Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Featured Listing January 23, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SFC for Sale

We don’t post a ton of “classic” sportbikes here, but some motorcycles transcend the era in which they were built: the bevel-drive Ducati 900SS, the Moto Guzzi V7 Sport, Norton Manx, Vincent Black Shadow, Kawasaki ELR, Honda CBX, and this bright orange Laverda SFC are iconic enough that they fit in just fine among machines decades newer. Quite literally a race bike with lights, the SFC or “Super Freni Competizione” was a high water mark for the marque, and always makes me sad they’re not currently in business. I think the world has room for a stylish, overbuilt motorcycle with great handling and Italian charisma. I picture something like a Triumph Thruxton R with Ducati SportClassic style…

At the heart of the machine was an air-cooled, 744cc two-valve, overhead-cam parallel twin supposedly patterned after Honda’s CB77 Superhawk and built to last, with five main bearings. The SFC shared the same engine with the more street-oriented SF1, although the SFC included the usual period upgrades to improve performance: larger valves, head work, different cams, balanced and polished internals, bigger carbs… The result was somewhere between 71hp and 81hp, depending on the year. They were all hand-built and dyno-tested and rolled out pretty much ready to compete in endurance racing events. Just remove the lights and add a numberplate.

Unlike other Italian manufacturers of the period, Laverda’s goal was to use the very best parts in their motorcycles, regardless of origin. So while the suspension and frame were by Verlicchi and Ceriani or Marzocchi, respectively, they used Nippon-Denso electrics, and Bosch ignition components. It’s significant that Laverda named their bike after its braking ability: Super Freni Competizione basically means “super competition brakes” and the early machines featured a massive magnesium brake drum out front with a similar unit out back.

Later machines moved to twin discs out front, with a matching disc in the rear, but the result was the same and Laverdas stopped as well as they went. In 1974, the frame was updated to lower the center of gravity and reduce weight, and to improve handling with revised suspension geometry. Fewer than 600 SFCs were ever made, making this one of the rarest examples of an already exclusive marque.

From the original eBay listing: 1974 Laverda SFC for Sale

At only approx 541 units produced, the Laverda SFC is one of the best bikes for the buck you can collect and ride! this is a street legal factory race bike that pumps out approx. 70HP, it’s fun, fast and vicious– to me the SFC is the pinnacle of 70’s Italian sport bikes, it hits all the marks and its built like a tank. This is the closest bike in feel to a Lamborghini Miura.

At this point I can say with some authority, that I have owned, bought and sold more SFC Laverda’s then just about anyone in the US, if you look in previous sales, this bike is just 12 bikes later than the last SFC that came through the shop.

Every SFC is slightly unique, every bike has a story. This particular example has been in private ownership for the last 10 years, the current owner had the noted Laverda craftsman Scott Potter do a complete frame up rebuild with the intention to ride her on the beautiful California coastal roads. At this point a new Steel tank was acquired and paint matched to the rest of the bodywork, new parts were used as needed and the rear shocks were upgraded.

As the bike had been sitting, I decided to give her a once over and clean and replace the jets, set the points. After putting in some fresh fuel, this BEAST roared back to life. The time and money spent on the rebuild was obvious as the quick pull of the throttle felt the parallel twin whip the bike back and forth, the feel of the SFC is unmistakable. BUY, RIDE, COLLECT.

WORLDWIDE SHIPPING IS AVAILABLE

Feel free to call me 929-264-7212 or email via my website – motoborgotaro.com

1974 LAVERDA SFC DETAILS –

  • Frame #17160
  • Engine #17160
  • Dell’Orto PHB 36mm carburetors
  • Borrani aluminum wheel rims
  • Steel tank
  • Ceriani suspension * rear is Marzocchi
  • Electron rear hub and sprocket carrier
  • High quality aluminum replica gas tank
  • Nippon Denso instruments
  • Smaller European taillight

Original parts included * Original fiberglass tank and original pipes

If you’re not familiar with Moto Borgotaro, they’re a restoration shop over in Brooklyn, New York and have had a number of very nice Laverdas pass through their hands. This example looks basically perfect, with just 4,304 miles on it, and the seller is asking $58,000.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SFC for Sale
Triumph January 22, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Brutal Hooligan: 1995 Triumph Speed Triple for Sale

After a long, slow fall from grace into obscurity, Triumph had some soul-searching to do. Once, a premier manufacturer of sporting motorcycles, the storied brand needed a brand new strategy when businessman John Bloor chose to resurrect the company, instead of turning their facility into upscale condos… Instantly creating a line of motorcycles to topple the Japanese brands from a pure performance standpoint was out of the question, so Triumph chose instead to play to their strengths: heritage and old-world build quality. Why build engines to racing specifications when racing is so expensive, and you’re likely to lose more prestige than you gain? The result was a line of bikes that included this very simple, brutish Triumph Speed Triple T309.

Originally, Triumph’s modular range included both three and four-cylinder engine variants that powered a range of sport, naked, and touring machines that were all built around a spine frame. The lighter, more characterful triples ended up being more popular and, although it may not look like much, the Speed Triple could be credited with keeping the newly reborn company afloat, since it’s a mainstay model even today. This first-generation model isn’t nearly as polished, but has plenty of old school charm.

Chief among those charms was the beefy, 885cc triple that gave the bike its name and was also a callback to the 1937 Speed Twin. Backed by a five-speed gearbox, the engine was a modern, liquid-cooled design with machined details that evoked the cooling fins on earlier, air-cooled Triumphs. Styling was very simple, basically a Daytona with the fairing removed and a simple, round headlight and simple, monochromatic paint. Available colors included “Fireball Orange” and basic black. Classic. Suspension was adjustable at both ends, for all the good it did.

The T309 version of the Speed Triple definitely not an ideal basis for a track-day machine: Triumph’s original modular concept had many virtues, but the spine frame carried weight relatively high and the Speed Triple was considered a bit of a pig, although things can probably be improved if that’s what you’re into: there was a Speed Triple Challenge single-make race series to promote the bike when it was introduced. Better to just enjoy this low-mileage example for what it is, and take it out for late night blasts around town in your black jacket with black helmet and dark-tinted visor, squirting from stoplight to stoplight and hoisting fat wheelies. Or sipping tea on sunny Sunday mornings at your local cafe, whichever you prefer.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Triumph Speed Triple for Sale

Triumph 3cylinder 900 cc Condition is Used. Please notice this is an extraordinary example of the Triumph Speed Triple with low milage @1700 miles a 2nd owner well maintained great running bike. Hi performance carburators re: flat slide Keihin smooth bore Venturis jetted and matched to the carbon fiber mufflers. Kept and garaged in a heated pest free environment. This bike does it all and sounds really good when gassing it twisting it open and bracing against the acceleration. Owner is downsizing his collection. We recently sold a Ducati Paul Smart classic from this same collection. No expense spared in the up keep of these bikes. Recent additions are a new battery and fuel petcock valve. The gas tank is clean inside without corrosion or swarf to contaminate the fuel system. Tires are excellent. Brake fluids and the oil and filter were changed before posting to sell.

With only 1,790 miles, this example is pretty much perfect for collectors. The Micron cans seen here are a great period touch and the flat-slide carbs should add some great induction noise, along with a few extra horses. Cosmetically, the biggest problem here is that set of oddly-shaped tank grip pads. Grip pads are great for fast riding, but this particular design doesn’t match the tank cutouts and cheapens the look. Obviously a very easy fix.

-tad

Brutal Hooligan: 1995 Triumph Speed Triple for Sale
Norton January 7, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

You’ll Never Take Me Alive, Copper! 1989 Norton Commander P52 for Sale

The history of rotary motorcycles is relatively short and includes a few technologically interesting, but largely unsuccessful motorcycles by Hercules, Suzuki, and Nortons. I’ll admit that I’m stretching the definition of “sport bike” much more than I usually do with this Norton Commando P52 police bike, but it’s such an oddball I had to post it. I mean, how could I not post a fully-faired Norton rotary-powered motorcycle? Hey, at least the P52 shared the same basic engine with the very rare and sporty Norton F1!

A rotary engine is elegant simplicity in concept, but problematic in execution: they have very few moving parts, and no need for camshafts, as the rotors themselves effectively open and close the fuel/air inlets. There are no poppet valves to bounce and play havoc when they try to share space with fast-moving pistons, and their rotational motion means they’re extremely smooth, compared to a reciprocal piston engine. One can understand an interest in avoiding engine vibration, as Norton’s previous parallel twins required the company to engineer the famous “Isolastic” mounting system to prevent the bikes from basically shaking themselves and their riders to pieces.

Unfortunately, Norton traded one set of problems for another by switching to a rotary design and, aside from a few spectacularly cool racebikes that did well in competition and a few road going F1 replicas to match, the bike was a relative failure. Rotaries tend to run hot, so after an initial run of air-cooled motorcycles, Norton switched their twin-rotor design to liquid cooling, which helped control temperatures somewhat, but added weight and complexity. Overall, Norton managed to work out most of the bugs, aside from emissions, fuel economy, and problematic apex seals. Reliability improved, but the bike didn’t really offer much of a performance advantage, compared to conventional machines, and it never really found enough of an audience to justify itself or save Norton from insolvency.

Rotary-powered cars haven’t fared all that much better than rotary-powered motorcycles: enthusiasts may love them, but warranty claims for NSU’s R0 80 basically sank the company and Mazda’s rotary has been in and out of production for years, owing to their fairly horrible fuel consumption and issues with emissions, as well as rotor apex seal durability. Ultimately, they’re not the simplest, or most efficient way to motivate a motorcycle. Considering the hard miles law-enforcement machines rack up, I can only imagine the headaches experienced by officers using a Norton Commander P52 in the field…

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Norton Commander P52 for Sale

This is a very rare Norton Rotary motorcycle and is in running condition.  It was sold to the Dubai (Middle East) Police Department as a demonstrator, probably with the hope of a large fleet sale.  I purchased this bike in the UK around 1995 and have finally been able to go thru it and get it 100% running and titled in the State of Arizona.

This bike has matching frame (VIN) and engine numbers.

This bike has a calibrated speedometer and has only 1150 original miles from new. Very little was done to bring the bike up to full running condition. As it sat for years (always indoors), I had to professionally rebuild the SU carbs with proper parts from the UK. As a safety measure the fuel lines were replaced due to age and hardness. (I have the old fuel lines for historical reasons). 31 years ago Iridium spark plugs were not yet either in wide use or even available. These plugs are well suited for an engine that burns oil  (as is the case in 2 stroke or rotary engines) so I installed NGK Iridium plugs in this bike to minimize fouling and promote easy starting and running. Again, I have the stock plugs. Norton also recommended Shell Rotella oil but once again I did some research and was advised by several people in the know that the Shell oil is perhaps not the best modern choice of rotary oil. Mazda, who perhaps has more success with the rotary engine in the world had commissioned Idemitsu  of Japan to develop a full synthetic oil for use tn their rotary engines. I decided that the Idemitsu oil was the best modern choice for the Norton Rotary and drained the oil tank and replaced the engine oil with Idemitsu full synthetic oil designed for the rotary engine.

The bike has all the equipment as shipped from the factory, including a 58/100 watt siren, front and rear blue flashing strobe lights and the STOP POLICE illuminated  rear sign. I have 2 new screen printed extras that were made by a friend of mine in the sign business. The siren can be heard for miles so I will include a 100 Watt audio L PAD that can be plugged in line with the siren driver to safely adjust the volume to a comfortable level. I Laser cut a “Norton” sign to replace the Police sign if so desired.

The machine uses 2 batteries and new sealed batteries were installed recently. ALL keys are included and except for the trunk key, duplicates were made for the rest.

The factory workshop manual only ever existed as a “work in progress” but I was able to secure a copy of the manual as a draft. All further work on the full published manual stopped when Norton shut down. I was also able to secure a full wiring drawing of the bike.

Several sales brochures  for the strobes and siren manufacture are part of the literature package included. A full parts list with images is part of the sale.

Norton designed in some unique features into this machine such as a 100% enclosed rear drive chain with an oil bath to promote long life. Built into the trunk is an on board battery charger with the typical UK plug and 240 volt AC input. I designed and built a 110 VAC to 240 VAC step up transformer, all mounted in a plastic box with a UK socket. This allows the built in battery charger to operate properly from US 110 VAC power.

The original owners manual, operators manual, and color sales brochure are part or the package along with letters from Norton to the Dubai authorities and letters in Arabic back to Norton.

The brake system had to be 100% rebuilt as the DOT 3 fluid had started to degrade. All calipers, and master cylinders were completely rebuilt and the fluid was replaced with DOT 5 silicone fluid to eliminate any future  concerns. Again, due to the age of the machine I did change the antifreeze coolant. The rubber hoses connecting the radiator to engine have hardened to the point of minor leaking… I have factory original  replacements that  have not been installed yet.

The tool pouch was missing the basic tools except for the important real wheel axle spanner wrench.

As the bike in NOT restored, various scratches and blemishes exist. I went so far as to NOT polish the bike in any way. To the best of my knowledge the bike is as described.

The Norton F1 is the bike we’d normally want to feature here on RSBFS, being a full-on race-replica with pretty solid performance credentials. The sport-touring Commander seen here used a variation of the liquid-cooled two-rotor powerplant, with fully-faired bodywork that included integral panniers, although later machines used detachable luggage instead. The starting bid is set at $15,000 which seems… honestly, I’d have no idea how to value this bike, but hopefully some collector with a taste in interesting machinery will give it a good home!

-tad

You’ll Never Take Me Alive, Copper! 1989 Norton Commander P52 for Sale
Benelli December 26, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

All I Want for Christmas: 2003 Benelli Tornado TRE 900 LE for Sale

Chasing the ever-changing rules of production racing can be rough on smaller companies. They spend years developing a machine that can be sold to the public, but also meets the stringent requirements to compete in racing, and then the formula changes, leaving the new machine high and dry, unable to race competitively. Larger companies can simply roll with the changes, but ones with fewer resources often have to cut bait, or struggle through a few sad seasons as an also-ran. Such was the fate of the Benelli Tornado TRE 900 LE.

For a long time, the formula for World Superbike allowed 750cc fours, 900cc triples, and 1000cc twins with the expectation that they would compete on relatively equal footing. During this period, the class was basically dominated by Japanese four-cylinder machines and Ducati’s v-twins. Several triples were designed and introduced just before the WSBK rules changed in 2003 to allow 1000cc displacements, regardless of configuration. Benelli’s newly-developed three-cylinder Tornado, along with Petronas’ Sauber-powered FP1, were left in the lurch and down on power. Handling of both was considered excellent, but when your more powerful opponents can simply gap you on the straights…

The production Tornado was eventually punched-out from 898cc to eliminate the performance gap, but that 1130cc version wouldn’t have been race legal at and the team had folded by then. It’s a shame because, in a surprisingly homologous landscape where the formula to create a competitive performance motorcycle was seemingly carved from stone, Benelli managed to incorporate some radical innovations into their machine. In an effort to place the engine as far forward as possible in the chassis, they moved the radiator from the front of the bike to the rear, where distinctive fans pulled air through ducts from the front of the machine, past the underseat unit, and out the tail. The chassis was a hybrid component made from tubes of steel bonded by industrial-grade adhesives to cast aluminum sideplates. A quick-change cassette-style gearbox and a slipper clutch, along with top-spec braking and suspension package rounded out this very exotic machine.

Rules changes may have made the bike obsolete for Superbike competition, but with those looks, the roadgoing version still should have sold well. Unfortunately, a few reliability issues and a sparse dealer network meant failure there as well. Like many bikes of the period, fuel-injection mapping was a bit primitive and, with around 134hp on tap, performance obviously can’t compete with modern 1000cc machines, but Tornados handle extremely well and will certainly generate interest wherever bikers gather.

From the original eBay listing: 2003 Benelli Tornado TRE 900 LE for Sale

This is my 2003 Benelli Tornado TRE Limited Edition LE, 150 were produced from homologation into the World Superbike Championship. 40 were slated for the United States but a claimed 30 were actually imported Stateside. MSRP was a whopping $36,500. Its a DOHC 900cc 4-valve triple with 6 speeds. The engine is canted forward for better weight distribution and balance having the cooling radiator in the rear – hence the dual rear fans. That’s the idea anyway.

The LE also gave you Marchesini wheels, front and rear Ohlins suspension, carbon fiber bodywork, carbon fiber tank and clutch cover, adjustable headstock and swingarm, titanium exhaust, magnesium engine covers, sandcast cases, dry clutch and probably more. Its a very different bike than the standard Tornado TRE, even the electronics are different. The battery is mounted under the motor and not under the seat. Service manual and factory cover are also included.

I bought it from the original owner 5 years ago but I’ve ridden it maybe only twice as part of my larger collection. It was restarted and serviced this month from it’s dormancy by Distefano’s Performance in Imperial, PA. The shop owner had been a regional service representative for Benelli and knows these bikes well. Mileage is original 5994 miles.

Clear  street title in my name. It comes with the Benelli suitcase (the race kit with swing arm pivot inserts, swing arm shaft and rear sprockets). Also comes with its Benelli rear paddock stand. It has the factory optional Arrow exhaust but the stock exhaust is also included.

The seller’s asking price is $15,500 which seems to be in the ballpark for these when they come up for sale. Styling is both striking and elegant, and looks especially stunning in these silver/green colors. The dash is a bit dated, but comprehensive and very functional, with a couple of stylish touches to make it look just a bit more special. And note the very slim, carbon-fiber turn signals and the delicate license plate holder. Surprisingly, the bulky exhaust shown is actually the optional Arrow bit and the stock component especially spoils the styling a bit, looking like it’s been pulled off the back of a Suzuki from the same period.

-tad

All I Want for Christmas: 2003 Benelli Tornado TRE 900 LE for Sale
Cagiva December 21, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Pint-Sized Oddball Exotic: 1986 Cagiva Aletta Oro S2 for Sale

When you see “Oro” in a motorcycle name these days, it immediately conjures images of low-production, high-spec exotics like the MV Agusta F4 750 Serie Oro. This little smoker was really anything but “limited-production” or “high-spec,” and Aletta Oro translates to “golden wing.” Of course, it’s obvious that it has nothing in common with Honda’s famous luxury touring mount, other than it being a motorcycle. Instead, the Cagiva Aletta Oro S2 was intended as a classy, entry-level bike with limited performance and plenty of style.

As you’d expect from an entry-level European machine, the Aletta Oro was powered by a motocross-derived, liquid-cooled 125cc two-stroke, with automatic oil injection to keep the little motor happily smoking. A six-speed gearbox helped newbie riders keep the engine in the meat of it’s meager powerband and make the most of the claimed 23.6hp. Thanks to a 277lb claimed dry weight, the little Cagiva could keep pace with its contemporaries in a straight line and the bike was a nimble handler, although ultimately limited by the budget suspension components.

Styling is very, very 1980s with pearl white bodywork and a red frame. Fuel goes in the normal place at the top of the tank, but the right-side fairing features what looks like a fuel door that hides the radiator cap. The dash is pretty comprehensive, although not shown here, with an absolutely huge tachometer front-and-center, temp gauge, and a digital fuel gauge, as well as the usual speedometer and row of idiot lights.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Cagiva Aletta Oro S2 for Sale

I purchased this bike off of original owner in about 2017 and installed a brand new Polini 162cc cylinder at my shop in New Hampshire. This is a stock bike otherwise originally 125cc 6 speed liquid cooled 2 stroke auto mix. Dash works and headlight/taillight work. Turn signals are cracked a little and have been repaired once (very poor design). I have personally taken this bike apart and ridden all over NYC this past summer and fall. Bike does a healthy 75+mph and shifts through all gears. Starts 1 kick and sounds very healthy. Can provide videos and additional photos upon request.

CLEAN STREET TITLE AND REGISTERED IN MY NAME. CURRENTLY BEING USED ON ROAD ONCE A MONTH OR SO.

Please keep in mind this is a very rare all original bike and there are almost none of these in the USA. this is not a showpiece but a running riding bike perfect for inner city domination or to hop on the highway for short trips here and there. 

I can also deliver up to 350 miles of NYC for Gas/tolls/fee discussed. Thanks.

The bidding is currently up to $2,000 with a couple days left on the auction. I highly doubt these will be worth much anytime soon, but you can’t beat a weird 80s Cagiva for novelty value. And, unlike a Motocompo or Monkey, it’s a thoroughly usable novelty, one that could make a great commuter or city bike, as the seller mentions. The biggest issue would likely be bodywork, although I’d expect you should be able to find plenty of used parts, if you’re willing to look online and trust shippers outside the US. This one isn’t pristine, but when will you have another opportunity to pick up something this rare for so little?

-tad

Pint-Sized Oddball Exotic: 1986 Cagiva Aletta Oro S2 for Sale
Ducati December 19, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Road and Track: 2005 Ducati 749R for Sale

You’d think that, for sportbike owners, homologation specials would be the ultimate ride. And they technically are, but the whole point of homologation is to meet production requirements that allow certain parts to be used on a company’s racing machines, whether or not they result in a better finished product. So it turns out a slightly steeper steering head angle will allow a bike to transition faster? That’s great, but you have to use that same design on a certain number of machines available for sale to the public. Unfortunately, the advantages for road riders may be nonexistent in many cases. Or even a step backwards: flat-slide carburetors often found on 80s homologation bikes are generally less practical than the constant velocity units that came on the standard bikes. Luckily, the Ducati 749R manages to be a fantastic road bike, in addition to providing the foundation for a first-class racebike.

The 749R was developed to compete in the World Supersport championship. Unlike World Superbike, the rules for this series are very strict and allow extremely limited modifications to keep costs for the teams competing under control. WSBK machines are based on the production bikes, but liberal changes to the bodywork, suspension, and engine are permitted. Supersport rules, on the other hand, are so strict that even the stock wheels had to be retained! In order for Ducati’s 750 v-twin to compete on equal terms with the 600cc inline fours from the Japanese manufacturers within these narrow parameters, the 749R ended up being one of the trickest machines they’d ever produced.

Available between 2003 and 2006, the 749R used larger, titanium valves, titanium rods, a lightweight crank, magnesium cam covers, and high-compression pistons with a much larger bore. The larger 94mm pistons were combined with a shorter, 56mm stroke to help it safely rev higher and gave an actual 749.5cc, unlike the 749 and 749S that had 748. Power was up from 108 to 121hp, and a slipper clutch helped keep the rear tire from locking up during hard downshifts.

The frame was modified significantly and included an adjustable steering head. Suspension was heavily revised to match, with a different rear suspension linkage, a WSBK 999-style swingarm, and top-of-the-line Öhlins components at both ends. Radial Brembos up front meant the bike shared the 999R’s stopping power, as well. The bike featured adjustable ergonomics as seen on the solo-seat 749S but actually had a smaller range of adjustment, due to the larger-diameter racing exhaust taking up some of the underseat space. Lightweight Marchesini wheels were used and the 2004 model year bikes were clad in carbon-fiber bodywork. Later years switched to a new, lightweight plastic, which works well but isn’t nearly as sexy. The lightweight bodywork was paired with a larger fuel tank with increased capacity and exclusive to the 749R.

The 749R is an excellent sports motorcycle, with pedigree and performance. It’s rare, too: supposedly just 500 originally made it to North America. But you paid a premium for that speed and rarity: in 2005, the 749S sold for $14,795 versus $21,995 for the 749R. For 99% of riders, the 749S was just as effective, for a much lower price.

From the original eBay listing: 2005 Ducati 749R for Sale

2005 Ducati 749R limited production #0172. Bike was meticulously maintained and needs nothing. It has a Termignoni racing pipe and exhaust, CRG quick adjust racing levers, Brembo front and rear brakes, adjustable titanium racing pegs, shifter and brake lever. Ohlins front and rear Suspension and steering dampener, forged Marchesini Forged rims and many carbon fiber parts. Please no low ball offers and no joy rides. I’m happy to answer any serious questions about the bike.

The Seller is asking for a $10,999 starting bid, with a Buy It Now of $16,892. In spite of all the high-spec bits and limited production, these are still usable roadbikes, as this example can attest: it’s no garage queen, with 17,000 miles on the odometer. Not bad for an homologation machine with race-bred Italian heritage. Buyers shouldn’t necessarily worry about a Ducati with that kind of mileage: if properly maintained, the basic components are pretty durable. The usage probably does damage the bike’s collectability a bit, since folks picking up R-spec bikes these days are most likely well-heeled Ducatisti, and low-mile bikes tend to command more interest and higher values. If you have to have the very best though, just in a smaller package, this could be an excellent dual purpose sportbike that’s even more at home on track than on the road.

-tad

Road and Track: 2005 Ducati 749R for Sale
Ducati December 12, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Champagne Taste on a Beer Budget: 2001 Ducati 996 Biposto for Sale

Ducati’s instantly recognizable 916 series of superbikes remain surprisingly affordable, considering their pedigree and perceived rarity. But the same basic design was in production from 1994 to 2004 and Ducati made a shedload of them. Sure, the SPS and R bikes are extremely rare, but regular production bikes like this 996 Biposto aren’t too hard to find in good shape, although most have accumulated way more mileage than seen here…

The 996 debuted in 1999 as an evolution of the 916. It might look virtually identical, but featured a host of subtle upgrades to the original bike, including changes to the frame, fuel injection and, most notably, the engine. The original 916 cases started to fail under racing conditions when punched out beyond 955cc, a disadvantage when World Superbike rules allowed twins up to 1000cc. The revised engine was first seen in the 916SPS and the 996 used the same cases, although the rest of the engine was in a lower state of tune, with milder cams and injection tuning to match.

It was followed by the 998 in 2002 that saw the introduction of the “Testastretta” or “narrow-head” engine that offered significantly improved power, making the 998 the fastest version of the bike, although a torque-rich 112 horses meant that the 996 was considered to be plenty fast. An Öhlins shock is matched to a set of quality Showa forks, and I much prefer these later five-spoke wheels to the original 916’s three-spoke design.

Right now, it seems like the 996 is the value proposition of the group. The 916 is the original and desirable for that reason, and the 998 the most powerful and well-developed. It’s not the fastest, or the rarest, but if you want a 916-style bike, this 996 Biposto offers a blend of handling and power, along with marginal passenger accommodations if your significant other is both petite and brave. And yellow bodywork

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Ducati 996 Biposto for Sale

Yes, this bike only has 1806 original miles! Collect it or ride it? You choose. Sharp looking yellow 996 that GP Motorcycles just changed all the fluids on and just replaced the timing belts. Bike still has original tires so you would want to change those if you are going to ride the bike but other than that, this thing is ready to go. Don’t miss out on this classic Ducati Superbike.

GP Motorcycles down in San Diego is offering this very clean, very low-mileage 996 for $6,999.00. Aside from the corroded paint on the brake fluid cap and the fogged headlight lenses, it’s very clean and comes with a set of Arrow slip-ons that were a popular choice when the bike was new. They aren’t my favorite in terms of exhaust note, but easy to change if you don’t like them. If you’re looking for a very sharp collectible and can’t spring for one of the more exotic Ducatis, this would be a pretty low-priced way to pick up a pretty pristine example of Tamburini’s iconic superbike. Assuming you’re okay with yellow, instead of classic Ducati red.

-tad

Champagne Taste on a Beer Budget: 2001 Ducati 996 Biposto for Sale
Featured Listing December 6, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 1998 Triumph Daytona Ex Formula Thunder Race Bike for Sale

I love seeing race and trackday bikes built out of unlikely candidates like this well-prepared, race-winning Triumph Daytona T595. After all, the whole point of the Daytona in the first place was that it wasn’t pretending to be just a numberplate away from placing at Brands Hatch. Instead, it was intended as a fast roadbike, with a focus on character, build-quality, and humane ergonomics. A gentleman’s sportbike. In this case, a bike for a very fast gentleman…

The original Daytona introduced in the early 1990s was available in three or four-cylinder flavors and it was a big, burly GT to rival bikes like the Kawasaki ZX11. The second generation seen here was codenamed the T595, although it was fairly quickly renamed the 955i to avoid confusion regarding its displacement. That’s the kind of thing that never bothered Bimota, and I wonder how many people ask SB6 owners if their bike is a 600… In any event, the bike displaced 955cc and was much lighter and more agile than the bike that preceded it.

That being said, the T595 really wasn’t intended for competition: the suspension was too soft, the motor biased towards a flexible midrange, as opposed to top-end power, and it was still just a tad too heavy. But this is a Triumph we’re talking about, and sportbikes are in their DNA. Fit some stiffer suspension, do a bit of headwork, swap in some custom-ground cams, and change out the stock wheels and bodywork for some lightweight parts. Voila: racebike! It’s obviously not quite that easy, but someone clearly put in the effort here: the description goes into great detail regarding the work and parts that went into building this successful racing machine.

From the Seller: 1998 Triumph Daytona Ex Formula Thunder Race Bike for Sale

This is an off road only track bike, no street parts available. This bike dominated at the local track in the Formula Thunder class in early 2000’s. Once retired from active duty it was sold to its current owner in 2003. At that time it was taken to a well known local engine builder go through entire motor and chassis and make get it ready for its last race, a 4 hour endurance race. The motor was torn down and a full fresh build took place. Invoice provided for build. It was then broken in on the Dyno (see chart) and off to the races it went. Retired after the event, until it was brought in to us to find a new home. It had sat for a few years so we carefully went over it, good compression @185-200, changed oil, filter, flushed coolant, fresh fuel and bike came right to life!

Here is a quick list of the obvious and a note from professional Triumph engine builder Scott Zollars.

  • 885cc
  • Dymag magnesium wheels
  • Rare Yoshimura full exhaust
  • Attack Performance Triple clamps and rear suspension linkage
  • Pro Circuit Suspension re-valved front and rear suspension
  • Penske rear shock
  • Brembo Master cylinder and calipers
  • 320 mm rotors with custom caliper brackets for Brembo’s

“The cylinder head is a ported 885 from a speed triple. The cylinder liners are the aluminum with nickasil coating items from the earlier generation Super 3. In particular they are all number 2 cylinder liners as they had a tighter tolerance from the factory. The pistons were from the earlier Super 3 also as they were 12-1 hi compression pistons. The cylinder head was decked when it was ported. A final compression ratio of 13.0 sounds familiar. The cams are a custom grind from Web Cam. The valve springs are a custom set from Kibblewhite. The airbox is a crudely made custom item. However it proved to be very effective. The transmission gears were back cut. The shafts that the shift forks ride on were shortened to allow them to float in the case similar in fashion as to what was standard on R6’s etc. All rod and main bearings were the White bearings. Carillo connecting Rods. This is how I remember the bike being set up. Things may have changed since 2004 though” – Scott

From one of the local forums:

“05-15-2005, 12:47 AM – Scott Zollars was the man behind I-90 Motorsports race 885 Daytona. That bike dominated the Formula Thunder class at Pacific Raceway for four years.
Also he was involved with Jack Lilleys highly successful 595 Daytona. I think it was the first British bike to win a National in eighteen years? I know first hand that Scott is an expert with fuel injection, electronics, motors and fabrication”

Credits cards accepted, up to $150.00 documentation charge may be added.

Seattle Used Bikes
4905 Aurora Ave N.
Seattle, WA 98103
dave@seattleusedbikes.com
Closed Sun/Mon Find us on Facebook, Instagram and the Web

The seller also includes a short walkaround video of the bike running and the throttle being blipped. There are obviously more sensible track-day mounts, bikes that are simpler to get parts for and faster. But if I was in the market for a $7,000 track bike, I’d be very tempted by this Triumph. It’s obviously a highly-developed machine for that kind of money, and you couldn’t replicate it for anything like what the seller is asking: just the rare parts fitted would probably be worth the asking price, not to mention the hours spent building and tuning it. And if you’re looking to go racing in a vintage class, you could certainly do worse than starting with a competitive machine like this one!

-tad

Check out the other Triumph SUB has Featured on RSBFS: 1998 Triumph T595 with just 2,518 miles ! Dave notes that a deal is possible on the pair! -dc

Featured Listing: 1998 Triumph Daytona Ex Formula Thunder Race Bike for Sale