni mufflers all boost top end power to an impressive claimed figure of (92BHP)- almost as much as the Ducati 748. The chassis also compares to the Ducati being considerably lighter and with suspension and braking components every bit as impressive.

Fully adjustable Paioli Upside Down forks and monoshock. Fully floating Brembo racing brakes and lightweight Marchesini wheels all play their part in giving the Formula impeccable manners for the street or track. The polished aluminum beam frame looks much more impressive than the Ducati’s thin steel tube!! A single seat race style fairing incorporates stylish cooling louvers and twin endurance style headlights, and is finished in Laverda Orange, the firm's racing colors.

This is your chance to stand out and be different with a stunning example of Italian heritage.

I've lusted after these for a while now, and this appears to be a very clean, low-mileage example that should appeal to collectors with a taste for the exotic. The mirrors appear to have been removed and the standard exhausts were carbon fiber, but these Termignoni parts are a desirable extra. Certainly, the name "Laverda" has a great deal of cachet with collectors and this bike represents a missed opportunity for the brand: it's a good, if flawed bike, and really did offer an interesting alternative to the Ducati. Parts for Zane-era Laverdas can be tricky to source, depending on what you need, but I expect this one will end up leading a pampered life in a collection somewhere and won't rack up enough miles to matter very much.

Contact the seller here: sennaducati79@gmail.com

-tad

Featured Listing: 1999 Laverda 750S Formula for Sale
Laverda August 18, 2018 posted by

Objet d’Art: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC for Sale

Wow, two Laverda 750 SFCs in one week, both with very serious pricing. Although, of the two, this one appears to be more original and is in much nicer, if less patina-d condition and appears to... what the hell, it's decorating a New York City apartment?! Oh well, I guess if I had the money for real estate in NYC with a stylish freight elevator, I'd probably do exactly the same thing...

It has no real bearing on its quality but, since I don't get to see most of these bikes in the flesh, I do appreciate some decent photography, and the SFC is certainly a deserving subject. I realize that orange isn’t likely to be too many people’s first choice for their fantasy motorcycle, but it just looks so right on a Laverda: it’s a brash color on a purposeful bike. These really were road-legal race bikes, the ultimate development of Laverda’s rugged parallel-twin platform before their switch to the triple, and the SFC had a history of racing success.

Laverda got their start making agricultural machinery, and their natural tendency to overbuild everything to increase reliability extended to their motorcycles. The two-cylinder engine had five main bearings and the very highest-quality components were used wherever possible: Ceriani provided the suspension, Bosch the ignition components, and Nippon-Denso the starter. Introduced as a 650cc machine, the displacement was quickly increased to 750cc so it could compete against bikes from Triumph, Norton, Ducati, and Moto Guzzi.

The SFC or "Super Freni Competizione" was named for its enormous magnesium Ceriani four leading-shoe front brake, although the later machines used a more effective dual disc setup as seen here. The 1974 model also featured improvements to the frame to make it lower and lighter, and suspension was updated as well. Engines were far from standard, and the bikes produced between 71 and 80hp.

The seller mentions that the sale is motivated by a move to the West Coast. New York City seems to an outsider like it'd be an amazing place to be a biker, and the traffic means motorcycles make huge practical sense. But road surface quality that wouldn't look out of place in Berlin at the end of World War II and traffic that more closely resembles gladiatorial combat than any sort of cooperative endeavor combine to make motorcycle riding in NYC less fun than it should be. Traffic in much of California is pretty awful as well, but legal lane-splitting, beautiful roads, and year-round riding weather would have me reconsidering a sale of this one if it were on display in my living room...

From the original eBay Listing: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC for Sale

Original 1974 "17000 series" Laverda SFC #17093 in perfect unrestored condition. If you don't know the history of these extremely limited and hand-built racers, just Google them.  She is the best time capsule in existence for sure. She has not been on the road since the late 70's.  Previous to my purchase as third owner, she was in a private collection for 30+ years in the Southwestern USA. I purchased her from the second owner as he was selling his collection due to his advanced age and he wanted her to go to a collector who would hopefully leave her untouched. This SFC also has its original "2-into-1" exhaust pipe that I removed as the original "2-into-2" exhaust pipe looks better when the bike is on display.  The original "2-into-1" pipe is included in the sale. I have turned over the engine every other month over the last few years. She still has all of her original fuel lines, taps and all hardware as included from day one. The only missing item is the original battery... lol. She has 2,930 miles and still has her original tires. I have a collection of over 20 motorcycles of which this is my clear favorite. She resides in my home office in New York City and I get to admire her every time I work at home. Time for her to find a new home as I am downsizing my collection as we are planing a move to the West Coast. I believe she deserves to reside in a museum or as any new owner seems fit. Re-commision her and take her to the track! I have often thought of re-commsioning her and taking her out as she should be ridden; but I never seem to be able to remove the original fuel lines and tires, etc. to make that happen. These time capsules are original only once in its life, and she remains that way to this day. I am happy to answer any questions.  f you would like to see any particular pictures, just ask. The bike can be seen by appointment in New York City. Deposit due within 24 hours and final payment by wire or bank check. If by bank check, bike does not leave my possession until the funds are cleared.  Good Luck!

This example is basically a museum piece, less a living document and more of an archival record, although the owner does "turn the engine over." I think he means "by hand" so I'm sure it will still need recommissioning if the new owner plans to ride it. It has a the full dash with both a tachometer and speedometer, something relatively rare among the SFCs I've seen for sale in the past few years: like many exotic bikes and cars of the period, they were a bit like snowflakes, and no two were exactly alike. With fewer than 600 produced during the entire run, the SFC is one of the most desirable sportbikes of the 1970s, and prices have obviously been increasing as a result. What's it worth? Well last week's was obviously a bridge too far for our readers, but this one, while still a very expensive proposition, is slightly less of one: the Buy It Now is only $135,000! Perhaps the nearly perfectly-preserved condition helps justify the asking price, although the last couple examples we featured were less than half that and in very nice condition...

-tad

Objet d’Art: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC for Sale
Laverda August 15, 2018 posted by

Overnight Success: 1984 Laverda 1000 RGS Executive

When you think "high speed touring" the usual suspects usually begin with BMW and then taper off quickly towards some muted, former sportbike, Japanese road missile (think Connie or otherwise). All good choices, to be sure. But if I challenged you to narrow your answer to cover the 1970s and 1980s, what would you say? BMW still comes to mind... but not a whole lot else. We're not talking about the two-wheeled Winnebagos with which the Big Four did battle across the decades. We are talking about packing a briefcase and a small bag and streaking across the autobahn/autostrada at max velocity for an overnight trip. Compared to the rather staid Beemers, today's RGS Executive was as exotic as a Ferrari, and just as rare.

1984 Laverda 1000 RGS Executive for sale on eBay

The engine powering the RGS was Laverda's long-serving and very charismatic three-cylinder 981cc engine, the legacy of the Jota. With the latest spec mill having a smoother 120° crankshaft - instead of the less refined 180° lumpy crank timing - and rubber mounts the big triple was very nearly civilized. But what really made the RGS was the bodywork. With a large, aerodynamic fairing, comfortable seat and swoopy tail section the RGS was spit and polish on the basic bones that were born in the mid-1970s. The top spec of the lineup - the Executive model - added fairing extensions for even more weather protection, bar risers and matching color-coded hard bags. Performance was strong for the time, suspension was courtesy of Marzocchi, and cast wheels and Brembo brakes rounded out the package. Expensive, exclusive and totally unique, the Laverda RGS Executive stands out as an icon from a manufacturer that has created quite a few.

From the seller:
I bought this Executive early this year with only 2500 miles. It was stored away in a warehouse since the late 80's. It had the original Laverda FIAMM battery and original tires when I took possession. I performed the usual tasks that one does to a bike that's been dormant for several years. I replaced the battery, tires, rebuilt front and rear brakes, clutch, front end, rebuilt carbs and did an added some fresh oil. I also installed a Sachse electronic ignition. It runs flawlessly but has some cosmetic issues. It's an all original bike with original paint. It has a baseball size dent on the tank which can be seen in the photos. Also has an area on the topside of right pannier that's been scratched or scuffed. The right side fairing extension is cracked. The aluminum piece of the right pannier fell of on the road and is missing. The original tank had old fuel in it for 3 decades and it was full of sticky gunk so an NOS tank was purchased installed. As you can see in the picture the NOS tank has a dent. The original tank was mint on the outside but the inside nit so much. The original tank recently fell over on my bench and now has a golf ball size dent in the same area as the installed tank. The bike will include the spare tank and if the buyer wants the original battery and phantom tires they will be included as well. All the cosmetic mishaps occurred while bike was in storage.

While the Laverda family threw in the towel in 1985, the company continued the occasional spasm of activity through the 1990s - including a rather audacious reboot attempt that unfortunately failed. Last owned by Aprilia and now fully shuttered, one can consider the long run of Laverda to be from 1873 until about 2004. That's a run of over 130 years, for those of you counting along at home. And during that time Laverda made a name for itself as building motorcycles for real men; motorcycles with substance. This RGS Executive is one of the final models offered by Laverda, and remains a beautiful and collectible machine. Outclassed by the fit, finish and demonic attention to detail of the Japanese, the RGS brings something to the party that cannot be matched by any other motorcycle.

This particular RGS Executive is a very low mileage example: only 4,430 original miles claimed by the seller. That is not a lot of travel for a long-legged beast like this one. Overall the bike looks to be in decent shape, but there are some very obvious (and unfortunate) cosmetic issues. The grips are also not stock items. Keep in mind that we are talking about a low-volume, mostly hand-built machine from a defunct manufacturer. Parts specific to this model will be pricey and hard to find, although the fan base and support group for Laverda remains strong. Does the low number on the odometer equate to a high number at sale time? Given the rarity of the Executive model, there must be interest - but we really don't have enough current data to determine value. Certainly the $15,900 OBO ask is strong, but not horribly out of line across the last 10 years or so. Check out this rare beauty here, and enjoy another cool bike that you won't see every day. Good Luck!!

MI

Overnight Success: 1984 Laverda 1000 RGS Executive
Laverda August 10, 2018 posted by

Blue-Chip Classic Friday: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC for Sale

Back in the 1960s and 1970s you could buy race cars and race bikes that were basically road-legal, vehicles you could actually drive or ride to the track and reasonably expect to be competitive with pretty minimal changes. Of course, those days are long gone: race machines often share very few components with their road-going counterparts and frequently bear little resemblance to any sort production vehicles whatsoever. But today's Laverda 750 SFC was a machine from the tail end of that earlier era and was very much a race bike with some lights and signals slapped on to make it vaguely road-worthy.

I mean, just take a look at that taillight: was it thoughtfully integrated into a specially-designed cut-out? Nope, it was literally bolted to the sloped rear face of a solo tail section that was obviously designed with a number-plate in mind. The instruments are basically just a tach, ignition barrel, and indicator light bolted to the inside of the fairing: this thing is the epitome of crude, at least in terms of creature-comforts and finish. Speedo? Who cares? Just figure out what revs approximate which highway speeds in top gear and assume you could just outrun cops of the period anyway.

But forget refinement: the mechanicals are where it's at, and the bike has those in spades. Early models used a huge alloy drum brake, and later machines like this one a pair of discs, giving the bike it's name: "Super Freni Competizione" or basically "Super Braking Racebike." Laverda used the very best components available everywhere they could, and the basic parallel-twin was overbuilt and very durable, making it ideal for endurance racing.

Ceriani forks, Bosch ignition, and Nippon-Denso electrical components, and that 744cc parallel twin with five main bearings, backed up by a five speed gearbox that put the bike's claimed 75hp to the rear wheel. This example isn't some museum-piece and the seller mentions it's done quite a bit of track time. How much? Who knows: like many SFCs, this one lacks a speedometer, and therefore an odometer. The tach looks non-standard, although I've seen several different types fitted to the original bikes. It's hard to tell from the pic, but maybe it's a Scitsu unit?

From the original eBay listing: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC for Sale

Am 76 and it's time to let go of my collection. Started collecting about 50 years ago and the main objective was to buy one owner high end cars and motorcycles for pleasure and investment. I won't bore you repeating the history of the 750 SFC Laverdas - If you are reading this you already know of the Laverda 750 SFC's iconic competition accomplishments, background and rarity. Hand built by a small number of employees, there were only 100 of these limited production Laverda 750 SFC competition motorcycles manufactured in 1974. Recently brought out of storage, it is an authentic two owner (I am the 2nd owner) matching numbers factory original survivor. I purchased it from the gentleman who bought it new at a dealership in Florida. He raced it on every motorcycle race track East of the Mississippi up until around 1984, when he found out he had terminal cancer and put the bike in storage. He did not want to sell it but had to liquidate his holdings. It is a beautiful piece of art. The engine had a complete overhaul from a company called Megacycle in California after it's last race and is in fresh like new original condition. Runs perfectly. What a sound. An exhilerating deep throbbing sound that can only come from a Laverda 750 SFC. It has been cleaned and the brakes rebuilt. It is in it's original racing condition complete with period stickers, as it came off the last track. The engine mount tab is indeed stamped "SFC" from the factory. My collection included many motorcycles but I kept this one for the last and had no intention of ever selling it - but to be realistic it needs to move along to another caretaker. I have framed photos of it being raced at different tracks and the original 1974 owners manual. Please read the complete description so you will understand all conditions and any issues. THERE IS NO TITLE - Sold on a Georgia bill of sale and Georgia Sheriffs Department inspection certificate. I will answer all email questions and consider offers.

Just 549 total were built between 1971 and 1975. So the Buy It Now for this race-bred classic? A mere... $195,000?! Well, maybe that's a mistake. I mean, it is eBay after all. So the starting bid is... $150,000?! Wow, I guess he is serious. Well I'll be curious to see if anyone bites. Seems like a major auction might be a better bet for something like this, but who knows? Certainly the SFC is one of the most valuable and collectible bikes of the era, and prices are certainly headed in that direction.

-tad

 

Blue-Chip Classic Friday: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC for Sale
Laverda May 24, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SF2

In 1974, the Laverda SF2 was roughly equivalent to an R1M, though at the time, twin disc brakes sufficed for high technology. Over-engineered and powerful, the bike in its day was as fast as it was premium. They aren't easy to find in any condition, let alone fully restored.

1974 Laverda SF2 for sale on eBay

This one, which is located in a dusty corner of New Mexico, has been treated to a full engine and transmission rebuild recently  and wears an older cosmetic restoration. The seller says it isn't perfect, or entirely correct or original, but it will make a great riding addition to a Euro bike collection.

The seller went over the bike's attributes in great detail, so we'll let him take it from here. From the eBay listing:

1974 Laverda 750 SF2

First introduced at the 1966 Earls Court Show the big Laverda twin was a 650. Barely 100 were made before becoming a 750 in 1968. As production was about to begin, in 1968, four prototype twins were entered in the Giro d'Italia and all four finished in the top ten. The factory officially began racing in 1969 enjoying considerable success in long distance events like the Barcelona 24 hours and the Bol d'Or. These successes lead to the production development of the road bikes. In 1971 two intrepid Italians, one just 20 years old, took a pair of production 750s on a 34,000km ride from Tierra del Fuego to Alaska. They actually started in Buenos Aires, then to Tierra del Fuego, then to Anchorage, Alaska (if you'd like to read more about this adventure pick up a copy of Jean-Louis Olive's book Raid Tierra del Fuego - Alaska ISBN 9782956254812

A bike that was built to stay built. Laverda's own foundry sandcast the alloy engine components. The crankshaft is a pressed up full roller affair with a duplex chain drive to a camshaft running in ball bearings. Ancillaries were all top shelf components; much of the electrics including the starter and generator by Bosch, suspension by Ceriani, rims by Borrani, switchgear and instruments by Nippondenso (starting 1974), etc.

By 1973 the 750 shared carburettor and valve sizes with the illustrious SFC. The SF2 of 1974 introduced disc brakes. The first production bike with twin front discs. Further reading can be found online at RealClassic uk , simply search for Laverda SF750.

This example of the SF2 is an older restoration which has recently benefited from a full mechanical rebuild of the engine and gearbox, carbs, front suspension, brakes. It has also been fitted with fresh tires, drive chain and battery. This numbers matching bike sports the optional solo seat with locking glove box. It is finished in a dark metallic grey close to one of the 17 factory shades offered on these machines. This is not a concours machine by any means yet it is an attractive and reasonably correct (seat should be satin black, pattern silencers and stainless brake hose) rider in sound mechanical condition. If I were to do anything toward modernization it would be to upgrade the rear dampers to Koni or Ikon units. Included is the original exhaust crossover box, indicator stalks and owners manual. Please ask if you wish for specific images.

Something you'll appreciate, as a rider, is the ease of service by the owner and the absolute reliability of its operation. Simple to maintain it begs a "How to keep your Laverda 750 alive for the complete idiot" (with apologies to John Muir). However, the esteemed Mssrs. Tim Parker and Phil Todd have conspired to produce the Twin and Triple Repair & Tune Up Guide; ISBN: 9780979689109 aka "the Green Book". Get one. There are also international forums and facebook pages for the marque.

With a total production run, of all models 650/750, being something less than 19,000 units you'll be fortunate to see one on the road (compare this to something like 150,000+ Norton Commandos) or at a bike show. This is a good time to saddle up on a relatively unknown and undervalued, sporting machine known for its stable handling and inspiring reliability. For mountain residents I can jet for your altitude.

As it is for sale locally (Santa Fe -Taos CL) and may be removed from auction do consider the buy it now option.

The bike is on Craigslist in New Mexico for $12,000, though the bidding is at just over $8,000 with three days left.

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SF2
Laverda May 16, 2018 posted by

Semi-Finalist – 1983 Laverda RGS1000

Laverda was already reeling from overseas competition in the early 1980's, but had the gumption for one more design project.  The RGS was based on their recent 1000cc air-cooled triple and rode more like a Beemer than a finicky Italian exotic.  This one has been enjoyed, but is quite original and well maintained.

1983 Laverda RGS1000 ( Canada ) for sale on eBay

For the RGS, Laverda civilized the 981 cc engine with rubber mounts and quieter exhaust, but the 83 hp didn't suffer.  Marzocchi  suspension is found front and rear, but triple 280mm Brembo brakes are a little undersized for a 135 mph streamliner.  Designer details like the Veglia dash, removable pillion fairing and the tank filler in the front ( out of the way of a tank bag ) are sweet period items.

Over the age of EPA, this Laverda should be an easy import from British Columbia.  Seems cared-for despite the mileage - though my back-of-the-napkin ( ok, google ) conversion shows 57,000 miles from 92,000 KM.  Making it sound like a recent acquisition, the owner isn't a slave to details, but says this in the eBay auction:

Hello, have my beautiful almost all orig RGS to sell.  Wolfgang recently went thru her before my purchase with full tuneup, fluids, tires, rejet, etc.  He has most history on it, has had top end done plus small items.  Most normal upgrades done with ignition, etc.  Runs very strong, and smooth.

After the Laverda family abandoned ship in 1985, the company was fits and starts until industrialist Francesco Tognon was nearly successful with a couple of new models in the 1990's, making the RGS almost the last design from an icon dating back to 1873.  Fast, quiet, and smooth, the Laverda was unfortunately slower, heavier, and more expensive than its Japanese rivals.  But if you're after a continental 1980's experience, the RGS is one of a very few...

-donn

Semi-Finalist – 1983 Laverda RGS1000