Posts by Category: Yamaha

Yamaha June 18, 2019 posted by

Two Picture Tuesday: 1984 Yamaha RZ350

Here is a beloved model smoker that was actually available to riders in all 50 States – for a brief period of time. The last of the true factory two strokes, the Yamaha RZ was 350 cubic centimeters of power-valved, parallel-twin goodness. Competing against the contemporary likes of the GPz550, GS550E and FJ600, the little RZ held its own as it buzzed its way into the hearts and minds of American youth. Today these 35 year old motorcycles are collector items, and highly sought after. Prices have been holding strong – if not climbing slowly – and time, butchers and accidents make the dwindling supply even more scarce. This advert has a fair amount of text but only two scant pics of this red/white beauty:

1984 Yamaha RZ350 for sale on eBay

From the seller:
1984 Yamaha RZ 350
14,780 miles
Single seat rear cowl
Rear shock replaced
New Bridgestones

Spec 2 Research & Engineering work –
Stage 1 Porting
Cylinder Bored and Honed Oversized (estimating almost 400cc now)
Open Chambers 1.5 over
Open Head Gasket for 1.5 over
Kick starter seal replaced with Yamaha OEM seal
Setup Auto-lube oil pump
Installed new 45,000 volt ignition coil
Precision machined Lighten Flywheel
Rebuild YPVS Power Valve to SPEC II tolerances, new seals and o-rings
Dynojet Research Re-jetting carburetor richer and new needles
Professionally tuned carburetor induction system
Top end kit H, R, B Water inlet
New OEM Stock Reed Manifolds with High performance Fiberglass Reeds and Cages
All fluids changed including brake master cylinders
Installed new small end rod precision needle bearing
New battery
New Kick starter Lever
New Exhaust Gaskets
New Spark Plug Caps and Spark Plugs
K&N Air filter with “Two in One
Canadian Expansion Chambers – mellow tone compared to Spec Il pipes, but very volumetrically efficient

This US-based chainsaw shows nearly 15,000 miles on the odometer, and has been the recipient of numerous modifications and maintenance. There does appear to be some rash on the right side can, but hard to tell if that was a parking issue or a serious off. Back in 1984 the RZ350 was good for about 40-ish HP and retailed for $2,399. Today, this hot-rodded RZ is good for significantly more HP, and the price hike is nearly commensurate: the Buy It Now price is $8,000, or best offer. This is, unfortunately, pretty much in line with pricing for these models lately. We have seen higher dollar amounts for more original / lower mileage examples, but as a whole these models are getting harder to find and more expensive when you do. Check it out here. Serious tire kickers will want to request additional photos and details (or better yet, see it in person). Good Luck!!

MI

Two Picture Tuesday: 1984 Yamaha RZ350
Featured Listing June 5, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1988 Yamaha RZ 350 in Canada

Update 6.5.2019: Price reduced to $8,000 USD. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

This 1988 Yamaha RZ350 is a gorgeous example of one of North America’s last-ever road-going two-stroke sport bikes. As the 1980s waned, environmental regulations had all but ruled the simple-but-effective machines off the roads on this continent, leaving the smoky mounts for European roads.

But what a swansong the RZ350 was. The parallel twin used the variable port height Yamaha Power Valve System that was developed over years in 500cc GP competition, which gave the normally peaky powerplant a respectable torque curve. The bikes still made prodigious power for their displacement and weight, and the two stroke was still a two stroke, which meant the machines were not to be trifled with.

In the United States, the RZ350s are best known without a fairing and with the bumblebee paintjob that adorned Kenny Roberts’ race bikes. This example wears a full fairing, and Yamaha’s equally cool red, white and blue block paint scheme.

From the seller:

1988 Yamaha RZ350 – Canadian bike – amazing survivor condition – never been down! The closest thing you can get to going back in time and buying a new 1988 RZ350 off the showroom floor.

Mileage: 8,223 miles (13,234 kilometers)

History – 2 owner bike prior to me – first owner – owned for 7 years – 2nd owner owned for 23 years – he rode the bike once the day he bought it and and carefully stored it after that (he has a big bike collection)

Factory Tool Kit and Original owners manual included

Service – The bike has been completely gone over by a motorcycle shop very familiar with 2 strokes.

Items addressed in $2K service in November 2018 include:

– new tires
– new battery
– carbs cleaned
– fork seals replaced
– coolant and brake fluid flush
– master cylinder serviced
– kick start oil seal replaced
– steering head bearing replaced
– full safety inspection completed

Imperfections – the tabs where the body work attaches under the seat have cracked – these are not visible from the outside – could be plastic welded back to be complete. There are two hairline stress cracks on the bike (shown in pics) – first is one side of the fairing – second is where one of the mirrors attach to the bike.

Paint condition – excellent – stunning to look at

Reason for selling: I had bought the bike as I had always wanted an RZ350 and was looking for something fun to ride for pleasure use. After buying it and having it serviced, I realized the bike is such a rare survivor that I don’t feel right risking riding it around town. It really should be in the hands of a serious collector or a museum. I have bought another “rider quality” RZ350 for my own personal use.

Factory Tool kit and Factory owners manual included

Price $9500 $8,000 US.

Importing a bike from Canada to the US is not a big issue – filling out the appropriate forms or using a broker is all you need to do. I can assist with shipping but all planning and costs are the buyers responsibility. I know an excellent transport company based in Canada that can deliver to the US and help with all the paperwork.

Bike is located in Toronto Canada – about 1.5 hours from the Buffalo, New York border

Mike Warner
riverworks2000-ab@yahoo.ca

Though the bike is in Canada, its age should make it eligible to be imported and registered fairly simply. With a recent service, it’s ready for a long riding season, though if you’re like the seller, it might be hard to stomach the idea of road hazards marring that beautiful paint.

Featured Listing: 1988 Yamaha RZ 350 in Canada
Featured Listing May 22, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR1000

Update 5.22.2019: This minty FZR1000 is back on eBay with a starting bid of $5k and NO RESERVE! Parts are now available separately for purachse. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

This 1987 Yamaha FZR1000 is what we’re all about. It is, at this point, rare, it set the industry on its ear when it hit the streets, it’s the textbook diagram of a sportbike and we want it. Badly. We’d wager a fair penny that you do, too. When Yamaha unleashed these in 1987, they joined the growing ranks of bikes from the Japanese manufacturers that would come to define the segment. Suzuki had the GSXR, Honda had the Hurricanes and Yamaha had the FZR1000.

1987 Yamaha FZR1000 for sale on eBay

With five valves per cylinder, water cooling and an astronomical 135 horsepower, though, the Yamaha stood apart. Like the Honda CBR900RR did six years later, it combined a svelte frame with prodigious power and grip to incredible effect. They’d hit 60 in around three seconds and go on to a top end of about 160 mph. At the end of the 1980s, Cycle World dubbed them Bike of the Decade.

As you can see, this one has few flies on it. It’s a two-owner machine with under 5,000 miles on it and most of its original parts intact. The seat and windscreen are aftermarket, but the original seat is included in the sale. The paint appears to have few, if any, blemishes and the original fairings are in great shape. Tired of taking our word for it? Check out the seller’s detailed rundown in the eBay listing:

Bike comes with $1k in NOS + few used parts! Bid with confidence!!! Click for two video links to hear the bike run: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Olpfe0GYss&t=23s

Click for additional photos of the bike and all parts that go with it.

https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipO9YuIdNxiIWcSczGr44Pf9F2LzNnljEOowgr0C-B8P99l9QqPv7U-xH5w5amQi6g?key=Y3R0TWVIMnVyb0lndXhFQXJmRUluZkhNd0Q2cl93

Up for sale is this rare, iconic 1987 Yamaha FZR1000 with 4,700 original 2-owner miles. This motorcycle is incredibly period-correct, sporting all its original plastics and paint, and even exhaust system! The only aftermarket/non-original components I have found are the smoked windscreen, windscreen fasteners and Corbin seat (bike comes with original black seat). When I purchased the bike in February 2018, it had been in a private collection as one of the cleanest, lowest-mile, first-year FZR1000 in the world. And from the photos and video hearing it run, it’s easy to see why!

The ’87 FZR1000 was truly groundbreaking motorcycle, with Cycle Guide naming it “The Fastest Streetbike in the World”, due to the bike’s legendary, bulletproof 20-value Genesis engine delivering massive amounts of power from the lowest RPMs to its 11,500 redline. Yamaha’s 998cc 20-valve inline four is one of the most reliable powerplants Yamaha ever assembled (valve adjustments every 26k!), with the engine just beginning to scream at 7,000 RPMs, force fed by factory ram-air induction plumbed through dual openings in the front of the fairing, adding to the bike’s power at speed.

One of the greatest characteristics of this particular FZR is its extreme light weight and maneuverability, making it a blast to handle around town or throttle and lean through the twistees. It’s ground-breaking Deltabox frame makes the bike an extremely rigid, solid and secure machine to ride. Unlike many modern sportbikes that require you to perch on top, this FZR is super comfortable and allow you to become one with the motorcycle with little effort.

The story:

I’m no stranger to these vintage Yamaha sportbikes, owning an ’85 FZ750 followed by an ’88 FZR1000 back in the day (30+ years ago) when these were new. And this particular ’87 FZR1000 is so much better balanced and more powerful than any FZR I’ve ever ridden.

I purchased this FZR a little more than a year ago when it had 4,300 original miles, when I signed the original title from the original owner (who purchased the bike new in 1988), transferring the FZR1000 into my name last year. At some point the original owner sold the bike to a collector, who had the bike in a private collection for several years without ever transferring the title. It was then sold to a motorcycle shop managed by a former Yamaha mechanic and FZR expert, who spent many hours and dollars on NOS parts refreshing the bike’s mechanical, braking and cooling systems prior to me purchasing the bike. And that’s when I came into the picture and snapped her up. Without a shadow of a doubt, after seeing and riding this FZR for the first time was love at first sight for me (and will, no doubt, be for you as well).

I spent the last year having a blast rounding up NOS parts, some super rare, for this motorcycle. Fast forward 12 months and 400 easy/careful miles later, and I’m now offering the bike and all the NOS parts up for sale for another person to fall in love with and ride, or better yet, to complete a collection with a highly original, beautiful low-mile bike that you’ll be set up to own and service for many years to come.

The ONLY reason I’m selling is another bike caught my eye and is now in the garage – and don’t have the room to keep three bikes. Plus, I don’t ride the FZR much as to not add too many miles to it. However, YOU sure could, as this FZR is a dream and better than you remember they were back in the day.

What you’re getting:

(Note: The RH hand grip / throttle end cap is not in place in the video; I didn’t realize it had come off and is now back on the bike. I took a few new pix the morning of 3/10 in the same spot in the driveway with the RH throttle end cap back in place.)

1987’s fastest streetbike in the world and the first of a nearly 10-year run of FZR100s; a bike with nearly the same powerplant and transmission as the ’97 YZF1000R “Thunderace” (which I also own!) and the predecessor to the infamous Yamaha R1 that debuted in 1998.
Starts flawlessly every time and reaches/maintains operating temperature as she should, pulling hard toward the 11,500 RPM redline from any RPM and in any gear. Smooth, constant/linear power delivery results in a bike that absolutely files from a dead stop and from any gear.
Idles and runs down the road like a sewing machine. And there are none of the lags, EXUP valve “chirping” or failures as with the later EXUP-valved FZR1000 models.
Fantastic bike in every way – looks, operating, riding. This machine feels like a new bike due to the low miles.
This bike is inspiring to ride, and is much better than you might expect for a 32-year-old sportbike.
Original plastics and paint (with zero evidence of the bike ever having been down)
All service is up to date; all fluids have been changed (brake, clutch, coolant); oil and filter
New front fork seals and fork oil
Front brake calipers freshened with new seals internally
Front master cylinder has been rebuilt with NOS parts
Clutch master cylinder has new NOS seals internally
New NOS Thermo Switch assembly (#3LN-82560-01) installed
New NOS temp gauge #2GH-83590-00 installed (used original gauge and packaging provided)
Clutch slave cylinder replaced with an NOS unit
New Yuasa sealed battery less than three months old
Main fuel petcock disassembled and refreshed with a new o-ring (solving a fuel drip)
Original exhaust
Bike passed Texas inspection two weeks ago (all lights, signals, horn work flawlessly)
No coolant, oil, fork, or brake fluid leaks
Needs nothing (zero issues with this bike (e.g., does not pop out of gear on hard acceleration, strong clutch lever and grip, does not use or drip oil, etc.)
New (less than 400 miles ridden) Michelin Sport Pilot 3 tires (120/70-17 front and 160/60-18 rear
Wheel bearings checked during tire install
Both cooling fans come up when bike reaches proper temperature; she does not overheat in the Texas summers
Super strong, confident brakes
Firm, sporty suspension feels as it should on uneven road surfaces, road imperfections, etc.
Has only been fed non-ethanol fuel for the past year + Sta-bill additive = zero carb. issues (I don’t run ethanol-blended fuel in either of my bikes)
Comes with a period-correct Corbin seat that matches the ’87-88 red/white/blue paint scheme (in addition to original black seat)
All original fasteners used on bike with the exception of the windscreen attaching hardware
Comes with $1000+ in spare parts (see list below) to allow you to run/maintain the bike for many years to come!
Two original ignition keys come with the bike
·

The flaws

Overall condition is very good for its age, but it is not absolutely perfect. The right fairing (next to the air scoop) has a crack from shipping to Dallas (as shown in the photos). Also, there is a crack in the edge of the RH cowl (next to the mirror). This the only actual damage on the machine and did not even happen while riding.
Some light scuffing and marring in the original plastic (as shown in photos). I bunched all pix of the scuffs/cracks in the google image link here: https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipO9YuIdNxiIWcSczGr44Pf9F2LzNnljEOowgr0C-B8P99l9QqPv7U-xH5w5amQi6g?key=Y3R0TWVIMnVyb0lndXhFQXJmRUluZkhNd0Q2cl93

Parts (new/NOS and used) that come with the bike:

(1) NOS emulsion tube (carburetor) #1AE-14141-90-00.
(8) emulsion tubes (Japanese made) 1AE-14141-90-00
(1) NOS FUEL COCK ASS’Y (under tank) # 2GH-24510-01
(1) used FUEL VALVE PETCOCK (main; LH side of bike)
(1) NOS Flasher (fuel pump) Relay #41R-83350-71-00
(6) NOS #36Y-13441-00 OEM oil filter elements
(5) NOS Yamaha O-RING Oil Pump, Cyl Head, Chain (oil filter bolt o-ring) #93210-16629
(4) NOS Plate Washer 90201-21608-00 (washer next to oil filter)
(2) NOS oil filter O-Ring #93210-87723-00
(1) NOS Rear Sprocket 47 tooth 2GH-25447-22-00
(1) NOS front sprocket 16 tooth #2GH-17460-00-00
(1) NOS DID Drive Chain DID532ZLV-110 X-Ring
(2) NOS sets of front brake pads 2GH-W0045-01
(1) NOS Radiator Hose [long hose under radiator to water pump] #2GH-12578-00-00 HOSE 3 + (1) used spare house
(1) NOS Radiator hose [short 90 degree hose under thermostat housing to top of radiator] #GH-12577-00 + (1) used spare house
(4) used radiator hoses (4 total radiator hose – upper (small) 2GH-12577-00-00, radiator hose out of thermostat (larger molded) 2GH-12576-00-00, lower hose 2GH-12579-00-00, lower hose 2GH-12578-00-00)
(2) used radiator hoses 2GH-12577-00 + 2GH-12576-00 [long hose out of the top of the thermostat housing to the cylinder pipe] and (1) thermostat housing, thermo switch and cap
(1) NOS Clutch lever #1AE-83912-00
(1) NOS Brake lever 36Y-83922-00
(1) NOS throttle cable 1 #2gh-26311-00-00
(1) NOS throttle cable 2 #2GH-26312-00-00 US
(2) OEM Assembly Manual FZR1000T/TC FZR750RT
(1) OEM FZR750/1000 Service Manual
(1) Owners Owner’s Manual 1987 Yamaha FZR1000T FZR1000 T
· Please review the photos and videos in the listing and hyperlinked within. Serious bidders may contact me at 214-289-sixtwo98 to answer any questions. I am offering this as a no-reserve auction, with all parts listed with the bike (over $1,000.00 worth). I’m selling this bike “as-is” with no refunds or warranty. However, in my honest opinion, this bikes needs nothing. A $250 non-refundable deposit is due via paypal within 24 hrs of the auction end. Winning bidder can pick up the bike in Dallas, Texas. If you need a transport company, I’d highly recommend www.keyboardmotorcycleshipping.com/ ($625 door to door across the U.S.- they are GREAT!) Good luck bidding and don’t let this one get away! It’s perhaps one of the nicest examples of an original, un-molested FZR1000 in the world.

The starting bid is roughly the price of a middling used Honda, so if you’re looking for a new mount for the 2019 season, look no further.

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR1000
Featured Listing May 14, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing -1988 Yamaha TDR250

Yamaha saw an opportunity in the late 1980’s to use their TZR250 two-stroke drivetrain and possibly show up on – ABC’s Wide World of Sports’ The Superbikers ( well, maybe just during a commercial break ).  A longtime friend of RSBFS, Moto2 Imports offers this recent import with just over 14,000 miles and U.S. title.

1988 Yamaha TDR250 for sale at Moto2 Imports

More of a supermoto than dual sport, Yamaha sought to transfer the 50 ponies and light weight of the TZR to a motard.  The parallel twin was tuned for better torque and a few less peak hp at 46, as well as painted silver.  Like on the TZR, timing is computer-controlled and uses 28mm flat-slide carbs and reed induction.  The hefty steel chassis could handle tarmac and jumps, and crossover exhaust stayed out of the way.  Air-charged front forks had 160mm travel, and the Monocross rear coped with 150mm.  Seeing far into rally bikes’ future, the Ultimate Dual had an integrated seat, tank and fairing with a high windshield.

Moto2 gives every import a thorough going over, but favors originality, selecting better candidates for import rather than doing more restoration.  It this case the TDR looks excellent with barely even a boot scuff, and Moto2 tests everything for proper operation.  Comments from correspondence and – their website –

Yamaha’s dual-sport adventure bike features a TZR250 derived two-stroke 250 engine specially tuned for the TDR. Bike has 14,000 miles (22,667km) and is in excellent cosmetic and mechanical condition. New Dunlop tires. Will come with US title.  Asking $7,999

Excellent condition example. Engine is in good running condition with all lights, horn, blinkers working properly. Dunlop tires in nearly new condition. Weighing under 300lbs with 50hp on tap, Yamaha’s two-stroke dual sport 250 is a blast on and off road. Video available on request.

While a little off RSBFS’s beaten path, the TDR is a close relation to the racy TZR.  It pre-dates the European super motard craze, and would’ve been a hit here but for the twilight of two-stroke emissions.  A gem for a fan of the brand, or maybe just a wild pit bike, Moto2 requests offers on (844) 44-MOTO2 or via email – here –.

-donn

Featured Listing -1988 Yamaha TDR250
Yamaha May 11, 2019 posted by

Never Say Never – 1982 Yamaha XJ650 Seca Turbo

Someone bought-it-now Friday afternoon – a reader ?   -donn

It was a short bandwagon but early 1980’s was the time for early turbo systems, and Yamaha developed the XJ-650 Turbo but resisted the urge to break the bank.  This Phoenix example is quite clean with just a couple of foibles and barely 10,000 miles.

1982 Yamaha XJ650 Seca Turbo for sale on eBay

Using a relatively low-tech two valve four as a base, the blown 650 used carburetors instead of injection and was rated for 90 hp and 60 ft-lbs. torque.  The YICS intake control system capitalized on the speed of the charge air to improve combustion.  Air cooling limited boost to 7.7 lbs., adding a gentler push than some of the competition.  Exhaust is simplified with one muffler dedicated to the wastegate, emissions kept quieter in the other single muffler.  Despite the higher speeds and weight of the turbo bike, brakes weren’t upgraded from the normally aspirated model.  Styling was one area where the Seca Turbo excelled, with and integrated fairing with a sport touring windscreen and locking glove boxes.

Averaging nearly 20 years for each of its two owners, this XJ650 Turbo has been only occasionally ridden, and looks very good.  The undamaged fairings, pipes, and cases far outweigh the worn stitching and tired trim shown in the owner’s video – here –.  Comments from the eBay auction:

I’m selling my 1982 Yamaha XJ650LJ Seca Turbo.  Low Miles, 10,100  Miles.  Excellent Condition.  2nd owner.  This is the same type used in the James Bond Movie never say never.  Recently serviced.  Runs great!  I also created a video of it running and  a walk around.

James Bond’s stunt double shredded a Turbo in a chase scene early in 1983’s – Never Say Never Again – but the real Seca had a less sporty rep.  The turbo era fizzled shortly afterward, along with a drop in fuel prices.  But each solution had their good points – Yamaha’s showed how 25% more power could be achieved with relative simplicity.  As presented, it’s a lot of bike for the fan, and for the buy-it-now.

-donn

Never Say Never – 1982 Yamaha XJ650 Seca Turbo
Yamaha May 9, 2019 posted by

Lucky Luc – 1994 Yamaha YZF-750SP

Yamaha continued developing and racing the YZF750 after the hallowed OW-01 with good results, even though the -SP homologation special never made it here with a motor vehicle title, they showed up as race machines on a bill of sale.  This street registered Canadian example has around 25,000 miles but a newly rebuilt engine.

1994 Yamaha YZF750SP ( Quebec ) for sale on eBay

With revised cams and 39mm flat slide carburetors, Yamaha’s 749cc Genesis engine delivered 125 hp, great for the era.  The alloy chassis sports a monoposto alloy seat console, and fully adjustable suspension.  320mm brakes came with 6-piston calipers and reviewed as magical.  “Torn paper” graphics were all the rage and look complete despite a note in the listing.

Just a few pictures will require investigation, but it does look worthy of the time.  With Canadian registry, the owner had the engine done in suburban Montreal, but maybe the Vermont location suggests free delivery to our northern border.  Normally an owner would be advised against refreshing and engine just before a sale, but that makes it intriguing.  Comments from the eBay auction:

Yamaha YZF750sp 1994.

This is the only ONE registered in Canada.

Engine refreshed by Luc Lapièrre from Moto RL in Saint-Jude Quebec.

The motor has less than 1,000 km on it. (600 miles)

The bike has 40,000km and it is all ORIGINAL. (25,000 miles)

Testers gigged the SP for a balky powerband and turn-in that needed a firm hand.  Remembering that this bike was intended for private race teams to acquire and modify to the limits of the rules, it makes more sense.  Engines would be blueprinted to accommodate what the carbs were feeding, and race-tuning the suspension and slick tires made it handle as intended.  But carefully set up for the road ( and with evident engine work ) this one might be all you could ask in a mid-size superbike.

-donn

Lucky Luc – 1994 Yamaha YZF-750SP
Yamaha May 8, 2019 posted by

Too Little or Just Enough? 1990 Yamaha FZR400 for Sale

The Yamaha’s R1M’s crossplane crank inline four makes 197 claimed horsepower. The brand-new, heavily revised BMW S1000RR supposedly makes 205. The new Ducati Panigale V4R? 221 horsepower. Where will it end? These bikes are technological marvels, with relatively minimal mass, power that would trump a world superbike machine of just a few years ago, and the electronics required to keep relatively novice pilots from launching themselves into next week when they sneeze and open the throttle a bit more than intended. But does that make these machines more fun? How much power can you really use on the road, and is anything more than 100hp really just gilding the lily?  Or did we hit “peak fun” with bikes like this 1990 Yamaha FZR400U?

On paper, pure performance is no contest, if that’s your definition of “fun.” The 399cc inline four that motivated the FZR400 was certainly much higher spec than you’d normally expect from a bike this size, and featured liquid-cooling, dual overhead cams, and sixteen valves. Unfortunately, there’s no replacement for displacement, and it all adds up to a claimed 64hp. The aluminum Deltabox frame helps reduce mass and the resulting 410 wet weight is light, but not shockingly so. Brakes are single-piston, but at least there are two of them up front.

But in spite of the fairly bland power-to-weight, the FZR was endowed with that magical agility possessed by the very best sportbikes. Handling certainly was a strong point for the FZR400, and these are famously competent sportbikes, although they often get overshadowed by Honda’s much more exotic VFR400R. That should be no surprise as, in many markets, the 400cc class was considered “middleweight” and was hotly contested on track and in showrooms. In the US, 400cc was definitely “entry-level” territory, and most companies gave only a half-hearted effort in selling their wares here: only the Honda CB-1 that shared an engine with the CBR400 and the Yamaha FZR400 made it here officially

As you can see from the pictures, it appears to be in very original condition, although the stalk-mount adapter for the left front turn signal is missing, and there’s plenty of surface corrosion and a few minor scuffs, as described by the seller below. The front calipers also look very freshly painted, which suggests regular maintenance of the parts that really matter.

From the original eBay listing: 1990 Yamaha FZR400U for Sale

This is a used 1989 Yamaha FZR400 with a clear title and very low miles, 28,375 mi. I don’t ride this, nor is it registered, so the mileage will not change. Selling to make space in my garage. I am the second owner of this ‘89 FZR400, it has spent the last 8 years in a climate controlled storage unit due to me being deployed. I had the fuel system flushed and the bike was serviced this past month, in addition it had a new battery installed. The tires are not dry rotten so I didn’t have them replaced. I can provide a video of the bike being started if you so desire. Being that it is a carburated model it takes a bit of choke to get it turned over. Now on to the pictures. As you can see there is some battle damage from a few different incidents. Since I have had it there was no use on it so the few chips and scrapes were done by the previous owner. There is some pitting on the forks and other aluminum bits. I didn’t see any cracks in the plastic, however keep in mind this has the OEM plastics on it. An oil change has been done recently,11Mar18, with Motul 5100 and K&N oil filter. Belly pan has some light scrapes and some distortion from the exhaust. This can be seen the photos. The heat distortion is the same that my ‘90 FZR400 has, the difference being my ‘90 has 1/6 the mileage on it. I can be present if you want the bike shipped, however I am not arranging shipping. I am not in a hurry to see this so, any low-ball offers will not be considered.

The seller refers to this as “very low miles” and, unless you’re talking about a car, I’m not sure nearly 30,000 miles qualifies. That being said, it’s not like this thing has been used as a commuter hack, so the miles wouldn’t necessarily put me off, either. Otherwise, it sounds like a solid bike, given the supposed care it’s received. After years of being the ideal budget-minded track or canyon ripper, these are starting to gain traction as collectibles. Certainly, they’re among the best-looking bikes of the era, with the classic Yamaha colors, twin headlamps, and chunky aluminum frame. Starting bid is $5,799.00 with no takers as yet. Prices seem to be on the rise for these, but the seller may be jumping the gun here and I’d say a $5,799.00 asking price is probably still a bit optimistic.

-tad

Too Little or Just Enough? 1990 Yamaha FZR400 for Sale
Yamaha May 5, 2019 posted by

M is for More: 2015 Yamaha R1M

As we speak, four-time World Superbike champ Jonathan Rea is throwing an unholy hissy fit over the spec of the 2019 Ducati Panigale V4R that Alvaro Bautista is using to convincingly pinch the crown that has become all but a foregone conclusion for him. The reason for the mud slinging is the big Ducati’s world-beating tech and eye-watering price tag. It’s not attainable for the average human, Rea argues, so it’s not exactly a fair fight.

2015 Yamaha R1M for sale on eBay

There may be some merit to that when you look at bikes such as this 2015 Yamaha R1M. When it broke cover as the tuning fork’s baddest offering in 2015, it carried a raft of tech and sexiness that was unheard of at its $21,000 pricepoint. Four years on, that cost has gone up a little, but the bike is no less astonishing now. It packs carbon fiber bodywork, a smartphone-controlled onboard computer (dial in suspension settings from your phone) and a 200-section rear tire. Not bad, considering it still goes for just over half of the R’s ask.

This 2015 Yamaha R1M has done just 4,000 miles and is in immaculate condition. It has a computer chip and a Graves can, but is otherwise stock. Fresh-looking Michelins have replaced the sticky original Bridgestones. There’s a lot of life left, but this bike for sure deserves a more aggressive set of meats.

From the eBay listing:

LIKE NEW!! -2015 YAMAHA R1-M
4377.8 ORIGINAL MILES WITH CHIP AND PIPE!
There’s really nothing else to say, the bike is super clean with receipts of the work done.
After payment we can assist your shipper loading or stop by, pick it up and ride away!
Don’t postpone joy, blow minds at the bike blessing or on the track next weekend!
BID WITH CONFIDENCE!

The reserve hasn’t been met at $13,800, which is still a deal for what this bike is. With the tasteful mods and just 4,000 miles under its belt, this might be the neatest way to get ahold of what is a truly mad street bike.

M is for More: 2015 Yamaha R1M
Yamaha April 29, 2019 posted by

Fiat Currency – 2008 Yamaha YZF-R1

Having presented an all-new R1 in 2007, Yamaha changed very little for 2008.  Hopeful for Rossi, they presented a Moto GP liveried body kit.  This owner has barely ridden the bike, kept it perfectly, and even improved a few of the minor decals.

2008 Yamaha YZF-R1 for sale on eBay

After many years with the 5-valve Genesis, Yamaha’s ’07 re-design used just four valves per cylinder, but still managed 180 hp from the liter.  Intake runner length is computer controlled, optimizing the low and high rpm running.  The throttle is electronic rather than mechanical, and there’s a factory slipper clutch.  The rider is warmed by air evacuating the fairing and the underseat exhaust.  Kayaba suspension is multi-adjustable and triple-puck calipers over 310mm rotors are outstanding.

The original owner has protected this R1 from a sportbike’s usual reality, installed the Fiat fairing kit, and made a few minor improvements.  For a fan, it’s a collectible combination, plus there’s a Rossi-signed tailpiece.  Pre-owned but not really used.  Comments from the eBay auction:

What’s unique about this particular scooter is the Limited Edition MotoGP Yamaha/Fiat Livery Kit which was presented by the Yamaha Factory Race Team back in 2007. Only 380 were made and distributed worldwide and my number is 144.  Every piece was meticulously installed and the results were and remain flawless.
The sponsorship decals that came with the kit were used at the time of installation but were of inferior quality so I had a professional printer make die cut decals copying what was on the factory race bikes at the time and the result is night and day difference. The decals you see on the swing arm and rear tire hugger show the better application. The original kit decals were smaller in dimension and were not proportionate to the areas of their intended placement. I did not keep the originals, some of them were damaged when removing them but in all seriousness, no big loss in that department. 

There have been no engine or exhaust modifications. Electronics have not been tampered with whatsoever. The bike is primarily stock with only a few aftermarket accessories. The stock brake and clutch levers were removed (for you purists, I still have them) and replaced with a machined set in anodized black. They’re not a brand name, I purchased them from a Chinese vendor on a whim but was pleasantly surprised by the exceptional quality and I thought they met my aesthetic and quality standard so that’s why they’re on the bike. 

The other decals you see on the bike which were not part of the Livery Kit are the number 46 on the windscreen and other assorted decals on the white bodywork towards the rear of the bike, the rear seat cowl and under the seat area. (No, that’s not a genuine OHLINS shock. Only the decal is genuine) All are high quality die-cut and replicate with accuracy of what was plastered all over Valentino Rossi’s bikes during the 2007/2008 MotoGP seasons. 
When Indianapolis Motor Speedway hosted the MotoGP races, I had the good fortune of first meeting Valentino Rossi in 2010 (and three times after) and he personally signed the seat cowl. I don’t have it installed on the bike. I’ve always kept it off. Safely protected of course.

Ten years on from the original R1, the oughties update had a host of improvements, and the bike got good reviews for it’s roadability.  The compact cockpit pleases smaller riders and the suspension isn’t too brutal.  Power delivery is slow starting but comes on strong above 8,000 rpm.  Number 46 went on to dominate the 2008 season, clinching the championship three races before the end of the season.  Collectible as it is, a ride would be hard to resist.

-donn

Fiat Currency – 2008 Yamaha YZF-R1