Posts by Category: Featured Listing

Featured Listing December 4, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1985 Kawasaki Ninja 600R

The seller of this early-run 1985 Kawasaki Ninja 600R recently completed a fastidious restoration of the bike, down to changing the aged rubber charcoal canister strap for an OEM replacement. He also sourced new gaskets for the anti-dive system in the forks, which took some parts hunting, elbow grease and careful planning. The forks got a new coat of paint and fresh seals when the rebuild was done.

1985 Kawasaki Ninja 600R for sale on eBay

The list goes on from there, including freshened carburetors and a couple invisible fairing repairs. The bike was evidently a solid rider before the current owner got ahold of it and made it into a running and riding museum piece. It has fewer than 7,000 miles on the odometer and was looked after properly over its life, so there shouldn't be much cause to worry about engine internals.

These bikes were far ahead of their time when they were launched, and forecasted aggressive riding positions, handling-friendly 16-inch wheels, full fairings and weight savings. By the time the Honda Hurricane came along two years later, Kawasaki was already preparing to refresh the Ninja 600R. The early bikes, known as the GPZ600R in other markets, pushed out about 75 horsepower (some say 76), which was good for 135 mph. The engines responded to revs, and contemporary reviewers said the bikes felt a little flat until the party got going around 8,000 rpm. Keep the engine on the boil, though, and the 600R would sing, and was nimble, if not totally sure-footed, on the tiny 16-inch tires.

From the eBay listing:

Completely original 1985 Kawasaki Ninja ZX600A California.
This is the first year of the Ninja, this model is a first run #2460 made 12/84. It has just 6610 miles. It was purchased in California by the first owner (it has the CA vent box) . I am the second owner and have put no miles on the bike other than test rides.
This is a rare bike in original/collector condition. No resto-queen here, this is the real deal. You are not likely to find another in this condition, and if you do you'll be faced with a great deal of work to get it into this ready to ride condition.
The bike starts and runs beautifully. I wouldn't make it a daily rider, but if you're a collector that likes to run your bikes - this is the one.
I found the bike in great condition, as the previous owner was an older rider who used the bike as a commuter and always stored it inside with proper storage habits.
The bike is in 99.9% original condition, with all original parts or updated OEM parts. It is the perfect survivor, the perfect collector (all original parts that were replaced are included).
This is my 4th nut-and-bolt restoration in the last 10 years (and likely my last). I’m moving to custom builds from here on out. In some ways it was the hardest restoration I’ve done, as I felt it was very important to keep the bike absolutely original and to be non-destructive instead of trying to reach “perfection”. I believe I’ve succeeded to the best of the situation – the following items have been addressed:
Fairing repair:
The previous owner dropped the bike in his garage, resulting in a the left turn signal hitting the wall, causing a silver dollar sized series of cracks around the mounting hole. The previous owner repaired the damage, but it was simply glued and the cracks were still visible.
I carefully grooved the cracks and seams, filled and repaired things properly with a professional plastic welding solution, I filled the area with vinyl body filler and sanded all things smooth.
It was professionally painted (only on the repaired spot) with perfectly matched paint and then clear coated to blend, and properly buffed. It is impossible to see the repair – except on the inside where you may see the weld seams when the fairing is off.
A similar process was followed on the nose cone, where a couple of scratches and rock dings necessitated proper attention. This repair is impossible to see as well.
Tank:
First, the tank has a very small, dime-sized impression on the back/top/left side (see photos) and the blue ring has age cracks (normal for an original bike of this age).
I have replaced the cap and repainted the outer cap ring (old parts included and in near perfect shape). I have also sourced and replaced an EOM fuel-level sending unit from England, as the old one failed due to corrosion.
The tank was fairly clean on the inside, but it was beginning to gather some rust on the surface. It was cleaned with muriatic acid and flushed, but still needed further cleaning – so I recently did a round with OTC rust remover. It’s very clean now.
New OEM petcock was installed as the original was beyond repair.
Forks:
If you are at all familiar with these bikes you know that they included a very complicated anti-dive system (known as ADVS) that used the front brake fluid pressure to dynamically control the compression dampening.
Great idea, but it was prone to leaking and corrosion over time - as there were many rubber parts inside. It is very common for the piston to corrode and leak out onto the fork – as was the case on the left fork of this bike.
As with the fairing, I carefully matched and repaired the paint on the fork, clear coated it, and completely overhauled the ADVS and fork seals with all new rubber (which is not easy to source BTW – OEM parts were found in England and Japan).
Everything was properly painted and overhauled – and all original fork stickers unaffected by the repairs. It is impossible to see the repair.
Brakes:
Just like all the other rubber on this bike, the brake calipers and levers were completely dried out and either seized or leaking.
I sourced all of the proper OEM seals for the calipers and primary/secondary cylinders and overhauled all, repainting a couple of items that showed corrosion.
The rotors were repainted and surfaces sanded and scuffed. Everything looks like new. New brake OEM brake pads have been installed on all three brakes as well (see photos).
Carbs:
The carbs were actually in perfect condition – but just like everything else, the rubber was dry. So, all new rubber gaskets were installed, and new fuel lines (I have placed a filter in-line as an insurance policy – not stock).
Misc:
Plugs, oil, filter, battery, chain, new charcoal box rubber strap (OEM), windscreen is original – outer face was sanded and polished, windscreen trim tabs replaced (OEM), etc. – no detail left out, all parts OEM.
Any small rust/dings were eraser sanded and airbrushed or spot brushed with the correct paint. These repairs are also impossible to see.
As you can see by the photos, everything on this bike is in great shape and very clean. It’s hard to believe a bike this old can still look this clean and perfect under the hood after all these years. It was a bit dusty, so I’ve cleaned literally every nook and cranny on the bike – including the entire motor (which was cleaned with bio-degreaser and toothbrush).
Please feel free to message me with any questions.

If the description doesn't convince you, the pictures will. If you're looking for a pristine version of the ancestor of modern sport bikes, look no further.

Featured Listing: 1985 Kawasaki Ninja 600R
Featured Listing November 23, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 2006 Moto Guzzi MGS-01 Corsa for Sale

Much as Moto Guzzi's purchase by the Piaggio Group saved the company from possible [likely?] extinction, it also doomed any chance that a new superbike to compete with Ducati or Aprilia would see the light of day. And one did reach the prototype stage, with a narrower-angle, longitudinally-mounted [I will die on that hill] v-twin that improved cornering clearance, with liquid-cooling, four valves, and a chain final-drive. So for the foreseeable future, today's Featured Listing Moto Guzzi MGS-01 is the closest we will get to a true sportbike from Mandello del Lario.

With no headlight or signals and just a mesh screen covering the air scoop that led to an oil cooler, it's pretty obvious that the original MGS-01 Corsa is a track-only machine. A roadgoing "Strada" version was supposed to follow, but unfortunately never materialized. In spite of a design that dates back to the early 2000s, the lack of bodywork and unnecessary stylistic flourishes mean it's aged well and the bike looks very spartan and purposeful.

It's quite obviously based around the standard Moto Guzzi Daytona powertrain that uses the air-cooled, four-valve "high cam" engine, the V11 Sport's six-speed box, and shaft drive. But beyond that, it's had a raft of high-performance parts thrown at it and is stripped to the bare minimum to save precious pounds, and lacks any sort of road-legal lighting. New internals took displacement out to 1225cc and the updated mill was good for 122hp and a staggering 82 lb-ft of torque.

Period reviews of the Corsa were very flattering, with the usual caveat that it wasn't really light or powerful enough to compete directly with the likes of something like a Ducati 999 in Superbike racing when it was new. So, aside from a couple of race series that catered to big, air-cooled twins, it was really just a very expensive track-day toy. These days, it does fit within the rules for several AHRMA classes, so well-heeled contrarian racers can fly the flag for Moto Guzzi and mix it up with other unconventional sportbikes, as the owner of this example appears to have done.

From the Seller: 2006 Moto Guzzi MGS-01 Corsa for Sale

One of approximately 120 produced between 2004 and 2006. The model was an absolute show stopper at Intermot 2002.Unfortunately, the model only saw a short production run prior to the takeover of Moto Guzzi by Piaggio and was ended soon after. This example was originally delivered in Italy where it saw about 750km of track use and was imported to the US in 2014 by its current owner under a racing exclusion with the EPA which is a bit of a process. The MGS-01 Corsa model was produced for racing use only cannot be legally registered for street use in the US under any circumstances with a hefty penalty if it ever gets the VIN run through. The characteristics of the bike are those of a Hot Rod fused with a race bike. It’s obvious weight number of 420 lbs. disappears once it is rolling and is amazingly nimble. Thanks to the tireless development of the racing program for many years including that by Dr. John Wittner, the disadvantages of having a shaft drive vs a chain drive was virtually eliminated by design of the rear of the bike. The handling is that of a proper racing machine in all aspects. Power is linear from near idle to 8000 RPM’s with torque that lets you pick a gear to suit, showing that a lack of ability to make gearing choices is not an issue. If one chooses to race the bike as its current owner has on occasion, it is a perfect fit for the “Battle of the Twins” class in AHRMA where air-cooled bikes only compete. It also fits in the AHRMA “Sound of Thunder 2” competing with the likes of Ducati 848’s triumph 675’s etc. For the collector only for display, please be aware that the bike as it has a couple of flaws from being used, but is still brilliant and original in it’s overall condition. It has never been down or off track or in the rain, just a mark on the tank cover and a small tear in the seat foam as shown from being bumped off the stand and hitting a toolbox. It also has a small crack at the base of the windscreen which is concealed by the Moto Guzzi decal in the photo. It currently has a Trans Logic servo push button shift unit as the current owner has trouble shifting the bike due to limited foot movement, which is why he is reluctantly selling it. The unit will be removed and no wiring has been cut or modified. Everything is in perfect working order and comes with Michelin EVO Slicks that were fresh at Barber in October 2018 with one practice day on them. The current owner has logged another 750km since 2014. Delivery within a reasonable distance of Southeastern PA can be arranged.

Specifications:

  • VIN# ZGULRRA006M10078
  • 1225cc Air cooled V Twin
  • 100mm bore x 78mm Stroke
  • Cosworth Pistons
  • Four Nymonic Valves per Cylinder
  • 11.0:1 compression ratio
  • 121 HP @ 8000 RPM
  • 83 lb./ft of torque
  • 6 Speed Gearbox
  • Forged OZ wheels
  • 320mm Brembo Floating Rotors (Upgraded)
  • 4 Piston 4 pad Brembo calipers with Performance Friction race pads
  • Ohlins 43mm Forks
  • Ohlins rear shock
  • Dry weight: 192 KG/ 423 lbs.
  • Wheelbase 1428mm/ 56.2
  • Comprehensive Service Manual in PDF form

Asking price is USD $ 43,500.00.
Contact bobr@inter-techsupplies.com

001-610-217-9926

Considering Guzzi's current status as a "heritage brand" for the Piaggio Group, it's amazing that these attract so much attention when they come up for sale. Unusually, this one has been modified to suit the owner and has seen some actual racing, which means it's not completely pristine, but Guzzis are famously durable and a bit of patina adds character. It also means the bike will spared the fate of so many collectible sportbikes, doomed to sit and slowly decay. As the seller mentions, very few bikes were produced, with as few as 50 originally sent to the US to compete in the AMA's Battle of the Twins series that allowed larger air-cooled twins to compete or, more commonly, to be used as track-day toys or the aforementioned display pieces.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2006 Moto Guzzi MGS-01 Corsa for Sale
Ducati November 19, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1993 Ducati 900 Superlight #776

The 1993 Ducati 900SS Superlight came rolling out of Bologna ready to rumble, with lightened frame rails, a single-seat tail section sporting a big, brash number plate and a production number just shy of 1,000, which meant only the most devoted Ducatisti got their hands on one. Two years before Hunter Thompson's Sausage Creature, the 900SS/SP, broke cover, this was the ultimate iteration of the machine.

By modern standards, the 900SS is kind of poky -- you could keep up with one on an SV650 without a Herculean effort -- but this 1993 Ducati 900SS Superlight has been treated to a big-bore engine rebuild by Vee Two in Australia, netting 944cc. The big jugs have been augmented with a set of Keihin FCR39 flatslides from Sudco, and the stock upswept exhaust was switched out for a set of Fast by Ferraci high pipes.

On top of the engine mods, the bike has a Holeshot quick shifter, a trick swingarm that was made by JMC and is now unobtanium (JMC is no longer in business), and one-piece Marvic magnesium wheels. The original two-piece Marvics will come with it. If you are looking for an exclusive, sorted, fast-as-it-can-be 900, look no further.

From the eBay listing:

1993 Ducati 900 Superlight #776, 3 owners since new, 13,254 miles. Originally sold new by Letko Cycles in Kansas City on 8/29/1992 for $10,479.

While this motorcycle has many upgrades, the 944cc big bore motor built and installed in 2001 is hands down its best and most expensive feature. The original owner spent over $7000, most of it with Vee Two in Australia, to create a power plant that has almost endless torque and horsepower delivery. Receipts are included for nearly all of these parts:

Millenium Technologies bored and plated cylinders

Vee Two: 94mm pistons, steel connecting rods, Vee Two head featuring 43mm inlet valves, 38mm exhaust valves, intake & exhaust cams and adjustable cam pulleys, balanced crank, primary gears, clutch basket.

Keihin 39mm flat slide carburetors

Fast by Ferracci carbon fiber high pipes

California Cycleworks Dyna Coils ignition coils

Barnett Clutch kit

Pro Italia clutch slave cylinder

Holeshot quick shifter

Stainless braided clutch and brake lines

Corbin seat

Speedy Moto adjustable clip ons with 3” risers. Spare set of Pro Italia sport bars also included.

Stock and Pro Italia rear sets. (Stock rear sets currently fitted)

JMC aluminum swingarm with elliptical chain adjustment

Marvic Streamline 1-piece Magnesium wheels (6” rear) with new 120 front/180 rear Pirelli Diablo Supersports. Original Ducati Marvic 2 piece aluminum/Magnesium wheels also included.

New Renthal 39T aluminum rear sprocket

Refinished carbon fiber front and rear fenders. Carbon rear mudguard.

New Motobatt MB16AU glass mat battery

Fresh oil, belt, valve adjustment service and carburetor rebuild by Scott Waters at Motoservizio in Signal Hill, California

I am the 3rd owner of this bike and have nearly every receipt starting from the original Bill of Sale. This is my second 900 Superlight (former owner of #712) and thought I would never sell this one. But a busy work and family schedule, plus a garage with other toys gathering dust, is a clear sign that it's time for someone else to become the caretaker of #776. It is truly a magnificent vintage machine to ride, period correct with its modifications. If you love the now "vintage" Ducati sport bikes of the 1990s (916, Monster, etc) this is one you must experience. It is a joy to ride leisurely, always mindful that it's a 25 year old machine, not a modern superbike. Yet a healthy twist of the throttle rockets it forward. So now I'm testing the waters to see if there's another person immersed in their own mid-life crisis, collecting the artifacts of his youth. If so, he needs this machine.

Serious buyers can contact me by email for Q&A. M5guy at AOL dot com. Even my email address is vintage!

For $12,000, this stylish piece of Italian sportbike lore is begging to be aimed at the twistiest road you can find and let loose. Sure, you aren't gonna be slicing inside R1s at the next track day, but there is little joy like piloting such a well-built machine with no agenda but to enjoy yourself.

Featured Listing: 1993 Ducati 900 Superlight #776
Featured Listing November 17, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 2018 Honda NSF250R Moto 3 Race Bike For Sale

For many years, Grand Prix motorcycle racing was dominated by two-strokes: 125s, 250s, and the hairy 500s that carried the likes of Schwantz, Rainey, and Doohan to victory. But as the popularity of two-strokes waned on the road, the formula was changed to allow four-strokes to compete, and ultimately all Grand Prix motorcycle racing machines transitioned to four-stroke power. The entry-level class was dubbed "Moto3" once the formula switched from 125cc two-stroke to 250cc four-stroke power, and today's Honda NSF250R was designed to compete in this fiercely-contested category.

They might sound a bit agricultural, but two-strokes are perfect racing motors: light, extremely compact, and relatively simple. Four-strokes are generally larger and heavier for a given displacement or output, since they include things like "cams" and "valves" in the package. Honda had to work hard to approach the standards of lightness and elegant simplicity set by the outgoing RS125R, but the results speak for themselves.

Single-cylinder four-strokes are traditionally the format of dirt bikes and economical commuters, but Honda packed plenty of tech into the relatively tiny package for the NSF250R. The dual overhead cam engine features a reversed cylinder head with the intake at the front, and the unit is rotated backwards in the chassis to fit between the frame rails and maximize space for the airbox. A cassette-style gearbox helps for quick trackside gearing changes, and the bike's dry weight is an impressively svelte 180lbs, so the 48 claimed hp offers serious performance for aspiring GP stars.

From the Seller: 2018 Honda NSF250R for Sale

Up for your consideration is this Honda NSF250R four-stroke race motorcycle from HRC (Honda Racing Corporation) I personally ordered it from HRC last November. Production was August 2018. Brand New, Never started, No fluids. Imported thru all legal channels. Located Cleveland Ohio. Included is the Option Parts Package (PGM-FI SETTING TOOL, MODE SELECT SWITCH, PIT ROAD SPEED LIMIT SWITCH) Seat pad included (not pictured) $18,000 USD OBO. Suitable trades will be considered. Contact: Greg 440.214.0954 deftonecycles@gmail.com

This one is being offered by our friends over at Deftone Cycles for $18,000. A brand-new NSF250R probably doesn't present too much of an investment opportunity, at least short term. But it does offer an aspiring racer the perfect platform on which to hone their skills, a blank slate on which a rider can write the first chapter of their career.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2018 Honda NSF250R Moto 3 Race Bike For Sale
Featured Listing November 7, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1999 Laverda 750S Formula for Sale

Sort of an homologation special for a company that wasn't planning to actually go racing, the Laverda 750S Formula used premium components to upgrade the company's existing fully-faired sportbike. After falling on hard times in the 1980s, Laverda was resurrected in the 1990s, with production centered in the town of Zanè, so you'll sometimes see these referred to as "Zane-era Laverdas" to differentiate them from the 1970s classics. The revitalized company managed to make very nice sports motorcycles with limited resources, and the Formula took their  750S and added some of the very best components available at the time to create something they hoped would give them the kind of reputation and attention Ducati enjoyed with their Tamburini-designed superbikes.

Laverdas of the period used either a steel trellis or an aluminum beam frame that apparently shared the same geometry, which was a very good thing. The Nico Bakker-designed beam frame, polished as seen here on the Formula, gave the 750S an excellent foundation, and Paioli suspension kit at both ends just sweetened the deal: every period review I've seen raved about the bike's handling. Unfortunately, they also noted the bike's performance deficit, compared to the Ducati 748.

These days, parallel twins can be made to be very smooth and refined with balance shafts and other trickery, but at the time, the only real reason Laverda chose that configuration was practicality: they already had one. Dating back to the 1970s Alpino, the existing air-cooled 500cc unit had its carburetors replaced with Weber-Marelli fuel injection for more modern performance, and was enlarged to 668cc, then again to 747cc. Along the way, it gained liquid cooling, although you can still see the cooling fins once the fairings are off.

Claimed peak power was on par with the competing Ducati 748, but the reality was that, although handling was possibly even superior to the Ducati, the engine was not. It was peaky, a bit thrashy, and it loved to rev, although you really had to work the six-speed gearbox to keep up with a 748. That shouldn't bother prospective buyers today: either bike would get murdered by a modern 600. And while the 748 is a design classic, it's almost too familiar, a cliché. The Formula, on the other hand, is a very exclusive machine, with around 600 examples built. It's also more comfortable, if you care about that, and while the Formula is not as pretty as the 748, it is very striking in these black-and-orange colors.

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Laverda 750S Formula for Sale

1999 Laverda 750 Formula S. 750CC  (6790 ORIGINAL MILES)  $12,500

Contact the seller here: sennaducati79@gmail.com

This is a 2 owner bike, part of a very rare large collection now being offered for the first time via the web. Current owner is an avid collector of pure, rare Automotive and motorcycles. This concourse conditioned bike has all the correct lightweight carbon parts and pieces. Never been on a track, abused or laid down. In a private heated collection, never seen rain. This investment will only increase over time and you will be very hard pressed to ever see another one, clearly not like this with these miles.

Laverda’s Formula S is essentially a factory built special edition of the basic Formula, with extensive engine tuning and even more special chassis componentry. The original Formula was a 650, built in 1996, with the Formula 750 following a year later in 1997.

The engine work was more extensive than most factory specials, and took the Formula almost to a race tune straight from the showroom. Updated cams, revised fuel injection settings and carbon fiber Termignoni mufflers all boost top end power to an impressive claimed figure of (92BHP)- almost as much as the Ducati 748. The chassis also compares to the Ducati being considerably lighter and with suspension and braking components every bit as impressive.

Fully adjustable Paioli Upside Down forks and monoshock. Fully floating Brembo racing brakes and lightweight Marchesini wheels all play their part in giving the Formula impeccable manners for the street or track. The polished aluminum beam frame looks much more impressive than the Ducati’s thin steel tube!! A single seat race style fairing incorporates stylish cooling louvers and twin endurance style headlights, and is finished in Laverda Orange, the firm's racing colors.

This is your chance to stand out and be different with a stunning example of Italian heritage.

I've lusted after these for a while now, and this appears to be a very clean, low-mileage example that should appeal to collectors with a taste for the exotic. The mirrors appear to have been removed and the standard exhausts were carbon fiber, but these Termignoni parts are a desirable extra. Certainly, the name "Laverda" has a great deal of cachet with collectors and this bike represents a missed opportunity for the brand: it's a good, if flawed bike, and really did offer an interesting alternative to the Ducati. Parts for Zane-era Laverdas can be tricky to source, depending on what you need, but I expect this one will end up leading a pampered life in a collection somewhere and won't rack up enough miles to matter very much.

Contact the seller here: sennaducati79@gmail.com

-tad

Featured Listing: 1999 Laverda 750S Formula for Sale
Featured Listing November 7, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000

We are lucky at RSBFS to be helping to offer this gorgeous 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 after a 15-year stay in a private collection. Though collection dwelling generally means a bike has sat long-term, this Goose shows 32,000 miles on the clock, which means it has been ridden and loved as much as it has been preserved.

The Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 was not really built to win races itself, but to celebrate Guzzi’s victories in a spate of endurance contests in the 1980s, and to show off the Italian firm’s ability to engineer and execute a jewel of a motorcycle from somewhat unlikely sources. The bike was designed by dentist-turned-privateer racer John Wittner, and was powered by a very tweaked version of Guzzi’s enormous longitudinal high-cam v-twin. Tweaks included bigger jugs and a longer stroke, which helped the mill push out 95 horses.

From the seller:

1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 $14,995 (32K miles)

First time ever offered via the web, this has been in a private collection for the past 15 plus years, never seen rain. Custom rear cowl and paint scheme, the wheels have been redone in gold to match. Stunning spotless example of this Italian beast, Termignoni Carbon pipes makes great deep thumper noise from the motor and fuel injection tubes.
MG Daytona 1000
Claimed power: 95hp @ 8,000rpm
Top speed: 145mph
Engine: 992cc air-cooled high-cam 8-valve 90-degree V-twin
Weight: 451lb (dry)

After his team of modified Moto Guzzis won the 1984 and 1985 U.S. Endurance Championship and the 1987 Pro Twins series, U.S. Moto Guzzi guru Dr. John Wittner was made an offer he couldn’t refuse. Summoned to Italy by Guzzi godfather Alejandro de Tomaso, Wittner, a former dentist turned endurance racer, was asked to help develop a new world-beating superbike. Guzzi revealed a prototype at the 1989 Milan show and named it for the famous Florida circuit (where they won the 250-mile endurance race in 1985), but in typical Italian fashion it took until late 1991 for the Daytona to go into production.
Although the hot rod Daytona engine was based around the classic “big block” air-cooled Moto Guzzi transverse V-twin, in the end it retained only the crankshaft and crankcases of the standard engine. Using the 78mm stroke of the 948cc Le Mans 1000 combined with new plated alloy cylinders with a 90mm bore, it displaced 992cc. A bright red sport fairing melded into the gas tank just above the Daytona’s all-new cylinder heads, grandly marked “OHC 4V” for overhead camshaft 4-valve. In truth, the cams were carried high in the cylinder heads, not on top, so the engine could also be considered a high-cam design overhead valve.
From the crankshaft, a reduction gear train drove a pair of toothed belts, each spinning a single camshaft in each cylinder head, which in turn opened four valves via short pushrods operating rocker shafts. Fueling was by Weber-Marelli electronic injection, and the exhaust system was in stainless steel. The engine drove a revised version of the 5-speed transmission used on most Guzzi twins through a beefed-up clutch (with 10 springs versus eight) and a driveshaft to the rear wheel.

The powertrain hung from a new spine frame based on Dr. John’s race bike design, constructed from 1.5mm chrome-moly tubing with a cantilevered rear swingarm and a fully adjustable Koni (later WP) monoshock under the seat. Marzocchi supplied the “conventional” three-way adjustable fork, and Brembo four-pot calipers with 300mm dual discs (two-pot/260mm rear) provided stopping power. Cast alloy 17-inch wheels ran on 120-section front and 160-section rear tires.

With a claimed 95 horsepower available at 8,000rpm, the Daytona was the most powerful road-going Guzzi to date, returning a top speed of 145mph. “The result is excellent rideability, with big-time low-end and midrange power available whenever you open the throttle,” Cycle World said of the big twin in 1993. On the road, they found that being long and low in Guzzi tradition gave the Daytona reassuring stability at high speeds: “The Daytona proved unflappable, with well-damped suspension, plenty of cornering clearance, premium tires and a relatively flickable yet very stable nature.” You will not see another one anytime soon. Be different and add this thumper to your collection. This investment will only increase over time.

Contact the seller here: sennaducati79@gmail.com

Though the performance is more than enough for mortals, the Daytona 1000’s real claim to fame is its scarcity, build quality and looks. It is a true gentleman’s road racer, made more for comfortable canyon carving than dicing at the sharp end of a club race. The previous owners of this machine clearly took that mandate to heart, given the beast the exercise it deserves.

Despite its mileage, the thing looks absolutely mint, with nary a blemish, nick or streak of grime. The rear cowl wears custom livery, and the wheels have been painted gold to match the accents. That might deter the hardest-core originality freaks, but we love the look. With pedigree, acres of charm and tons of special bits, this thing is not to be missed at $14,995. Contact the seller here: sennaducati79@gmail.com

Featured Listing: 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000