Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Ducati November 20, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Truth in Advertising: 1993 Ducati 888 SPO for Sale

It’s common for manufacturers to fudge things a bit when identifying their cars and motorcycles. Often, the name specifically referred to at least the approximate size of the engine, but liberties are often taken, especially when the displacement changes, but the name stays the same. The Mustang 5.0? Actually 302ci works out to 4948cc, which you should probably round down to 4.9 liters… But it’s pretty close at least, and sounds much cooler. Can you imagine Vanilla Ice crusin’ in his four-point-nine? Bike manufacturers are even worse about rounding things off to sound good. The Norton Commando 850 was packing 828cc, and the Ducati Pantah 600 had 583cc. Fortunately, Ducati redeemed themselves with the oddly-specific 888 SPO…

Until the introduction of the the also-accurately-named 851, Ducati made do with air/oil-cooled engines, and relied on their light weight and agility to compete against more poerful machines. Unfortunately, the handling of Japanese superbikes continued to improve by leaps and bounds, and the Italians knew the only way to stay competitive in production racing would be to evolve. Ducati’s 851 superbike was powered by an extensive redesign of their 90° v-twin that added liquid cooling and four valves per cylinder, with all eight actuated by the company’s famed Desmodromic system. The system basically eliminated valve float, although high mean piston speeds were a much bigger issue for a 10,000rpm v-twin. A more important advantage probably came from the ability to use more aggressive cam profiles to both open and close the valves.

The 888 that followed naturally used a slightly larger, more developed version of that engine. A six-speed gearbox backed by an exotic dry clutch gave racing credibility, along with that characteristic Ducati rattle that is often louder than the exhaust at idle, especially on a stock bike. Two versions of the bike were available in most markets: the 888 Strada and the higher-performance 888 SP5. The SP5 wasn’t road-legal here in the USA, so we got a bike that really slotted in between the two Euro versions called the SPO or “Sport Production Omologato” that was intended to homologate the bike for AMA racing. Unlike the Strada, the SPO had a solo-seat tail, upswept exhaust for more cornering clearance, and an Öhlins shock. A heavier steel subframe was used in place of the SP5’s aluminum unit, and the engine was basically in the same state of tune as the Strada, with around 100hp and a meaty torque band.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Ducati 888 SPO for Sale

1993 Ducati 888 SPO with 4824 original miles and in excellent condition.  

Purchased new in the Seattle area and stayed a local bike all its life. Documented history throughout its 4824 miles, beginning from original purchase agreement in 1993 (pictured). Last full service (includes belts adjustment) done at 4600 miles in 2015. All major parts are original, including radiator (pictured) which shows matching usage/wear to the bike’s mileage. Pipes were upgraded to Ferraccis back when the bike was new, and coolant hoses were replaced during the last service in 2015. Also recently replaced the fairing fasteners to period correct OEM fasteners as the gold plating on the originals were faded due to age.

Title is free and clear, and comes with 2 original keys and owners manual. Stand is not included.

This bike has very low miles and includes the desirable, period-correct Fast by Ferracci exhaust is a nice option that should add a period-correct exhaust note. The seller is asking a very steep $16,500 for this one, but it’s very original, well-kept, and you’ll likely not find another in this kind of condition if you’re looking to grab an SPO for your collection.

-tad

Truth in Advertising: 1993 Ducati 888 SPO for Sale
MV Agusta November 16, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

A Touch Too Much? 2014 MV Agusta Brutale 1090RR for Sale

Modern supercars and superbikes have too much power. There, I said it. The only thing keeping 95% of owners from launching themselves into the scenery are the sophisticated traction control systems that do their best to interpret your inputs and give you what you think you want, instead of what you’ve actually just asked for. Purely analog superbikes with more than 160hp or so are a pretty serious handful for anyone without a racing license. That doesn’t mean they aren’t plenty of fun though, and sometimes “too much” is just enough: insane bikes like the MV Agusta Brutale 1090RR are the kind of excessively-endowed exotica that make motorcycling so enjoyable.

What do I mean by “excessively-endowed”? The Brutale’s upright position hangs the rider’s upper torso out in the wind with nothing to hide behind unless your chin is flat on the tank, making even 80mph freeway blasts a bit exhausting, unless you’ve got steel cables for neck muscles. And the 165mph top speed is frankly ridiculous, unless you plan to use high-speed runs as some sort of core isometric workout…

Powered by an evolution of the F4’s radial-valved inline four and cassette-style gearbox, the 1090’s designation helps differentiate it from the F4, although it shares the 1078cc displacement. The 1090RR’s 158 claimed horsepower is down a bit on the previous version, although the Brutale is “tuned for more midrange” so it’s probably the torque we should be looking at, and the bike’s 83lb-ft is pretty significant for an inline four. That is at least a nod towards practicality and should make this a monster on the road, although it’s actually very suited to the track as well.

Brembo Monoblock calipers are mounted to the bottom of MV’s typically beefy 50mm Marzocchi forks and matched to a Sachs rear shock provide a good foundation, while 8-level traction control and RLM “rear-lift mitigation” and a hydraulic slipper-clutch function let you exploit those powerful brakes. If you’re lacking serious threshold-braking skills, available ABS will help you make good use of the available stoppers, and offer peace-of-mind if you live in places where it rains things other than fire and ash…

Other improvements compared to the earlier Brutale include a longer swingarm and wheelbase to help tame the bike’s brutal character, along with a larger fuel tank looks pretty much identical, but has additional capacity and offers better ergonomics for track and canyon cornering histronics. The original Brutales did suffer from somewhat primitive ECUs, but this updated version had better fueling from the start, combined with the aforementioned electronic trickery.

Personally, I prefer the earlier gauge cluster, but time marches on and the additional electronic aids available on this model more than make up for a small area of the bike you likely won’t spend much time looking at anyway when you’re desperately trying to keep this thing from flipping over backwards and laughing your head off. Yes, the F4 is prettier, but it’s hard to argue that the original Brutale isn’t one of the best-looking unfaired bikes of all time. The asking price for this one is $8,850, which is a lot of exotic motorcycle and raw performance for the money. I’m constantly surprised that they don’t command higher values, but that just means that riders of ordinary means can actually afford to buy them, although I wouldn’t recommend owning one as your daily ride if you’re not prepared.

From the original eBay listing: 2014 MV Agusta Brutale 1090RR for Sale

Here is my pristine MV Agusta Brutale 1090RR up for sale.

This bike is almost like new and had all the factory services and an oil service every 3000 miles.

This beauty gets attention everywhere and it’s a blast to ride it. The handling, power and sound are outstanding.

Upgrades are:

  1. Header from Arrow (Sound makes you addicted)
  2. Beautiful Mufflers from a 2012 Model. (I have the pristine stock ones)
  3. MV-Agusta Corse Seats. (I have the new stock seats)
  4. Heated Grips
  5. Rizoma Mirrors (I have the stock Mirrors)
  6. Rizoma Bar End Turn Signals.
  7. New Brembo Mono Block Calipers in Black. ( I have the stock calipers)
  8. R&G Fender Eliminator with beautiful LED Turn Signals. (I have all the stock parts)
  9. Garmin Zumo GPS
  10. LSL Superbike Handle Bar with Rox Risers. ( A lot more comfortable and better handling. I have the stock parts.)
  11. LED Head Light. (Very Bright)

This bike is ready to go everywhere without any issues.

I didn’t washed this beauty for the pictures, so you can see some mosquitos but there are no scratches.

Please don’t send me low ball offers because I will ignore them. This is almost a collector Bike and hard to find in this color combination and conditions..

The stock parts are not included in this price.

Questions? Text 864-607-5845

The red/white/blue “America” colors aren’t my favorite, but they look good here, owing to the careful choice of individual colors and the fact that they’re draped across an MV Agusta. Overall, the bike is very clean, with just a shade under 11,000 miles on the odometer. It might seem disappointing that the bike doesn’t include aftermarket mufflers, but the gorgeous titanium Arrow headers and link pipe that deletes the catalytic converter should liberate all the noise you’ll need, and there are very few aftermarket setups that effectively duplicate the slash-cut shotgun-style originals that look so good, excepting the tiny openings themselves. These are sexy, sexy bikes and continue to be available at rock-bottom prices and, although they can be more troublesome than your average Japanese bike, are relatively straightforward to maintain and pretty durable when properly maintained. Just don’t drop that headlight unit…

-tad

A Touch Too Much? 2014 MV Agusta Brutale 1090RR for Sale
Ducati November 12, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Appreciating Icon: 2001 Ducati 996 for Sale

Values of Ducati’s wasp-waisted superbike have been shockingly low, considering their status as one of the most important, and most beautiful superbikes of the modern era. Sure, an SPS or 998R might pull decent money, but examples of the garden-variety 916 and especially the more refined Ducati 996 were available for as low as $4,500 pretty recently. And that wasn’t necessarily for clapped-out ex-race bikes either: solid, well-maintained bikes could be had for that sum. No, a 996 won’t keep up with new machines in a straight line, the braking ability of the current crop of superbikes is superior, and they lack modern electronic rider aids, but this iconic superbike still has impressive handling, even by modern standards. And the low prices won’t last forever…

Clean, low-mile 916s have already started to climb in value, and 998s that represent the final evolution of Tamburini’s superbike never really dipped that much. But the middle-child 996 still represents great value, especially if you’re looking for a bike to ride, as it featured more power and many subtle updates to the 916. It was introduced in 1999, after the 916 engine had hit its developmental limits.

World Superbike displacement for v-twins increased to allow 1000cc twins, but the original 916 cases started to experience failure when the displacement was enlarged to anything beyond 955cc. It might look like a 916 with some stylistic tweaks, but the 996 featured a heavily-revised 996 version of the engine that was introduced in the 916SPS, along with tweaks to the frame and fuel injection to improve handling and drivability.

This example features an updated Öhlins shock matched to a set of Showa forks, suggesting that it could be a 996S, although it lacks the numbered plaque generally seen on the triple. Some questionable stylistic flourishes have been added, but the seller claims the the original bits are all there, if you’re not a fan, and the other upgrades are very functional and intended to improve the usability and reliability of this classic Italian superbike, along with a set of aluminum Termignoni cans to liberate some classic Italian thunder.

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Ducati 996 for Sale

For your consideration is a 2001 Ducati 996 with 4,982 original miles on the clock. This bike is all original. It’s been ridden and well cared for. It’s in excellent condition, not just for the year, but for any year. I’m selling it because it’s impractical for long distances, and because I’m more interested in two-up riding these days. Bike has:

  • A Scotts reusable oil filter to improve cooling and filtering capacity
  • A Pipercross race filter. Chosen for lack of side effects on throttle response, noise, and engine longevity.
  • A Power Commander III. Currently, the bike is running and older version of the PCIII.  A newer USB PCIII is included with the bike.  I’ve just procrastinated on installing it.
  • An Afam quick change sprocket carrier and JT sprocket swap. The Afam carrier prevents cush drives from backing out and makes sprocket changes a lot easier. The current sprockets have less than 100 miles on them.  circlip is not in photos, but has been installed and safety wired.
  • I replaced the fuel quick disconnects and fuel sending unit nut with metal pieces. The OEM units are nylon/plastic and prone to breaking. Not anymore.
  • I installed a Cox Racing Case Saver. This item protects the precious engine case in case of an accidental chain break If you take care of your chain like I do, it’s not an issue, but stuff happens.
  • Replaced the US light switch with a European one, which allows you to turn off the headlight on startup. Less drain on the battery at startup means easier starting. Works like a charm.
  • I replaced the OEM fan with an aluminum unit that runs off a switch that allows you to run the fan anytime the temp gets too high for your liking. This bike has never overheated, but the stock temps are too high for my taste, so I installed a fan kit.
  • Swiftech, made in Germany, carbon hugger. Keeps debris off your suspension and tailpiece. Buyer also gets a Ducati performance lower hugger which is not installed.
  • Cox racing radiator and oil cooler guards to keep debris from damaging those two crucial components.  The radiator and oil cooler are in excellent condition (pictured) and I plan on them staying that way. Last, I’m including a carbon tank shield. It’s not installed because I wanted to show the excellent condition of the tank.
  • I have replaced all the seals on clutch master cylinder and on the clutch shaft within the last 100 miles. Buyer gets a Yoyodyne slave cylinder with the bike and has the option to install it or keep it as a spare.

This bike is in excellent condition. It is not a restoration. All parts are original to the bike, save for the mufflers. I also installed a billet clutch plate and housing. All body panels are original to the bike and undamaged/unrepaired. It’s all Ducati, no aftermarket. There are no cracks, repairs, or damage anywhere on the body, apart from light scratches here and there.  the paint is original everywhere, including on the underside of the seat. There is no rust whatsoever in the tank and only minor surface corrosion on some fasteners around the bike. There are no dents anywhere. This bike has never seen rain under my ownership.

The timing belts are brand new, properly installed (new Fuji nuts) and tensioned. The proof of the pudding is in the tasting, and this bike runs very smoothly and strong. The valves are not due for another 1000 miles. I inspected them and they look good. All rubber and soft parts are in good to excellent condition, down to the little bleed screw rubber caps. Only a couple of electrical plug sleeves have shown cracking despite my best efforts. Those (and I think it is literally a couple) have been mitigated and have no effect on function or reliability.

I replaced all coolant hoses with new Ducati parts in the last year. No leaks. Not coolant, not oil, not brake fluid. Gold DID chain has less than 100 miles. NGK Iridium plugs. Battery is less than a year old and wired for battery tender, which also comes with the bike. New Continental tires.

I kept all the OEM parts I replaced. Buyer also gets the excellent Baxley chock pictured. I always keep bike on chock at home. Sale includes a few special tools required for routine maintenance. 4 excellent manuals including Ducati shop manual.

I will be happy to send more pictures on request. Thank you for looking.

Considering the thoughtful upgrades and the 4,986 miles on it, I have a feeling it won’t be long before the $8,100 asking price will seem like a bargain. I’d expect this is one of the lowest-mile non-display bikes around, and with much less mileage I’d be concerned it would need significant maintenance before being ready to ride! Low-mileage bikes can seem more desirable, but mothballed Ducatis can cost a fortune in servicing to make roadworthy if they’ve been sitting for extended periods, and the attention lavished on this example make it worth a premium: as they say, “There’s nothing more expensive than a cheap Ducati…”

-tad

Appreciating Icon: 2001 Ducati 996 for Sale
Aprilia November 8, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

For Offroad Use Only: 2001 Aprilia RS250 Cup for Sale

By 2001, the entire quarter-liter sportbike class was basically dead, leaving the Aprilia RS250 Cup a bit of an orphan. Yamaha TZR250 production ended in 1995, Honda’s NSR250R in 1996, and the Suzuki RGV250Γ held out until 1998. But I guess Aprilia still had some of the older 90° RGV250 engines lying around, so they kept churning out bikes for a few more years. The bigger issue was their viability as road bikes: one of the biggest reasons for the classes’ demise was the increasingly stringent emissions regulations that favored cleaner-burning four-stroke engines, instead of the light weight, but very dirty two-strokes that powered these bikes. They don’t call them “smokers” for nothing…

So the 249cc powerplant was from Suzuki, with a few Aprilia-branded bits to make the claim that they’d tuned it extensively somewhat believable. The frame was an aluminum twin-spar unit like the donor bike, but what a frame: unlike the industrial units seen on the Gamma and NSR, Aprilia’s was gorgeously sculptural, as was the swingarm. Brakes were more than up to the task, since the very same triple-Brembo setup was used on much heavier bikes like the Ducati 916 and Moto Guzzi Sport 1100…

By 2001, new two-strokes weren’t legal for road use in many markets, including the US. The RS250 Cup got around this by not bothering to be a road bike. It was intended for a single-make racing series, although an awful lot of them turn up here on eBay with very few miles, suggesting folks bought them to collect and not to race. It’s not too difficult to source bits from the road-legal version if you’re looking to convert one, although that doesn’t appear to have been done in this case.

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Aprilia RS250 Cup for Sale

This is an Aprilia RS250 imported into the US for the Aprilia Cup club road racing series. It was sold as a race bike only so bill of sale only. This example was never raced and spent most of its life in a private motorcycle collection. The original owner added lighting, turn signals, horn, and other equipment typically found on a street bike. I have only ridden it 6 or 8 times in the years I have owned it but I recently went over it from nose to tail and made sure everything is in good working order. Other than the added street equipment the bike is as originally delivered by Aprilia. Having owned and road raced one of these for many years I am very familiar with them and this motor is quiet and tight. Factory shop manual is included with the bike.  Also includes a new Shorai lithium/iron battery.

The Aprilia RS250 Cup was originally a track-only machine, although the seller indicates that it’s been made nominally road-legal and that it has managed to accumulate 3,000k miles so far, and bidding is up to just $5,250 with a few days left on the auction. The projector-beam headlight isn’t stock, but actually works pretty well, although I’d replace those red-anodized fasteners with black as soon as I got the bike home. Obviously, any potential buyers should be wary if they intend to register this machine for road use, unless they just plan on converting it back to track-only configuration.

-tad

For Offroad Use Only: 2001 Aprilia RS250 Cup for Sale
Featured Listing November 5, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: Pristine 1990 Gilera Saturno Bialbero with 72kms!

This is the second of four motorcycles being offered from the Stuart Parr Collection. Thank you for supporting the site and good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Looking very 80s, the Gilera Saturno Bialbero  could be mistaken for some sort of custom Ducati. But Gilera, of course, should be held in the highest regard by fans of this site, as they were the first company to slot an inline four into a frame transversely, solving in one fell swoop the difficult cooling issues that previously faced four-cylinder motorcycles. This bike has just one cylinder like the original Saturno and embodies the company’s racing ethos, stressing light-weight and handling.

In the 80s, Gilera was mostly producing a line of offroad-biased singles with a 350cc capacity that were obviously a far cry from their road-racing bikes of the 1950s. At the urging of a Japanese marketing company, they developed a retro-styled sportbike, and that updated Saturno sparked some minor interest worldwide.

In most markets, the Nuovo Saturno was motivated by a liquid-cooled, 491cc version of the company’s four-valve, dual-overhead cam single, although a smaller 350 was available in Japan. In fact, the “Bialbero” designation helps to differentiate the bike from the earlier Saturno and refers to the number of camshafts: two. That engine put out a seemingly unimpressive 44hp, but the complete trellis-framed machine weighted in at a claimed 302lbs dry. That’s 250cc two-stroke territory, with the same claimed peak output and a much broader powerband. Suspension was simple but modern, with 17” Marvic wheels front and rear and a set of Brembo brakes to slow things down. The ‘box has just five speeds, owing to the package’s off-road roots, but the torquey engine should make any gaps easy to ride around.

With just 72 kilometers on the clock, this may be the lowest-mileage Saturno on the planet, and you may be waiting a long time for an example this nice, regardless of miles: these very rarely come up for sale, as Gilera collectors aren’t flavor-of-the-week types. It helps that the Nuovo Saturno was intended for collectors in Japan, and only a few made it to other countries: in 1990, just 50 were imported to the UK.  However, in spite of their rarity, they don’t sell for huge money, making them a reasonable proposition for regular folks who want something out-of-the-ordinary.

From the seller:

Imported in 2016 from Germany. Comes with original German registration and U.S. Customs and Border Protection entry form (Form 7501). This one can be registered and ridden. It is in out of the crate perfect condition.

The Gilera Saturno Bialbero 500 is a motorcycle road made the motorcycle manufacturer Gilera and marketed between 1987 and 1991.

If you’re looking for something rare, affordable, and very fun: these are extremely nimble bikes that would make perfectly lightweight track or racing machines. Asking price is $20k and inquiries can be directed to Gregory Johnston on (631) 537-1486 or via email – here -.

-tad

Featured Listing: Pristine 1990 Gilera Saturno Bialbero with 72kms!
Featured Listing November 1, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: Euro Spec 1994 Honda RVF750R RC45 for Sale

Certainly one of the most sought-after bikes of the 1990s, today’s Featured Listing RVF750R RC45 was the follow up to Honda’s extremely successful VFR750R or RC30. Ultimately, the RC45 didn’t have the same success in racing as their earlier RC30, but it wasn’t for lack of effort. The RC45 was every bit as polished and exotic, and used the same basic formula as the RC30: light and stiff aluminum beam frame, V4 with gear-driven cams, and a single-sided swingarm. The RC45 was powered by a 749cc, 90° V4 with gear-driven cams and the “big bang” firing order that gave the Honda V4s their characteristic sound and improved traction coming out of corners. The cam gears were moved from the center of the engine as is typically seen in motorcycles, including the RC30, to the side of the engine to improve packaging, while sophisticated PGM-FI fuel injection replaced carburetors.

Total displacement of the new V4 was almost identical to the earlier bike to squeeze under the limit for to meet World Superbike regulations, but the bore/stroke were changed significantly from 70 x 48.6mm to 72 x 46mm, making the engine more oversquare to reduce piston speed and increase revs. Titanium connecting rods helped reduce reciprocating mass and magnesium castings kept the overall weight of the engine down, while a slipper clutch helped keep the rear tire from locking up during downshifts.

Showa adjustable suspension components at both ends of the aluminum beam frame kept the odd-size 16″ front wheel and 17″ rear wheel in contact with the ground, with the rear hoop mounted to a distinctive, ELF-developed single-sided swingarm that helped ease wheel changes during endurance racing events. So why didn’t the RC45 match the RC30’s success, particularly in WSBK? Well, the RC30 was incredibly innovative when it was introduced, so perhaps the competition from the other manufacturers had just caught up to Honda. I’ve also heard rumor that the new engine was incredibly difficult for privateers to tune. Regardless, it was still an amazing piece of engineering from Honda, and one of the most desirable superbikes of the era.

From the Seller: Full-Power Euro Spec 1994 Honda RVF750RR RC45 for Sale

This is the very first RC45 model to be brought into South Africa (one of only 3), it was imported brand new. I bought it from a collector and since then have fitted new tyres, chain, battery and had all the fluids replaced. She rides beautifully and sounds eargasmic, note that this is the full power model as noted by the ED demarcation on the PGM-Fi. 34,000km (21,250 miles). All bodywork and the screen is OEM Honda, and the only aftermarket bits are the Yoshi exhaust, and the indicator deletion. (Which are readily available from Honda, and can be arranged). No rust or oxidation due to our favourable, dry climate, and careful storage by myself and the previous owner. Tool kit and paddock stand will be included in the sale.

A rare opportunity to own, ride and enjoy the ultimate 90s superbike. A reasonable asking price of $35,000 includes free shipping and crating to any location, worldwide. Please contact Justin via email justin@redladder.co.za

Just 200 were made worldwide, making this a very rare machine. The mileage isn’t barn-find-low, but Hondas are built to last and this still appears to be a very sharp machine. Keep in mind that these are incredibly rare, finding the parts and an experienced specialist to refresh your 0-mile RC45 could be a real headache. This one looks ready to ride and enjoy!

-tad

Featured Listing: Euro Spec 1994 Honda RVF750R RC45 for Sale
Suzuki October 29, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Tastefully Modified Smoker: 1993 Suzuki RGV250Γ VJ22 for Sale

Two-stroke sportbikes of the late 1980s and early 1990s followed a very similar format: aluminum beam frame, full fairing, racy ergonomics, and a small two-stroke powerplants packing cutting-edge technology and serious power per cubic inch. But the formula wasn’t really the result of a lack of imagination, it was convergent evolution: the class was ruthlessly competitive, and every component of bikes like the Suzuki RGV250Γ was maximized for performance and minimal weight.

Early on, the quarter-liter two-stroke class saw a variety of configurations: longitudinal and transverse parallel-twins, v-twins… But as time went on, Honda, Yamaha, and Suzuki all moved to a v-twin. The original RG250 used a parallel-twin, but by the time of the RGV, the engine was a liquid-cooled, 90° two-stroke v-twin that displaced 249cc, along with a six-speed gearbox, a package that was also used to motivate Aprilia’s RS250.

Naturally, all of the bikes in the class used some form of expansion chamber to help increase the peaky little two-stroke’s flexibility. In the case of the Suzuki, it was their SAPC or “Suzuki Advanced Power Control,” an electronically-controlled power valve and ignition-timing system. An asymmetrical swingarm with a pronounced curve on the right side allowed for the bulging expansion chambers on that side, and the second generation VJ22 version of the RGV250 used 17″ wheels at both ends, meaning you should be able to find good, modern rubber to shoe your whippy little sportbike.

The SAPC graphics and bodywork are very 90s, but upper fairing on this example isn’t stock: normally, the VJ22 has a large, trapezoidal unit in the center of the bike, as opposed to the more cat-eyed style, asymmetrical design seen here. It’s probably meant to evoke an endurance-racing machine of the era, since they often swapped the stock twin-lamp setups for single lights.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Suzuki RGV250 VJ22 for Sale

1993 Suzuki RGV250 custom with only 10,816 kilometers (6,720 miles). This RGV is gorgeous! Bike is in excellent condition with just a few scratches and blemishes you would expect to find on a used bike. There is a small rub mark on the left side frame down by the foot shift lever and scratches on the right side lower fairing towards the bottom. However there are no cracks in the fairings and no dents in the tank. Bike is really clean and has great curb appeal. All fairings are 100% genuine Suzuki factory OEM except for the custom upper cowling. I don’t normally buy custom bikes but this one is special. The custom single headlight look with the wide front fairing looks awesome! The previous owner changed the rear sprocket 4 teeth down for a higher top speed and added a Sugaya full exhaust system for a few more ponies and awesome racing sound. Original OEM sprocket and OEM exhaust chambers and silencers come with the bike so you can go back to stock if you like. The color looks black indoors but the true color comes out when you take the bike out into the sunlight. It is actually blue metallic and the paint really comes alive outside in the sun. Pictures don’t do it justice. Bike runs excellent and will arrive with new fluids. Bike comes with a Utah state title and is titled as a street bike for road use. $200 deposit due immediately after sale ends thru PayPal. Remaining balance due within 5 business days by bank wire, cash or check. Please text 801-358-6537 for more pictures or questions. 

We’ve featured bikes from this seller’s collection in the past and, as a group, they’ve been very nicely preserved examples of various rare Japanese sportbikes, and there’s no reason to expect this would be an exception. Purists might give the aftermarket headlight setup and exhaust the side-eye, but they’re pretty cool updates to what is, in most markets, a pretty commonly available machine. And the bike is priced well, with a $6,750 Buy It Now price!

-tad

Tastefully Modified Smoker: 1993 Suzuki RGV250Γ VJ22 for Sale
Moto Guzzi October 24, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Before It Was Cool: 1991 Moto Guzzi 1000S for Sale

In 1991, “retros” weren’t really a thing yet. Kawasaki was dipping a toe in with their Zephyr, and Honda’s GB500 had been around for a bit. Both bombed here in the USA, where chromed, raked-out cruisers or hard-core sportbikes represented both the impractical, polar extremes and the majority of the market. But it was pretty easy for Moto Guzzi to whip up a retro of their own in the 1000S with very minimal investment or risk, since they’d basically been making variations of the same bike since the 1970s…

The bike already had handling sewn up: Lino Tonti’s brilliant V7 Sport frame still worked just fine for anything other than a full-on sportbike, pretty high praise since the bike was introduced in the early 1970s. Decent suspension helped riders take full advantage of the new Guzzi’s capabilities, and a pair of 18″ wheels helped it look every inch the classic cafe racer. The triple disc brakes were strong, and had the benefit of the company’s simple and proven linked braking system. Some purists hate it, but the system works well.

Into that twin-shock frame, Guzzi fitted the latest 949cc iteration of their two-valve, pushrod v-twin and five-speed gearbox, and their typical shaft drive transferred power to the rear wheel. It’s not going to win races, but the twin’s 82hp at 8,000 and 76 ft-lbs of torque are enough to push the 475lb 1000S to just under 130mph. Bikes made in 1993 switched to smaller valves to improve midrange torque and provide better emissions, but reduced power to 71hp at 6,800rpm.

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Moto Guzzi 1000S for Sale

This one is the Big Valve model
It has a little over 35k miles,
It runs excellent, just needs a new home.
Tires are like brand new, looks amazing.
The bike still has its original paint.
There are some scratches in the paint on the side covers.

Only 1,360 were built and fewer than 200 made it to the U.S. between 1991 and 1993.

35,000 miles?! That’s barely broken in, when you’re talking about a Guzzi! The seller’s $17,800 asking price is a bit higher than examples we’ve seen in the past, but Guzzis have continued to creep up in value, and just a few hundred were imported to the US.

-tad

Before It Was Cool: 1991 Moto Guzzi 1000S for Sale