Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Featured Listing May 22, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 1989 Kawasaki Ninja GPX750R for Sale

Kawasaki’s ZX-7R is finally getting its due and clean, low-mile examples are getting pretty hard to find anywhere near the rock-bottom prices they fetched not too long ago. Older, 1970s and early 1980s Kawis like the KZ1000R have found their collectible niche as well. But the mid-1980s bikes like this Ninja GPX750R have been a bit too new for the classic fans, and too old for anyone into superbikes with more modern looks. So maybe now is the time to start looking for one to add to your collection?

The Ninja name always seemed a little… silly to me, but I’m obviously wrong because Kawasaki still has a bunch of them in their lineup. GPz900R Ninja introduced in 1984 packed a big engine into a lightweight, round tube steel chassis and was very popular, with a great mix of handling and straight line performance. In 1984, Kawasaki took the GPz900’s chassis and dropped a 750cc into it to create the GPz750, a bike with well-rounded and competent but unexciting performance, compared to bikes like the GSX-R750.

An improved engine in 1987 led to the bike seen here, the GPX750R that was available until 1991, depending on the market. That means it would have been available alongside the ZX-7R in some places, long after the GPX would have been considered cutting-edge. Power came from a 748cc sixteen-valve inline four with liquid-cooling and a six-speed gearbox, and the package was good for 141mph. Mechanical anti-dive forks worked well enough, although they and the air-shock out back are obviously not as sophisticated as modern examples. The 16″ front and 18″ rear wheel combo date the bike somewhat, but you still should be able to find decent rubber to fit.

Ultimately, the GPz and GPX750R represent a bit of an in-between stage for Kawasaki, which may be why they’re a bit forgotten today. Performance was perfectly adequate for the class, but they didn’t have exciting new technology or class-leading power. Style isn’t quite Top Gun classic like the GPz900R or World Superbike classic like the ZX-7R, but the GPX750R is supposedly a great bike to ride. If you’re a collector, or just feeling nostalgic, this could be a great candidate. Miles are very low, with a mere 6,065 on the odometer, and overall condition is excellent. There are a few minor blemishes clearly shown in the seller’s photos as you can see from the gallery included.

From the Seller’s eBay listing: 1989 Kawasaki Ninja GPX750R for Sale

At One-Up Moto Garage (https://www.oneupmoto.com) I have high standards for condition and I would rate this Ninja cosmetically 9.5/10 and mechanically 10/10. I am the second owner, the original owner put 95% of the miles on it (totaling just over 6,000). Since day one it has been stored indoors with a bike cover, so it has no sun fading, rust or corrosion. I took pictures of every little chip and blemish I could find on the bike. The tires are nearly new, and carbs were addressed with new float bowl gaskets a few months ago. Not because they were leaking, I just wanted to see how the insides looked- and it was like new (I can send pics upon request). Gas tank also looks new inside. The bike starts easy, runs and rides flawlessly. It has never had ethanol gas in it. Everything feels like new on it, throttle cable is smooth, hydraulics are firm, all switches are tight and snappy.

It spends most of its time in my showroom with the battery tended, I ride it once every few weeks to keep things moving. You won’t be disappointed with this bike! I can send a start, run, and ride video upon request. I can also give you the whole life story of the bike going back to its original sale in Arkansas in 1990. 

Bikes we’ve traditionally considered “classics” are wonderful, but require that you temper your expectations: 1950s motorcycles require more attention and maintenance, have much less power, sketchier handling, and brakes that won’t hold a candle to what even a Ninja 300 can provide these days. The best thing about a bike like this Ninja GPX750R is that it straddles the classic and modern eras. It may not have ABS and an autoblipper, or make 200hp at the rear wheel, and you won’t be able to fit the very best rubber but bikes like this offer good comfort, reliability, and plenty of performance to handle the cut-and-thrust of modern traffic, all while helping you relive your lost youth.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1989 Kawasaki Ninja GPX750R for Sale
KTM May 16, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Gives You Wings: 2010 KTM RC8R Red Bull Edition for Sale

I’m not always a fan of race-replica graphics, but it’s hard to argue that some just look right: Rothmans and Repsol Hondas in particular just drip with style and authenticity. KTM’s RC8R lends itself to wild graphics as well, since it’s anything but restrained, even in regular production colors. Even slathered in all-black aftermarket carbon fiber, it still isn’t subtle. It just looks like a low-flying F-117… Love the looks or hate them, it’s pretty impressive how well the look of the bike has aged, aside from the simple LCD dash: anyone not familiar with the KTM could easily be forgiven for thinking it’s a brand-new bike.

Unfortunately, the nice ones that have come up for sale in recent years have often had asking prices not far off that of a brand-new bike. Which is ironic, since they didn’t sell very well when new, and managed to make that unusual move from slow-selling lame duck to modern classic in one jump. Certainly, the performance specifications are there: introduced in 2008, the bike was powered by a 75° v-twin that originally displaced 1148cc. Much-needed gearbox improvements were made and displacement was increased to 1195cc for the 2010 model, with an output of 175hp and an impressive 90 ft-lbs of torque.

Adjustable ergonomics made for a surprisingly versatile sportbike that could be set up to do a bit of light touring or hard-core trackday riding after just a few minutes fiddling with some tools. One thing you’ll notice that’s missing: a sophisticated electronics package. The RC8R was introduced on the cusp on the modern sportbike electronics revolution and, although traction control and the like were fairly primitive at first, they were undeniably effective, and have only become more refined over the past decade. And unfortunately, the RC8R didn’t have them.

The Akrapovič and Red Bull Editions celebrate the RC8R’s racing efforts, but the company had limited success in that arena: perhaps owing to the roadbike’s limited sales, KTM didn’t bother to develop the RC8’s electronics to allow it to compete on equal terms with the superbikes from other manufacturers. Which is a shame: it was a blast to watch Chris Fillmore roar down the main straight at NJMP back in 2011, the lone v-twin fighting a losing battle against a field full of inline fours… It is apparently possible to fit the updated engine and electronics from the current Super Duke R into the RC8R, but it’s not nearly as easy as you’d think and not a project for the casual wrench-turner.

From the original eBay listing: 2010 KTM RC8R Red Bull Edition for Sale

Immaculate condition, super rare: RC8R- Red Bull Edition – with KTM Club Race Kit… $5000 option.

Over $30,000 new. KTM Club Race Kit, a $5000 option. Race kit includes full titanium Akrapovic exhaust, air filter, head gasket and 10 addition HP. Orange powder-coated frame, carbon fiber fenders. All stock otherwise , except for orange KTM anodized brake, clutch reservoir caps. Have all stock components as well including all 3 keys. NO trades, serious inquiries only.

This Canadian example is available for $13,990 CAD, or just a shade under $10,000 USD, and has a tick over 5,000 miles on the orange-tinted odometer. The Akrapovič exhaust should liberate a few horses and some much-needed noise, and the bike is otherwise nearly stock. It sure ain’t subtle, but it’s collectible, has amazing presence, and is a damn fine sportbike, to boot.

-tad

Gives You Wings: 2010 KTM RC8R Red Bull Edition for Sale
Featured Listing May 13, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 1996 Yamaha YZF600R for Sale

If you grew up reading about, riding, or lusting after 80s and 90s Japanese sportbikes, the good news is that these machines are finally getting their due from collectors. The bad news is that there aren’t many nice, low-mile examples out there anymore, and prices are no longer what they were. Luckily, today’s Featured Listing is probably one of the cleanest, low-mile Yamaha YZF600Rs left in existence. 

The YZF600R, also known as the “Thundercat” in some markets, was introduced in 1994. It was an evolution of the steel Deltabox-framed FZR600 and shared that bike’s overall shape until a redesign in 1996 brought the styling into line with the bigger YZF1000 “Thunderace.” It was more of an all-rounder than some of its period competition, but it was still considered a highly-competent sportbike, just one that was more suited to street use than other, more highly-strung options. Like Yamaha’s own R6 for example. The YZF was available in some markets until 2007, sold alongside the R6 as a more practical alternative to that very track-focused machine.

The YZF600R followed the typical format for the class at the time, with the aforementioned steel Deltabox frame that added weight, compared to aluminum versions, but kept costs under control. The complete package weighed in at 453lbs wet and the bike’s 87 rwhp could push the bike to more than 150mph. Adjustable suspension at both ends was on the soft side, but handling was good enough for the track when properly adjusted, and the package was good enough to win an AMA Supersport championship in 1996.

This is listed as a 1996 model, so I’m assuming it was produced before the changeover to the later styling that replaced the “cat-eye” design seen here for a single-headlight. All things considered, this is an extremely clean and original example, with less than 1,700 miles showing on the odometer. Note that there are a few cracks and minor blemishes to be found, but these are clearly documented in the huge gallery of images below.

From the Seller: 1996 Yamaha YZF600R for Sale


1996 Yamaha YZF600R Survivor

With only 1,700 original miles and a striking maroon and dark magenta cocktail color combination, this fox-eye YZF has been in storage since 1999. It was recently brought back to life by cleaning the carbs, scrubbing the bike from top to bottom, oiling the cylinders, flushing the brakes, changing the oil, installing a fresh AGM battery, replacing the ignition, installing a new fuel pump and repairing a few minor fairing cracks (likely from damage during storage). The bike is clean and ready to ride with a clear Minnesota title.

The bike is all original except for an aftermarket ignition switch and in-tank fuel pump. The tires (old but intact), exhaust, windscreen, rear seat cowl, owner’s manual and even the reflectors everyone tore off are on it. The plastics are nice, but not perfect, with a few minor cracks. The same thing applies to the overall condition of the bike. The bike shows no signs of ever having been down.

The YZF is located in Minneapolis, Minnesota and can be picked up or shipped from there.

Over 100 pictures available.

Price: $4,500

Contact:
Dan
952-237-0214 (mobile)
dtinklenberg@gmail.com

The seller is asking $4,500 for this very classy, low-mile machine. You could probably find a cheaper YZF600R, but this is probably the nicest one you’re likely to find anytime soon. The only possible downside is that this example is slathered in very classy burgundy paint, not some lurid and evocative period race-replica scheme. Like Honda’s CBR600 F3, they made plenty of these, and they were never all that rare or valuable. But if you want to relive your youth in style, this one can’t really be beat. Just fit some fresh rubber and enjoy!

-tad

Featured Listing: 1996 Yamaha YZF600R for Sale
Ducati May 7, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Matched Set: A Special Pair of Ducati Supersports for Sale

The Ducati Superlight I posted up a few days ago was a classic barn-find, with an incredible 300 miles on the odometer and all the dust and neglect you might expect from a bike that has barely turned a wheel in nearly 30 years. The first of today’s two Ducatis is nearly the exact opposite, a Superlight with many more miles and a shedload of upgrades and modifications that suggest passionately enthusiastic ownership. The components that went into its construction are clearly well thought out and complimentary, much more go than show. Which is fine because the blinding yellow paint, gleaming white frame, and half-fairing have all the bling you’ll ever need.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Ducati Superlight for Sale

1993 Ducati 900 Superlight #771 25193 original miles. All original carbon fiber is in perfect condition. As she sits: custom Ducati Kamna ¼ fairings. Termignoni carbon fiber mufflers with Rob North narrowed and flowed OEM header pipe. Ducati Kamna alloy exhaust rings. Lidless airbox mod. Original Marvic/Akront magnesium/alloy 2-piece wheels. Pro-Italia billet rearsets. 11.2:1 JE/Pro-Italia pistonsHeads ported and matched by Pro-Italia. Keihin 39mm FCR carburetors. Ducati Kamna alloy clutch basket. Ducati Performance gold alloy pressure plate. Barnett kevlar-alloy clutch. Galfer stainless brake and clutch hoses. Ferodo CP911 brake pads. Original cast iron rotors. Ohlins 46PRCL fully adjustable shock. Peterson PPS revalved forks. Brembo goldline clutch and brake master cylinders (from a Ducati 996). Pro-Italia seat support. Dr. Desmo alloy clip-ons. MagKnight tank bra. Corbin seat. K&N air filter. Pro-Italia billet oil cooler relocation valve cover. Fast by Ferracci alloy sprocket cover. DID ERVX gold chain/AFAM alloy 39-tooth rear sprocket. Shorai lithium battery. Nichols jewelry (alloy fairing buttons, billet “Flying D” timing cover). Also included: Storz steering damper. Stock rear shock. Stock exhaust header. Stock mufflers. Original full fairings. Stock rearsets. Stock carburetors. Original Ducati tool kit. Spare belt covers. Spare belts from California Cycleworks. Spare ignition coils from California Cycleworks and NGK spark plugs. Evoluzione billet clutch slave cylinder. Assorted spare small parts/hardware/etc. Original owner’s manual. Lots of documentation including service records, receipts, manuals, valve adjustment instructions, etc.

Obviously, this is not completely original and purists may turn up their noses, but the finished result is absolutely true to the Superlight’s spirit, and the upgrades are of high-quality. This is the Superlight I’d want to build. The stock parts are included, including the full fairings, but I’d just put those in a box and ride it as-is. The second bike is a teeny bit scruffier from a cosmetic standpoint, but is more of a Ducati hot-rod. It’s also much more red.

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Ducati 900SS/SP for Sale

1996 Ducati 900 SS/SPI took ownership of the bike in 2017 with the intention of keeping it for a daily driver. I now have two kids, multiple Ducatis and no time to ride. This preloved has been under my ownership since 2017. Never rode it extensively, I put approximately 900 mi on it since purchase. Current mileage is at 22,345 mi. The Dunlop Q3’s were new upon my acquisition. Frame and swingarm are perfect, no cracks. Moving beyond the normal stuff, this isn’t a run of the mill, ordinary 900 SS/SP. The following improvements have been made to the bike: 944 pistons. Keihin 41mm FCRs. Ducati cast iron rotors. Termignoni high mount CF pipes and flowed header. Ohlins 46PRCL rear shock. Ohlins 20mm cartridge kit into the stock Showa adjustable forks. Ducati Racing magnesium engine cover – clutch side. CA Cycleworks coils. Dr. Desmo alloy clip-ons. Steel braided brake lines. Ducati Superlight solo seat with correct seat supports from the ’98 FE. Pro Italia rearsets. Kamna ¼ fairings. Dyno’d (10/13/2011 – at 21,410 miles) at Ferracci at 91.97hp. The suspension was redone by Markbilt Racing in 9/2011. This included rebuilding of the Ohlins rear shock and installation of the Ohlins 20mm cartridge kit into the stock Showa adjustable forks. The oil cooler has been relocated to under the headlight for better cooling. I had the bike professionally repainted, as the fairings were unpainted, to the tune of $1500. Stunning example of a true classic. No accident damage or history of damage.

It doesn’t look like it’s an original Superlight, in spite of the graphics on the tail. It’s still a worthy replica, considering the performance on tap. There’s some surface corrosion on the heads and barrels, but the bodywork is very clean and this thing should go like a stabbed rat: 92 whp is pretty impressive for an air-cooled, two-valve Desmo engine intended for street use. The 944cc mill should have an impressive midrange and launch out of corners with impressive urge and an even more impressive bellow…

Bidding is active on both bikes, with a couple days left on the auctions and the Reserve Not Met. If air-cooled Ducatis leave you cold, the seller also has a nice 888 SPO available for sale currently.

-tad

Matched Set: A Special Pair of Ducati Supersports for Sale
Ducati May 2, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Purist: 1992 Ducati Superlight for Sale

The Ducati Superlight is a far-cry from today’s “limited edition” superbikes like the Superleggera that have a performance envelope well beyond most owners’ ability to fully exploit. The Superlight isn’t a particularly fast bike, but it is very collectible, and rewarding to ride at speeds normal humans can enjoy without risking license, limb, or achieving escape velocity… Basically, the Superlight is a 900SS/SP with lightweight Marvic composite wheels with a polished aluminum rim and magnesium spokes, some carbon bits, upswept exhausts, and a solo tail. Combined, the upgrades saved about 15lbs compared to the regular 900SS. So the Superlight wasn’t super light, unless Ducati was referring to your wallet: considering the minimal performance improvements, it was priced significantly higher than a regular Supersport. You did get a nice numbered plaque, though.

They still sold like hotcakes, and Ducati increased production to meet demand far in excess of the original planned 500 bike run. Part of that is down to the usual Ducati mystique, but the basic package has long been viewed as much more than the sum of its parts. On paper, the air/oil-cooled, two-valve 904cc Desmo looks pretty anemic, but a good Desmodue makes around 75 horses at the rear wheel, which really is plenty to have fun with on the road. It’s also relatively simple to maintain, surprisingly durable, and even gets good gas mileage. Fully-adjustable Showa suspension at both ends and a stiff trellis frame meant handling was very good then and still competent now, while very reasonable ergonomics [for a sportbike anyway] means even… ahem, older gentlemen can enjoy all-day rides. It was available in the vivid yellow seen here, although some markets got red instead. Considering how few bikes look good in yellow, I think it’s a great choice, and makes the bike feel more exotic.

The carbon-fiber Ferracci cans seen here are an almost mandatory option for any air-cooled Ducati, since the stock components make the bike sound strangled, and would likely be drowned out by the unfiltered rattle of the dry clutch. Ferracci didn’t make their own exhausts to my knowledge, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing: at various points, they rebadged SilMoto and Arrow parts, so quality should be high.

From the original eBay listing: 1992 Ducati Superlight for Sale

1993 Ducati Superbike, bought new and stayed in same ownership since.

I am happy to answer any questions about the bike via messaging.

Thanks!

So is it a 1992 or a 1993? It’s also odd that the seller calls it a “Superbike” when it says “Superlight” right there on the fairing. They may not know exactly what they have here, since a 300-mile Superlight would normally go for well north of the $9,000 the seller is asking. Although in this uncertain market, maybe it’s just priced to sell? From the pictures, it looks a little dusty, but otherwise as nice as you’d expect a bike with such low miles to be. It’s hard to tell from the images just how nice this bike is.

-tad

Purist: 1992 Ducati Superlight for Sale
KTM April 24, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Skorpion’s Sting: 2010 KTM RC8R Akrapovič Edition for Sale

First sold in 2008, KTM’s RC8R superbike came at the tail-end of the analog superbike era, just as things like ride-by-wire, traction-control, and cornering ABS were becoming the norm. After some initial issues with a crunchy gearbox that were quickly resolved, the RC8’s four-valve, twin-plug 75° v-twin was increased from the initial 1148cc to 1195 and gained the “R” designation. It didn’t have the electronic bells and whistles of the contemporary Ducati or BMW, nor did it have much in the way of [road]race-winning heritage, but the Katoom’s 175hp and 90 ft-lbs of torque meant it could easily keep up with other superbikes of the era.

It’s much more user-friendly than any Ducati, with adjustable ergonomics and a general layout that seems to favor taller riders. Handling is excellent and the bike was well-reviewed when new, although the high price and KTM’s inexperience in the world of big-bore sportbikes meant it never sold well. And the styling, although far from subtle, looks as fresh now as the day it was introduced. For better or for worse, depending on your point of view. Buying one now, it’s a good idea to find one with any significant upgrades you might want already installed. The RC8 is pretty rare and have been out of production for a while, so quality components like aftermarket exhausts can be hard to source new. Luckily, this one has that all sorted out already.

Unhappy with the prices of high-performance motorcycle exhaust systems from western countries and with the low-quality of ones available from Eastern Europe, motorcycle racer Igor Akrapovič founded Skorpion to build them himself. If you remember Skorpion from back in the 1990s, you probably had no idea that they would eventually grow to become a juggernaut of aftermarket and official factory accessory exhausts for both cars and motorcycles. The original Skorpion brand Igor founded evolved into the one bearing the Akrapovič name, and awful mispronunciations began.

For the record, it’s pronounced /ah-KRA-po-vich/. Try not to maul it too badly.

From the original eBay listing: 2010 KTM RC8R Akrapovič Edition for Sale

This a very rare special bike. This is not a typical RC8R. It is a genuine Factory Akrapovic Edition. They only made this bike for 1 year and only 25 made for the United States. This bike was imported from Austria. Over $26,000.00 new.

Has Full Akrapovic Exhaust.
Marchesini Forged wheels
Factory Akrapovic Paint/Decals
Annodized forks
Several other factory extras

Bike is mostly stock with slipper clutch and quick shift added. Also has Akrapovic sets and a few other bolt ons.

Excellent Condition. No damages. Recently Serviced. No issues

Only 2500 miles. You won’t find another bike like this. It is a beast ready for the track, collector or hooligan street bike enthusiast. Super condition.

Watch “2010 RC8R Akrapovic Edition” on YouTube

Clean TX Title in Hand

281-415-2646

The seller is asking $12,900 for this very clean, very rare machine and includes a YouTube link to a walk-around of the bike here. Akrapovič makes high-quality stuff although, perhaps owing to their close working relationships with a number of major manufacturers, they do tend toward the quieter end of the aftermarket spectrum. That being said, you can hear the nice, mellow tone the system produces in the video and the exhaust should be up to their usual high standards of quality. The aftermarket quickshifter helps drag the old-school machine into the modern age. You’ll have to manage your own downshifts, although the addition of a slipper-clutch should help there.

-tad

Skorpion’s Sting: 2010 KTM RC8R Akrapovič Edition for Sale
Aprilia April 15, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Road or Track: 2000 Aprilia RSV Mille R for Sale

If you’re looking for a track bike, your best bet is something as modern as possible, with broad parts availability. A reliable tool for going fast as effortlessly as possible. Something completely disposable. There’s a reason you see a ton of GSX-R600s and 1000s, R6s, the occasional SV650, even a new crop of Ninja 400 and other relatively modern tackle that offer anvil-simple reliability. Basically the opposite of this Aprilia RSV Mille R in almost every way. But personally, I know I’m nowhere near fearless enough to delude myself into thinking I’ll ever be more than a B-Group trackday rider, so I’m willing to make some sacrifices to style, and this would be at the top of my personal trackday bike list.

Styling is subjective and, while Aprilia’s first foray into full-size sportbikes isn’t exactly pretty, it didn’t make the mistake of trying to out-Ducati Ducati: the looks were wild and very modern, with a gorgeous aluminum beam frame and curving swingarm. Handling felt much more “Japanese” in terms of turn-in and agility, compared to the 996’s incredible mid-corner stability. Austrian firm Rotax eschewed old notions of what made a v-twin smooth and revvy, and created an engine with a relatively narrow 60° layout kept smooth with balance shafts, while four-valves and liquid-cooling gave it power to compete with the Bolognese brutes. In addition, they included something that seemes to have eluded Ducati until pretty recently: reliability.

So it was exotic, fast, blessed with excellent handling, and surprisingly durable. And it came with lots of trick equipment straight from the factory: Öhlins components at both ends, along with a steering damper from the famous Swedish suspension specialists, and a smattering of nice carbon bits. The biggest limitation here is that the bike is sporting what appears to be largely original bodywork. Certainly, it’s painted to look the part. That makes a trackday crash a pretty pricey proposition, so if you’re really planning to flog it, perhaps some less stylish trackday bodywork is in order.

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Aprilia RSV Mille R for Sale

With a total of 2,293 original miles this was a one owner bike bought brand new in 2000. A well cared for, great riding great sounding clean bike. Has been in indoor climate controlled storage for years. No ethanol fuel was ever ran through this bike. Also on a battery tender.

I purchased from original owner with the idea of making a track bike. I reworked the seat and put brand new Dunlap SportMaxx tires on both front and rear of the bike (high speed balanced). Change oil filter (K&N), fresh oil (Motul) all new fluids for brakes and clutch (Motul) and radiator. Pingel deadman kill lanyard switch was installed.  

Bike is safety wired for tech. I removed mirrors and installed mirror block off plates, removed turn indicators, tail lights, disconnected head light, etc. All wiring was not cut and factory din connectors are all labeled and properly routed and zipped tied for ease of re-installing lights. All stock turn indicators, rear tail light, mirrors, an extra Motul oil filter, Motul oil, Motul DOT5 brake fluid, full 5 of Sunoco race fuel, are all included in sale along with a manual and factory books & key. This bike has a clear clean Ohio title in my name and is street legal with lights installed.

This bike has Full Ohlins suspension, Brembo brakes, carbon fiber fenders, chain guard, and side panels. It is completely stock except for chip and upgraded exhaust, installed by previous owner. Here is your chance to get a track made bike ready to go for cheap. I even have full Vanson race leathers and boots in another listing to make it a full race package. Can help with shipping but shipping cost is on buyer. Please check out photos as bike is sold as is and if you have any questions please don’t hesitate to ask. Thanks.

The asking price? $3,400 and that includes all of the road-legal equipment, making that a very nice price for a track-ready machine and a pretty screaming deal for an Italian exotic. I’m not the biggest fan of the RSV’s styling, but you can’t argue that the package offers tremendous bang for your buck: it looks very trick, the specification is amazing. I’ve always wanted one just like this as a track bike…

-tad

Road or Track: 2000 Aprilia RSV Mille R for Sale
Aprilia April 11, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Pint-Sized ‘Prilia: 2002 Aprilia RS50 for Sale

A rare sight here in the US, the Aprilia RS50 was pretty common overseas, where strict licensing laws made these a must-have for aspiring sportbike pilots who didn’t yet qualify for the overwhelming power of a 600 or even 400cc machine… Of course there are plenty of good reasons to ride an RS50, even if you’ve long-since graduated to a larger machine. Weight is the enemy of performance and, while the little Aprilia may not produce much power, at around 200lbs dry it also doesn’t have much in the way of weight.

The tiny displacement meant that the RS50 was classified as a moped, although it really was more a small motorcycle, with 17″ wheels and a six-speed gearbox. The overall package was more sportbike than scooter as well, with a twin-spar aluminum beam frame, a monoshock rear, and disc brakes at the front and back. It was sold here in the USA from 1999-2003, although it continued to be built much later in other markets.

As usual, Aprilia didn’t build the engine in-house, so the RS50 was powered by a liquid-cooled, two-stroke Minarelli AM6 engine displacing 49.7cc. All that snarling power could push the lightweight machine to 55mph, and this bike’s 75cc big bore kit should pretty much double the engine’s output… Keep in mind, these were raced in Europe, so plenty of tuning and suspension upgrades exist.

I haven’t shopped for RS50 parts, but these were popular outside the US, so it shouldn’t be too hard to track down a replacement fuel cell, or perhaps a professional repair might be possible?

From the original eBay listing: 2002 Aprilia RS50 for Sale

This owner of the bike modified and upgraded this Aprilia with the purpose of making it the best RS50 around. It has a 75cc top end with a moly coated piston. A 24mm flatslide Mikuni feeds water cooled cylinder and a silver ceramic coated Arrow exhaust has been added to round off all the performance enhancements.

It has AF1 triples and a custom backed instrument cluster. In addition to being a unique head turning motorcycle on it’s own this model sports the nearly endangered Black Lion body and logos. You’ll likely never see another one like it in the wild.
The bad: this is literally a “ran when parked” situation. The fuel cell cracked next to the the tap screws. It was fixed with a fuel tank epoxy and patch but that eventually started to leak. Ultimately it will need another tank. In mid-January the back tags for the registration in California came to $740. Fortunately we can arrange shipping to the other contiguous 47 states (or factor that into your bidding). I have a very reasonable and trusted shipper from whom I can get a quote and time. Just contact us before bidding to confirm the price and eta.
This is definitely a head turning joy to ride. When people hear it coming they don’t expect to see this pull up. It was genuinely built by the owner with the long term purpose of being reliable, ride-able and fun.  
Well, the leaking fuel cell will obviously need some work, but the price does reflect that: just $1,750 for this little hot-rod two-stroke. Miles are pretty low, and the bike does have a few nice extras, like that big-bore motor, top triple, and the Arrow exhaust. All together, the package should be good for more than 9hp at the rear wheel and 75mph with favorable winds, a huge leap from stock power. If you’re looking for a cool, low-cost project bike that shouldn’t take too much to get rolling, assuming you live outside California, and can dodge those back registration fees…
-tad
Pint-Sized ‘Prilia: 2002 Aprilia RS50 for Sale