Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Aprilia March 25, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Super Naked: 2004 Aprilia Tuono R for Sale

The first-generation Aprilia Tuono is the odd Italian bike notable more for what it does than for how it looks. It’s relatively practical, with a comfortable, upright seating position, is powered by a reliable v-twin developed by Austrian firm Rotax, and offers bonkers, uncompromising performance. Suspension is high-quality, handling is excellent, and it apparently is great for pulling wheelies. And those looks? Well, it’s… distinctive, at least. Basically, it’s a bike for riders, not poseurs.

The market has finally found a name for bikes in this class: “supernakeds.” They used to be called “streetfighters” since these naked sportbikes were originally exactly that: Japanese sportbikes that had their fairings removed and upright bars fitted to maximize road comfort and hooligan potential. This was obviously done for practical reasons, not because the owners crashed their bikes and didn’t want to pay for pricey replacement plastic panels… Even the Speed Triple and Ducati Monster used that formula, and were basically parts-bin machines based on fully-faired sportbikes.

Significantly the Tuono, unlike more practical nakeds from Japan and even most European competitors, didn’t use a last-generation powerplant, detuned with milder cams more suited to everyday riding. It’s pretty much exactly the Mille engine, with the same claimed power output. Part of that decision is obviously rooted in pragmatism: Aprilia didn’t have an older engine they could slot in on the cheap. And using the same engine, frame, and other components certainly simplified production for a company producing their first big-bore sportbikes. But it was also the “right” thing to do, and the bike has a serious cult following: with less being more in this case, the Tuono actually a bit lighter that the RSV on which it’s based and makes for a serious canyon weapon.

The second-generation Tuono is generally considered to be better looking than the original. The styling was more refined, or maybe just slightly more coherent, but it still isn’t exactly a pretty bike. And if you’re going to build a bike with intentionally outrageous styling, you might as well lean all the way into it. What I’m saying is: I much prefer the original, far funkier Tuono seen here. It just looks nuts, and should be a blast to ride.

From the original eBay listing: 2004 Aprilia Tuono R for Sale

First full naked Superbike. 998cc 138hp tuned for street use this was the Aprilia RSV Superbike with the fairings off and handlebars instead of clip ons. It’s a beast will eat Monsters easily, for experienced riders. Before traction control or ABS this beast will spit you off it you don’t handle it properly.  

Second owner. No accidents. Clean and clear title. Always garaged. Its my third bike I always end up riding my zx14r so it might go to someone more appreciative. Only have done routine maintenance like fluids, filters, tires and chains. 

  • Tires are Michelin Pilot Power 3s
  • Aprilia Racing twin pipes 
  • Eprom Chip 
  • Handlebar guards (keeps hands warm)
  • Heated Grips
  • Aftermarket rear sets
  • aftermarket adjustable brake and clutch levers
  • crash bobbins on axles and frames
  • Electic outlet on dash
  • Zero Gravity smoked windshield
  • Neutral finder mod completed

Bike is all day comfortable. Toured it with side bags for weekends. Or will do track days. Bike is in Oklahoma. Buyer to arrange local pickup I will assist your driver and shipping company when buyer makes arrangements. Cash only or bank wire. No checks of any kind. No paypal beyond the deposit. Clean and clear title in hand ready to go. 

Miles aren’t all that low, but these are hard to find in any condition. The seller is asking $4,499 for this one, and it looks like it’s been well maintained and looks really sharp in this all red scheme. Sure, there are a few dings and cosmetic imperfections, but for that price, you get a cool bit of budget exotica that goes even better than it looks: there’s a reason you can find low-mile Ducatis all day long, but every single Aprilia I find for sale seems to have 25k+ miles on it.

-tad

Honda March 19, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Bantamweight Racer: 1981 Honda RS125RW for Sale

Today’s Honda RS125RW might be a bit obscure for most of our readers, and is certainly older than the bikes we usually feature here, but a genuine Honda Grand Prix machine is certainly worth a look whenever one comes up for sale! This one has plenty of patina, period stickers, and an apparently rare dry clutch for less weight and extra noise!

Honda’s Grand Prix racing motorcycles were based around four-stroke engines until the two-stroke MT125 was introduced in the 1970s. The MT125 was replaced in 1980 by the RS125RW seen here, and that machine soldiered on until it was replaced in 1987. The significantly updated RS125 introduced in 1987 was eventually developed into the dominant machine more familiar to most of our readers.

Powered by a motocross engine borrowed from the RC125M, the RS125R’s liquid-cooled, reed-valve engine made 30hp from 124.9cc with a bore and stroke of 56 x 50.6mm. The frame was a twin shock, steel duplex design, had disc brakes at both ends, and weighed in at 170lbs dry. It wasn’t considered cutting edge when new, but it was reasonably successful in competition and Honda continued to develop the bike and its successors as an over the counter racing machine available to younger racers honing their skills.

From the original eBay listing: 1981 Honda RS125RW for Sale

1981 Honda RS125R-W located at our shop in Santa Ana, California. The pictures in this auction were taken at our shop in Japan. This RS125R-W is in very good condition for its age. Engine has a super rare dry clutch. The previous owner said he rebuilt the engine before it was put away many years ago. RS125R-W are very hard to find now. This bike is the best we have had for many years now. And the only one we have had with a dry clutch. Bike will come with a new windscreen not mounted to the bike. There are no spares with this bike. Bike is sold as is, no returns. Look at the pictures carefully and ask questions before you bid. Sorry, no Paypal on this item. Again, bike is sold with a bill of sale, no title. Bike comes with what you see in the pictures in this auction.

The starting bid is $6,995 with a few days left on the auction and no bids as yet. This one is obviously a bit of a gamble, since parts to keep one running will be difficult to source. The engine is said to have been rebuilt, but I’d be prepared for the worst if it was my money. Experts might have a line on what they might need to actually ride it, and this bit of Honda racing history would obviously make an awesome display piece for your living room or the lobby of a business, if you just want to show it off in all its period patina.

-tad

Bantamweight Racer: 1981 Honda RS125RW for Sale
Ghezzi-Brian March 16, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Gorgeous Guzzi: 2001 Ghezzi-Brian Supertwin for Sale

The Daytona/Sport 1100i were very entertaining machines, with plenty of grunt from the nearly 1100cc v-twin, matched with quality suspension and brakes. Unfortunately, they were also burdened with shaft drive and nearly 100 extra pounds of weight, compared to other Italian sportbikes of the era. So basically a charismatic engine in an overweight package. Sadly, Colin Chapman wasn’t available to help out, but Giuseppe Ghezzi and Bruno Saturno, two halves of the Ghezzi-Brian team, stepped up to build the lightweight, but very pricey Supertwin that cost nearly $15,000 in 2001 money.

There’s a lot of clever engineering going on here, and the completed machine supposedly weighed in at nearly 70lbs less than a Daytona or Sport 1100i. The bike certainly looks lighter and more agile than a Sport 1100i, although I feel like the colors on this example date the bike a bit. Perimeter brakes similar to Buell’s ZTL or “zero tortional load” system supposedly reduce unsprung weight up front and look really trick, the frame channels air through to the airbox below the rear shock, and a redesigned rear suspension helped to reduce the torque reaction of the shaft drive.

I have an old “all Italian” issue of Bike magazine that features one of my favorite comparison tests of all time: an Aprilia RS250 versus a Ducati 748 versus a Bimota YB9 versus a Moto Guzzi Daytona RS. Obviously, the “big old bus” Guzzi didn’t fare well in such light-footed company, but their big, longitudinally-mounted v-twin could still be entertaining slotted into something like this Ghezzi-Brian Supertwin. And this wasn’t the end of the line for Ghezzi and Guzzi: in the Supertwin you can see the kernel of ideas later used in the stunning MGS-01.

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Ghezzi-Brian 1064cc Supertwin for Sale

Frame no. FP1239

As Roland Brown of Motorcyclist puts it:

“I’m carving through a series of immaculately surfaced bends in the hills near Lecco in northern Italy, aboard a stunning new V-twin whose jutting cylinders, grunty power and off-beat exhaust could only come from Moto Guzzi.

“The Guzzi factory at Mandello del Lario is only a short ride from here, but this bike isn’t the first dramatic result of Guzzi’s recent acquisition by Aprilia. This is the Supertwin 1100, now being hand-built in small numbers by Ghezzi & Brian, a specialist firm from the nearby village of Perego.

“As you ride it, carving through the twisties, the aural clues don’t match the experience. The grunty power and off-beat exhaust could only come from Moto Guzzi. But this isn’t just a Guzzi from the Mandello del Lario factory, this is the Supertwin, a hand-built, low production superbike from Ghezzi-Brian, the specialist firm from the nearby village of Perego.

“Moto Guzzi is one of the oldest and most storied motorcycle manufacturers in existence, but they’ve drifted pretty far from their sporting roots, owing to their purchase by Piaggio, a move that has kept them afloat, but forever relegated to building vintage-styled and cruisers to prevent them competing with more sports-oriented bikes from sister-company Aprilia. Really though, the downward slide began long before that, as Guzzi just couldn’t keep pace with the ruthless development of modern sportbikes from Japan. Luckily, there’ve been a few bright spots along the way, like this Ghezzi-Brian Supertwin that point out just how much life is still left in Moto Guzzi’s v-twin.

“Produced by Giuseppe Ghezzi and Bruno Saturno this is a race-replica designed around Ghezzi’s successful racing machine, the Supertwin features quality suspension at both ends and clever engineering designed to reduce weight. The slim bodywork reveals the iconic longitudinal v-twin and contrasts nicely with the hulking mechanicals. The huge perimeter front brakes look incredibly trick on the OZ Racing wheels and should offer up excellent stopping power to go with the increased straight-line performance that comes mostly from a huge weight reduction: the Supertwin weighs in at a claimed 427lbs dry, down 55lbs from the largely stock V11 Sport that donates its engine. Power is a modest 91hp but the 1064cc motor puts out impressive torque to match the amazing soundtrack. 

“Ghezzi’s frame is based on a steel spine and uses the motor as a stressed member, but that’s where the similarities end. The Supertwin spine doubles not as the oil tank but as the airbox, taking in air under the tank to feed the intakes that run back from those jutting cylinders.  There’s plenty of clever engineering rearward, too, where a multiadjustable Bitubo shock lies horizontally and is worked by a rising-rate linkage. In Guzzi fashion the Supertwin’s box-section steel swingarm incorporates a parallelogram arrangement to cancel torque reaction.  But this bike’s real innovation is up front, where its multiadjustable, inverted Paioli fork holds a 17-inch wheel whose twin discs are a massive 420mm in diameter and are fixed to the rim rather than the hub. The entire system, incorporating four-piston calipers biting on thin discs that are fully floating to allow for heat expansion, has been developed by local firm Braking.”

The bike offered is presented in truly excellent condition throughout with the gentle patina of a sparingly used, but meticulously kept near 20-year-old machine. The odometer reads an original 7,500 kms from new, most of which were enjoyed earlier in its life, as it has been on static display in three prominent private California collections for the last half of its existence.

The bike is offered in a Bill of Sale, but I can assist with titling. Please contact me.

For additional photos and details, please visit Classic Avenue.

The $24,900 asking price is a lot of cash for a Guzzi-powered special with pushrods and two valves per cylinder. In the plus column, 90hp should provide plenty of poke in the relatively light machine, the design is extremely exotic, and Guzzi engines are very durable and easy to service. Unfortunately, the bodywork is nearly unobtainable, and I’m not sure where you’d pick up a set of those perimeter brake discs, or a replacement wheel if you ding a rim.

-tad

Gorgeous Guzzi: 2001 Ghezzi-Brian Supertwin for Sale
Bimota March 13, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Extra, EXTRA Exclusive: 1984 Bimota SB4S for Sale

This Bimota SB4S is the epitome of an Italian exotic: long, low, lean, and fast, stuffed full of the best componentry and radical thinking available at the time. Imagine it sitting next to nearly any other early 1980s machine and it’s almost like a MotoGP bike just dropped by your local bike night. Note the one-piece tank and tail section attached by just a few fasteners to help simplify maintenance, the quick-release axles, high-spec suspension, eccentric chain adjuster, and lightweight 16″ wheels that were fitted with then-rare radial tires. Most SB4s used modular units similar to Honda’s Comstar wheels, but this example is fitted with beautiful Campagnolo hoops.

Bimota’s reputation was built around their race-inspired frames, and the SB4’s is no exception. The chrome-moly trellis unit with machined aluminum side-plates is a gorgeous piece of engineering, once the lightweight bodywork is removed, and wrapped around the utterly massive 1074cc powerplant borrowed from Suzuki’s GSX1100. Air-cooled, with four valves per cylinder and Suzuki’s Twin Swirl Combustion Chamber technology, it was left largely stock in this application because the main performance advantage of the SB4 came from a reduction in weight: the Bimota came in at a claimed 405lbs, 130lbs less than the 535lb GSX1100!

Significantly, the SB4 was available with both three-quarter and full fairings. Looks are subjective, but the three-quarter design is probably the better bet if you plan to regularly use your Bimota: the full fairing apparently traps lots of heat, and the air-cooled mill has a hard time managing the resulting elevated temperatures. That being said, this example has 15,000 miles on the odometer, so previous owners have either ridden it fast enough to keep temps down, or spent a lot of time rolling it around their garages…

I’ve seen a number of different directional indicators, or even no indicators fitted to the SB4. I’m assuming that none were originally included, because Italy, but different solutions were found to suit the requirements of different markets. These flush indicators seem to work as well as any, and are a damn sight less obnoxious than the DOT-approved bits fitted to many later motorcycles. I’d fit some bar-end signals and get rid of these barnacle-looking things, but that might just be me.

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Bimota SB4S for Sale

1984 Bimota SB4S, 1 of only 34 produced

Bimota’s significant reputation was forged in the creation of fast, exclusive motorcycles oozing with Italian style. That reputation began in the 1970s when founders Giuseppe Morri and Massimo Tamburini shifted their successful heating and ventilation firm’s focus to that of their passion – motorcycles. 

Japan’s offerings of the time often consisted of a wonderfully smooth, powerful engine mounted in a frame of limited performance. Moto Martin of France, Bakker of Holland, and Harris and Spondon of England, all saw the potential of these engines. But Bimota exploited the situation with Italian flair, building exotic, exclusive, innovative machines in very limited numbers. Technical innovation too has long been a Bimota hallmark, as exemplified by the hub centre-steered Tesi models, while on the world’s racetracks Bimota-framed machines have won hundreds of races and numerous championships. 

Utilizing the Suzuki GSX1100 powerplant, the Bimota SB4 was priced at approximately $11,000, making it one of the world’s most expensive motorcycles. And one of the most exclusive with only 272 built, 34 of which were the even-more-exclusive SB4S models with full fairing. And one of these SB4S is on offer here. In perfectly original condition, the bike has covered a little more than 15,000 miles from new. Having been on static display for several years, the bike was recently re-commissioned and serviced, and now starts easily and rides perfectly. Brakes work well and all electrical systems function as they should.

This is a perfect opportunity to add an exclusive, very limited production Italian exotic with the ease of ownership and outright power and pace of a Japanese superbike.

For further information, video of the bike running, and additional photos, please visit ClassicAvenue.com

The SB4S is extremely rare, rare enough it’s hard to find actual pictures of one. Just 34 were built, and I’m not sure how consistent they were in terms of specifications. It supposedly differs from the “regular” SB4 with its four-into-one exhaust, oil-cooler, and other details. This example has the standard dual exhaust, and I can’t tell if there’s an oil-cooler hiding behind the full fairing. I’m also curious about the adapters that apparently allow larger, four-piston front brake calipers to be fitted. They appear to be a period-correct update, so I’d love to know more: did the bike come this way from Bimota? Was it modified when new? We’ve featured this particular bike a couple times in the past, but this is a heavily revised listing with much nicer photos, so it seemed a good time to revisit it. The seller is asking $21,900 this time around, so maybe the third time is the charm?

-tad

Extra, EXTRA Exclusive: 1984 Bimota SB4S for Sale
Ducati March 6, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Premium Trackday Toy: 2018 Pierobon X85R Superbike for Sale

If you’re thinking today’s Pierobon X85R is just some sort of Panigale in race bodywork with an aftermarket exhaust, you’re partly correct, but also missing an important detail. Hint: it’s red and is something you wouldn’t normally see on Ducati’s semi-monocoque superbike. A frame. Less obvious is the extended swingarm to improve the v-twin Pani’s somewhat unruly handling. All of it crafted to the highest standards from the best materials available, and the completed machine should be impossibly light: an X60R powered by Ducati’s two-valve engine weighs in at around 300lbs wet, depending on specification.

So why would you add a frame to a largely frameless bike? You’d have to ask Pierobon, although I’d suspect the frame has more flex to add a bit of feel to the somewhat feedback-challenged Panigale. But I’d trust them if I were you: located in Bologna near Ducati’s headquarters, they’ve been making frames, subframes, swingarms, and fuel tanks to their WSBK and MotoGP teams for over 50 years. As a sideline, they make a variety of trackday and racebike kits meant to accept Ducati’s two and four-valve engines. Be prepared for some sticker-shock though.

These are basically kits that include the frame, airbox, air duct, rear subframe, rearsets, and brackets for the electronics. To that base kit, you can add whichever suspension you want, using the original Panigale tank and swingarm. If you want, you can add beautifully-crafted, lightweight replacements from Pierobon, along with carbon bodywork that appears to be based on the Panigale. You’ll also need an exhaust, and other sundry bits. Boulder Motorsports, the folks selling this bike, have built a few of these in the past, and I’ve seen them at track days out here on the west coast. They’re minimalist and beautiful in the way that only pure racing machines can be. The seller includes the insane level of equipment that went into this one below.

From the original eBay listing: 2018 Pierobon X85R Superbike for Sale

2018 Pierobon X85R Superbike, Serial #1

This Pierobon X85R is a very unique and special trellis frame Panigale 1199R powered race/track bike and is frame number one built by Pierobon in Bologna Italy.  The bike is light weight and was built by Boulder Motor Sports (US Pierobon importer) with the highest level components from Brembo, Ohlins, OZ, Magneti Marelli, etc.  

Who is Pierobon you ask?  Pierobon is located in Bologna Italy adjacent to Ducati’s headquarters and is a chassis and fabrication specialist company that supplies many racing teams in World Superbike and MotoGP with frames, subframes swingarms and fuel tanks as well as paddock equipment.  Pierobon has built three versions of complete chassis kits known as the X60R (2-valve air cooled Ducati engine, X80R (4-Valve liquid cooled Ducati engine) and the X85R (4-valve Panigale liquid cooled engine). The X85R utilizes a lightweight trellis frame combined with a Pierobon built +30mm single sided swingarm and triple clamps that offers amazing feedback to the rider with precise engineering.  

The following components where used to build this unique bike:  

  • Pierobon X85R Chassis kit #1 (main frame, subframes, rear sets, handle bars, etc)
  • +30mm Pierobon WSBK single sided swingarm
  • Ducati 1199R SBK Engine (900km apx)
  • Ohlins RVP25 Forks
  • Ohlins RSP40 WSBK Shock 
  • Ducati Corse WSBK Rear link and adjuster
  • Brembo Monobloc 2-pad GP front race calipers with Brembo Z04 pads
  • Brembo 16×18 Billet front brake pump
  • Brembo 16×19 Billet clutch pump
  • Brembo 84mm Bilett rear caliper
  • IMA adjustable thumb brake with optional rear foot brake control
  • 336mm front racing brake rotors
  • Magneti Marelli SRT SBK ECU and electronics (Bike includes cable and software)
  • Custom race wiring loom, switch gear and components built by Bike Sport Developments UK
  • Electronics support traction, wheelie and launch control as well as closed loop engine braking
  • AIM SmrtyCam HD camera system with embeded data on screen for video playback
  • Termignoni WSBK/BSB Edition Force full racing exhaust 
  • OZ “R” racing wheels
  • Febur full SBK radiator and oil cooler
  • Carbon bodywork
  • Race seat with seat extender
  • EK 3d chain with quick change sprockets
  • Titanium hardware throughout the entire bike 

Bike will be sold with limited spare parts. 

This bike was built by Boulder Motor Sports in 2018 and was ridden by Moto Rapido British Superbike rider Tommy Bridewell in the AHRMA Pro Challenge race during the Barber Vintage festival in 2018.  The following year it was ridden at the same event by WSBK champion Scott Russell.  The bike has been meticulously maintained and was built utilizing the highest level of components.   

This is a great opportunity to purchase a collectible engineering masterpiece by one of the worlds best chassis designers, engineers and fabricators.

Sound like your dream bike? Only one problem, the $110,000 asking price. Which, believe it or not, is probably well south of the actual build cost. Is it worth it? Considering the quality components, rarity, and performance, probably it technically is, although the performance is far beyond what most of us could hope to fully exploit and it doesn’t really have any value to collectors. Basically it’s a very, very expensive toy. But I know if price was no object, I’d want one.

-tad

Premium Trackday Toy: 2018 Pierobon X85R Superbike for Sale
Sport Bikes For Sale March 3, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Naked and Unafraid: 2007 Aprilia Tuono 1000R for Sale

Pug-ugly and well-endowed, the Aprilia Tuono has always been a bike for those who favor performance over looks. Sort of like the motorcycling equivalent of Ron Jeremy… I’ve never ridden a second-generation Tuono like this one, but I’ve ridden the less scantily-clad RSV1000R with which it shared its major components, and I’d assume it also has that bike’s torque, agile handling, and surprisingly effective wind protection. Okay, maybe scratch that last bit…

None of Aprilia’s v-twin sportbike offerings are really lookers, so it’s the bits under the plastic and carbon-fiber we’re really interested in here. Aprilia has always made great-handling machines, and their aluminum beam frames seen on the RS250 and first-generation RSV Mille and Tuono are gorgeously sculptural. The second-generation v-twins had a more angular design, but it was equally effective, and feature quality suspension at both ends from Showa, Sachs, or Öhlins, depending on which version you’re looking at, along with light-weight wheels and quality Brembo brakes.

Unlike other manufacturers of naked sportbikes, Aprilia didn’t bother to detune their Tuono. They just ripped off the fairings, stuck on a little bikini unit to house the lights and give the gauges a place to live, slapped on a set of handlebars, and called it done. They didn’t even detune the 130-odd horsepower engine at all. In this case, we’re talking about the compact, Rotax-designed v-twin that displaced 998cc and used an unusual 60° layout, with a pair of balance shafts to cancel out the resulting vibrations.

From the original eBay listing: 2007 Aprilia Tuono 1000R for Sale

AKRAPOVIC EXHAUST SYSTEM-LITHIUM BATTERY-OHLINS STEERING STABILIZER-OHLINS REAR SHOCK-RIZOMA MMIRRORS-THROTTLEMEISTER-3D LEVERS-F/R/FRAME SLIDERS-3D FOOTPEGS & FOORESTS-SEAT COWL-FENDER ELIMINATOR-TANK PROTECTOR-BAR RISERS-NEW LITHIUM BATTERY-PUIG TINTED SCREEN-SPARE KEY. ALL FLUIDS CHANGED. 12403 MILES-EXCELLENT CONDITION.

These tend to have more miles than your average Italian sportbike, a testament to the Tuono’s practicality. Or at least its usability. Luckily, the 12,000 miles indicated are nothing to worry about, unless it’s been pretty badly abused. This one includes a few quality upgrades and features a BMW vibe with those handsome blue-and-white graphics. There are just hours left on the auction, and the bike is selling for a reasonable $6,750. You can find Italian exotica for less money, but the Tuono still offers a huge fun-to-dollar ratio, along with excellent reliability.

-tad

Naked and Unafraid: 2007 Aprilia Tuono 1000R for Sale
Honda February 15, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Honda Week Continues: 1988 Honda NSR250R for Sale

Oh god, I can only imagine the backlash in the comments as our unofficial Honda Week rolls on! Today, we’ve got a clean MC18 version of the NSR250R, Honda’s little two-stroke sportbike that took the fight to the Suzuki Gamma, Yamaha TZR, and Kawasaki KR-1. And like those bikes, it was a technological powerhouse, squeezing maximum power from the tiny engine. Introduced in 1987, these never officially made it to our shores, but are now old enough that they can be legally imported and registered in most states.

The original NSR250R MC16 was followed by the MC18 seen here in 1988. It was powered by a compact, lightweight, crankcase-inducted 249cc 90° v-twin that used Nikasil-plated cylinders for a slightly undersquare 54 x 54.5mm bore and stroke. An early version of Honda’s PGM electronic ignition and their electronic RC or “Revolutionary Controlled” powervalve gave a more flexible spread of power, and a six-speed cassette-style gearbox put power to the 18″ rear wheel that was matched to a 17″ front.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Honda NSR250R for Sale

For sale is a 1989 Honda NSR 250 two-stroke motorcycle with rare hard to find CA title and registration for street use. The bike was just serviced so it is in running condition with everything working, it has been owned by its last owner for over 18 years. It is in good shape for its age but it is not perfect. If you have any questions feel free to send me a email.

The odometer shows 17,590km, which means the bike has a little less than 11,000 miles on it. No problem if the bike has been properly maintained, and it has that all-important California title that should make a trip to the DMV somewhat less painful if you want to register it here… Probably. The MC18 is less desirable than the later MC21, let alone the MC28, but it’s still an NSR250R and should go for a good bit less: bidding is up to $3,856.00 with several days left on the auction.

-tad

Honda Week Continues: 1988 Honda NSR250R for Sale
Honda February 14, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Speak of the Devil: 1990 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale

Speaking of the RC30… After the little-brother VFR400R we posted this week, we’ve now got the legendary Honda VFR750R here on RSBFS. The RC30 wasn’t especially light, or powerful, but it was beautifully made and was incredibly easy to ride, with intuitive handling. A true sportbike icon, it represents an unusual way to approach production racing.

Most of the time, homologation bikes are tweaked and upgraded versions of regular production machines. You take your basic sportbike platform, then add an adjustable steering head, or flat-slide carburetors, or titanium engine parts, or a different bore and stroke, then build enough examples incorporating those changes to qualify the resulting machine for whichever classes you intend to enter. Instead, Honda built a low-production superbike that was sold alongside its more conventional inline-four sportbikes like the CBR.

Honda’s belief in the the V4 has obviously been validated: the format is popular in MotoGP, and several modern hyperbikes use the format for all of the same reasons Honda felt it was a winning formula. A V4 is heavier and more complex than an inline four, since it has two cylinder heads and an additional set of camshafts. But the format contributes to mass-centralization and is much narrower than an inline four, which allows for better aerodynamics.

Honda’s V4 used a set of gears to drive the overhead cams, and a 360° crankshaft to improve rear-wheel traction. Build quality was incredibly high and, with the fairing removed, the RC30’s components are densely packed in between the thick aluminum frame spars. The V4 configuration is great for handling, but it also makes a bike generally complex and hard to work on. Perfect for a bike that was designed for homologation purposes.

I’m curious about the wheels on this bike: the seller mentions that it currently wears wheels from an RC45, which is an odd choice. The original RC30 wheels would be a 17″ front and an 18″ rear, which makes the fitment of modern sportbike tires problematic. The RC45 would have a 17″ rear, but went to a 16″ front. Again, making the fitment of modern sport tires difficult. An RC45 rear and an RC30 front would make the most sense to me, but the photos don’t clearly show what’s been done here.

From the original eBay listing: 1990 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale

If you are viewing this bike, you know exactly how influential the VFR750R/RC30 was to the motorcycle world.

  • With only 3,000 being produced, RC30’s with this mileage are extremely hard to find
  • 748cc V4 powerplant is pure bliss
  • Often referred to as a Homologation Special for HRC’s World Superbike Campaign
  • This bike is believed to have 4,754 unrestored original miles
  • The bike currently has RC45 wheels and a aftermarket exhaust
  • Factory Wheels, Exhaust, and Jetting goes along with the sale
  • Rear Stand is also included with the sale
  • This RC30 has spent the last 2 years in the Throttlestop Motorcycle Museum on Display
  • The bike runs and rides beautifully
  • Paint work is very nice, no dings or issues with the gas tank
  • Lower belly pan has normal wear, see pictures
  • All the hard to find pieces are on this bike and untouched

This was the pinnacle for Honda in the late 80’s/early 90’s and is extremely timeless. Here is your chance to own one of the most desirable Sport Bikes of this era!

Bidding is active, and up to $25,100 with several days left on the auction. This example isn’t perfect, but is low-mileage, unrestored, and looks very clean in the photos. And if the RC45 wheels aren’t to your liking, the original wheels and exhaust are included, so you can put it back to stock before you lock it up in your hermetically-sealed storage vault.

-tad

Speak of the Devil: 1990 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale