Posts by Category: Featured Listing

Featured Listing August 21, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1986 Honda VFR750F

Even legends have parents. They don’t often get lauded for their offspring’s exploits, but their influence is indelible, and without their genes, what would our heroes be? The 1986 Honda VFR750F is a minor legend in its own right, but its offspring — the Honda RC30 and RC45, are the beasts everyone remembers. But in 1986, Honda was hungry to catapult itself past the other Japanese marques in the sportbike arms race, and to cure its new V4s reputation for weak valve trains.

The VFR750F delivered. Under Fred Merkel, Wayne Rainey and Bubba Shobert, the bikes cleaned up in AMA. And under a crew from Cycle World that included Nick Ienatsch and a motley crew of racers and journalists, blew the ’86 Suzuki GSXR750’s 24-hour speed record out of the water by nearly 20 mph. Follow the link to that story at the end of this writeup. You won’t regret it. The red-white-and-blue beasts achieved the feat thanks to an improved 105-horsepower 750cc V4 that represented a 20-horsepower gain over the Magnas and fixed reliability questions. The bikes were also something like 40 pounds lighter than the previous model.

Coupled with a roadrace-worthy suspension and wide, sticky tires, the VFR had the goods to take it to Yamaha and Suzuki.

This 1986 Honda VFR750F is in impeccable, low-mile shape, with a long list of recent mods and maintenance to make it even tastier. It sports a Yoshimura exhaust and an RC30-style front fender, among other improvements. Seller Joe spent a long time on his description, so we’ll let him take it away:

1986 Honda VFR750F

Honda collector for over 30 years. My recent focus has been V4 bikes of the 80s/90s, including both RC30/RC45. This is my second 1986 VFR750F, which I purchased in 2016. I bought this bike because of its low mileage and overall survivor condition. Plus, I really wanted one with a pipe. The videos don’t do the sound of this Yosh pipe justice. The bike has 11,357 miles. As you can see from the title, I’ve put less than 100 miles on the bike while freshening up a few things. I have over 20 bikes and like to work on them, but I don’t ride them enough, so it’s time for someone else to enjoy it.Upgrades – all done within the last 18 months: New Honda fuel pump (specific to this bike and $200 for part alone); New fuel filter; New choke cable; New Yuasa AGM battery; New Honda grips; New Metzeler rear tire (Metzeler front matches but older – see code); New DID x-ring chain with rivet; re-zinc’d rear sprocket; Cut down front fender to match race bikes/RC30, and painted to match (includes uncut stock front fender); Valve adjustment and carbs disassembled and ultrasonic cleaned and sync’d (see video – work done by Joe Nelson of VFR Dreams); Fresh oil and filter; New brake fluid front and rear; New clutch master fluid; Known blemishes: 20-25 tank “pimples”appeared over this last winter. Odd, because always stored in a heated garage. Scrapes on left rear cowl/tail. A few very small scratches on windscreen. Hairline crack on LH fairing (3/4”). Normal cracking on mirror arm. Clear title in my name. Includes factory shop manual. I do not have factory owners manual. 2 keys, including original stamped key and a Honda duplicate. Multiple videos show carb sync, cold start, fast idle, fast idle warm up with two other of my bikes. Asking $4000. Contact Joe:joexray77@icloud.com

Cell 414-232-5077

Located in Milwaukee, WI 53207

Shipping is solely the buyer’s responsibility. I can assist with the shipper of your choice. I have used Haulbikes.com and JJ Bagwell Shipping.

VFR750F 24-hour world record recap: https://www.motorcyclistonline.com/hondas-1986-vfr750f-interceptor/

While later sport-touring RC36 VFRs don’t command the same coin (somehow) as the earlier bikes, VFRs are still a bargain compared to a slab-side Gixxer in similar shape. For such a jewel of a machine in such gorgeous condition, the $4,000 asking price is almost a no-brainer.

Featured Listing: 1986 Honda VFR750F
Featured Listing August 20, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo!

In 1982 Honda fired a technological missile, the implications which were heard and felt around the world. Overnight Honda had changed the game (again), offering the promise of liter power in a mid-sized package with the first full factory Turbo motorcycle. With futuristic styling, wild colors and TURBO emblems screaming mystical propulsion methods, the CX500 Turbo made a bold statement before the key was even turned. Once the bike fired up, there became an interesting dichotomy between the low boost tractability and comfort of the Dr. Jekyll side around town, and the wild Mr. Hyde nature of the bike on boost. In 1982 this was the most technically advanced motorcycle you could purchase, and despite the performance it was built with typical Honda quality and reliability.

Featured Listing: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo!

Starting with the rather pedestrian CX500 standard/cruiser power plant, Honda introduce forged pistons into the the Moto-Guzzi like transverse vee. Unlike most vee configurations, this one splayed 80 degrees rather than the usual 90. This engine already had liquid cooling and four valve heads (operated by pushrods), and was already at that time known for being overbuilt. The chassis was sturdy and equipped with shaft drive and monoshock rear suspension. It was an easy – if not overly inspired – choice to be the foundation for something much, much greater. The basic engine package was beefed up, Honda bumped the compression slightly, and then bolted on an IHI turbocharger built to Honda specifications. At it’s peak, the turbocharger pumps out 19 psi before the wastegate opens to slow the party down.

Simply bolting on a Turbo is not enough to engineer a working, reliable motorcycle. So Honda introduced digital (programmed) fuel injection – a world’s first for motorcycles. This system contained redundancy to protect the engine; fail safe circuits ensured fuel delivery while a separate ignition system protected the more highly stressed engine from potential meltdown. Rarely utilized or needed, these fail safe measures show the level of planning that Honda put into the CX500 Turbo. Management of these redundant systems was completely automatic, the rider being made aware of any potential failures via a comprehensive and well-laid out instrument panel. “Cockpit” might be a better description for the gauge cluster, as in addition to the usual tach, speedo, fuel and temp gauges there also exist a number of warning lights, a fuel system failure warning light, and of course a centrally located TURBO BOOST indicator.

From the seller:
In 1977 Honda began their Turbo powered motorcycle project…which would become the world’s 1st ever, from the ground up…purposeful built, turbocharged motorcycle and Honda’s 1st fuel injected bike. When finally released in 1982 it was described as “a technological tour de force”…”a milestone in motorcycle history”…”one of the most futuristic motorcycles of it’s time”…”one of the most influential motorcycles of the decade”. Now some 37 years later all that still rings true!

The project was a combined effort of Honda’s R&D folks, IHI Turbo America and Italian automotive stylist, Giovanni Michelotti, one of the most prolific & influential designers of the 20th century. Michelotti created the innovative and curvaceous fairing and body work.

Two years pre-production, in 1980… Honda in a bold and unprecedented move…put their CX500TC/Turbo on display at the Cologne International Motorcycle Show. This was probably no more than a “finger wag” at Yamaha…as the 2 giants, from the Land of the Rising Sun, were in a fierce battle for market supremacy. “Turbo Wars” soon followed.

Honda’s platform would be their tried and true…bullet-proof V-Twin / 4-Valve / CX500 motor. Every aspect of the bike was considered. Not only designing a motor that would be capable of handling the rigors of turbocharging but a frame to work with the stresses and a suspension to complement it all. Block castings were made thicker. A stronger crankshaft, connecting rods and clutch were employed. Honda’s first specific forged pistons were used. Larger end & main bearings installed. Over 200 new patents were created to build this motorcycle.

An improved futuristic liquid-cooled / digitally fuel injected motor…pushing those (up to) 82 ponies through a modern shaft drive to the rear wheel…with TRAC Anti-Dive forks up front and a Pro-Link rear suspension handling duties at the rear…twin piston brake calipers in place to haul it down…beautiful redesigned gold Comstar wheels fore & aft…a comprehensive dashboard…all that wrapped in a wind tunnel designed Michelotti fairing & body panels. A motorcycle with superb ergonomics & smoothness. A rolling piece of art!

More from the seller:
This example has been well cared for with only 16,904 miles. A fine example of this rare, 1 year only production, motorcycle at this price point. Three known owners…with the last 2 being in their late 60’s. Private collection offering. All pictures are recent and more are available as needed. I do have quite a number of pictures showing the cleanliness of the undercarriage.

A new stator & stator connector had been installed along with cam seals & water pump seals and all associated O-rings, seals & gaskets (previous owner). All this is called a “Triple Bypass”. An excellent factory spec re-spray of the body and motor was done also at that time. This bike shows quite well! Runs and shifts as it should. Turnkey bike w/no known issues.

> Matching Dunlop D404T tires are in excellent condition
> Battery was replaced and is excellent
> Seat was recovered to factory spec
> A “Visual Instruments Inc” voltmeter has been added
> Brakes are excellent
> Coolant flushed & replaced
> Castrol 4T/Full synthetic oil & WIX filter done @ 16,830 miles
> Rear shaft spline & ring gear correctly lubricated
> Stock tool kit & owner’s manual with bike
> Factory Shop Manual with bike
> Extra set of keys

Your chance to own a rare example of “Motorcycle History”! These rarely come up for sale. Be the only person w/one of these at your local cycle rally or cruise-in! Located near Binghamton NY


Asking Price: $6,750

Contact Joe: jshuta@hotmail.com or 607-343-9019 (9am to 9pm EST)
Live calls only, please – no text messages

Nestled between some truly interesting hardware in the Honda showroom – including the CB1100R, the GL1100 GoldWing, the CBX, the VF750 and the simple FT500 Ascot – the CX500T was competing for attention and customer wallet share. And it required a bigger share of the customer’s wallet than most of the bikes on the floor (MSRP $4,898). As a result, not many of these one year only models were sold. With sportish-touring bodywork, a wide seat and higher bars, the CX500T is a comfortable place to rack up the miles. Roll on torque – the real strong suit of the Honda Turbos – fits nicely into the highway cruiser persona. At 550+ pounds these were never destined to be racers, however they are fabulous riders and far more reliable than a 37 year old technological wonder has a right to be.

This bike looks to be absolutely gorgeous. With 16,000+ miles on the clock it has been ridden, but we all know that nothing deteriorates faster than a hangar queen. Regular use is positive for the mechanicals, the seals, the electrics and the turbo system. This one has the right number of miles to be carefully used, without being beaten up or at the end of its service life. History has proven that these Honda Turbo bikes have very few weaknesses – the key being the stator. The fact that this one has been changed is a real plus, as there are another estimated 20k-25k miles to be enjoyed before this should become a concern. Otherwise all of the pieces are here, and the general handling shows the care that went into the stewardship of this rare factory Turbo; it is not often that we see such a clean first-year example. Located in New York, this one is going for a very reasonable asking price. Give Joe a call (607-343-9019 – no texts please) or drop him an email and start the conversation. It only takes one experience on boost to know that Turbo ownership is worth everything that was promised. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo!
Featured Listing August 19, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Tyga-Bodied 1988 Honda NSR250R for Sale

Today’s Featured Listing Honda NSR250R was one of the most iconic bikes of the late 1980s and early 1990s, at least if you lived in Europe or Japan. We never really got them here in the US, at least not officially. This tiny sportbike was a technological powerhouse, with Honda’s usual obsessive attention to detail, including an advanced electronic ignition system and quality components generally found on bikes with much larger displacements.

The 1988 model year means this is the MC18 version of the NSR250R, with a slightly undersquare 54 x 54.5mm 90° liquid-cooled 249cc v-twin backed up with a six-speed cassette gearbox nestled in between the aluminum rails of the frame. Engine management was via the PGM-II version of Honda’s sophisticated digital ignition matched to a powervalve to increase midrange power, in this case ATAC, an acronym for “automatic torque amplification chamber.” Power was quoted at the “official” 45hp, but more was available with tuning.

If you’ve just looked at the pictures, you might wonder why I’m talking about the NSR250R, since they appear to show something else entirely. But what you’re looking at is a highly modified MC18 with a complete set of Tyga bodywork, decked out in the classic Rothmans Replica graphics scheme. I’ve already lost those of you who know these bikes and prize absolute originality, fans who consider that Honda knew what they were doing, and that any deviation from their template is sacrilege have. Everyone else should read on.

The Tyga fairings honestly modernize the bike and the main giveaway that this is a thirty year old bike is the relatively conventional swingarm setup, as opposed to the “gull arm” version of the MC21 and the single-sider of the MC28. It’s not for everyone, especially the squinty headlights, but the swoopy tailsection that evokes the TZR250 and the curvaceous bellypan are very nicely done, and the whole thing is painted up in the classic Rothmans graphics scheme. Under the skin, you can see the stunning expansion chambers that indicate a higher state of tune, and more information on the details of this build at the Tyga Performance website.

From the Seller: 1988 Honda NSR250R for Sale

Up for sale is a fully restored custom build Honda NSR250. My Son purchased this bike while he was in Japan for four years. After he returned to the states he brought the bike back with him and gave it to me as a gift. Pretty cool.

I am a retired ex motorcycle guy and thought I was done with motorcycles. At any rate there were a few items that needed attention so I started to do some basic stuff. I installed a new rear YSS shock as the stocker was blown. Installed a new battery and I fully went through the carbs since it didn’t idle very well. During this time I had been looking at bikes on Moto2 Imports who specializes in two strokes like this and started a conversation with them about really doing the bike up proper.

The bike was then shipped to Speedwerks in Dover Delaware for a major renovation.

  • Steve Long is the master at Speedwerks who did all of the work on the bike.
  • First off the bike was the first MC18 to be fitted with the all new Tyga GP-T full fairing kit.
  • The bike was custom painted in Rothman’s livery and the paint is stunning in person.
  • While there the carburetors were fully gone through, the bike was de-restricted and dyno tuned.
  • The rear wheel was replaced with a 17” rear wheel from a MC21. Both wheels were cleaned, powder coated and now have new Michelin Power RS tires.
  • The bike has Tyga stainless steel expansion chambers and is equipped with their new shorty carbon silencers.
  • All of the wheel bearings were replaced and the front forks were resprung and fitted with new seals.
  • Both sprockets and drive chain are brand new and the battery was replaced since it was in the shop for a fair amount of time.
  • Both brakes have new pads and fresh brake fluid.

The bike was featured as the Tyga Bike of the Month and I will include the link for that article describing the build. The link below will detail the work that was done on the bike. The last thing is that Steve let me know there was some minor scuffing in the cylinders so they installed a full Tyga OEM top end on both cylinders.

As I mentioned I thought I was done with motorcycles as I am now retired but this was a really fun project to see it go from wow that’s cool, a NSR, to something that is now a museum quality build. I have ridden the bike about 15 miles since it was finished. I am too old to ride a sport bike anymore and hate to see it just sit so have decided to put it up for sale.

Price is $9500 OBO
Contact Cameron Kline: cmrnkline@gmail.com or +1 (817) 734-9201

This is a one-of-a-kind motorcycle, a very nicely prepared “restomod” that will hopefully find the right buyer, and the asking price should help that happen. It almost seems too nice to actually ride, but it’s been built to perform, should the new owner choose to put some miles on it. Honestly, it be even more a crime to just display it.

-tad

Featured Listing: Tyga-Bodied 1988 Honda NSR250R for Sale
Featured Listing August 16, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1971 Norton Dunstall 810 Sleeper

By the early 1970s, if you were a roadracer or a cafe rat with a few extra shillings and a penchant for Nortons, tuner Paul Dunstall’s name was never far from your mind. A retired racer, Dunstall started knocking out performance exhausts for Nortons in his family’s scooter shop, before buying a raft of leftover Norton racing parts and building spec engines for customers. His tweaks were the stuff of legend by the end of the 1960s, and in 1971, Norton commissioned him to build a few factory-tuned bikes around the Commando platform.

The result was the 125-mph, 70-horsepower 1971 Norton Dunstall 810 Sleeper, a parallel twin monster sporting a tiny fiberglass fuel tank, bored out jugs and bigger cams and carburetors than the stock bike. CycleWorld hustled their tester to the magazine’s first-ever sub-12-second quarter mile. On the street, the bike would knock down the 0-60 run in less than five seconds. Heady stuff at a time when motorcycles were either Dennis Hopper’s Harley Davidson or Brian Wilson’s groovy little Honda.

This 1971 Norton Dunstall 810 Sleeper is a factory-built superbike, not one of the dozens of modified Commandos that followed the factory run. It has had a recent restoration, which included a new steel fuel tank to replace the ethanol-damaged fiberglass original. The steel tank is a great addition if you plan to ride this bike, but it would be a great idea to have the fiberglass unit restored all the same. In its 48 years, the bike hasn’t managed to crack 3,000 miles.

From the seller:

You are looking at a rare 1971 Norton Dunstall 810 Sleeper model. They say that less than five percent of advertised Dunstalls are true factory bikes, rather they are regular Nortons with added Dunstall parts. This is the real deal, an unrestored factory produced bike with 2,100 original miles. It’s in amazing original condition with great patina. It comes with incredible documentation, original bill of sale, correspondence between the original owner and Paul Dunstall, shipping forms, customs forms and more. It really belongs is a Norton collection or a museum as it’s a true time capsule.

The Sleeper model was designed to look like a regular Commando but run circles around them. This one includes the following options verses a regular Sleeper, 810 kit, Mk 4 Cams, a rare Quaife five speed transmission, high performance Dr. Gordon Blair exhaust and an electronic ignition.

The bike was just recommissioned by Jaye Strait of Britech New England, a well known British Bike expert. New carbs, coils, fuel lines, gas tank, etc. The tank was replaced due to ethanol having its way with the original fiberglass one. The new steel tank was painstakingly modified to look like the original, including reproducing the original decals and rear tank mounts. The original which is included can be repaired but we decided to go with steel for riding the bike but keep the original for collecting. The bike runs great pulls like a race horse smoothly through all gears and idles beautifully once warmed up. It’s very entertaining to ride for an almost fifty-year-old bike. However, if you are going to ride it new tires are needed as the set on the bike is very old.

I’m happy to answer any questions and supply more photos. I will also work with your shipping company, but you are responsible for shipping. No low ball offers or tire kickers please.

The bike is located in Concord, NH, and is listed on eBay with a starting bid of $15,000. If early English monsters are your thing, it’d be tough to find a cooler one.

Featured Listing: 1971 Norton Dunstall 810 Sleeper
Featured Listing August 12, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1994 Kawasaki Ninja 600R (ZX600C)

It takes something special to stand out in the middleweight sportbike segment, especially in the used market when a goodly number join the fray each year.  The seller spotted this back-of-the-garage find a few years ago and returned it to the road with several major service items.  As delivered in period black and turquoise livery, this 600R is a great survivor and affordable classic.

1994 Kawasaki 600R ( GPX600 ) with just 6,900 miles !

Though there isn’t much radical engineering in this profitable corner of the showroom, the Ninja 600R does boast more than 100 hp per liter at 84, thanks to 11.71-to-1 compression on the twin-cam four.  Kawasaki’s Electronic Suspension Control ( ESCS ) compensated for front end dive under braking, and their Uni-Track with adjustable monoshock tamed the rear end.  The frame-mounted fairing cut a hole in the wind for rider, and vinyl tank panels offered good grip.

Likely purchased new by a fledgling rider, this 600R was parked soon afterward, and re-commissioned by the new owner after almost 20 years on the lam.  Since the drivetrain is pretty much bulletproof, the rehab involved all liquids, new rubber, carb rebuild and a thorough cleaning of the fuel system.  The seller has these comments about the bike and its return to service:

I acquired this bike back in 2016 with approximately 2,500 original miles and it was completely original down to the tires. It still has the original owner’s manual, tool kit, factory key, and is completely stock right down to the exhaust.

I replaced all the fluids, installed new spark plugs, a new UNI air filter, a new battery, and had new Bridgestone Battleax BT tires fitted. The tank has been removed and professionally cleaned, given a new petcock valve, and I had all four carburetors professionally rebuilt at the same shop that the tank was cleaned.

The bike has since been ridden 4,500 trouble-free miles over the past three years, and at the time of writing has about 7,000 miles, however, this number will go up every weekend as I like to ride it to keep the carbs in shape. Minor cosmetic blemishes include light scratches on the tank, two small scratches on the left rear cowl, mild corrosion on the coolant drain plug, and small bits of rust starting to surface on the exhaust.

You never see these anywhere anymore and this all original example is the best I’ve seen for sale in years. Even if you’re not a collector, this Ninja 600R is a fun, reliable survivor that gets attention from onlookers that know, and is a terrific and inexpensive way to enjoy a classic sportbike.

Asking price is $3,500 and offers are requested by text message at (757) 806-9296

Having served a generation of daily riders, The seller is right that they are rarely seen in this condition these days, and the best way to maintain a fuel system is to use it occasionally.  Maybe this all original model was your brother’s favorite bike, or a friend needs a down payment-sized entrée into the sporty side, either way this 600R looks ready to please a new owner.

-donn

Featured Listing – 1994 Kawasaki Ninja 600R (ZX600C)
Featured Listing August 8, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1977 MV Agusta 750S / 850SS America

Update 8.8.2019: This seller has decided to upgrade to a Featured Listing and is also available on eBay. Thanks for supporting the site, Jamie, and good luck to buyers! -dc

The mid-seventies saw MV Agusta floundering after the founder’s death, and about to accept an offer they couldn’t refuse from the Italian government.  U.S. importers persuaded the company to try and revive their fortunes with a special 750, a monoposto bristling with premium parts.  This rare example returned to Italy for a mid-stream model upgrade before sale.

1977 MV Agusta 750S / 850SS America for sale on eBay

Before almost every big bike was an inline four, MV Agusta had a history of air-cooled DOHC Grand Prix machines.  For the 750S, displacement was increased to 788cc’s, heads re-designed and 26mm Dell’Orto carburetors were specified.  Though the cams are driven by a gear train between cylinders two and three, the alternator is behind, resulting in a trim crankcase.  Shaft drive indicating its more GT purpose, most MV 750’s came with front discs and a drum rear brake.

Not enough to be one of 500 or so, this MV was upgraded by the factory to an 850SS, which the factory did to just a few dozen leftover machines to make them more enticing.  A little history from the eBay auction:

“The Ferrari of Motorcycles”

Up for sale is a stunning 1977 MV Agusta 850SS. This is pretty much the quintessential late-70s Italian sport bike and the last, highest spec iteration of MV’s factory-built four cylinder sport bikes. Less than 500 Americas were made from 1975-77, and this 750S-to-850SS factory conversion is one of just 19 (or 27, or 35, or 42, depending on your source) total 850SSs made. Just to be clear, all MV Agusta 850SSs were conversions from 750S machines; some were done by the factory, some were done by dealers based on instructions from the factory.

The bike in question is a 2800-mile example in excellent overall condition. It features factory-optional cast wheels, Lafranconi exhaust, and its original suede covered seat. Frame and engine numbers match; not all do. There are a few nicks here and there, as you would expect from any 40+ year old machine, and the finish on the front edge of the instrument binnacle is separating (see photos), but the bike is whole and has obviously never seen any hard use. It has a wonderful, honest overall appearance. It starts, run, shifts, and stops, but with such low mileage and limited use in the last few years, it could probably benefit from a more fulsome recommissioning, including carb tuning/cleaning, before any serious road riding. A video of the bike in action can be sent upon request.

750S to 850SS conversion: Factory records during this period in MV history can be inconsistent, if they are available at all. 1977 was the final year of factory-produced MV Agusta motorcycles, and the factory was fast and loose with some things, including specifications from bike to bike. They were also having a hard time selling new 750S Americas in a crowded field of ever larger and more powerful Japanese machines, which could be had for a fraction of the MV’s $6500 sticker price. So, an uprated variant of the 750S, the 850SS, was cooked up as a way to move leftover or unsold 750S machines. In late 1976, MV recalled 19 unsold new 750S machines from distributor stock (including this bike) back to the factory in Italy for conversion to 850-spec. They also instructed dealers/distributors in how to convert other 750S machines to 850SS spec. Fortunately, this bike’s journey is well-described in both factory and distributor documents. The bike is first described in factory documents from 1975 and early 1976, as a “1976 model 750cc ‘S’ America”. Later documents from 1977 list it (by serial number) among 19 bikes that were recalled in late-1976 to the MV factory in Italy for conversion to “850S” specification. Additional documents from 1977 pertain to the re-importation of the bike by the US distributor, Garville, now as an “850S” with “86hp” (vs 75hp in standard 750S trim), and allocation to Champion Motorcycles in Costa Mesa, California. The bike has 750S sidecover emblems; these may have been left on the bike at the factory or re-installed later during a refinish (easily remedied by removal of the emblem and replacement with an “MV” decal, which is what the factory did on some 850SS machines). It has the factory optional and 850SS-correct EPM cast alloy wheels with triple disks and Brembo calipers. 850SSs typically used 27mm carbs unless bound for the US, like this one, which then used the standard 26mm Dellorto carbs of the 750S America.

All original documents relating to this bike are included in the sale, both when it was a “1976 750S” and after conversion to 1977 850SS (see pix), with the exception of the document listing this bike among the 19 recalled to the factory for 850SS conversion. That particular document belongs to the records of another of my MVs, but I will provide a copy/scan of that original document to the new owner as well. The sale also includes a commissioned hardcover photo-book of this particular machine, by Ian Falloon.

Values on these bikes are hard to pin down…but at much less than the price of a 1974 Ducati 750SS “Green Frame”, which was produced in significantly greater numbers than the MV 850SS and by a manufacturer of less racing pedigree than MV Agusta, values of the late-spec MV classics seem destined to close the gap to their Italian brethren. Imagine this red stunner in your garage/mancave/lair next to your 275GTB or 365 GTB/4 Daytona or 365BB! These bikes rarely come up for sale, outside of major auctions, where buyer and seller can be expected to pay as much as 12-20% in combined fees on top of the hammer price. Consider this bike instead.

42 years on, the 850SS shows no particular wear, but chips and aging paint and plating of a real classic.  Despite the outstanding components from Ceriani, Tomaselli, and Brembo, the factory thought having the LaFranconi mufflers black would be sporty.

Already playing catch-up to the new Japanese imports, Agusta didn’t have the time or resources to engineer a new lightweight model.  At over 500 lbs. dry, the 750 and 850S reviewed as a better ride for moderate speeds but did so in style.  The factory wound down shortly and was offline for ten years before being revived by Cagiva.  Seeming more appropriate for a white glove auction than online, this 850S is a history lesson in 1970’s design and manufacturing.

-donn

Featured Listing: 1977 MV Agusta 750S / 850SS America
Featured Listing August 8, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1980 Laverda Jota for Sale

Check out all of Joe’s bikes for sale on RSBFS! Many thanks for choosing us to help move your collection! -dc

When it rains, it pours, and the past couple weeks have seen us feature several different Laverdas. Bikes this old are usually a bit too “classic” to feature regularly on the site, but certain models are just too important not to include at RSBFS, and the hairy-chested Lavereda Jota like today’s featured listing is one of them. As a followup to their successful parallel-twin models, Laverda introduced a three-cylinder in 1973 after teasing prototypes for several years. It wasn’t just a twin with an extra cylinder grafted on, it was an almost entirely new design, with a twin overhead-cam head.

1980 Laverda Jota for sale on eBay

The earliest three-cylinder bikes used a large drum brake at the front, but that was soon updated to a twin-disc setup, although a drum was retained at the rear for a bit longer. Although it wasn’t tuned as aggressively as it could have been, the new, unimaginatively-named “3C” was one of the best-performing bikes available, with a 133mph tested top speed. But stock performance, however impressive, is never enough for some people, and UK Laverda importers Slater Laverda saw plenty of untapped potential and decided to build a bit of a hot rod.

Slater fitted factory racing cams and high-compression pistons, an updated exhaust, and SFC yokes for different front-end geometry. The resulting bike impressed Laverda’s management, and limited production began in 1976. Power for the 981cc engine was up to 90hp and the bike could clear 140mph, making it the fastest production motorcycle at the time. After success racing the bike in the UK, Laverda expanded distribution, and eventually the bike found its way to the US, although bikes originally intended for us were of lower-spec than the UK machines.

The Jota, named for a Spanish dance, is often characterized as a “man’s bike” but could more accurately be described as “a bike for tall people with strong hands.” The triples weigh in at nearly 500lbs dry, with a very tall seat 32″ high, no side stand fitted as standard, and a brutally stiff clutch-pull. Like all Laverdas of the period, they’re solid and overbuilt with power and handling to spare, but a Jota takes work to ride quickly. Or slowly.

Slight clarification of the seller’s information below: all of the early Laverda three-cylinder models, including the 3C and the original Jota used a 180° crank that basically fired “like a four with a miss.” The Jota was basically a hotted-up version of the regular production triple and used the same crank as the 3C. The “two up, one down” crank was great for power and made a pretty distinctive noise, but vibrated a bit more than than was considered acceptable. Later triples switched to a 120° crank after 1981 for increased smoothness, but purists feel like only the 180° bikes are the only “real” Jotas. Personally, I think the 120° bikes sound pretty cool too, but the 180° bikes are definitely more desirable to collectors.

From the Seller: 1980 Laverda Jota for Sale

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. These motorcycles were targeted by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best were available and that is what I purchased. 

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari. 

When you decide, as I did, that the rare, large Italian Sports bikes of the 1970s are a great place to be for collecting. You will for sure want to have a Laverda Jota in your collection. 

Make sure that your Jota is a real Jota with 180 degree firing order, which distinguishes the Jota from other Laverda models. Again, the 180 degree firing order means that the 3-cyclindar engine fires off when two of the cylinders are up and then 180 degrees later when one cylinder is up, it again fires. In other words, the Jota fires two times per 360 degrees and not three times per 360 degree rotation, like the lesser Laverda models. This is what gives the motor its unique power and especially its unbelievable thundering exhaust note. These are big, heavy, and handsome bikes. This one was restored by a Laverda guru a little over 10 years ago and was put in our collection shortly thereafter. If you are talking about these Italian bikes that are designed to look like they have big muscles the Jota certainly exemplifies that. Of course, any of the rare Italian 1970s and 1980s iconic bikes are always great garage art and most often wonderful bikes to ride. The Jota is a man’s bike and not meant for the faint of heart unless you are going to just put it in your living room to look at it.  

There is plenty of information on the Internet about the Jota. There is a very large international club for them. This Jota was restored to perfection and is still in wonderful cosmetic condition and riding form. 

This is certainly a bike for serious collectors and for those that don’t know all the details, the internet is just loaded with information. I can only suggest that you scrutinize the pictures and decide for yourself if this is another rare Italian collector bike that will eventually become as iconic as the Ferrari automobile. I spent a decade looking for the best one and this is the best one I have ever seen.

The real Jotas seldom become available and you should always get the best. When they are available, they are almost never in highly restored condition.  All my bikes are kept on trickle chargers ready to take a day’s ride at a moment’s notice. The Jota is one of those.  

I would suggest that you check out the other rare cycles that I am offering for sale by clicking on “other items for sale” in the upper right corner to see the other bikes being offered from my collection.  

Prefer phone calls 847-774-4857

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

The seller clearly knows bikes, and the collectability of the Jota is undeniable. The only Laverda model more valuable is the earlier SFC, and the Jota is a bit more civilized, although that probably isn’t saying much. Many Jotas came with a half-fairing, but I much prefer my big, burly bruisers to be naked! Wait, that came out wrong… Anyway, the additional wind-blast will be perfect for bulking up your neck muscles to match your newly-muscled hands: I’ve got a couple friends with Laverda triples and the effort required to pull that clutch still blows my mind.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1980 Laverda Jota for Sale
Bimota August 7, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Zero-mile 1997 Bimota VDue time capsule

CMG Motorcycles has two motorcycles on RSBFS right now, a 0 mile VDue and a brand new Bimota Tesi! Check them both out! -dc

There is no more tantalizing bike on the planet for me than the Bimota VDue. A bespoke Italian chassis from the finest boutique bike maker on the planet, draped with exotic suspension and prodigious brakes with fuel injection, the waistline of a ballerina and 110 or so two-stroke horsepower. A dream machine for the ages, it was supposed to kick Bimota into a new market segment in a cloud of sweet-smelling blue smoke. Instead, the dream went up like a Persian Gulf oil field and took the iconic nameplate down with it. 

Bad power delivery, seizing pistons, oil leaks plagued the first couple hundred VDues, and most owners returned them. Fixing the issues, which meant sticking carburetors on and invalidating the bikes for street use, ruined Bimota’s finances. Eventually, an engineer on the team that put the idea together bought the leftovers and fixed them. He sold about 120 that put out more than 120 street-legal two-stroke ponies, but by that point the toothpaste was out of the tube. 

This 1997 Bimota VDue never experienced any of those issues, because it has racked up exactly zero miles in its 22-year life. It is a literal museum piece in absolutely flawless cosmetic condition. Given the likelihood that its mechanicals are absolutely useless, both by design and from sitting, this thing is perfect for a collector who needs the finishing touch on a prestigious collection. 

Having never moved under its own power, it wears its original tires, which are now shiny from sitting around vulcanizing for a couple decades. But that’s no matter. When else will you get the chance to own a bike that is original and untouched down to the protective film on the windscreen? The thing we love most is that this bike is in its best state: an unblemished embodiment of bold vision and faith in engineering. It deserves to stay that way.

It is available in Christchurch, New Zealand for $48,990 USD and requests and inquiries can be sent to Brad by email  – here –.

Featured Listing: Zero-mile 1997 Bimota VDue time capsule