Posts by Category: Featured Listing

Featured Listing March 31, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda 750 SFC

In case you thought race replicas were a recent innovation, Laverda set the world on it’s ear some 50 years ago, with its 750 Super Freni Competizione, first in endurance racing, and then on the road.  Presented by a Seattle area restorer, this 750 SFC has been restored to museum quality and is ready for its next display.

1974 Laverda 750 SFC for sale

A development of Laverda’s 650cc parallel twin ( itself a template of Honda’s 305 ), the 750 SFC immediately did well in competition, and was made in rather small lots from 1971-75.  For 1974, the factory blue-printed engine with two 36mm Dell’Orto carbs and 9.9-to-1 compression made a reliable 75 hp with Bosch electronic ignition.  The classic nickel plated chassis held the engine from above as a stressed member, stabilizing the 38mm forks with their Super Freni ( Super Brakes ) 280mm disks.  Orange was adopted as Laverda’s competition color at some point in the early 1970’s, and the small seat and long range tank on the SFC appear to have been the inspiration more than one generation of café racers.

Evidently a previous owner started the restoration using all factory Laverda parts, and Duncan has these notes about the SFC and this example in particular :

A Production Racer For Sale

Laverda 750 SFs achieved notable endurance racing success in 1970, including a win of the 500km of Monza, a 1-2-3 podium sweep at the 24 Hours of Oss in Holland, and a third and sixth in the Bol d’Or in France. These bikes improved incrementally, but so did the competition. By the end of the year, Massimo asked Luciano Zen to think about a production racer version of the Laverda 750 SF.

In May 1971, the Laverda 750 SFC, for (Super Freni Competizion) was launched. Compared to the 750 SF, the engine was extensively modified. The reworked cylinder head had bigger valves and a new cam profile (designated 2/C), rockers were polished and 36mm Amal concentric carbs replaced the 30mm Dell’Ortos. A close-ratio five-speed was fitted, and the crankshaft and rods were carefully balanced and polished. Power output was rated at 70hp, and each engine was dyno tested to ensure output. The frame was strengthened with gussets and the front brake was either standard Laverda item or an optional Ceriani four-leading-shoe unit. The bikes ran on Dunlop K81 TT100 tires.

Bodywork was also new, with a 23-liter (6.1 gallon) handmade aluminum gas tank, a single seat with fiberglass tail section and a half fairing, all painted in the now-famous bright orange, a color selected to make the bikes easy to spot on the track, especially at night. It was also chosen to please the Dutch importer, Jan Raymakers, orange being the national color of the Netherlands.

Laverda 750 SFC models were produced in small batches between 1971 and 1975. The first batch, built in May 1971, numbered about 20 bikes, all intended for factory competition. SFCs were hand built by a small team and with little regard to cost. They were built to meet exceptional standards of performance, and in particular were intended to excel in endurance races, where bulk and a relative lack of nimbleness would not be so much of a handicap and where their great strength and robustness would give them a competitive advantage.

In their first official race in 1971, the Six Hours of Zeltweg, SFCs finished first and second. That year, SFCs also placed first, third and fourth in the 24 Hours of Montjuic in Barcelona, first and third in the 24 Hours of Oss, and first in Vallelunga (Italy). They also placed second at the Bol d’Or in Le Mans, first and second at Imola, and finished first and second in the 500km of Modena. Not bad for the first year.

In November 1971, 80 more SFCs were produced, and some were sold to the public. The aluminum gas tank was now fiberglass (the alloy ones had a tendency to crack), and the bikes had revised gearbox ratios and exhaust systems. They also had a new Laverda drum brake, with the more effective Ceriani a popular option. Another batch of SFCs were produced in early 1972, with slight changes to the shape of the fairing and seat and a new exhaust with a crossover pipe.

By this time, the Japanese had made significant progress in the development of their machines, and while there were SFC victories in 1972, they did not match the stellar performance of 1971. Only three 750 SFCs were made in 1973, and these served as test beds for radical changes like magnesium crankcases, new cylinder head designs and even lighter crankshafts. The results were not impressive, the bikes becoming more fragile and difficult to ride.

1974 would see the largest single-year run of SFCs. For the first time, the Laverda 750 SFC was considered part of the normal product range offered to the public and was no longer reserved solely for racing. The SFC was promoted as a “Production Racer,” similar to Ducati’s 750SS or Norton’s Commando-based production racers, and the changes were numerous. The bodywork was improved, and the zinc-plated frame was lowered and modified with revised steering geometry, larger front forks, and triple 280mm Brembo disc brakes. A new, strengthened close-ratio gearbox was fitted and the engine was enhanced by a lightened crankshaft, slim, polished connecting rods, a new camshaft (5/C), a higher capacity oil pump, new 36mm Dell’Orto carbs (without accelerator pumps), modified valves and valve springs, a new exhaust system and higher, 9.9:1 compression ratio. Power was now rated at 75hp at 7,500rpm.

A total of 222 SFCs were built in 1974, with slightly less than half of them going to the U.S. To comply with federal regulations, U.S. models had turn signals, bigger taillights, side reflectors, adjustable handlebars and Nippon-Denso speedometers and tachometers. Even though the bike was being sold to privateers in 1974, factory-prepared racers were performing well in the national production class races.

During the 5 year production run, a total of 549 were made. The SFC being offered is one of only 100 SFCs made for the North American market in 1974. According to well-known SFC expert Marnix van der Schalk (in correspondence with the previous owner), the factory records state it was shipped to the USA on July 8, 1974.

The last version of the SFC was the 1975 Laverda SFC Elettronica, its name reflecting its Bosch electronic ignition. It had a new cylinder head, revised valve angles, re-shaped combustion chambers and a new, optional high-lift cam with 10.5:1 compression ratio. A contemporary magazine test produced a 12.5 second quarter mile at 180kph (top speed over 220kph). A final batch of 33 SFC Elettronicas featuring five-spoke cast-alloy wheels were built in 1976.

The following is a list of much of the work commissioned by the previous owner and performed by Ron Small in 2002-2003, with the invoices totaling nearly $6,000.  Previous owner noted that all replacement parts used on the bike were authentic Laverda SFC parts purchased from Wolfgang Haerter at Columbia Car and Cycle in British Columbia, Canada (receipts totaling $1,000).

Motor:

Re-sleeved cylinders

bore and size cylinders

valve job

new valve springs

new valve guides

new cam chain

new cam tensioner

new guide wheel

new rings

blast and clean heads

Cam and timing set correct.

 

Other items:

new gas tank

sealed new tank 

paint new tank

new fork seals

new swing arm bushings

paint swing arm

rebuild brake master cylinders

new clutch cable

new throttle cables

new tires

new brakes

Subsequent to the work being completed at Maximum Effort, the previous owner only rode the bike 900 miles. The current owner has ridden it less than 100 miles. It has spent the past 13 years on display in a climate-controlled garage. 

There is no knowing if the 6753 miles showing on the odometer is the actual mileage, but the condition of the bike, combined with the minimal miles ridden by the current and previous owner in the past 20 years would lend credibility to that number. 

There is a small amount of surface rust on center stand.

Recently recommissioned for the road, it has a new battery, new fluids, top end adjust and inspection. Carburation adjustments and tune. Bike has had complete nut and bolt, safety inspection and test ridden. 

Tires are 15-20 years old.  They are not dry rotted, but if the bike is going to be ridden, changing them would be a good idea. 

For at least the past 20 years, this SFC has been adult owned, never down, always maintained by marquee knowledgeable technicians. Makes big noise and runs flawlessly.

Being offered at $49,950 in US Funds. Will assist on Worldwide Shipping.

 Email sennaducati79@gmail.com your contact numbers for an immediate return call. 

Duncan asks $49,950 and reminds readers – This bike is absolutely correct, adult owned, never down, never abused, maintained by the best techs, riders in the business. Makes big noise and runs flawlessly.  He can be reached via email – here –.

Early in the 1970’s the orange bikes sometimes captured multiple podium spots at championship events like Bol d’Or and Suzuka 8 Hours, but increasing competition from the east made it more of an occasion as the decade wore on.  Mostly made a handful at a time, production peaked at 222 in 1974, and total production is said to be 549.  As happens to race bikes, few survive to be restored, and just 100 of the federalized SFC’s were said to be imported in 1974.  But the SFC put Laverda in the exclusive company of a leading motorcycle manufacturer.  Duncan requests offers via email – here –.

-donn

Featured Listing:  1974 Laverda 750 SFC
Featured Listing March 29, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing: 1983 SUZUKI GS750ES

The 1980s: A period of rapid and wild development that set the motorcycling course for the next several decades. It seemed for a time that every innovation was rapidly made defunct by the next quantum leap in engineering – or experimentation. From the end of the 1970s right into the 1990s the world saw massive jumps in suspension tech, chassis engineering, internal combustion enhancements, clutch and transmission improvements, and aerodynamics. Some of the innovations worked and became mainstream. Others were fated to be “one year wonders” as manufacturers rapidly pivoted to something new. In between the extremes some absolutely amazing motorcycles were created. Today’s Feature Listing is one such model: the 1983 Suzuki GS750ES.

Featured Listing: 1983 SUZUKI GS750ES

The Suzuki GS750 first bowed to the world in 1977. At that time it was more of a UJM (Universal Japanese Motorcycle), or what would be better known as a standard motorcycle. This was a response to Honda’s dominant expertise in the inline four game, and at which Suzuki was playing catch up. But catch up they did, steadily evolving the GS750 into an absolute gem of a sport bike; the ’83 ES variant enjoying a 16-valve DOHC head with Suzuki’s trademarked Twin Swirl Combustion Chamber (TSCC), a greatly updated chassis which included the cutting-edge Full Floater single shock setup in the rear, and trick anti-dive forks up front. And rather than the 18/19 inch combo front and rear carried by predecessors, the ES model now carried a 17 incher out back and a GP-inspired 16 inch wheel up front. The smaller front wheel did turn out to be a short-lived fad, but the reduction in rotational weight and gyroscope tendencies helped the smallest and lightest of the GS750 lineage turn and track like no other.

From the seller:
Completely stock, unrestored, unmodified and un-faded
Classic 80’s sport bike style
Two adult owners from new, 3,000 miles believed correct
As close to a showroom-new GS750ES as you’re likely to find
Original tool kits come with bike
Regularly and recently ridden

Price: Mecum Auction Lot F67 April 28 – May 1

Contact: Bob (superhawk65@gmail.com) or visit the Mecum Auction site

The 1983 Suzuki GS750ES was the last of this particular lineup; the economy stalled any further development and unsold units were sold off as 1984 models (unchanged). By 1985 H-D began the Great Tariff War and capacities were dropped to 700cc to avoid additional taxation. That makes this 1983 Suzuki GS750ES the last of its kind, and in about the best shape we’ve seen one of these retro machines. With 70-ish HP on tap and relatively modern components, the GS750ES is a great pick for anyone wanting to pick up some nostalgia – and who also wouldn’t mind riding it around. Suzuki did crank out a large number of the GS750 models (a definite best seller for the Hamamatsu manufacturer), but today few of them survive in this kind of condition.

Today’s Featured Listing will be enjoying the limelight at the Mecum auctions in Las Vegas, April 28 – May 1. With very few miles and sitting in stock, original condition, this bike will certainly catch the eyes of collectors. Interested parties might want to chat with Bob ahead of the auction to learn more. This bike is an incredible time capsule of the pinnacle of the pre-GSXR world, and will certainly be grabbing attention wherever it shows up. Whether you were there and had one, missed out but always wanted one, or just learning about the era now, this 1983 Suzuki GS750ES is worth the effort. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1983 SUZUKI GS750ES
Featured Listing March 23, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing: 2000 Triumph TT600

Spring has sprung and we are just starting to see the tendrils of growth that promise to make this another banner year. And right on queue comes this wonderful Triumph TT600 Featured Listing. While perhaps not as rare or expensive as some bikes in collecting circles, the Triumph is a wonderful and unique machine that certainly fits into the rare and unusual category here on RSBFS. We don’t see them all that often, and these 600s represent an inexpensive way to get into a quality sport bike riding the road less traveled.

Featured Listing – 2000 Triumph TT600

In 2000, Triumph was the only manufacturer outside of Japan to take on the Big Four at their own game: the 600cc hyper sport segment. To be successful in this ultra-competitive space, the Hinkley, UK-based constructor needed to bring some serious mojo to the design table. What they crafted was a powerful, fuel-injected inline four cylinder screamer housed in a twin-beam aluminum frame. Eager not to fall into the trap of “not invented here,” ancillary components were sourced from the best that the Japanese had to offer, putting the TT600 on the same footing as the competition. Brakes were excellent Nissin units (310mm front, 220 rear), and front and rear suspension pieces were provided by Kayaba. In an attempt at cutting edge, Triumph engineers fitted the TT600 with a Sagem digital fuel injection unit. This ensured that the bike was firmly rooted in the new century (producing power AND fewer emissions), but Triumph was to discover the this new technology was not without pitfalls.

From the seller:
2000 Triumph TT600 for sale in great condition. Has 13,000 miles on the unit. The unit is rated at 110 HP, I have replaced the stock exhaust with an aftermarket pipe. I do have the original pipe to go with the bike. I have purchased a rear fork jack for storage. The bike has Diablos for tires currently. The bike comes with a cover and also a tank and rear foot peg video or go pro attachment. I also have a TT600 jacket that is in red and silver color. New battery as 11/2020. The bike runs well, it will need service on oil and brake fluid before taking it out for a long ride. The bike has an excellent riding position for long rides or tearing up the corners. There are very few left in the market place.

Price: $4,000
Contact Peter: pfmolgaard10@gmail.com

Reviewers of the day lavished the bulbous Triumph with high praise, being extremely comfortable despite being a competitive crotch-rocket. The Kayaba suspension was set up a bit softer than the other middleweights, and the engine was a estimated 110 HP powerhouse that pulled hard in the upper revs – although suffered from some fuel injection stumbling at lower throttle settings. Handling was reported to be excellent as the alloy chassis was ultra stiff – even when compared to the Japanese competition. Overall build quality was up to a very high standard as well, making these motorcycles as exotic in the US as other European brands. Here is a video shot by the seller of this exact bike:

The TT600 model evolved in the 3 short years of its existence, paving the way for the Daytona series. Today these are relatively rare models, and difficult to find in decent condition. Today’s Featured Listing is a well-cared for rider that has the miles to prove the TT600 concepts works well, yet still looks as rare and unique as it did 20 years ago. In fact, given that most of the competition maintains a very angular design language, one might argue that the Triumph has aged far better that its peers; it certainly makes a distinctive statement in 2021. The exhaust upgrade helps with sound, performance and looks (win win win), and the overall package is listed for just $4,000. Interested parties should give Peter a shout. The Triumph TT600 is a great looking bike that owns a rightful place in history as a serious 600cc contender. Check out all of the pictures and video and then talk to the man.

MI

Featured Listing: 2000 Triumph TT600
Featured Listing February 21, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing: 1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS

The 1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS is probably the pinnacle of MG’s powers, and it’s a true emblem of the storied marque’s steadfast dedication to doing its own thing, consequence and technology be damned. The Daytona line was released in 1993 to celebrate Goose’s racing success with a privateer in the 1980s. If you can find one from any production year, they are magnificent machines, but the ’97 RS model adds some handling finesse and power the older bikes lack.

For ’97, the v-twin got a 12-horsepower bump to just under 110 horsepower, thanks to better breathing heads, Carillo rods and forged pistons, a lightened crankshaft and upgraded EFI. Braking was now handled by Brembo, and adjustable WP suspension front and rear kept the 500-ish-pound brute headed the right direction. Other trick bits included Marchesini wheels and an Bitubo steering damper.

Complaints at the time included notchy fueling from the big twin, but this bike has had its issued smoothed out with a chip tune from Creedon. The mod should bump power slightly as well as cure the throttle response woes.

From the seller:

Asking price for this beautiful, rare beast is $14,500 and it shows 13,360 miles. It’s not Ducati quick, or as precise and capable as a Japanese bike, but neither of those machines carries the same panache. Unless you’re a member of a well-heeled Guzzi club, the chances you’ll ever see another at the local cruise night are nil. Contact Tim with your interest: guzzirider06@hotmail.com

Featured Listing: 1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS
Featured Listing January 4, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing – 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R Eddie Lawson Replica

From the days when men were men and AMA Superbikes had muscular steel frames, this museum-quality ELR is presented  by RSBFS fan Bob, and his Globe Motorcycles shop ( if not curatorial facility ! ).

1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR for sale on eBay

The big KZ suited “Steady” Eddie’s lanky frame, and with help from updated camshafts and Kerker exhaust, its 104 hp sent the 500 lbs. replica rocketing toward 134 mph.  To augment the taut chassis, Showa built air-adjustable forks and remote-reservoir shocks as similar as could be to the racer’s WP dampers.  Serious speed called for serious brakes, and Kawasaki mounted three 10-inch disks to answer the call.  The low handlebars were a Lawson bend, and the stepped seat provided solid placement for a solo rider, as well as legroom for a pillion.  The mean green livery, with black mechanicals and gold accents on the shocks and wheels, just about defines classic, maybe with a capital K.

Bob has been an ELR superfan from day one, and has the knowledge not to over-restore, and replaced needed parts with NOS when possible.  Carbs have been rebuilt and new classic-pattern Metzeler’s mounted, so you could ride to a vintage show, but you’ll need someone to carry a trophy home.  Just a portion of Bob’s comments from the eBay auction:

JUST WON 2ND PLACE BEST JAPANESE MOTORCYCLE. THE JUDGES FROM THE EVENT WERE BLOWN AWAY AT HOW PERFECT SHE IS.
THIS BIKE UNDERWENT MINOR CLEAN UP / REFRESH AT MY SHOP, GLOBE MOTORCYCLES LIMITED. THE  BODY WORK WAS RE-PAINTED IN EXACT MATCHING KAWASAKI LIME GREEN A FEW YEARS AGO BY ANOTHER ELR EXPERT IN CONNECTICUT, “NOS” HANDLE BAR GRIPS, END CAPS, AND HANDLE BAR SWITCHES WERE INSTALLED – SO VERY HARD TO FIND. I SWAPPED OUT THE ENGINE SIDE COVERS WITH “NOS” UNITS AND NEW OEM GASKETS AND SEALS. 
WITH ONLY 6,822 MILES (10,980 KM) THE ENGINE ITSELF HAS NEVER BEEN PAINTED SO NO PAINT WENT WHERE IT DOES NOT BELONG. THE ENGINE SIDE COVERS WERE REPLACED WITH “NOS” UNITS – VERY HARD TO FIND.
THE CARBURETORS WERE COMPLETELY DISASSEMBLED, ULTRASONICALLY CLEANED, AND PAINTED JUST AS THE FACTORY DID, REASSEMBLED AND SYNCHRONIZED. I RE-JETTED THEM WITH #132 MAIN JETS AND RAISED THE JET NEEDLE WITH ONE WASHER TO AID IN RUNNING BETTER WITH THE MID SIZE COMPETITION KERKER BAFFLE.
THE FRAME AND SWING ARM ARE MOSTLY ALL ORIGINAL PAINT WITH JUST A FEW TOUCH UPS AND LOOK BETTER THAN MOST OF THE OTHER ORIGINAL ELR’s I HAVE HAD. 
THE TIRES HAVE BEEN REPLACED WITH METZLER SPORTEC KLASSICS (K300’S ARE NOT AVAILABLE). THE SEAT IS ALL ORIGINAL WITH NO BLEMISHES.

Bob has the opening bid for his ELR set at $19,500 and can be reached through the eBay auction.

Eddie Lawson had previous experience with Yamaha during his dirt track days, and saw a chance for a 1983 world championship on an RZ-500 ( with teammate Kenny Roberts, under Agostino management ! ).  Too bad the ELR couldn’t be issued with the AMA champ’s signature, but Lawson went on to four MotoGP titles, and the 1982-3 replicas are still a prize for any collector.  Bob’s are some of the finest seen on RSBFS, in striking condition, a keen look back at Eddie Lawson’s first championship.

-donn

 

Featured Listing – 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R Eddie Lawson Replica
Featured Listing November 15, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing – 1978 Kawasaki KZ1000 Z1R

As the icing on the 1970’s superbike cake, Kawasaki’s KZ1000 built on the 900 Z1’s formidable reputation.  Bob’s Z1R-D1 has quite low miles and a curatorial owner who emphasizes correctness for finishes and mechanical updates.

1978 Kawasaki KZ1000 Z1R for sale on eBay

It’s easy to see the lineage from earlier Kawasaki’s early -70’s four cylinders, even though the factory stylists put a great set of bodywork on the Z1R.  Inside, the 1015cc mill had a heavier crankshaft and the four Mikuni carbs had slightly larger bores.  The new four-into-one exhaust let the 94 horses loose and weighed less too.  Headstock gussets and firmer rear shocks shored up handling, and three big disk brakes – drilled up front – slowed the 18-inch alloys with authority.  The angular café design is resolved from nose to tail and even takes in the rectangular fuel cap.

Look into the background of Bob’s pictures and you’ll see many Z1R’s, other period superbikes, and blue ribbons – as he says, this one won’t disappoint.  The engine and chassis have been given new gaskets and fasteners but keep their original looks.  Period upgrades like V&H exhaust and K&N filters accompany the rebuilt carburetors and new Avon tires.  The silver blue metallic paintwork has been refinished, but is virtually indistinguishable from new.  Some of Bob’s comments from the eBay auction:

THIS IS AN AMAZING UN-RESTORED EXAMPLE THAT HAS NEVER HAD THE FRAME OR ENGINE PAINTED. SOME OF THE HARDWARE WAS REPLACED WITH OEM OR “NOS” PARTS, BOLTS, SCREWS, NUTS AND WASHERS ARE NEW OLD STOCK AS I HAVE A VERY EXTENSIVE “NOS” INVENTORY, ALONG WITH COUNTLESS OTHER PARTS. 
 
ALL THE PERIOD CORRECT MODS ARE BOLT ON ITEMS THAT CAN EASILY BE CHANGED BACK TO THE ORIGINALS. SO IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR AN ALL ORIGINAL Z1R THIS IS A GREAT BIKE TO START WITH AND I WOULD BE HAPPY TO HELP THE NEW CUSTODIAN SOURCE THE NEEDED PARTS.
 
THE BODY WORK WAS PAINSTAKINGLY RE-FINISHED TO A DEEP LUSTER SHOW QUALITY FINISH USING THE METALLIC STARDUST SILVER.
I THOROUGHLY INSPECTED AND RE-SEALED THE OUTER COVERS/SEALS AS NECESSARY WITHOUT REPAINTING THE ENGINE SO NO OIL LEAKS ON YOUR CARPET. THE ORIGINAL CARBS WERE ULTRASONICALLY CLEANED AND REBUILT, RE-JETTED, AND SYNCED  WITH ALL NEW SEALS AND GASKETS. THE PERIOD CORRECT VANCE & HINES EXHAUST WAS DISASSEMBLED, STRIPPED AND RE-CHROMED TO BETTER THEN NEW SPECS (NOT AN INEXPENSIVE TASK).
 
THE WHEELS ARE ALL ORIGINAL AND IN PERFECT CONDITION. SHE IS FITTED WITH AVON TIRES “SEMI PERIOD-CORRECT”. THE BRAKES WERE COMPLETELY OVERHAULED. THE SEAT IS A CUSTOM SEAT FROM THE 70’s AND IS IN AMAZING PERFECT CONDITION. THE WINDSCREEN AND SEAL ARE “NOS” AS ARE THE LEVERS AND MORE COMPONENTS THEN I CAN LIST. A NEW RK CHAIN AND SPROCKETS WERE INSTALLED. 
THE FRAME HAS NOT BEEN REPAINTED. THE FRONT FORKS HAVE BEEN REBUILT WITH THE LOWER LEGS PROPERLY REFINISHED TO OEM STANDARDS. THE REAR SHOCKS ARE PERIOD CORRECT PROGRESSIVE UNITS. THE TANK AND SIDE COVER EMBLEMS ARE NEW OLD STOCK. THE ORIGINAL OWNERS MANUAL AND KAWASAKI POUCH ARE INCLUDED. THE BIKE HAS THE ORIGINAL LION HEAD KEY. LIKE ALL MY BIKES THIS WILL BE A BIKE THAT WON’T DISAPPOINT.
 
WITH ONLY 9,200 ORIGINAL MILES THE BIKE STARTS IDLES RUNS AND RIDES LIKE IT DID IN 1978

The KZ1100 and Z1R went a lot of places, of course it liked a good straightaway and did well at the drag strip.  When race-prepared they were a force in superbike racing – AMA and all over the world.  Compared with its contemporaries, it struggled against newer designs from the other Japanese manufacturers and got gigged for the smallish fuel tank.  But for many owners, the bulletproof mechanicals and sharp fairing give the Z1R a head start.  Bob’s auction has a $12,000 starting bid and buy-it-now of $17,900 and he can be contacted through the eBay auction.

-donn

Featured Listing – 1978 Kawasaki KZ1000 Z1R
Ducati November 14, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1996 Ducati 900SS/SP

This beautiful 1996 Ducati 900SS/SP is a rare beast, being a yellow half-faired SP. Most of the time, the half-faired bikes were the lesser CR-spec model, which had lower end suspension and just weren’t quite as tasty as the SP. The SP meant you got fully adjustable Showa suspension front and rear, but the 80-ish horsepower engine was unchanged from the CR. The 900 SS/SP was also famously the bike about which Hunter S. Thompson penned the terrified, fawning “Song of the Sausage Creature.”

It’s quaint to think about an 80-horsepower machine invoking the level of terror Thompson expressed, but even in the mid-1990s a powerful motorcycle was a very different thing than it is now, and Ducati’s torquey delivery meant that terrifying velocities were much more easily accessed than they were on a peaky inline four. Theoretically, anyway. The 900SS’s party piece has always been lithe handling, a slim waistline and a certain Italian-ness that makes the big much more than the sum of its bits.

This 900SS/SP has been made even sweeter than stock, with an Ohlins shock replacing the already competent Showa, a gorgeous white powdercoated frame and a low-profile LED taillight to replace the blocky period unit.

According to the seller, whose description was handwritten, the bike was built in 2017 by Moto Motivo in Raleigh, NC. In addition to the Ohlins and the low-profile taillight, it wears carbon fenders and a carbon exhaust, cast aluminum wheels and new Brembo brakes. The seller has added about 1,000 miles since picking it up last year. The bike is on a clean Oregon title, and asking price is $6,200. You can reach the seller at wolfandson@live.com.

 

Featured Listing: 1996 Ducati 900SS/SP
Featured Listing November 12, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR

The RSBFS faithful see the green paint, the giant black lump of air-cooled, four cylinder goodness, the gold accents, and instantly know this bike as an ELR: Eddie Lawson Replica. Eddie was responsible for Kawasaki championships in the 1981 and 1982 AMA Superbike series. The homage was well deserved, and Eddie has been inextricably linked to these models ever since. Technically the 1983 KZ1000R was officially branded as “Superbike Replica” and does not exhibit Eddie’s signature on the tank (Lawson had moved to the Yamaha GP team after 1982), but the blanket term of “ELR” continues to stick for these models. Today’s Featured Listing is brought to us by a RSBFS regular Bob Benyo, a true guru of this specific model. This 1983 KZ1000R is about as perfect as one could hope to find, and I’ll let Bob pick up the story at this point.

Featured Listing: 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR

From the seller:
1983 KAWASAKI KZ1000R EDDIE LAWSON SUPERBIKE REPLICA NEAR PERFECT UN-RESTORED ORIGINAL CONDITION! ! MULTIPLE AWARD WINNING WITH ALL “NOS” BODY PARTS COMING OUT OF MY PRIVATE COLLECTION.

MULTIPLE AWARD WINNER JUST WON 1ST PLACE BEST ORIGINAL JAPANESE MOTORCYCLE. THE JUDGES FROM THE PEBBLE BEACH EVENT WERE BLOWN AWAY AT HOW PERFECT SHE IS.

THIS BIKE UNDERWENT MINOR CLEAN UP/REFRESH AT MY SHOP GLOBE MOTORCYCLES LIMITED. I USED A FULL SET OF “NOS” BODY WORK, SO VERY HARD TO FIND. I ONLY HAVE 2 FULL SETS LEFT. I SWAPED OUT THE ENGINE SIDE COVERS WITH “NOS” UNITS AND NEW OEM GASKETS AND SEALS.

I HAVE HAD THIS BIKE FOR SEVERAL YEARS AND IT HAS BEEN THE ELR THAT I RIDE (ABOUT 200 MILES IN 5 YEARS. SHE LOOKS AND RIDES AS GOOD AS SHE DID BACK IN 1983.

More from the seller:
THE ENGINE:
SERIAL NUMBER KZT00JE041780 THIS ENGINE IS THE ORIGINAL THAT CAME WITH THE BIKE. I GET ASKED THIS QUESTION ALL THE TIME, WHY ARE’NT THE ELR ENGINE NUMBERS EVER CLOSE OR SIMILAR TO THE FRAME NUMBERS? THE ENGINE NUMBERS HAVE A SPECIFIC RANGE THEY MUST FALL INTO FOR 1982 AND 1983 KZ1000R’s. THIS IS THE ENGINE THAT CAME WITH THE BIKE WHEN SHE WAS NEW AND IS IN THE CORRECT SERIAL NUMBER RANGE FOR A LATE VIN# 1983 ELR.

WITH ONLY 1776 MILES ON IT THE ENGINE RAN GREAT WHEN I GOT HER BUT I OPTED FOR HER TO RUN A BIT BETTER SINCE I WANTED TO RIDE TO AND FROM SHOWS. I INSTALLED A NEW HD CLUTCH, ALL NEW OEM SEALS, PUSHROD, AND GASKETS (ITS JUST WHAT I DO). THE ENGINE ITSELF HAS NEVER BEEN PAINTED SO NO PAINT WHENT WHERE IT DOES NOT BELONG. THE ENGINE SIDE COVERS WERE REPLACED WITH “NOS” UNITS, VERY HARD TO FIND.

THE CARBURETORS WERE COMPLETELY DISASSEMBLED ULTRASONICALLY CLEANED, AND PAINTED JUST AS THE FACTORY DID, RESEMBLED AND SYNCHRONIZED. I RE-JETTED THEM WITH #132 MAIN JETS AND RAISED THE JET NEDDLE WITH ONE WASHER TO AID IN RUNNING BETTER WITH THE COMPETITION BAFFLE.

More from the seller:
THE FRAME:
THE FRAME AND SWING ARM ARE ALL ORIGINAL PAINT AND LOOK BETTER THEN ANY OF THE OTHER ORIGINAL ELR’s I HAVE HAD.
THE TIRES HAVE BEEN REPLACE WITH DUNLOP K400’s (K300’S ARE NOT AVAILABLE). THE GRIPS, LEVERS, MIRRORS, , END CAPS ARE ALL “NOS”.
THE SEAT IS ALL ORIGINAL WITH NO BLEMISHES.

THE KERKER KR EXHAUST IS THE ORIGINAL UNIT THAT I HAD RE-COATED TO MATCH THE ORIGINAL KAL*GARD FINISH. IT IS INSTALLED WITH OEM COPPER GASKETS. THE KERKER SIDE EMBLEM, THE HANGER BRACKET/BUSHING ASSEMBLY, AND THE LARGE COMPETITION BAFFLE ARE ALL “NOS” ($500). THE FUEL TANK, PETCOCK, FUEL GUAGE SENDER, FUEL CAP, SIDE COVERS, FRONT COWL, REAR COWL, FRONT FENDER, TAIL LIGHT, WIND SHIELD AND RUBBER SEAL, EMBLEMS, AND ASSOCIATED HARDWARE ARE ALL “NOS” OVER $7500 WORTH OF UNOBTAINIUM. A RIDICULOUS AMOUNT OF NOS/OEM HARDWARE WAS USED. AS ALL THE “NOS” ELR PARTS HAVE DISAPPEARED FROM THE MARKET YOU CAN ONLY IMAGINE THE VALUE THIS BIKE WILL BRING IN THE FUTURE.

More from the seller:
TELL YOUR WIFE THIS IS A GREAT INVESTMENT THAT WILL ONLY GO UP IN VALUE UNLIKE HER SHOE AND HANDBAG COLLECTION :). SO HERE IS YOUR CHANCE TO OWN THE BEST EXAMPLE OF 1 OF THE 750ISH 1983 KAWASAKI KZ1000R EDDIE LAWSON SUPERBIKE REPLICA’S EVER BUILT FOR NORTH AMERICA. IT IS AS CLOSE TO WHEN IT CAME OUT OF THE CRATE WITH THE EXCEPTION OF THE DUNLOP K400 TIRES AND A VERY SMALL AMOUNT OF PATINA ON THE WHEELS. I WILL REFINISH THE WHEELS TO EXACT OEM SPECS FOR THE NEW CARETAKER AT MY COST IF HE OR SHE PREFERS “NOS” LOOKING WHEELS (A VERY EXPENSIVE PROCESS). I WILL FOR SURE CRY WHEN SHE SELLS, BUT I AM BLESSED TO HAVE A FEW MORE ELR’S.

I HAVE OWNED MORE THEN 20 ELR’s. I HAVE THE LARGEST INVENTORY OF ELR PARTS SO BID WITH CONFIDENCE. THIS BIKE WILL NOT DISAPPOINT. PLEASE FEEL FREE TO CONTACT ME WITH ANY QUESTIONS 954-816-0806 BOB. PLEASE COME SEE HER FIRST IF YOU HAVE ANY DOUBTS. I HAVE BEEN RIDING, RACING, FIXING, RESTORING, AND COLLECTING SPECIAL BIKES SINCE GRADUATING FROM AMERICAN MOTORCYCLE INSTITUTE “AMI” IN DAYTONA BEACH FLORIDA IN 1980.

More from the seller:
THIS ELR BELONGS IN A MUSEUM SO DON’T MISS OUT. I RESTORED AND PRESERVED MORE BIKES THEN I CAN COUNT AND HAVE MANY SATISFIED OWNERS AROUND THE WORLD WITH GIANT SMILES ON THERE FACES EVERY TIME THEY LOOK AT WHAT THEY PURCHASED FROM ME.

THE LAST 2 ELR’S I SOLD (A 1982 AND A 1983) WENT TO JAPAN. THEY BOTH HAD NOS BODY PARTS ON ALL ORIGINAL BIKES WITH LOW MILES AND SOLD FOR $28,500 AND $36,000 AND JUST NOT AS PERFECT AS THIS ONE.

THE ORIGINAL TOOL KIT, OWNERS MANUAL, AND 2 KEYS COME WITH THE BIKE. THE FIRST BUYER TO HIT THE BUY IT NOW WILL GET MY AUTOGRAPHED CUSTOM PAINTED 1983 BELL HELMET.

With flawless bodywork and paint, engine cases that you can eat off of, 1776 miles on the clock, and the exclusivity of owning an extremely rare milestone of motorcycle collecting history, this ELR deserves a home where it will be appreciated. Appreciation is the name of the game, after all: the price point for ELRs continues to climb to new heights, and show few signs of abating. Think of an ELR as the RC30 of an earlier age – about as recession proof as anything you are likely to collect in the motorcycle world. With a Buy It Now of $35.5k USD, this bike is priced in line with its condition. We have seen less expensive ELRs on this site, but never one quite as clean and complete (and just check out that man cave!). If you are in the market for an Eddie Lawson Superbike Replica, do yourself a favor and check this one out. You will not be disappointed. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR