Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Triumph February 17, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Mad About Saffron: 2000 Triumph Daytona 955i for Sale

This Triumph always makes me think of that classic Donovan song: "I'm just mad about Saffron, she's just mad about me, they call me Mellow Yellow [quite rightly]" Honestly, it isn't exactly mellow, but the Daytona 955i does look great in this pretty wild shade of yellow. It helps that the overall styling is simple and elegant, and there are no graphics to date the bike, but it's still hard to believe this thing is nearly 20 years old now, and I think it's one of the best-looking bikes of the period.

Designed as a road bike first and foremost, the 955i wasn't intended to go head-to-head with sports multis from Japan. Which is a good thing, because in the rigorous instrumented testing that has always been popular for comparison tests when bikes are new, they blew the Triumph into the weeds. But while bench-racing and dyno comparisons may help sell the latest and greatest sportbikes and do offer an unbiased way to compare different machines, they don't tell the whole story: then, as now, the Daytona is an excellent sportbike.

Back in the 90s Triumph made the calculated decision not to pitch their bike directly against the Japanese supertbike offerings. They knew they just didn't have the resources to develop a bike that weighed less than, make more power than, or would turn laptimes within 1/10th of a second of them, so they went ahead and just made a pretty great all-around sportbike oriented towards the road. It's a bit heavier, the riding position a bit more humane, the powerband more midrange-oriented, and the suspension just a little bit softer. All that meant the bike wasn't the greatest at turning a hot lap, but a higher build-quality and timeless looks mean it's a great bike for 95% of sportbike pilots, and those remaining 5% could ride the bike well enough

The original Daytona was available in three and four-cylinder versions, but only the triple got the nod for a redesign in 1997 seen here. It was redesigned in 2001 with a single, modern headlamp and a lighter, stiffer double-sided swingarm. That updated bike was much improved, but I prefer this earlier design, with the double headlight and the single-sided swingarm. This one appears to be in good condition, but miles aren't especially low. The bike has the very cool undertail exhaust that several companies made for these when they were new, although I understand the official factory performance exhaust upgrade was the way to go for real improvements across the board.

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Triumph 955i for Sale

This super bike is da BombDigity! It’s a real peach with only 21, 254 miles since birth. This machine is NOT for wimps or sissy-boys. When you grab the throttle on this 955cc, three cylinder throttle monster it’ll cause your ass to grab to seat OR… you just fall off. This monster comes with Triumph stock Brembo brakes on both tires. Speaking of tires these rubbers are brand new. Heck… wearing these rubbers just mike keep you safe in a Ron Jeremy movie starring Stormy Daniels. Remember what is was like to grab ahold of something and twist it and KNOW your day just got better? Well... This is the machine that will do that for you. This beast is fuel injected with an aftermarket Trident dual pipe under the seat. It already has the Battery Tender terminals attached to the batter so you can keep that battery fresh and ready to fire all year long. On a serious note though this example has never been track ridden and has only had two adult owners. This 2001 Triumph Daytona 955i is the bike that everyone wants to talk about and everyone loves to hear. 

This beast breathes through a larger, non-ram-air-equipped airbox with 46mm throttle bodies that feed a redesigned CNC-machined cylinder head featuring 1mm larger intake and 1mm smaller exhaust valves sitting at a narrow 23-degree included valve angle. New forged-aluminum pistons force a 12.0:1 compression ratio (over the previous 11.2:1 ratio), sitting atop stronger carburized connecting rods and a lighter crankshaft. This 955i pumps out somewhere in the neighborhood of 125 rear-wheel horsepower. On a dyno run that number bore with an impressive 128 hp at 10,500 rpm showing. The rear wheel is hung on a single-sided swing arm making for a killer look for sure.

The 955cc triple has no problem pulling the tall lower gears due to its stupendous amount of low and midrange torque. Big power starts at 4000 rpm (any lower than that requires a smooth throttle hand), launching the Daytona forward through the rev band like a locomotive on crystal meth; revs climb even quicker once the tach hits 7500 rpm, spinning up far faster than the old T595 ever could. The power continues to build up top, with the Triumph's distinct exhaust timbre accompanying the blurring scenery.

The Triumph Daytona 955i can make time with the best of Japanese track weapons through the curves; it just generates its acceleration in a slightly less frantic manner. Despite the claims of a lighter crankshaft, the 955i still has a lot of flywheel effect. This can be a boon for riders less accustomed to the precise throttle control and gearbox manipulation necessary with a typical four-cylinder. Throttle application isn't as critical, and sweeping turns where momentum is key allow you to showcase the Triumph's stomping midrange. 

The best part of this bike is its near V-twin torque and low/midrange grunt with a four-cylinder's screaming top end. The 955i is very deceptive in how it generates its speed. The gearing, especially in the lower cogs, is tall enough that the motor's relatively loping gait fools you into thinking you aren't really traveling that fast... until the next corner comes up. That tall gearing, however, when combined with the heavy flywheel effect, means care must be taken with downshifts during corner entries in the tighter stuff to avoid rear wheel hop.

If you’d like to come by and test ride this bike you must have in your possession a non-expired license with a motorcycle endorsement, you must have the full asking price of $5500USD in cash and you must let me hold the cash, your license and the keys to the vehicle you arrive in while you do the test ride.

Does anyone actually say "da BombDigity" anymore? Questionable taste in slang aside, this is a pretty great description of the bike, although the front brakes are Triumph-branded and not Brembo units. The seller does include the picture above showing damage to the tank with no explanation, and the scratch is gone in the other pictures, so it's worth a message to the seller before bidding, considering he's asking premium money for this one: the asking price is on the high side for a Daytona of this vintage at $6,500. Daytonas are especially appealing on the used market and offer pretty great value: they look great, have plenty of performance for all but the most hardcore road-racers, are reasonably reliable, and have been dirt-cheap for years now, although that's bound to change sooner or later.

-tad

Honda February 13, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Affordable Cult Classic: 1988 Honda Hawk GT for Sale

Styled like a Japanese Ducati Monster, Honda's Hawk GT actually beat that bike to market by several years. It may have lacked a bit of sex appeal, but offered incredible versatility, reliability, and even some steering lock... The Hawk could scratch, commute, do some light-duty touring and, with a bit of work, made a great basis for a race bike. They've been extremely affordable for a while now, since they never really found an audience here in the US and are a bit too practical to be considered sexy, but fans love them, and low mileage examples like this one are pretty hard to find.

It was built around a simple, reliable 647cc 52° v-twin engine with liquid-cooling and three valves per cylinder. It was so reliable, in fact, it would go on to power thousands and thousands of Honda's shaft-drive Revere and Deauville touring bikes. Hardly the most inspiring legacy, but it could push the little Hawk GT, also known as the NT650 in some markets and the Bros 650 in Japan, to a top speed of 107mph.

But the Hawk GT, aka NT650 aka Bros 650 had another designation: the RC31 and Honda's competition legacy is visible if you look. Out back is the bike's party piece, a Elf-Racing Pro-Arm single-sided swingarm. The front end had just one disc brake, but the bike's relatively light 393lb dry weight meant stopping was adequate outside a race track, and a CBR600 front end with adjustable forks and an extra front disc and caliper is a popular swap.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Honda Hawk GT for Sale

1988 Honda Hawk 650 Low miles in mint condition. The Honda Hawk is the perfect choice for a low cost, fun good looking and reliable motorcycle. Single sided swing arm like its more expensive brother (RC30) and an excellent reliable power plant that is sure to give you more than ample power for every day use. You will be hard pressed to find a cleaner example of a bike that is 30 plus years old. Please feel free to call with any questions or for more information on this great machine.  Call  215 630 5952

It's unfortunate the seller doesn't include more pictures, but they are at least of high quality. There's plenty of time left on the auction, with no bids yet at the $3,500 starting bid. These can typically be had for that number or less, although condition and the mere 4,000 miles mean this might still get snapped up by Honda collectors, since that's still peanuts to pay for such a fun, reliable bike.

-tad

Affordable Cult Classic: 1988 Honda Hawk GT for Sale
Ducati February 9, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 2008 Ducati 1098S for Sale

Made for just a couple years between 2007 and 2009, the Ducati 1098 was a more conservative approach to their top-flight superbike after the radically-styled 999 threatened to upset Ducati's apple cart. It's almost like the bikes were released out of order, and that the 1098 should have been the direct successor Tamburini's 916, as it had the same slab-sided bodywork, undertail exhaust, single-sided swingarm, and side-by-side headlights. Today's Featured Listing 1098S is typical of many Ducatis, in that it's been lovingly maintained, has low miles, and has had an entire catalog of aftermarket parts thrown at it.

So the 1098 was introduced to reinvigorate Ducati's superbike fortunes and the bike indeed proved very popular and sold well, so why was the bike only made between 2007 and 2009? Well rules changes in WSBK conveniently allowed an increase in displacement to 1200cc and the 1098 was quickly succeeded by the 1198 that displaced... 1198cc. In the early days of World Superbike, v-twins got a decent displacement advantage that kept them approximately equal to the inline fours that had 25% less displacement. But with the inline fours allowed a full 1000cc for the 2007 season, Ducati had to work hard to stay competitive, and there was a noticeable jump in power between the 999 and the 1098, from 138 to 160hp, with the new bike punching out a stout 90 lb-ft of torque.

Ergonomics took a bit of a backward step from the surprisingly user-friendly 999's adjustable seat and pegs, but you do have to suffer for art... This example, as stated earlier, has had a raft of aftermarket parts thrown at it, most notably a set of full carbon-fiber bodywork, including the tank. That's not a wrap, it's actual carbon fiber, thoughtfully lined to prevent damage from modern gas that seems to particularly plague Ducatis of this era. The entire, detailed list can be seen at the end of the seller's listing.

From the Seller: 2008 Ducati 1098S for Sale

Gentlemen's Express: DUCATI 1098S Full Carbon, Low Miles, Perfect Condition!

My Ducati 1098S Show bike is available for sale. It has been a prized part of my collection, but it’s time to move on to a new platform. This bike is exceptional in every way.  Stunning full carbon body and tank, Galfer Superbike Racing Brakes, Driven Racing Quick Change Sprockets, and much, much more!

The modifications to this bike were targeted in three areas; weight reduction, aesthetics and performance.

This bike draws a crowd everywhere it goes.  Extremely well cared for with full maintenance performed every winter. An impeccable machine with outstanding performance. It’s what all sports bikes should be, and given the extreme weight reduction it went through it still competes with today’s current sports bikes! There was a liberal use of titanium bolts (caliper bolts, rotor bolts, fender bolts etc., and the entire rear racing drive is all aluminum. The bike sits on two new brand new Michelin Pilot Tires and has the Ducati Racing ECU.

With less than 7800 miles, its just broken in. Everything works as it should, you will not be disappointed adding this to your collection or as a rider! This bike was over $35,000 to build (pretax), and comes complete with a Bursig Paddock Stand! All maintenance was just completed (as was done every winter) and is shown below along with the build list.  No rock chips, dings dents or scratches. It also has two Tec mounts – one for radar and one for a cell phone. Currently set up for an Escort 360 Radar unit and Smart Phone Blue Tooth Interface. The radar unit is not included. 

This bike has always been adult ridden, never wheelied (but it wants to), never down, has never seen rain never been raced or tracked.

Anyone that knows this generation of Ducati knows how beautifully the body flows. The exhausts sound awesome as does the open dry clutch. And the braking system is literally being used on superbikes across the country today.

The bike is available for inspection and pick up in East Texas (Tyler) or pickup at our performance shop in Dallas. We will also help prepare the bike for your shipper at your expense. We can recommend a great one we use for domestic white glove shipping, door to door.

Please note an immediate deposit of $500 is due upon purchase with full payment made within 5 business days. 

Serious parties only, please. If you want to discuss the bike, or arrange a viewing, send me a note with your phone number and name and I will contact you that day or feel free to call at (214) 585-3354. 

Thank you for looking, and happy eBaying! 

1098S Maintenance Completed Includes:

  • New Timing Belts $104.64
  • Changed Oil & Filter $42.00
  • Changed Filter $19.95
  • Changed Front Fork Seals $86.53
  • Changed Front Fork Oil $32.00
  • Changed Air Filter $58.99
  • Changed Coolant $28.00
  • New Front and Rear Tires $462.00
  • Replaced Rear Axle Hub with NOS $700.00
  • Changed Brake Fluid [Front and Rear] $24.00
  • Check Steering Head Bearings $0.00
  • Check Swingarm Bearings $0.00
  • Check Wheel Bearings $0.00
  • New Shift Return Springs $39.00
  • New Lightweight Battery $119.00
  • Fresh Dry Clutch Plates and Springs $368.00
  • Valve Stems $38.00
  • Shop Labor $821.00
  • Total $2,943.11

Upgrades Include:

  • New Galfer Superbike Rotors [Front] $812.00
  • New Galfer Superbike Rotor [Rear] $119.00
  • New Ferodo Carbon Ceramic Pads [Front and Rear] $211.00
  • Replaced Brake Lines with New Spiegler Thin-Wall Stainless $174.95
  • New Full Carbon Fiber Upper Cowl $599.00
  • New Carbon Fiber Side Panels $618.00
  • New Carbon Fiber Lower Cowl $299.00
  • New Carbon Fiber V Panel $111.00
  • Carbon Fiber Chain Guard $119.00
  • Carbon Fiber Rear Fender $106.00
  • New Carbon Fiber Solo Seat $439.00
  • New Carbon Fiber Rear Draft Panel $132.00
  • New Carbon Fiber Front Draft Panel $89.00
  • Carbon/Kevlar Fuel Tank $2,600.00
  • New Carbon Fiber Side Panels $185.00
  • New Carbon Fiber Heat Shields $85.00
  • Caswell Tank Seal to Protect Tank From Ethanol $54.99
  • New Puig Smoked Windscreen $92.50
  • New Puig Aluminum Screen Bolts $22.00
  • Full Dzus Quick-Release Body Fasteners $105.00
  • Puig 2.0 Short/Folding/Adjustable Control Levers $237.00
  • Rizoma Superbike Grips $112.00
  • Rizoma Frame Plugs $69.00
  • Ducabike Folding/Fully Adjustable Rearsets $580.00
  • Carbon Fiber Shift Rod $58.00
  • CNC Racing Carbon Fiber Racing Gas Cap $218.00
  • Ducati Corsa/Race ECU Flash $500.00
  • Termignoni Carbon Fiber Exhaust $854.00
  • Saddlemen Gel Seat $209.00
  • Ducabike Hydraulic Reservoir Covers $86.00
  • 520 GP Chain $189.00
  • New Driven Racing Quick Change Sprocket Carrier $219.00
  • New Driven Racing Rear Sprocket $89.00
  • New Rental Front Sprocket $54.00
  • Changed Gearing to 17/39 $0.00
  • New Aluminum Flange Race Cover $119.00
  • Chain Case Saver $39.00
  • Carbon Sprocket Cover $86.00
  • Black Billet Clutch Cover $129.00
  • Sprocket and Carrier Aluminum Nuts $98.00
  • Aluminum Front Axle Nut $36.00
  • Rear Aluminum Axle Nuts $89.00
  • Aluminum Flange Cone $64.00
  • ProTi 64 Titanium Rotor Bolts [Front and Rear] $119.00
  • ProTi 64 Banjo Bolts on Calipers $69.00
  • ProTi 64 Caliper Bolts [Front and Rear] $99.00
  • ProTi 64 Keyguard Bolts $39.00
  • Tech Mount Radar Mount $189.00
  • Tech Mount Cell Phone Mount $139.00
  • Escort 360 Radar $599.00
  • Skeletonized Fork Preload Adjusters $39.00
  • Fender Eliminator/Plate Mount Kit $119.00
  • Integrated Tail/Turn Light $89.00
  • Battery Tender Pigtail $6.99
  • Ducati Performance LED Mirrors $206.00
  • Bursig Paddock Stand $599.00
  • Shop Labor $3,500.00
  • Shop Supplies $72.00
  • Build Expenditure $16,991.43
  • Base Bike $18,000.00
  • Pretax Cost $34,991.43

The asking price for this very well-documented machine is a cool $25,000. But if you're looking for something truly one-of-a-kind, this 1098S should be almost as fast and less likely to kill you, with or without traction control.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2008 Ducati 1098S for Sale
Ducati February 9, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

#388 of 400: 2002 Ducati 998S Bayliss Replica for Sale

Ducati's lineup of superbikes has long included three main tiers: the "entry-level" exotic standard version, the S-version that generally includes some trim and suspension updates, and the homologation R-version, that is sometimes a step up from the S, and sometimes an altogether different beast entirely... The most desirable bikes are most often the R-version, but when you make 400 examples of the Troy Bayliss replica 998S, you create something that combines the power and dynamics of the very best of the 916 era bikes with racing heritage.

The 998 was the end of the line for the iconic Tamburini-designed four-valve superbike that began with the 916, itself an evolution of the earlier 851 and 888. And although there is some parts interchangeability between the 916, 996, and 998, they represent a pretty significant evolution of the platform that's much more than skin-deep. Bodywork appears largely unchanged, although subtle massaging of the shape between generations is noticeable if you look closely. In the 998, it was redesigned to fit the new frame originally used in the 996R, and allow different airflow to the reworked cooling system.

Most significantly, the 998 saw the widespread introduction of the narrow-angle "Testastretta" engine originally seen in the 996R for a big boost to performance. "Narrow-angle" doesn't refer to the angle between the cylinders, which remained at Ducati's traditional 90° for perfect primary balance. Instead, the Testastretta engine featured new, more compact and efficient cylinder heads with a reduced included valve angle of 25°, down from 40°, along with bigger valves, larger pistons, more aggressive cams, and shower-type fuel injectors. The result was a claimed 123hp in the regular 998, up from 112 in the 996, with an increase to 136 for the 998S.

From the original eBay listing: 2002 Ducati 998S Bayliss Replica for Sale

Offered for sale is this stunning 2002 Ducati 998S Baylis #388 of only 400 made.

Built as a tribute to Troy Bayliss' 2001 WSB Championship, this 998S is in incredible condition and recently serviced.

Only 2200 miles!

Virtually stock with an Arrow exhaust, levers, Sargent seat, integrated turn signals and open carbon clutch cover with pressure plate.

A rare opportunity to own a classic. These 998's are as amazing in person as they looks in pictures.

Clean title as always.

Bayliss was a popular rider, but this particular race-replica graphics scheme is a bit bland to my eye, the kind of thing you could replicate on a box-stock 998 with Photoshop and a good quality printer. It's almost too authentic race-bike, in that it's a rolling billboard first and foremost. 916s and 996s have dipped pretty low in terms of values and seem to be on an upswing, but the 998 was never really very cheap. It was still being produced when the... controversial 999 was introduced, and many people seem to have been aware that they'd eventually be considered collectible. This one's $17,450 asking price is more in line with one of Ducati's R-model bikes, but extremely limited production and low miles make it a very desirable bike.

-tad

#388 of 400: 2002 Ducati 998S Bayliss Replica for Sale
Featured Listing January 31, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: Street-Titled 2018 Kawasaki H2R for Sale

There is obviously no practical reason to own a 300hp, track-only motorcycle that isn’t eligible for any racing series of which I’m aware. Maybe something involving quarter miles and ETs? Reviewers of the Kawasaki H2R generally don’t even seem to regard the bike as a particularly good track-day weapon: it’s just too heavy, and that fat rear tire needed to keep the power on tap from going up in smoke slows steering significantly. So you can’t race it, it's almost too fast for track-day antics, likely eats tires like they’re free donuts at a sales meeting, and you can’t ride it on the street… or can you? Apparently, you can, with a bit of DMV chicanery, since this Featured Listing Kawasaki H2R comes with a street title!

The original H2 from the 1970s seemingly has nothing in common with this iteration, other than the name: it was an unfaired, upright machine with handlebars and a long, Schwinn-style "banana" seat that was powered by a two-stroke triple, while the new bike has room for just one and is powered by a supercharged 998cc inline four. But the spirit is there in spades, since both bikes were about speed, speed, and more speed, and all other considerations be damned.

People often forget that there were two different versions of the H2 when the name was resurrected by Kawasaki: the regular road bike and the H2R seen here. The regular bike is a… regular bike: it has the usual turn signals, mirrors, and a really cool projector-beam headlamp in the center of the fairing that looks like it shoots some sort of death-ray. It also made a claimed 200hp, which is impressive, until you consider that Ducati’s V4 Panigale makes well north of that, and even several of the v-twin Panigales got shockingly close. BMW’s S1000RR, Aprilia’s RSV4, and most of the other liter bikes hover around 200hp as well.

And all that power is dulled a bit by the bike’s 475lb wet weight, which is significantly higher than those bikes. Of course, the Kawasaki still has a massive midrange hit of supercharged torque, but on paper, the literbike brigade makes the regular H2 look… a bit regular, although I'm reliably informed it's anything but in practice. But it doesn't matter anyway, because this isn’t the regular H2.

The H2R upped the game by saving weight by deleting the lighting and mirrors, replacing them with some extremely expensive carbon-fiber winglets to increase downforce, a set of slicks, and 35psi of boost. The increased positive pressure results in 300 claimed horses that announce their arrival through a stunningly gorgeous and deafeningly loud titanium exhaust that will require earplugs for your unborn descendants: the H2R is so loud that Performance Bikes Magazine wasn't even able to test one in the UK, as it wouldn't meet the dB limits at any track in the country.

It's also worth noting this H2R benefits from the most recent electronic revisions from Kawasaki in 2017 including an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and autoblipper. Cosmetically it has updated upper wings and the "matte mirror" paint.

From the Seller: 2018 Kawasaki H2R for Sale

For sale is a 2018 Kawasaki Ninja H2R, complete with a clean street title in hand. The H2R only has 60 miles on the clock, and hasn't been rode enough to register even one hour on the service interval tracker (it tracks based on time spent above 8000 rpm). Bike was broken in per Kawasaki's specs on a dyno, at which point it was immediately serviced at the dealer. I took it out for a few minutes on the track and otherwise it has sat on front and rear stands plugged into a battery tender.
Includes all original accessories: front and rear OEM stands, Chicken Hawk tire warmers, and Dr. Beasley's wax kit. Also includes one unused front tire and three rears (OEM-spec Bridgestone slicks), complete with spare rear wheel (you'll need it for a track weekend!). The bodywork has been completely ceramic coated and the edges of the lower wings have a clear film on them for protection.
This is a tremendous bike and is virtually new, with the added benefit of a street title so you can easily turn around and take it on the street rather than wait for the next track day.
Regarding pricing, because H2Rs are so fantastically rare and streetable H2Rs even moreso, I find it difficult to put a price on it. I am not desperate to sell, but I've had a few opportunities come up, so I'd like to see if anyone is interested in one of the most incredible bikes out there that is only some tires and a mirror away from being street-legal.
For perspective on rarity, the VIN number on this bike ends in 10. I was told by a Kawasaki rep that Kawasaki skips VIN number 1, and this was the last 2018 H2R built worldwide. Unfortunately this is purely anecdotal but if you look for photos of H2Rs, there are so few images of them with the 2017+ revised wing design that it is not hard to believe.
Located in Indiana, USA but am happy to cooperate to find shipping within the US. Please send all offers or inquiries to StreetH2R18@gmail.com

This isn’t the first H2R we’ve seen with a street title, so it can’t be all that difficult to manage, assuming you don’t live in California or New York. I’m assuming it has a normal VIN to help things along, and this has been done in the past with the Ducati SPS, which apparently wasn’t road-legal either, but came with lights and signals and a VIN, making it more of a, “Of course you’re not going to ride this very fast, very loud exotic racing motorcycle on the road, even though it has headlights and turn signals and treaded tires…” [wink, wink] Obviously, do your homework if you intend to buy it and actually use it on the street, as your local DMV may have some problems with this one, depending on where you live. But other than that, I love the idea of an over-the-top track-day weapon you can use to commute to work on Fridays.

-tad
Featured Listing: Street-Titled 2018 Kawasaki H2R for Sale
Suzuki January 31, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

2FAST4U: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

The seller isn't mincing words here in the listing for this Suzuki GSX-R1100: "This is no poverty sale so low ballers and under 10 feedback stay away... this is too much bike for you."  So apparently if your eBay feedback is low or you like to grind someone for a good deal, a 30 year old motorcycle with 138hp is too much to handle? Good to know. Luckily, I'm not much of a haggler, so I'm sure I'll be fine trying to wrestle this beast through a set of corners.

Of course, rumor is that the K-Model GSX-R1100 was too much for anyone to handle, but not because of the power: handling wasn't the best and both Phil Mellor and Jamie Whitham crashed riding the GSX-R1100K at the Isle of Man TT in 1989, resulting in a ban of big bikes for years afterward. Some people blamed the bike's geometry, some the suspension setup, and many different fixes and parts combinations have been tried to sort out the bike's handling woes, but the bike maintained its reputation as a heavy, ill-handling brute, which ironically has probably helped the bike's mystique, considering similar Yamaha FZR1000s go for much less at the moment.

At 462lbs dry, it wasn't the heaviest GSX-R1100, but it's pretty portly. Personally, I think it's the best-looking version of the big Suzuki, and this iteration of the bike are sometimes known as "Slingshots" in reference to the semi-flat-slide Mikuni carburetors, although I've seen them off the bike and disassembled and I still can't see anything that looks like a slingshot in there.

These days the GSX-R1100's handling shouldn't be a problem, considering the kind of riding the new owner is likely to do on it. The bike has plenty of straight-line speed and stability for weekend blasts, you just want to make sure you plan ahead and don't try to change lines mid-corner. Certainly, it's not lacking in power: the K-Model was powered by the 1127cc version of Suzuki's inline four, still with oil-cooling. That beast of a motor, aside from the styling, is probably the primary reason for buying a "Slingshot" GSX-R1100.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

1989 GSXR 1100. Well kept killer bike. New tires ,brakes , clutch, carbs just redone. Paint is showroom cond. 200psi in all cylinders. This is when bikes were bikes. Very rare to see in this cond. top seat pad has some delamination, Top tree is a little dull from keys (common). XL jacket inc, with stand, 1000.00 bonus. This is no poverty sale so low ballers and under 10 feedback please don't bid. The pics say it all!

1989 GSXR 1100. Well kept killer bike. New  tires, brakes , clutch, carbs just redone. Paint is showroom cond. 200psi in all cylinders. This is when bikes were bikes. Very rare to see in this cond. top seat pad has some delamination, top tree is a little dull from keys (common). XL jacket inc, with stand, 1000.00 bonus. This is no poverty sale so low ballers and under 10 feedback stay away... this is too much bike for you. The pics say it all

It's a shame about the picture quality on this listing, since it looks like it's in pretty good shape and, with 21,000 miles, is pretty much just broken in. Bidding is up to $3,250 with another six days left on the auction, so dive in and take a chance, or maybe request some betting images from the seller!

-tad