Posts by Category: Featured Listing

Featured Listing June 10, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing: 1999 Suzuki TL1000R

Update 6.10.2021: Tim listed this bike last year on RSBFS but ended up deciding to keep it. It’s back and now available for $7,000. This now includes new brake calipers (front and rear), as well as both wheel bearings and spacers, ready to be installed — in addition to all the stock parts as well! Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Craigslist and Facebook Marketplace will cough up examples of Suzuki’s thundering, hairy-chested v-twin superbike bruiser if you really look, but they’re almost never worth a second glance. Generally, they’re wrecked, stretched, rattle canned or all three, and more often than not have been without a title since the Bush administration. The 1999 Suzuki TL1000R you see here is none of those things. In fact, if you’re looking for one, this might be your stop.

It’s a two-owner bike that has been ridden enough to show it was maintained and the bugs were duly dealt with. It looks clean enough to eat off of, and has been treated to an Ohlins rear damper, in place of the notorious factory piece. The seller says it has Penske springs front and rear. It also has Jardine exhaust cans, switched cooling fans, a Power Commander and a toggle switch for diagnostics. The paperwork for the suspension work is present, and the bike comes with a shop manual.

The TL1000R’s history as a race bike is, excuse the pun, checkered, as it didn’t quite measure up to contemporary Ducatis and Honda’s RC51 when it came time to put up or shut up. But the bikes don’t look like anything else on the road at the time, and are known as wonderful, brawny streetbikes and track toys. There’s more than enough power to get yourself into serious trouble, but none of the peakiness of an inline four.

From the seller:

I have 1999 Suzuki TL1000R I am looking to sell. I am only second owner and previous owner was a Suzuki mechanic so it has been adult owned it’s whole life. I have Ohlin’s dampener with Penske spring in back, and Penske racing springs up front. Jardine pipes, upgraded grips, a toggle switch in back that will read the problem codes as well as an auxiliary switch to keep the fans on while bike is turned off to cool oil. I recently rebuilt the original clutch so that is new. I also installed a new drive shaft seal as well as the pushrod seal (the pushrod seal is from an SV1000 and installed backwards…much better fit than the original part as this was a known oil leak issue). Also included are 2 head gaskets, 2 fuel pumps, a crank case gasket, full additional wiring harness and CPU’s, and a full set of shims for the bike. (not cheap stuff). It has just shy of 29k miles. I also have all original parts for it including the rotary dampener and springs, original muffler and additional items for maintenance. It will come with the full mechanic book as well as paperwork for suspension upgrades. It has been very well taken care of and runs perfectly with the power commander.

Seller Tim is asking $7,000 for this beast, which is an immaculate, two-owner machine that represents the pinnacle of the nameplate. Contact Tim by email: tim.morse33@gmail.com

Featured Listing: 1999 Suzuki TL1000R
Featured Listing June 9, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing: Kawasaki KRR150

Rarer in the U.S. than a 145-lb. rider, Kawasaki’s 150cc two stroke KRR-150 sings a high RPM song of far off places.  But for a lighter weight fan of two-stroke fun, RSBFS reader Michael’s KRR might be the perfect hobby.

2003 Kawasaki KRR-150 for sale

A staple in the south Asian market, the KRR-150 is a single with 30 hp, passenger pegs, and quite capable of the ton.  Though it has the KIPS integrated power valve and CDI ignition , the KRR-150 relies on the six-speed to keep the engine in the power band.  The lightweight steel frame and 17-inch wheels look like a larger Ninja, with a four-piston front and rear brakes.  Even with full fuel and oil injection tanks, weight is under 300 lbs., and the skinny fairing makes a slot in the air if not a hole.

Michael picked up his KRR150 a few years ago, after seeing this RSBFS – profile –, cleaned it up nicely, and took care of the overdue maintenance items.  It still has just 9,243 kms or 5,743 miles, and features CA title.  Michael’s comments:

I received this bike in early October of 2018 and I have only changed the tires, cleaned the carb, and changed the spark plug.  Like the previous owner says, the bike takes some work to get it started after it has been sitting for a while.  I use a starter fluid that has a lubricant in it and I usually have it started and running after 2-3 sprays.

The bike runs great and really rips for a 150cc 2-stroke.  It has a factory boost bottle type of resonance power chamber and KIPS power valve which work well together to flatten the torque curve and give more in both low, mid, and high RPM ranges.  I have a handful of 2-Stroke bikes from every decade from the 60’s onward besides the 90’s and from an all around fun to ride and capable machine, this bike holds its own.

I was able to get the bike registered in California and I highly recommend if you are a California resident and you are considering this bike, do it.  2-stroke bikes are not easy to register in California from any year, but the more modern, the more difficult.  Registration is current and CA title is in hand.

If I had more space I would keep this in my collection due to its rarity, it’s CA title, and it’s all around ripper fun level.

If you love 2-stroke bikes and you want to ride what I believe to be a full featured, modern, tech-advanced bike that was never available in the US, you will not be disappointed.

Walk around video:

Michael is asking $3,799 for his KRR and can be reached by email – here -. Bike is located in San Anselmo, Ca, 94960.

Michael’s KRR150 has a few paint blemishes but was imported as a new bike, and shows very well.  The KRR model had a long run and parts should be easy, and Tyga Performance shows several upgrades and has a U.S. distributor.  Michael’s bike is a relatively recent year, seems to have had just two owners, looks excellent, quite rare, and a lightweight performer.  Even if the next rider isn’t from the left coast, the California paper trail will make it easier for a subsequent owner.

The asking price is $3,799 and Michael welcomes your email – here -. Bike is located in San Anselmo, Ca, 94960.

-donn

Featured Listing:  Kawasaki KRR150
Featured Listing May 14, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing – 1983 Suzuki Katana 1100

Found in New Jersey, today’s awesome 1983 Suzuki Katana is a throwback to what was the state of the art. Looking like a space ship – but rolling on caveman technology – the Katana made a serious statement to the world. This was a major score for Suzuki, and the entire world watched as the Hamamatsu manufacturer leapt to the front of the line with a string of successful models, including the forthcoming (and game changing) GSX-R. But in the first half of the 1980s it was the Katana making news and stealing the show.

Featured Listing: 1983 Suzuki Katana 1100 for sale on eBay

The radical lines of the Katana were penned by designer Hans Muth. They evoked a sense of motion with angular lines and a short, stubby windscreen. By all accounts the new Katana was not Gold Wing comfortable, but was no worse than the hyper sports bikes to come in the next decade (here’s looking at you, Ducati). Power came from an evolution of the big GS mill, with DOHC and four valve heads, but that is where brute force took over from technology. The big 72mm slugs displaced 1074cc, and slide in air cooled bores. These were fed by a brace of four Mikuni carbs, with the mixture squished to a compression ration of 9.5:1. All told, expect 110-ish HP from a stock unit (when new). The rest of the bike consisted of a steel double loop frame, and a twin shock swing arm arrangement. Brakes were big for the day, with 275mm disks up front and double piston calipers. When introduced ahead of the 1981 model year, Suzuki claimed the Katana was the fastest production motorcycle in the world.

From the seller:
1983 Suzuki GSX / Katana 1100. Listing for my father who has owned it since 1987. The engine was taken out and rebuilt in the 1990’s. It has a 1166cc big bore kit, Stage 2 port and polished head, megacycle cams, springs, and retainers, super hub clutch basket, 36mm mikuni RS carbs. Ohlins shocks, braced swing arm, powder coated wheels, large aftermarket performance machine front brakes, brand new Michelin tires, yoshimura header, dyna coils and MSD ignition box. We have most of the original parts for it including the original carburetors, shocks, seat, center stand, air box, swing arm, and a spare gas tank that is dented. Everything operates on the motorcycle except for the tachometer because of the MSD spark box. The box has an adjustable rev limiter. The motorcycle only has about 3000 miles on the rebuilt engine and has never been raced. Runs and stops great.

This particular Katana has benefitted from some very period-correct mods as well as newer technology. Read carefully through the seller’s description to find the deeper details, but essentially the GS motor responds well to a big-bore kit. This comes straight out of the dragstrip mentality of “bigger is better,” and by all counts the 1166cc upgrade is relatively conservative. The Yoshimura headers, the Kerker can, the braced swing arm, the upgraded carbs and the new cams are all old school trickery to make the Katana even faster (and thanks to upgraded brakes, it stops better too!); it all looks the part today. Even the MSD ignition seems to fit, itself a far better solution than the early-style, weak transistorized unit of the stocker. Sadly, said upgrade fails to communicate with the analog rev counter, making the tach inop. Many of the original parts are included in the sale, which is a plus for the collector.

The seller notes that this bike has been in the family for a long time – since 1987. That is great loyalty and longevity for what was initially thought of as a motorcycle oddity. Thankfully Suzuki experienced great success with the model, which spawned many variants including smaller capacities, different bodywork, and of course models crafted using similar design language (GS550 and XN85 Turbo, to name two). The Katana name was reused many times over the years as well, although never with such the impact as the original. This fantastic looking beast is prowling for a new garage or man cave to call home. And who wouldn’t want this sitting somewhere where it could be seen? Anthony can be reached by email here and is asking $15,000.

MI

Featured Listing – 1983 Suzuki Katana 1100
Aprilia May 6, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing – 2012 Aprilia RSV4 Factory APRC

Aprilia designed a V-4 liter bike for 2009, and has steadily updated and improved the model.  RSBFS reader Dave has also made many upgrades to his 2012 RSV4 Factory APRC, and kept miles low.

2012 Aprilia RSV4 Factory APRC for sale

With R&D and racing departments sharing the workload, Aprilia created a thoroughly new machine, using a compact V-4, narrower than any in-line liter and the four intakes grouped in the 65-degree vee.  Thoroughly oversquare and using ride-by-wire engine management, 180 hp are claimed at 12,500 rpm.  The chassis is fabricated from aluminum stampings and castings, light and rigid with adjustable headstock and swing arm pivot.  Öhlins racing 43mm forks are up front, with their remote reservoir monoshock amidships, and adjustable steering damper up top.  Brembo supplied their monoblock calipers and 320mm rotors, matching the gold anodizing on the forged 17-inch rims.  As tantalizing as the specs are, Aprilia’s Performance Ride Control ( APRC ) is the big story, with selectable control of traction, launch, quick-shift, and wheelies.  With mid-size car horsepower in a 435-lbs package, it improves performance and safety.

Dave is in high dry Albuquerque, and though he started with a superbike that won a lot of magazine shoot-outs, found a lot of nicer components to replace the factory controls, brakes, exhaust and more.  With just 3,700 miles only minor maintenance would be expected.  Dave’s comments:

I am looking for someone who can appreciate my mods instead of blue book value and realize this is a pretty good deal. I enjoy building bikes as much as riding them. I am the second owner and the first was an old guy like me so no abuse. The bike has 3,700 original miles and a clean NM title. It has the race ECU. Bike is in Albuquerque and is worth the drive as this is the last year before all the ABS junk. Do the research and add up the retail prices to justify my asking price.

  • This bike is crying out for a gold chain but the OEM is in great shape with such low mileage.
  • The YZF-R125 mirrors offer a better view than any sport bike I’ve ever ridden. However they look like antennas! You can install the stock ones for a view of your chest even after you move your arm like you have to on most sport bikes.
  • Like new Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa tires not even scrubbed in yet.
  • The Brembo 19 RCS M/C and Ferodo XRAC pads will have you out braking Marc Marquez! Braided stainless lines are OEM on this bike. The Brembo folding levers have a great shape and don’t feel like grabbing a knife edge like the Rizomas.
  • The race ECU is necessary with a cat delete and open exhaust. A Bazzaz tune would even make it better.
  • The Sato rearsets are top quality, offer great feedback and do not get slippery when wet.
  • Digital volt meter mounted on dash.

The following parts have zero miles and are from my build:

  • Dark windscreen is by Zero Gravity stock contour.
  • Brembo 19RCS master cylinder with folding lever, matching clutch lever also.
  • Rizoma M/C cap.
  • Ferodo XRAC front pads and sintered grip rear.
  • Beautiful Sato gold rearsets with black pegs and silver collars.
  • Light Tech gold chain adjusters and spools.
  • Sato Racing gold bar ends.
  • GiaMoto 12 point titanium engraved axle nuts.
  • CBE top triple clamp and sprocket cover.
  • Competition Werkes integrated clear lens tail light with stainless fender eliminator.
  • 15/44 gearing.
  • Bike has red and black Rizoma gas cap, also stock cap included.
  • YZF-R125 carbon mirrors. Running light to turn signal conversion.
  • SC project CRT exhaust.
  • Sato racing rear master cylinder cap.
  • R&G exhaust hanger plates.
  • Battery Tender lithium battery.
  • Digital volt meter, putting out 14 volts at idle. Updated regulator/rectifier.
  • Extra 10 gauge wire from battery to start relay to cure hot start problem. (tip from the Aprilia forum)

Also included:

  • 2 programmed keys and owner’s manual.
  • Akrapovic carbon can and mid pipe if you care about your neighbors.
    R&G hanger bracket included.
  • Dark double bubble windscreen by Puig their racing windscreen. Taller than stock.
  • OEM front master cylinder with Rizoma lever, matching clutch lever also.
  • Have stock mirrors but wires were cut.
  • Stock rearsets and Rizoma rearsets.
  • Red Rizoma oil cap.
  • Stock bar ends.
  • Tail Tidy and turn signals.
  • Stock gearing.
  • Stock air filter.
  • Mr. Jay Leno, have you got one of these in your garage? The titanium axle nuts are stunning and even engraved! If you don’t want attention then purchase something else. The pics don’t do it justice. Also never leave it out of sight and invest in a good alarm system. This bike is so beautiful I am confident the first person that sees it will buy it. Even people who aren’t motorcyclists comment how pretty the bike is and the powerful exhaust note sounds more like an exotic sports car rather than a motorcycle. Please leave a message when you call and I will get back to you in a day or two. Repeat your number, state your time zone and the best time to call.


    Dave’s price is firm at $12,000.  Telephone him at (505) 463-6462

    The RSV4 put Aprilia into the thick of WSBK racing, with championships in 2010, ’12 and ’14.  The streetbike was expensive but very competitive with other European makers.  Value is built in with solid engineering and APRC features.  Dave’s RSV4 has almost too much to list, and too few miles to call it used.

    Call Dave on (505) 463-6462 to discuss !

    -donn

     

     

    Featured Listing – 2012 Aprilia RSV4 Factory APRC
    Featured Listing April 29, 2021 posted by

    Featured Listing – 2004 Honda RC51 Nicky Hayden

    AMA Superbike champion. AMA Superstock winner – in both 600cc and 750cc classes. Formula Extreme winner. MotoGP rookie of the year. MotoGP world champion. Dethroned Valentino Rossi by interrupting his 5-in-a-row championship streak. Three time MotoGP winner and 28 time podium visitor. Scored at least one point in each of his 14 seasons in the top class. Won in WSBK. Inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of fame. When it came to racing, there was not much that Nicky did not accomplish. Known as a genial and affable persona, Nicky was a wonderful ambassador on the world’s stage, and brought the US back to the top step in international competition. The Kentucky Kid will be missed.

    2004 Honda RC51 Nicky Hayden Edition

    Honda created the RC51 in order to go Superbike racing. With ruling changes that allowed twin cylinder motorcycles a displacement advantage over four-bangers, Honda ditched the successful RC45 (RVF750R) for an all new effort to be known as the RVT1000R in the US and VTR1000 in other markets. The new 90 degree v-twin displaced just under the rule book limit of 999cc and thus was born a Japanese interpretation of a Ducati. And while the 130-odd HP twin is special in its own right, the packaging of the narrow motor within a sculpted wraparound twin-spar aluminum frame is what made the RC51 successful. So successful that it won the WSBK championship in 2000 – its first year out – with Colin Edwards at the helm. The RC51 then won a spectacular double championship in 2002, with Edwards taking WSBK honors and Nicky Hayden winning the AMA Superbike title in America.

    From the seller:
    This is a Honda RC51 or RVT1000R Nicky Hayden Special Edition, #69.

    Contact: Keri: kroskill@gmail.com
    Asking $12,000
    22,703 miles

    This racing bike has been heavily modified with track riding/racing in mind. Meticulously maintained this RC51 is meant to be ridden and enjoyed. Starting from the top down it has a Power Commander III professionally tuned by BMW’s race team. Engine mods to the airbox/emissions. Sato Racing high mount exhaust and rear sets. New sprockets and gearing changed to favor acceleration over top speed. Stainless brake lines. Suspension professionally set up for a 180 lb rider. Custom undertail with LED’s. The bike has been tracked but never been down. There is some small cosmetic damage with the left fairing in the sticker kit very minor. (check pictures).

    Included in the purchase:
    Rear passenger seat, travel bag that goes in place of the rear seat, original front signals, original tail and signals, stock exhaust, original clip-on bars, and original brake and clutch levers.

    The Nicky Hayden Edition of the RC51 is a special tribute to a special rider. This one year only offering differed very little mechanically from the same year base RC51, but included a special brushed aluminum finish on the frame and swingarm, a white area on the front and tail sections for numbers, and a unique Nicky Hayden sticker kit as part of the #69 livery. The tank is also bestowed with Nicky’s signature and 2002 AMA Superbike Championship creds.

    How about a video of this beast running? See below and turn up those speakers!

    Today’s Feature Listing RC51 is a rare Nicky Hayden Edition with some tasteful performance mods. On the engine side, intake, fuel injection and exhaust have all been massaged thanks to a Power Commander module and those gorgeous Sato Racing cans. Running gear has also been upgraded in the way of improved gearing for the real world, and upgraded brake lines for even better stopping power. Visually the bike has been cleaned up with the undertail kit, and the trick adjustable levers serve double duty as good looking and highly functional. The Sato rear sets are a work of functional art in their own right. All in all, this bike appears to be well sorted and ridden as it was meant to be. The seller is asking $12k for this rare homage to the Kentucky Kid. Please send inquiries to Keri, and snag this rare beauty. Nicky would approve. Good Luck!!

    MI

    Featured Listing – 2004 Honda RC51 Nicky Hayden
    Cagiva April 16, 2021 posted by

    Featured Listing: One-Owner 2000 Cagiva Mito 125 with 667 Miles !

    From the Seattle area’s Garage Assassins, today’s Feature is a micro-giant, 125 cc cranking out 34 hp, weighing just 284 lbs. and looking for all the world like a Ducati 916 !  Always in a collector’s hands it has just 667 miles, all DOT equipment, and current registration.  We’ll let Duncan pick up the story from here –

    2000 Cagiva Mito 125 for sale

    The 2000 Cagiva Mito 125 boasts a maximum power output of 34 horsepower and 23 Nm of torque from its liquid-cooled, two-stroke, 125cc, single cylinder powerplant that was mated to a six-speed manual transmission. 284lbs. 3.4 Gallon capacity. Legendary designer Massimo Tamburrini re-styled the bike in 1994, giving it a knife-edge fairing, winged tank and monoposto seat fairing reminiscent of the Ducati superbike. Massimo Tamburrini went on to Ducati where he designed the 916 Ducati. This bike has many of the very same design attributes in a smaller package.

    This entry-level machine boasts features such as a two-piece, dual seat, a full-fairing with a small, adjustable windshield, die-cast aluminum wheels, an analogue instrument cluster, a suspension package composed of a 40mm Marzocchi telescopic front fork and an adjustable mono-shock in the rear, a disc braking system both in the front and in the rear and a paint and graphic scheme inspired from racing
    motorcycles.

    This special find is not even broken in yet. We still have in the box a factory upgrade package. Air intake, special jets for carburetion, rear sprocket plus an exhaust upgrade, still in original packaging.

    Duncan asks $14,500 for the 2000 Mito, and can be reached by email sennaducati79@gmail.com.

    This 916 Ducati look alike is a Cagiva Mito 125 2-stroke, the same type of motorcycle that Valentino Rossi started his racing career on at a young age. Back in the day they had a 125cc class of highly modified 2-stroke street bikes for upstart racers in Europe. Cagiva was the bike. Cagiva even sold an entire massive hop up race kit to convert these little rockets into race bikes.

    This one owner gem has never seen rain, never down, properly stored in a climate-controlled man cave filled with a proper collection of amazing Italian motorcycles. Owned and maintained by a skilled knowledgeable rider of many years. The bike has recently had a complete proper nut/ bolt go through. Runs perfect and strong. If you plan on riding versus display, we recommend newer tires. The tires are not cracked or damaged, just not as fresh for your riding safety.

    Now just over twenty years old, this perfect Mito 125 might be a singular opportunity for the next collector.

    Duncan offers assistance with worldwide shipping and asks $14,500 for the 2000 Mito, contact him by email sennaducati79@gmail.com.

    -donn

    Featured Listing:  One-Owner 2000 Cagiva Mito 125 with 667 Miles !
    Featured Listing March 31, 2021 posted by

    Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC

    In case you thought race replicas were a recent innovation, Laverda set the world on it’s ear some 50 years ago, with its 750 Super Freni Competizione, first in endurance racing, and then on the road.  Presented by a Seattle area restorer, this 750 SFC has been restored to museum quality and is ready for its next display.

    1974 Laverda 750 SFC for sale

    A development of Laverda’s 650cc parallel twin ( itself a template of Honda’s 305 ), the 750 SFC immediately did well in competition, and was made in rather small lots from 1971-75.  For 1974, the factory blue-printed engine with two 36mm Dell’Orto carbs and 9.9-to-1 compression made a reliable 75 hp with Bosch electronic ignition.  The classic nickel plated chassis held the engine from above as a stressed member, stabilizing the 38mm forks with their Super Freni ( Super Brakes ) 280mm disks.  Orange was adopted as Laverda’s competition color at some point in the early 1970’s, and the small seat and long range tank on the SFC appear to have been the inspiration more than one generation of café racers.

    Evidently a previous owner started the restoration using all factory Laverda parts, and Duncan has these notes about the SFC and this example in particular :

    A Production Racer For Sale

    Laverda 750 SFs achieved notable endurance racing success in 1970, including a win of the 500km of Monza, a 1-2-3 podium sweep at the 24 Hours of Oss in Holland, and a third and sixth in the Bol d’Or in France. These bikes improved incrementally, but so did the competition. By the end of the year, Massimo asked Luciano Zen to think about a production racer version of the Laverda 750 SF.

    In May 1971, the Laverda 750 SFC, for (Super Freni Competizion) was launched. Compared to the 750 SF, the engine was extensively modified. The reworked cylinder head had bigger valves and a new cam profile (designated 2/C), rockers were polished and 36mm Amal concentric carbs replaced the 30mm Dell’Ortos. A close-ratio five-speed was fitted, and the crankshaft and rods were carefully balanced and polished. Power output was rated at 70hp, and each engine was dyno tested to ensure output. The frame was strengthened with gussets and the front brake was either standard Laverda item or an optional Ceriani four-leading-shoe unit. The bikes ran on Dunlop K81 TT100 tires.

    Bodywork was also new, with a 23-liter (6.1 gallon) handmade aluminum gas tank, a single seat with fiberglass tail section and a half fairing, all painted in the now-famous bright orange, a color selected to make the bikes easy to spot on the track, especially at night. It was also chosen to please the Dutch importer, Jan Raymakers, orange being the national color of the Netherlands.

    Laverda 750 SFC models were produced in small batches between 1971 and 1975. The first batch, built in May 1971, numbered about 20 bikes, all intended for factory competition. SFCs were hand built by a small team and with little regard to cost. They were built to meet exceptional standards of performance, and in particular were intended to excel in endurance races, where bulk and a relative lack of nimbleness would not be so much of a handicap and where their great strength and robustness would give them a competitive advantage.

    In their first official race in 1971, the Six Hours of Zeltweg, SFCs finished first and second. That year, SFCs also placed first, third and fourth in the 24 Hours of Montjuic in Barcelona, first and third in the 24 Hours of Oss, and first in Vallelunga (Italy). They also placed second at the Bol d’Or in Le Mans, first and second at Imola, and finished first and second in the 500km of Modena. Not bad for the first year.

    In November 1971, 80 more SFCs were produced, and some were sold to the public. The aluminum gas tank was now fiberglass (the alloy ones had a tendency to crack), and the bikes had revised gearbox ratios and exhaust systems. They also had a new Laverda drum brake, with the more effective Ceriani a popular option. Another batch of SFCs were produced in early 1972, with slight changes to the shape of the fairing and seat and a new exhaust with a crossover pipe.

    By this time, the Japanese had made significant progress in the development of their machines, and while there were SFC victories in 1972, they did not match the stellar performance of 1971. Only three 750 SFCs were made in 1973, and these served as test beds for radical changes like magnesium crankcases, new cylinder head designs and even lighter crankshafts. The results were not impressive, the bikes becoming more fragile and difficult to ride.

    1974 would see the largest single-year run of SFCs. For the first time, the Laverda 750 SFC was considered part of the normal product range offered to the public and was no longer reserved solely for racing. The SFC was promoted as a “Production Racer,” similar to Ducati’s 750SS or Norton’s Commando-based production racers, and the changes were numerous. The bodywork was improved, and the zinc-plated frame was lowered and modified with revised steering geometry, larger front forks, and triple 280mm Brembo disc brakes. A new, strengthened close-ratio gearbox was fitted and the engine was enhanced by a lightened crankshaft, slim, polished connecting rods, a new camshaft (5/C), a higher capacity oil pump, new 36mm Dell’Orto carbs (without accelerator pumps), modified valves and valve springs, a new exhaust system and higher, 9.9:1 compression ratio. Power was now rated at 75hp at 7,500rpm.

    A total of 222 SFCs were built in 1974, with slightly less than half of them going to the U.S. To comply with federal regulations, U.S. models had turn signals, bigger taillights, side reflectors, adjustable handlebars and Nippon-Denso speedometers and tachometers. Even though the bike was being sold to privateers in 1974, factory-prepared racers were performing well in the national production class races.

    During the 5 year production run, a total of 549 were made. The SFC being offered is one of only 100 SFCs made for the North American market in 1974. According to well-known SFC expert Marnix van der Schalk (in correspondence with the previous owner), the factory records state it was shipped to the USA on July 8, 1974.

    The last version of the SFC was the 1975 Laverda SFC Elettronica, its name reflecting its Bosch electronic ignition. It had a new cylinder head, revised valve angles, re-shaped combustion chambers and a new, optional high-lift cam with 10.5:1 compression ratio. A contemporary magazine test produced a 12.5 second quarter mile at 180kph (top speed over 220kph). A final batch of 33 SFC Elettronicas featuring five-spoke cast-alloy wheels were built in 1976.

    The following is a list of much of the work commissioned by the previous owner and performed by Ron Small in 2002-2003, with the invoices totaling nearly $6,000.  Previous owner noted that all replacement parts used on the bike were authentic Laverda SFC parts purchased from Wolfgang Haerter at Columbia Car and Cycle in British Columbia, Canada (receipts totaling $1,000).

    Motor:

    Re-sleeved cylinders

    bore and size cylinders

    valve job

    new valve springs

    new valve guides

    new cam chain

    new cam tensioner

    new guide wheel

    new rings

    blast and clean heads

    Cam and timing set correct.

     

    Other items:

    new gas tank

    sealed new tank 

    paint new tank

    new fork seals

    new swing arm bushings

    paint swing arm

    rebuild brake master cylinders

    new clutch cable

    new throttle cables

    new tires

    new brakes

    Subsequent to the work being completed at Maximum Effort, the previous owner only rode the bike 900 miles. The current owner has ridden it less than 100 miles. It has spent the past 13 years on display in a climate-controlled garage. 

    There is no knowing if the 6753 miles showing on the odometer is the actual mileage, but the condition of the bike, combined with the minimal miles ridden by the current and previous owner in the past 20 years would lend credibility to that number. 

    There is a small amount of surface rust on center stand.

    Recently recommissioned for the road, it has a new battery, new fluids, top end adjust and inspection. Carburation adjustments and tune. Bike has had complete nut and bolt, safety inspection and test ridden. 

    Tires are 15-20 years old.  They are not dry rotted, but if the bike is going to be ridden, changing them would be a good idea. 

    For at least the past 20 years, this SFC has been adult owned, never down, always maintained by marquee knowledgeable technicians. Makes big noise and runs flawlessly.

    Being offered at $49,950 in US Funds. Will assist on Worldwide Shipping.

     Email sennaducati79@gmail.com your contact numbers for an immediate return call. 

    Duncan asks $49,950 and reminds readers – This bike is absolutely correct, adult owned, never down, never abused, maintained by the best techs, riders in the business. Makes big noise and runs flawlessly.  He can be reached via email – here –.

    Early in the 1970’s the orange bikes sometimes captured multiple podium spots at championship events like Bol d’Or and Suzuka 8 Hours, but increasing competition from the east made it more of an occasion as the decade wore on.  Mostly made a handful at a time, production peaked at 222 in 1974, and total production is said to be 549.  As happens to race bikes, few survive to be restored, and just 100 of the federalized SFC’s were said to be imported in 1974.  But the SFC put Laverda in the exclusive company of a leading motorcycle manufacturer.  Duncan requests offers via email – here –.

    -donn

    Featured Listing:  1974 Laverda 750 SFC
    Featured Listing March 29, 2021 posted by

    Featured Listing: 1983 SUZUKI GS750ES

    The 1980s: A period of rapid and wild development that set the motorcycling course for the next several decades. It seemed for a time that every innovation was rapidly made defunct by the next quantum leap in engineering – or experimentation. From the end of the 1970s right into the 1990s the world saw massive jumps in suspension tech, chassis engineering, internal combustion enhancements, clutch and transmission improvements, and aerodynamics. Some of the innovations worked and became mainstream. Others were fated to be “one year wonders” as manufacturers rapidly pivoted to something new. In between the extremes some absolutely amazing motorcycles were created. Today’s Feature Listing is one such model: the 1983 Suzuki GS750ES.

    Featured Listing: 1983 SUZUKI GS750ES

    The Suzuki GS750 first bowed to the world in 1977. At that time it was more of a UJM (Universal Japanese Motorcycle), or what would be better known as a standard motorcycle. This was a response to Honda’s dominant expertise in the inline four game, and at which Suzuki was playing catch up. But catch up they did, steadily evolving the GS750 into an absolute gem of a sport bike; the ’83 ES variant enjoying a 16-valve DOHC head with Suzuki’s trademarked Twin Swirl Combustion Chamber (TSCC), a greatly updated chassis which included the cutting-edge Full Floater single shock setup in the rear, and trick anti-dive forks up front. And rather than the 18/19 inch combo front and rear carried by predecessors, the ES model now carried a 17 incher out back and a GP-inspired 16 inch wheel up front. The smaller front wheel did turn out to be a short-lived fad, but the reduction in rotational weight and gyroscope tendencies helped the smallest and lightest of the GS750 lineage turn and track like no other.

    From the seller:
    Completely stock, unrestored, unmodified and un-faded
    Classic 80’s sport bike style
    Two adult owners from new, 3,000 miles believed correct
    As close to a showroom-new GS750ES as you’re likely to find
    Original tool kits come with bike
    Regularly and recently ridden

    Price: Mecum Auction Lot F67 April 28 – May 1

    Contact: Bob (superhawk65@gmail.com) or visit the Mecum Auction site

    The 1983 Suzuki GS750ES was the last of this particular lineup; the economy stalled any further development and unsold units were sold off as 1984 models (unchanged). By 1985 H-D began the Great Tariff War and capacities were dropped to 700cc to avoid additional taxation. That makes this 1983 Suzuki GS750ES the last of its kind, and in about the best shape we’ve seen one of these retro machines. With 70-ish HP on tap and relatively modern components, the GS750ES is a great pick for anyone wanting to pick up some nostalgia – and who also wouldn’t mind riding it around. Suzuki did crank out a large number of the GS750 models (a definite best seller for the Hamamatsu manufacturer), but today few of them survive in this kind of condition.

    Today’s Featured Listing will be enjoying the limelight at the Mecum auctions in Las Vegas, April 28 – May 1. With very few miles and sitting in stock, original condition, this bike will certainly catch the eyes of collectors. Interested parties might want to chat with Bob ahead of the auction to learn more. This bike is an incredible time capsule of the pinnacle of the pre-GSXR world, and will certainly be grabbing attention wherever it shows up. Whether you were there and had one, missed out but always wanted one, or just learning about the era now, this 1983 Suzuki GS750ES is worth the effort. Good Luck!!

    MI

    Featured Listing: 1983 SUZUKI GS750ES