Author Archives: Tad Diemer

KTM August 24, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Priced to Move: Low-Mileage 2008 KTM RC8 for Sale

Considering they never sold all that well when they were new, the asking prices for used examples KTM’s RC8 superbike have been pretty shocking. They were always extremely competent bikes, but just a step behind in terms of outright performance, and they lacked the top-shelf tech of Ducati’s 1098 and BMW’s S1000RR and the Japanese offerings. But reading between the lines, it always seemed that reviewers wanted to rank it higher, the mark of a charismatic superbike. And, if we’re being honest, that’s a truly important consideration for most of us who don’t get paid to win races.

Not that the thing was slow, by any means. Obviously, KTM had been around for a while when the RC8 was introduced in 2008, and their offroad and hooligan machine credentials were well-established. They’d even been doing multis for a while, with their 990 SuperDuke and Supermoto leading the charge to establish the brand as a premier builder of entertaining roadbikes. But somehow, the pleasingly simple character of the thumping v-twin didn’t sell bikes to brand-conscious superbike buyers.

In it’s original incarnation, the liquid-cooled 75° v-twin displaced 1148cc and produced a stout 151hp and 85ft-lbs of torque. It wasn’t stout enough, and the bike lost out in the spec-sheet wars to the Ducati 1098 so in 2010 displacement was bumped to 1195cc for the updated RC8R version. Power jumped to 175hp with 90ft-lbs, which was on par with the regular 1198 and 1198S. Unfortunately, the RC8 wasn’t any less expensive than the Ducatis, and not many people wanted to take a chance on the Austrian brand so the bike soldiered on with very few updates until 2013.

If the the bike didn’t have class-leading horsepower numbers or cutting-edge technology, why buy one now? Well, first of all, take a moment to look at it. Are you horrified by the sheer angularity and garish colors, are you worried you’ll cut yourself if you lean on it? Well, move along to something less dangerous-looking. The styling is wild and that’s down to personal preference, but considering the design was introduced way back in 2008, the thing could have been built yesterday and it would still look fresh. For a superbike, the ergonomics are surprisingly humane and are adjustable: the seat moves, as do all the controls, making it especially appealing to tall riders, which you’d expect from an Austrian company… It’s also relatively simple to service, almost like KTM planned for owners to do their own basic maintenance. Reviews then and now talk about how easy the RC8 is to live with and how, contrary to the wild image, it’s a superbike that’s surprisingly easy to live with.

This particular RC8 is being offered for what seems to be a much more reasonable sum, and it’s not clear why, since it looks like nothing at all is wrong with it, the bike is barely broken-in, and it comes with a wealth of quality bolt-on extras. Perhaps the seller is just reasonable, or is looking for a quick sale? Ideally, you’d probably want the later, more refined RC8R, but this still offers plenty of performance for the money.

From the original eBay listing: 2009 KTM RC8 for Sale

Mint condition 2009 KTM RC8 with less than 800 original miles and beautiful KTM color combination! Properly broken in, serviced and minimally ridden. Only Motorex lubricants and ethanol free premium fuel with Star Tron stabilizer have ever been used! Stored covered 24/7 in climate and humidity controlled garage, never ridden in the rain or off road. Wiped and polished after every ride! It is in like new! Original tires! Extras include:

  • Power Commander V fuel and ignition tuner.
  • LSL bar riser and clip on kit imported from Sweden!
  • Air suction valve and O2 bypass kit.
  • PUIG tinted screen. 
  • Throttle tamer.
  • JC custom exhaust with interchangeable baffles, original exhaust included.
  • WPS dry cell featherweight battery.
  • Larger rear sprocket, factory KTM.
  • Tank protector, factory KTM.
  • Tail tidy with LED blinkers, original included.
  • Goodridge front brake lines.
  • Clean title, all original keys and owner manual. 

Bike was over $19000 new and has $3000 in extras! Please ask any questions you might have prior to placing a bid! This mint condition 2009 KTM RC8 is the closest to a new bike one could possibly find! It has less than 800 miles and is minimally ridden just to maintain the proper mechanical condition. Battery tender installed and included, together with the factory original tail light assembly, exhaust, keys, owner manual. Bike is located in Park City UT and buyer is responsible for pick up or shipping. Please check the 2007 Yamaha FJR1300 recently sold and my feedback. Video of the bike is available upon request. Cashiers check, bank wire transfer or cash in person is accepted and the clean&clear title will be signed over and mailed only upon completion of payment. $500 NON REFUNDABLE PayPal deposit due within 48 hrs of placing the winning bid! Thank you and have a nice day!

The seller is asking just $8,000 for this example, thousands less than the others I found while looking on eBay. There’s been a bit of a glut recently… Admittedly, those more expensive examples were the improved R version and I prefer the orange/white ones, but there’s no denying this is a pretty great price on KTM’s contrarian superbike. The title is claimed to be clean, the bike is pretty much perfect, with all the modifications easily reversible with the included original bits. I don’t know if these will ever be properly collectible, but they’re wild-looking with plenty of analog performance to keep even expert riders entertained.

-tad

Priced to Move: Low-Mileage 2008 KTM RC8 for Sale
Featured Listing August 19, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: Tyga-Bodied 1988 Honda NSR250R for Sale

Today’s Featured Listing Honda NSR250R was one of the most iconic bikes of the late 1980s and early 1990s, at least if you lived in Europe or Japan. We never really got them here in the US, at least not officially. This tiny sportbike was a technological powerhouse, with Honda’s usual obsessive attention to detail, including an advanced electronic ignition system and quality components generally found on bikes with much larger displacements.

The 1988 model year means this is the MC18 version of the NSR250R, with a slightly undersquare 54 x 54.5mm 90° liquid-cooled 249cc v-twin backed up with a six-speed cassette gearbox nestled in between the aluminum rails of the frame. Engine management was via the PGM-II version of Honda’s sophisticated digital ignition matched to a powervalve to increase midrange power, in this case ATAC, an acronym for “automatic torque amplification chamber.” Power was quoted at the “official” 45hp, but more was available with tuning.

If you’ve just looked at the pictures, you might wonder why I’m talking about the NSR250R, since they appear to show something else entirely. But what you’re looking at is a highly modified MC18 with a complete set of Tyga bodywork, decked out in the classic Rothmans Replica graphics scheme. I’ve already lost those of you who know these bikes and prize absolute originality, fans who consider that Honda knew what they were doing, and that any deviation from their template is sacrilege have. Everyone else should read on.

The Tyga fairings honestly modernize the bike and the main giveaway that this is a thirty year old bike is the relatively conventional swingarm setup, as opposed to the “gull arm” version of the MC21 and the single-sider of the MC28. It’s not for everyone, especially the squinty headlights, but the swoopy tailsection that evokes the TZR250 and the curvaceous bellypan are very nicely done, and the whole thing is painted up in the classic Rothmans graphics scheme. Under the skin, you can see the stunning expansion chambers that indicate a higher state of tune, and more information on the details of this build at the Tyga Performance website.

From the Seller: 1988 Honda NSR250R for Sale

Up for sale is a fully restored custom build Honda NSR250. My Son purchased this bike while he was in Japan for four years. After he returned to the states he brought the bike back with him and gave it to me as a gift. Pretty cool.

I am a retired ex motorcycle guy and thought I was done with motorcycles. At any rate there were a few items that needed attention so I started to do some basic stuff. I installed a new rear YSS shock as the stocker was blown. Installed a new battery and I fully went through the carbs since it didn’t idle very well. During this time I had been looking at bikes on Moto2 Imports who specializes in two strokes like this and started a conversation with them about really doing the bike up proper.

The bike was then shipped to Speedwerks in Dover Delaware for a major renovation.

  • Steve Long is the master at Speedwerks who did all of the work on the bike.
  • First off the bike was the first MC18 to be fitted with the all new Tyga GP-T full fairing kit.
  • The bike was custom painted in Rothman’s livery and the paint is stunning in person.
  • While there the carburetors were fully gone through, the bike was de-restricted and dyno tuned.
  • The rear wheel was replaced with a 17” rear wheel from a MC21. Both wheels were cleaned, powder coated and now have new Michelin Power RS tires.
  • The bike has Tyga stainless steel expansion chambers and is equipped with their new shorty carbon silencers.
  • All of the wheel bearings were replaced and the front forks were resprung and fitted with new seals.
  • Both sprockets and drive chain are brand new and the battery was replaced since it was in the shop for a fair amount of time.
  • Both brakes have new pads and fresh brake fluid.

The bike was featured as the Tyga Bike of the Month and I will include the link for that article describing the build. The link below will detail the work that was done on the bike. The last thing is that Steve let me know there was some minor scuffing in the cylinders so they installed a full Tyga OEM top end on both cylinders.

As I mentioned I thought I was done with motorcycles as I am now retired but this was a really fun project to see it go from wow that’s cool, a NSR, to something that is now a museum quality build. I have ridden the bike about 15 miles since it was finished. I am too old to ride a sport bike anymore and hate to see it just sit so have decided to put it up for sale.

Price is $9500 OBO
Contact Cameron Kline: cmrnkline@gmail.com or +1 (817) 734-9201

This is a one-of-a-kind motorcycle, a very nicely prepared “restomod” that will hopefully find the right buyer, and the asking price should help that happen. It almost seems too nice to actually ride, but it’s been built to perform, should the new owner choose to put some miles on it. Honestly, it be even more a crime to just display it.

-tad

Featured Listing: Tyga-Bodied 1988 Honda NSR250R for Sale
Bimota August 16, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Thoroughly Italian: 1986 Bimota DB1 for Sale

The DB1 wasn’t Bimota’s first bike, but it perfectly embodies the company’s philosophy of taking a well-developed engine from an outside manufacturer and putting it into a package that was lighter, sleeker, and better-handling. That wasn’t really all that difficult to do when you’re looking at beasts like the Suzuki GSX1100: just take the good stuff and ditch the rest, then replace it with better, stronger, lighter components. But Ducati’s bikes were already a good bit lighter and more agile to begin with. They had to be, with smaller engines and fewer cylinders.

The DB1 was Bimota’s first Ducati-powered model, and used the two-valve, air and oil-cooled Pantah engine that included a pair of toothed rubber belts to drive the single overhead cams. The arrangement that was still pretty unusual at the time, since most bikes were still using traditional chains in 1985. A 352lb dry weight was claimed, which is pretty outrageously light for a sportbike of the era. Marzocchi suspension meant the light, compact machine would handle and 16″ wheels at both ends that exaggerated the already large front brakes to nearly pie-plate dimensions that were clamped by four-piston Brembo calipers.

Bimotas are famously hard to work on, with the frames so closely wrapped around the mechanicals to save weight, centralize mass, and improve aerodynamics: everything is optimized for performance. The SB3 actually had a frame that unbolted and separated into two sections to free the drivetrain for servicing! Jokes about Italian reliability aside, every single motorcycle will need regular servicing, and removing the fairings of a sportbike is often needlessly tedious. But they make up for that by at least being easy to strip clean of bodywork. Note that the entire tank cover and tail section is just one piece, held in place by just a few fasteners!

So was it really better than the Ducati F1 that donated its engine and five-speed transmission? Probably not, unless you were going racing. As with more modern Bimotas, it was much more expensive with minimal benefits for the average rider, compared to the donor bikes. But the DB1 was impossibly compact and futuristic, with the incredible detailing that Bimota has always been known for. I particularly love the brake and clutch reservoirs incorporated into the tops of the fork tubes.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Bimota DB1 for Sale

1986 Bimota DB1, 5 miles AS New, Very rare-one of 400

First Ducati powered Bimota.

This spectacular DB1 has 5 miles from new, these miles could be factory dyno or road test miles as the bike is new and in brand new condition. Everything is original and untouched, bike has always been in heated storage and shows almost no signs of aging.

This DB1 is nearly flawless, the only flaws I could find is a slight rub mark on the rear of the solo cowl near the tail light (see pic). Second flaw is a super small green paint dot on top of the solo cowl (see pic), this looks like a factory flaw. Other than that the bike is perfect and new.

I am the second owner.

For an indication or reference of value see last picture. That bike had mileage and has been slightly restored. 

This bike is number 203 of 400 produced.

There are no bids yet at the $25,000 opening bid, and there’s a long way to go before the $32,000 asking price. The original listing includes an ad from Bimota Spirit for a similar bike with price of $29,000 and it appears the seller is assuming or hoping that the much lower mileage of his bike will bring a higher price. Unfortunately, although bikes like the DB1 and the original Tesi are rare and desirable, Bimota values in general have remained pretty flat and it looks like the seller may be jumping the gun here slightly, given the overall lack of interest.

-tad

Thoroughly Italian: 1986 Bimota DB1 for Sale
Ducati August 9, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 1990 Ducati 851 Strada for Sale

Update 8.24.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Ducatis tend to evolve gradually, rather than in sudden leaps, and the 916 was no exception. Sure, the wasp-waisted styling was a shocking change but, underneath, much of it had been seen before, in one form or another. Significantly, the four-valve, liquid-cooled Desmoquattro engine had been increasing in size and improving since it was introduced in today’s Featured Listing Ducati 851, and the trellis frame was a development of the 888 that followed.

Introduced in 1987, the 851 was the first production four-valve Ducati sportbike, their first bike in years able to compete on relatively level terms against the Japanese manufacturers in top-level classes, and Ducati had their eye on the new World Superbike series where the new bike would go head-to-head against a host of inline fours. It weighed in at around 405lbs dry, and the new v-twin was good for 105hp and a top speed of 155mph. And while the switch from carburetors to fuel injection was a tricky one for many manufacturers, Ducati’s Weber-Marelli set up was very refined and responsive.

Early 851s came with a 16″ front wheel that pretty much ruined the handling, but that was quickly rectified and subsequent versions were considered some of the best handling bikes of the period. The aluminum tank replaced by steel in 1992, a curved radiator replaced the standard unit, and the styling was revised slightly. But visually, differences are pretty subtle, even between the 851 and 888, so it helps that they have “851” or “888” emblazoned proudly on the sides of the bike to help differentiate them.

Today’s Featured Listing is a very nice example of what appears to be an 851 Strada. As always, the Italian lack of imagination is visible here, as the 851 obviously describes exactly the engine’s displacement and this “Strada” version simply means it’s in roadgoing or “street” specification, as opposed to the “Kit” or “Corsa” models intended for racing. or conversion into race bikes. The bike is also listed on Craigslist and the seller is asking $10,000 for this very clean example of one of Ducati’s most significant sportbikes, with just over 5,500 miles on the odometer.

From the Seller: 1990 Ducati 851 Strada for Sale

This is a highly collectible, modern classic, show-winning super bike. I purchased this bike 14 years ago with 1,800 original miles. Upon purchasing the bike I took it to Ted’s BMW in Scotts Valley and the bike was given a complete maintenance service under the supervision of Adam Cecchini. All maintenance recommendations by Ducati were completed at that time. Cecchini MotorSports also did the most recent safety/maintenance check. The price reflects the care and maintenance lavished upon this bike as well as its collectibility. According to Ducati expert Michael Cecchini, the 1990 white frame and white wheels with the contrasting Anniversary Russo red paint give the 1990 the freshest look of any Ducati. Michael has also stated that he feels that the 1990 is the most appealing. You may find a cheaper 851 but you will not find a better 851.

This bike is original with the exception of after market Staintune High Rise exhaust, Penske rear shock and mirrors. I have all original parts to revert back to stock. I also have detailed maintenance logs. Included in the sale are 4 numbered limited addition Ducati prints.

The Staintune exhaust is a quality, period-correct upgrade with a bit more bling than traditional Termignoni carbon tubes. The frame sliders should be good for protecting the bodywork in tipovers, and appear to use existing mounting points to avoid needing holes cut. It also looks like there is a headlight modulator installed, as you can see the light sensor mounted in the cockpit. If one is installed, removal should be very easy if you want to return the bike to a more stock configuration. Certainly, white frames and wheels are a total pain to keep clean, but they do look very classy and I doubt any new owner will be riding it often enough to make dust and grime a problem. With all the evolution going on, there’s a good bit of parts-interchangeability between Ducati models, so it should be relatively simple to maintain your superbike in the years to come, in some cases with updated or improved parts! Or as long as gasoline is still available, in any case… It’s not one of the rarer SP or Tricolore bikes, but is in very nice, collectible condition, the perfect thing to complete your Ducati superbike portfolio!

-tad

Featured Listing: 1990 Ducati 851 Strada for Sale
Aprilia August 9, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Original Hooligan: 2005 Aprilia Tuono Factory for Sale

“Necessity is the mother of invention” or so the saying goes. You’re out riding your brand-new GSX-R750 in the canyons, hit a patch of oil, and low-side into a ditch. You limp home and realize what new bodywork will cost, but no worries: you just rip it off, and fit a set of motocross bars to help you do sick wheelies! The irony of the modern supernaked is that the trend started with owners actually improving the power-to-weight ratio of their sportbikes, but when the factories got involved, they almost always detuned their bikes to make the performance more “road-oriented,” and fitted lower-spec brakes and suspension to keep costs down. The Japanese usually went even further, using last-generation engines and building new, heavier frames to house them. But not Aprilia: their Tuono Factory was just an RSV Mille with the fairings removed and a set of handlebars added. Just like dad used to make…

All the good stuff from the Mille is still there: the sculptural aluminum beam frame is more visible in this application, a big plus in my book. Lightweight wheels and quality suspension. The compact, powerful, and reliable 60° Rotax v-twin… the weird 90s Aprilia styling, here with added weirdness. Given the already questionable styling of the RSV Mille, the results were less than cohesive, a jumble of angles, odd shapes, futuristic details, and random mesh vents. Luckily, it somehow swings around past “ugly” on the dial and back towards “cool” as a result of all the quality kit on display. The first-generation Tuono is by no means a pretty bike, but it looks sinister and brutal, dangerous to the rider and to anyone nearby. Like a chainsaw with a rusty knife blade for a handle…

The 60° Tuono unit had balance shafts to offset the vibrations caused by the narrower angle between the cylinders. Like the Ducati superbikes of the era, it displaced 998cc, had four valves per cylinder, and liquid cooling. Unlike the Ducati, the twin featured a “Pneumatic Power Clutch” or PPC that took the place of a more conventional slipper clutch. On the overrun, engine vacuum is used to disengage the clutch and prevent the rear wheel from locking during downshifts. Fully-adjustable Öhlins suspension, including a steering damper not found on the Mille, Brembo radial calipers, and lightweight forged wheels rounded out the very trick package.

The Factory produced a claimed 127hp, up a few from the less carbon-adorned and more basic Racing version. Which is a bit ironic, don’t you think? You might be under the impression that all v-twin sportbikes share a similar character, but large power-pulses aside, they can have vastly different feel. The Aprilia is supposed to rev harder but be a bit more “agricultural” than the Ducati, perhaps owing to the additional shafts spinning in the crank cases. Handling was excellent for both the Tuono and the Mille on which it was based, with a much more “Japanese” feel to the handling, compared to the slow-steering but hugely stable Ducatis.

From the original eBay listing: 2005 Aprilia Tuono Factory for Sale

This is a rare opportunity to buy a very nice Gen 1 Tuono Factory model. 

They don’t come up for sale very often so you will want to take advantage of this opportunity to snag a very clean example!

These were built with all the right parts straight from the factory, Ohlins front & rear, Brembo (radial front) brakes, lightweight OZ wheels, Titanium pipe, carbon fiber bodywork, great V twin torque 🙂

This example has been upgraded for comfort, performance & aesthetics with the following…

  • Sargent seat, 
  • Throttlemeister bar ends, 
  • Rizoma clutch & brake reservoirs, 
  • Pazzo adjustable levers, 
  • Zero Gravity & stock wind screens, 
  • Carbon rear cowl on bike with Pillion seat and pegs also included, 
  • Evo air box mod and Chip, 
  • Leo Vince SBK Titanium exhaust with removable silencer insert

I have owned this bike for a number of years and it spends most of its time indoors on a battery tender, but I do take it out for a ride now and then to keep it running right. Only flaw is a scratch on the top of the front fender, see pic.

It’s not absolutely perfect, but it’s obviously been cared for and enjoyed: note the horseshoe-shaped bit surrounding the fuel filler that is likely a tank-bag mount. It has a bit north of 20,000 miles on it, but the Rotax twin is famously unburstable when properly cared for. $6,500 asking price represents a premium over an equivalent RSV, but that’s par for the course these days.

-tad

Original Hooligan: 2005 Aprilia Tuono Factory for Sale
Featured Listing August 8, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 1980 Laverda Jota for Sale

Check out all of Joe’s bikes for sale on RSBFS! Many thanks for choosing us to help move your collection! -dc

When it rains, it pours, and the past couple weeks have seen us feature several different Laverdas. Bikes this old are usually a bit too “classic” to feature regularly on the site, but certain models are just too important not to include at RSBFS, and the hairy-chested Lavereda Jota like today’s featured listing is one of them. As a followup to their successful parallel-twin models, Laverda introduced a three-cylinder in 1973 after teasing prototypes for several years. It wasn’t just a twin with an extra cylinder grafted on, it was an almost entirely new design, with a twin overhead-cam head.

1980 Laverda Jota for sale on eBay

The earliest three-cylinder bikes used a large drum brake at the front, but that was soon updated to a twin-disc setup, although a drum was retained at the rear for a bit longer. Although it wasn’t tuned as aggressively as it could have been, the new, unimaginatively-named “3C” was one of the best-performing bikes available, with a 133mph tested top speed. But stock performance, however impressive, is never enough for some people, and UK Laverda importers Slater Laverda saw plenty of untapped potential and decided to build a bit of a hot rod.

Slater fitted factory racing cams and high-compression pistons, an updated exhaust, and SFC yokes for different front-end geometry. The resulting bike impressed Laverda’s management, and limited production began in 1976. Power for the 981cc engine was up to 90hp and the bike could clear 140mph, making it the fastest production motorcycle at the time. After success racing the bike in the UK, Laverda expanded distribution, and eventually the bike found its way to the US, although bikes originally intended for us were of lower-spec than the UK machines.

The Jota, named for a Spanish dance, is often characterized as a “man’s bike” but could more accurately be described as “a bike for tall people with strong hands.” The triples weigh in at nearly 500lbs dry, with a very tall seat 32″ high, no side stand fitted as standard, and a brutally stiff clutch-pull. Like all Laverdas of the period, they’re solid and overbuilt with power and handling to spare, but a Jota takes work to ride quickly. Or slowly.

Slight clarification of the seller’s information below: all of the early Laverda three-cylinder models, including the 3C and the original Jota used a 180° crank that basically fired “like a four with a miss.” The Jota was basically a hotted-up version of the regular production triple and used the same crank as the 3C. The “two up, one down” crank was great for power and made a pretty distinctive noise, but vibrated a bit more than than was considered acceptable. Later triples switched to a 120° crank after 1981 for increased smoothness, but purists feel like only the 180° bikes are the only “real” Jotas. Personally, I think the 120° bikes sound pretty cool too, but the 180° bikes are definitely more desirable to collectors.

From the Seller: 1980 Laverda Jota for Sale

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. These motorcycles were targeted by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best were available and that is what I purchased. 

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari. 

When you decide, as I did, that the rare, large Italian Sports bikes of the 1970s are a great place to be for collecting. You will for sure want to have a Laverda Jota in your collection. 

Make sure that your Jota is a real Jota with 180 degree firing order, which distinguishes the Jota from other Laverda models. Again, the 180 degree firing order means that the 3-cyclindar engine fires off when two of the cylinders are up and then 180 degrees later when one cylinder is up, it again fires. In other words, the Jota fires two times per 360 degrees and not three times per 360 degree rotation, like the lesser Laverda models. This is what gives the motor its unique power and especially its unbelievable thundering exhaust note. These are big, heavy, and handsome bikes. This one was restored by a Laverda guru a little over 10 years ago and was put in our collection shortly thereafter. If you are talking about these Italian bikes that are designed to look like they have big muscles the Jota certainly exemplifies that. Of course, any of the rare Italian 1970s and 1980s iconic bikes are always great garage art and most often wonderful bikes to ride. The Jota is a man’s bike and not meant for the faint of heart unless you are going to just put it in your living room to look at it.  

There is plenty of information on the Internet about the Jota. There is a very large international club for them. This Jota was restored to perfection and is still in wonderful cosmetic condition and riding form. 

This is certainly a bike for serious collectors and for those that don’t know all the details, the internet is just loaded with information. I can only suggest that you scrutinize the pictures and decide for yourself if this is another rare Italian collector bike that will eventually become as iconic as the Ferrari automobile. I spent a decade looking for the best one and this is the best one I have ever seen.

The real Jotas seldom become available and you should always get the best. When they are available, they are almost never in highly restored condition.  All my bikes are kept on trickle chargers ready to take a day’s ride at a moment’s notice. The Jota is one of those.  

I would suggest that you check out the other rare cycles that I am offering for sale by clicking on “other items for sale” in the upper right corner to see the other bikes being offered from my collection.  

Prefer phone calls 847-774-4857

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

The seller clearly knows bikes, and the collectability of the Jota is undeniable. The only Laverda model more valuable is the earlier SFC, and the Jota is a bit more civilized, although that probably isn’t saying much. Many Jotas came with a half-fairing, but I much prefer my big, burly bruisers to be naked! Wait, that came out wrong… Anyway, the additional wind-blast will be perfect for bulking up your neck muscles to match your newly-muscled hands: I’ve got a couple friends with Laverda triples and the effort required to pull that clutch still blows my mind.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1980 Laverda Jota for Sale
Suzuki August 2, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Just Right: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R400R for Sale

Update 8.2.2019: This seller has upgraded to a Featured Listing. The bike is back on eBay and is now NO RESERVE! Good luck to buyers and seller! Links updated. -dc

I’m a big fan of smaller, less powerful sportbikes. Sure, maybe that sounds like I’m not a real motorcycle enthusiast, since I’m not addicted to excessive horsepower… But I’ve always found that chasing peak power to be a bit of a pointless exercise: there’s always something newer and faster. I really can’t use the power most of the time anyway, especially on the road. And let’s be honest: neither can most of you. I love the idea of a 250cc inline four, but the meagre power output and small physical size mean they’re probably not practical for my 6’2″ frame, but something like this Suzuki GSX-R400R might be perfect.

Many sportbike fans don’t realize that it was really the GSX-R400 that came first in 1984, a year before the GSX-R750 was introduced. Although they could be easily forgiven, since it wasn’t available in all markets. Unlike the bigger 750 and 1100 versions, the 398cc inline four was actually liquid-cooled, and produced a claimed 59hp, a power figure that didn’t really change throughout the different versions, since it had more to do with government regulation than actual performance. It was the lightest, fastest 400 four-stroke on the market when it was introduced, although other manufactures quickly jumped on the bandwagon and the whole class was hotly contested throughout the 80s and 90s.

The GSX-R400 was redesigned for 1986 and introduced SATCS, Suzuki’s “advanced, three-way cooling system” that used both water and oil to cool the engine. So basically like a normal liquid-cooled engine… I assume it incorporated an oil-cooler so they could tie it in with the bigger, “oil-boiler” SACS bikes, but technical details are pretty scarce online, so I’d love input in the comments. Those 1986 bikes also used an oddly modern-looking rectangular headlamp that wasn’t popular, so the 1987 bikes went back to the twin-round lamp setup. 1988 saw the bike styled to tie in with the whole GSX-R lineup, with “baby Slingshot” looks, a new aluminum frame, regular-old liquid-cooling, and a set of “slingshot” carburetors, along with a shorter wheelbase and a claimed 352lb dry weight. 1989 seen here was virtually the same bike, but added the “R” at the end of the name, probably for added poweR…

The seller is asking $4,999.00 for this particular GSX-R400R. It needs a little bit of mechanical attention to make it a runner but, as you can see from the pictures, it doesn’t need much cosmetic work. The original listing has plenty more pictures if you need convincing.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 GSX-R400R for Sale

This is a 1989 Suzuki GSX-R400R GK73. I found this bike in Japan back in 2015, it was a very rare color for 1989, few of them were made and it really caught my eye as being especially unique. The GK73 was an interesting model with the aluminum frame and liquid cooled engine. 

I imported this GSX-R legally from Japan and it has a clean and clear U.S. title with plate and street registration.

I did a mini restoration on this bike, it still needs a small amount of work so I am selling it AS IS (at a loss as well as I have over $6000 in it).

The bike currently does not run. I have rebuilt the carbs with the Litetek kit replacing all internal o-rings and seals. I had the bike running well but the fuel inlet o-rings weeped so I replaced those with original Suzuki new OEM ones. One of these leaked and the carbs needed to be synced… somewhat defeated and pulled away on other projects this is how I left the bike. So it will run, but you will at a minimum need to pull carbs and check the fuel inlet o-rings and make sure they are seated/installed properly and then double check carbs, re-fit and sync. The bike has a decent battery installed and all electric/lights work as they should.

The bike has had a FULL service front to back and has ZERO miles on the following. 

ALL fresh fluids front to back, brake fluid, coolant, engine oil. New spark plugs. Front forks were rebuilt with new fluid and seals, brand near tires on freshly powdercoated wheels with new bearings and valve stems.

I had the bike completely repainted in the stock colors and using all of the original OEM bodywork! The originally paint had some sun fading and typical scuffs and scratches for its age but no major damage. Likewise the wheels had some marks and corrosion so I had them powder coated, I did not get an exact match of the bronze type color Suzuki used on this unique paint scheme but it is pretty close!

This is a VERY nice GSXR-400R, most of the ones I have seen in Japan and elsewhere need a lot of work. I have done all the hard stuff (and costly work $$$!!) already, it will just need a few hours put into the carbs and some tuning work to have a VERY NICE rider!

I can help arrange shipping anywhere in the U.S. or world wide including crating!

It’s in California and claimed to be “plated” here but definitely do your homework. It’s not perfect, but the simple mechanical work indicated by the seller is something you’d expect of any bike this age, and the cosmetics look really sharp. I’ve ridden a Honda NC30 and you might think that the 60hp of a JDM 400 sounds pretty weak, but you might be surprised. Sure, you do find yourself twisting the throttle to the stop more often than on other bikes, but it means you get to run the bike to redline more often as well. If you and your buddies regularly head out to terrorize the freeways at 160mph, you will find a 400 underpowered. But if twisty canyons are more your thing, you might love something like this.

-tad

Just Right: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R400R for Sale
Suzuki August 2, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Japanese Thunder: 2000 Suzuki TL1000R for Sale

The Suzuki TL1000R was famously underwhelming when released. It was a bit too fat, didn’t handle as brilliantly as the Italian competition, and while it looked appropriately Suzuki-ish, styling wasn’t considered a high point. Sort of like the designers were watching a lot of platypus porn while they were styling the bike… In fact, all of the would-be Ducati challengers basically fizzled, but several, including the Honda RC51 and the TL1000R, have since managed to become cult-classics. It certainly helped that their used values cratered, with lower prices making their flaws much easier to forgive.

Aside from the TL-R’s styling, which is always subjective, the biggest issue was handling. V-twins always present particular packaging challenges, particularly the transversely-mounted designs usually used in modern sportbikes. Obviously, a Harley-esque 45° angle between the cylinders is great for packaging in terms of length and width, if not height. But they vibrate like crazy at revs. Unless you want to add balance-shafts, a 90° twin is your best bet, but then the issue is the bike’s wheelbase: use an “L-twin” like Ducati and long swingarm for maximum traction, and the machine ends up with an unfeasibly long wheelbase. Rotate the engine backwards in the chassis to keep it shorter front-to-back, and you limit room for a rear suspension.

Suzuki went the second route, and got around space limitations by using an unusual rotary damper instead of a traditional linear unit. The concept is proven, but Suzuki’s unit was too small for the application and overheated under hard use. Strangely, aftermarket linear units from Penske and others can be swapped in with adapter kits, and Bimota used Suzuki’s v-twin in their SB8R, fitted alongside the heads and operated via a linkage, so the rotary damper was clearly a bit of a gimmick that backfired.

Handling issues aside, the TL-R was powered by a peach of an engine, a 996cc v-twin with liquid-cooling, four-valve heads, and 135hp. That engine, along with the six-speed box, could be found in a number of bikes from other manufacturers that lacked the resourced to develop their own. Away from the utterly ruthless nit-picking and hype surrounding them when new, odd-duck bikes like the TL1000R can now be appreciated on their own merits. All of the Suzuki’s flaws can be mitigated, or you can just enjoy it for what it is: a booming, easy-to-own supberbike at a bargain price.

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Suzuki TL1000R for Sale

Selling my Suzuki TL1000R, needs nothing, I was going to use it for track but change of plans. Bike has 15k miles, new tires, new brakes, rebuilt front forks, new fluid, flush brake fluid, coolant, fresh oil and filter change, new engine air filter, new spark plugs, rebuild clutch slave master cylinder, dual Yoshimura slip-ons and power commander, bike needs nothing and is road ready. I have the title.

Nothing flashy here, just a decent, well-maintained and largely stock bike, although the seller doesn’t mention whether the original tail section and passenger pegs are available. Miles are reasonable, and the upgraded Yoshi exhaust and PC setup is almost mandatory, since the Suzuki twin sounds great when allowed to breathe: deep and rumbly, without the additional layers of clutch and valvetrain noise of a Ducati. The $4,750 Buy It Now isn’t the cheapest we’ve seen, and suggests values continue to creep up, but that still represents a great deal for a very capable v-twin superbike. Just save up for a conventional shock conversion and ride this till the wheels come off!

-tad

Japanese Thunder: 2000 Suzuki TL1000R for Sale