Posts by Category: Moto Guzzi

Bimota February 13, 2019 posted by

Mid-Winter Roundup of Featured Listings

Even though there are prodigious cold fronts trained on both coasts, planning ahead is always in season. Here's a little review of RSBFS' recent features:

Let's start with a couple of smokin' race machines -

Featured Listing: 2018 Honda NSF250R Moto 3 Race Bike For Sale

Featured Listing: 2017 Suter MMX500 for Sale

From the 1980's we have two classic supersports, plus a unique Harley-Davidson -

Sponsored Listing: Zero-mile, 1-of-25 road-going 1994 Harley-Davidson VR1000!

Sponsored Listing: 1983 Honda CB1100F

Featured Listing – 1982 Honda CB750F Super Sport

These three are more along GT lines but very sporty -

Sponsored Listing: 1994 Suzuki GSXR-1100

Featured Listing – 1995 Yamaha GTS 1000 Euro Edition

Featured Listing: 1984 Honda CX650 Turbo!

If you are a skilled track rider there are four big-displacement racers, from classic to modern -

Featured Listing: 1991 Yamaha OW01 FZR750R Race Bike

Featured Listing: 2004 Moto Guzzi MGS-01 Corsa

Featured Listing: 2000 Ducati 748RS track bike

Featured Listing: Honest-to-God 2012 Suter BMW MotoGP bike

The 1990's were a sweet sportbike spot, and we have four currently -

Sponsored Listing: 1990 Honda CBR400RR NC29 for Sale

Sponsored Listing: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

Featured Listing: 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000

Featured Listing: 1990 Yamaha FZR750R OW01

The rest are a little of this and a little of that, or more accurately a lot of this and a lot of that -

Like a naked 2003 Yamaha R1 -

Featured Listing – 2003 Yamaha FZ1 with just 661 Miles !

Here's Honda's own winning V-twin, the 2005 RC51 SP2 -

Featured Listing: 2005 Honda RC51 SP2

Or this stealthily accessorized Monster -

Featured Listing: 2006 Ducati Monster S2R 1000 build!

This '06 SportClassic is a custom using the factory Paul Smart fairing -

Featured Listing – 2006 SportClassic 1000 with Paul Smart Fairing

From just last year, here's a Kawasaki H2R with road registration -

Featured Listing: Street-Titled 2018 Kawasaki H2R for Sale

Also looking very ready for the track, this 2004 999R is an homologation special -

Featured Listing: 2004 Ducati 999R FILA

We had two MH900E's but one has sold.  This one has never been registered -

Featured Listing: 2001 Parking Space Odyssey – NEW 2001 Ducati MH900e

And our most recent feature is this '08 1098S, fully decked out in carbon and billet aluminum -

Featured Listing: 2008 Ducati 1098S for Sale

When you're not chipping the ice off something or throwing things at the weather broadcast, check the right column on RSBFS for our sponsors and friends' latest features !  Spring is just around the corner...

Donn

Mid-Winter Roundup of Featured Listings
Moto Guzzi February 11, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000

Update 2.11.2019: Now on eBay. Good luck to buyers and seller. Links updated. -dc

We are lucky at RSBFS to be helping to offer this gorgeous 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 after a 15-year stay in a private collection. Though collection dwelling generally means a bike has sat long-term, this Goose shows 32,000 miles on the clock, which means it has been ridden and loved as much as it has been preserved.

1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona for sale on eBay

The Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 was not really built to win races itself, but to celebrate Guzzi’s victories in a spate of endurance contests in the 1980s, and to show off the Italian firm’s ability to engineer and execute a jewel of a motorcycle from somewhat unlikely sources. The bike was designed by dentist-turned-privateer racer John Wittner, and was powered by a very tweaked version of Guzzi’s enormous longitudinal high-cam v-twin. Tweaks included bigger jugs and a longer stroke, which helped the mill push out 95 horses.

From the seller:

1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 $14,995 (32K miles)

First time ever offered via the web, this has been in a private collection for the past 15 plus years, never seen rain. Custom rear cowl and paint scheme, the wheels have been redone in gold to match. Stunning spotless example of this Italian beast, Termignoni Carbon pipes makes great deep thumper noise from the motor and fuel injection tubes.
MG Daytona 1000
Claimed power: 95hp @ 8,000rpm
Top speed: 145mph
Engine: 992cc air-cooled high-cam 8-valve 90-degree V-twin
Weight: 451lb (dry)

After his team of modified Moto Guzzis won the 1984 and 1985 U.S. Endurance Championship and the 1987 Pro Twins series, U.S. Moto Guzzi guru Dr. John Wittner was made an offer he couldn’t refuse. Summoned to Italy by Guzzi godfather Alejandro de Tomaso, Wittner, a former dentist turned endurance racer, was asked to help develop a new world-beating superbike. Guzzi revealed a prototype at the 1989 Milan show and named it for the famous Florida circuit (where they won the 250-mile endurance race in 1985), but in typical Italian fashion it took until late 1991 for the Daytona to go into production.
Although the hot rod Daytona engine was based around the classic “big block” air-cooled Moto Guzzi transverse V-twin, in the end it retained only the crankshaft and crankcases of the standard engine. Using the 78mm stroke of the 948cc Le Mans 1000 combined with new plated alloy cylinders with a 90mm bore, it displaced 992cc. A bright red sport fairing melded into the gas tank just above the Daytona’s all-new cylinder heads, grandly marked “OHC 4V” for overhead camshaft 4-valve. In truth, the cams were carried high in the cylinder heads, not on top, so the engine could also be considered a high-cam design overhead valve.
From the crankshaft, a reduction gear train drove a pair of toothed belts, each spinning a single camshaft in each cylinder head, which in turn opened four valves via short pushrods operating rocker shafts. Fueling was by Weber-Marelli electronic injection, and the exhaust system was in stainless steel. The engine drove a revised version of the 5-speed transmission used on most Guzzi twins through a beefed-up clutch (with 10 springs versus eight) and a driveshaft to the rear wheel.

The powertrain hung from a new spine frame based on Dr. John’s race bike design, constructed from 1.5mm chrome-moly tubing with a cantilevered rear swingarm and a fully adjustable Koni (later WP) monoshock under the seat. Marzocchi supplied the “conventional” three-way adjustable fork, and Brembo four-pot calipers with 300mm dual discs (two-pot/260mm rear) provided stopping power. Cast alloy 17-inch wheels ran on 120-section front and 160-section rear tires.

With a claimed 95 horsepower available at 8,000rpm, the Daytona was the most powerful road-going Guzzi to date, returning a top speed of 145mph. “The result is excellent rideability, with big-time low-end and midrange power available whenever you open the throttle,” Cycle World said of the big twin in 1993. On the road, they found that being long and low in Guzzi tradition gave the Daytona reassuring stability at high speeds: “The Daytona proved unflappable, with well-damped suspension, plenty of cornering clearance, premium tires and a relatively flickable yet very stable nature.” You will not see another one anytime soon. Be different and add this thumper to your collection. This investment will only increase over time.

Contact the seller here: sennaducati79@gmail.com

Though the performance is more than enough for mortals, the Daytona 1000’s real claim to fame is its scarcity, build quality and looks. It is a true gentleman’s road racer, made more for comfortable canyon carving than dicing at the sharp end of a club race. The previous owners of this machine clearly took that mandate to heart, given the beast the exercise it deserves.

Despite its mileage, the thing looks absolutely mint, with nary a blemish, nick or streak of grime. The rear cowl wears custom livery, and the wheels have been painted gold to match the accents. That might deter the hardest-core originality freaks, but we love the look. With pedigree, acres of charm and tons of special bits, this thing is not to be missed at $14,995. Contact the seller here: sennaducati79@gmail.com

Featured Listing: 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000
Moto Guzzi January 26, 2019 posted by

Italian Oddity: 1987 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario for Sale

Even if you're an Italian bike fan, this one might have flown under your radar. But that's what we do here at RareSportbikesforSale.com: let you know that interesting bikes like the Moto Guzzi V65 Lario exist. I especially love 80s Moto Guzzis because they're generally pretty durable and very affordable. They won't set the world on fire with their performance, but they're quirky, stylish, and pretty good handlers, if you allow for the fact that it's a 32 year old motorcycle on 16" wheels.

The bike could work up a decent turn of speed, with 60hp and a five-speed gearbox that meant the bike could do an honest 110+ with good handling for the time. Oddly, Moto Guzzi's 643cc "middleweight" was a more mechanically sophisticated machine than their big Le Mans. It was still air-cooled, but had four-valve Heron-style heads, with the four valves operated by pushrods and rockers, similar to the setup used in the later four-valve Daytona. Heron heads, if you're not familiar, have flat surfaces instead of domed or hemispheric combustion chambers, with recesses cut for valves and spark plugs. Instead, Heron-head engines generally use dished-top pistons to allow room for the fuel/air charge. This means the heads are easier to produce, and Heron heads have been used in a number of automotive applications, including Jaguar's V12.

Unfortunately, the 4-valve "small block" Guzzis have a reputation for catastrophic failures. Digging around the Guzzi forums, the problem likely stemmed [ahem] from the two-piece valves that tended to fracture, although the cam and valve springs have also been blamed. Who knows? You might get lucky and the bike will be fine, or a combination of softer valve springs, a set of Suzuki 250N valves, and careful use might see you through, but… caveat emptor.

Hopefully by now that's either been an issue and rectified, or never will be a problem, but I do get a bit nervous when I see a low-mileage example come up for sale. Easy to check though, with those cylinder heads sticking out proud of the bodywork like that, and the owner may be aware of them being checked recently or repaired. Bottom line: if you buy one, try out the updated valves and springs recommended by the Guzzi message boards and ride it with your fingers crossed until it breaks, then see about finding a two-valve engine from a different model. I believe the 750cc Nevada engine is a popular choice for this, if you can find one.

I love the huge, white-faced Veglia tachometer on a bike that probably doesn't even need a tach, the padded "safety" dash, and the button key. If you've never seen an original Guzzi key from the era, the fob basically folds over once the key is in place, forming a sort of knob you turn to switch on the ignition [see above]. Bodywork is swoopy and very 80s, but will provoke questions wherever you go. First and most common: "Moto Guzzi? Who makes that?"

This isn't pristine, but is in very nice condition and should make a great, quirky weekend ride if you want something interesting and don't have a ton of cash to splash. If you're looking for a budget classic, the V35 and V50 are obviously not as fast, but sweet-handling and much more reliable. All-in-all, it's a funky little bike, but there are reasons they don't go for very much and have low miles. If you like to tinker, it might be worth a shot.

From the original eBay listing: 1987 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario for Sale

I bought this bike in 1993 and I am the second owner. Very low miles always starts up no problem, idle is a little rough when cold but fine when warmed up, carb balance is difficult to maintain on these even with the right tools. Previous owner had megaphones on it and said he had changed jets to suit, I put the original exhausts back on and messed with jets but couldn’t find any better set up than what it has now, it runs great accelerates very well  and it is pretty fast for an old 650.

The only issues I have had are leaking fuel lines and carb/intake connections, all of which have been replaced.

There are a few cosmetic issues that I tried to show in the photos, mainly with cheap plastic and paint. The fairing has a crack across it which has been repaired with a fiberglass patch across the back leaving a small step, this could be buffed and painted but the crack is only visible from the underside. The belly fairing also has a stress crack down the front; nothing has been done to it. Some of the engine paint is peeling under the carbs due to the fuel leaks and on the bevel gear housing; the front forks have a few scratches due to tag stickers and their removal. Some of the red wheel paint is flaking but this is an easy fix.

The air cleaner box has been removed and K&N filters installed and the seat replaced with a Corbin single. The only other mod was to replace the remote choke lever assembly with individual carb mounted levers. I have the remote assembly.

It has the original tool kit, a few spares, including the megaphones, at least two keys and a clear title.

I can deliver to a shipping point within 50 miles of Columbia SC.

The price is right, the bike is funky, and it makes Italian v-twin noises, although there's more sound than fury. The biggest limiting factor could be the 16" wheels: rear tires are particularly hard to find in the correct sizes, and some of the bigger Guzzis suffered handling issues when fitted with the smaller hoop. They look a little strange too. 18" wheels supposedly fixed the bigger Gooses, so maybe that's an option here, if you don't like the way the Lario goes around corners. Parts may also be hard to come by, although these days you can probably get used bits from Europe via eBay.

-tad

Italian Oddity: 1987 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario for Sale
Moto Guzzi January 18, 2019 posted by

The Manly Ride: 1978 Moto Guzzi Le Mans

My knowledge of French comes courtesy of car manufacturer Renault (pronounced Run-Not) who marketed Le Car in the 1970s. It came with Le Tires, Le Hubcaps, and Le tiny little motor. But it was, according to Renault, a car. Popular Mechanics dubbed it a French VW Rabbit, low on style but practical and useful. Thankfully the Italians speak foreign languages better than we Yanks. And in Italian, Le Mans is not merely The Men, but rather a reference to a popular French vacation locale along the Sarthe river. Oh, and also the name of a pretty famous racetrack known for endurance competition. And unlike Le Car, the Le Mans is high on style, while still offering practicality and performance. Today's find is a first generation 850cc example in Le Euro trim.

1978 Moto Guzzi Le Mans for sale on eBay

The Moto Guzzi Le Mans was introduced in 1976. Today we think of these as Gen I machines, however there was no such official nomenclature for the original release; that came with the introduction of the Gen II design. There were two different builds of this model, referred to as Series One and Series Two. The Series One bikes were the first (approximately) 2,000 examples, and the most rare. The Series Two bikes had some minor cosmetic changes (different seat, rectangular tail light, black fork sliders, etc), and numbered approximately 4,000. Either way you look at it, the first generation of the Le Mans is relatively rare today - especially one wearing original patina and remaining relatively stock.

From the seller:
1978 Moto Guzzi Lemans euro. I've owned and cared for this bike since early 2001.

It started it's life in London,England, was moved to Los Angeles, where i purchased it, and now lives in Ohio where i now work. I have a bit of paperwork on the provenance of the bike. This Moto Guzzi is a very low mileage bike that is all original except for raask period rearsets and side covers. I have the original foam seat, front turn signals, and one of the original sidecovers. The right side cover was lost 20 years ago on a freeway. All of these items are included and in excellent condition.

The aftermarket seat was an item I purchased from Italy 15 years ago. It has proved to be a good looking, functional piece for this bike. This Guzzi runs like a freight train, like original, unmolested lemans should. Only Guzzi and Ducati savvy mechanics have touched this bike it's whole life.

The euro models have non matching frame and engine numbers, all can be traced, and a short headlight frame, and no bright orange fairing paint job. This bike has an excellent original patina, no crashes, dents, etc. Engine is very tight, with only some minor weep dusting at the back. Makes you wonder why people ever had to restore these bikes. All gauges, electrical work as expected.

These early Moto Guzzis can be thought of as very similar to air-head era BMWs. The hardware layout of air-cooled twin with longitudinal crank, pushrod two-valve heads, inline transmission and shaft drive is the same - if you bent the Beemer's cylinders upwards 45 degrees per side. Brakes on both are Brembos. Swap the Bing carbs for Dellortos and you have Le Guzzi! Blip the throttle and the torque roll is the same between the Italian and German machine. So too is the driveshaft reaction that causes the rear of the bike to raise under throttle, and drop when the throttle is cut. But resemblances end there. Unlike the Teutonic autobhan stormer, the Le Mans is just so, well, Italian. The Le Mans looks faster, offers a reasonably stout 80 HP thanks to high compression pistons, and offers the immutable "cafe racer" look before that look was a collector thing.

This particular bike started life across the pond, but now lives in the US. As a result it wears some cosmetic differences compared to officially imported examples. The owner(s) have also made some mods, all which look to be non destructive. The black side covers look period correct, but the originals were color coded to the bike (fun fact: not all Le Mans models were red/black). So this is not perfectly original as if it were parked in a museum since Day 1 - but you should age this well. At 41 years new, this bike is just hitting its mechanical stride, and is perfect for a rider. Prices are always hot for pre-80s Guzzis, and this one is starting right at the five figure territory (with no takers as of yet). Check it out here, and then hit the Comments for a compare and contrast: How do you take your vintage Guzzi? Would you prefer a plain V7, or the Le Mans? Let us know, and Le Good Luck!!

MI

The Manly Ride:  1978 Moto Guzzi Le Mans
Moto Guzzi January 12, 2019 posted by

Cool As a Cucumber: 1991 Moto Guzzi 1000S

When you think retro-cool, it's hard not to picture Moto Guzzi. Long the archaic slugger in a room full of mixed martial arts experts, Moto Guzzi created (relatively) modern machinery faithful to the image built over decades. The elder statesman in nearly every motorcycle manufacturer conversation, M-G made their way by choosing their own path. And while some may argue their path was not too wisely chosen given that technology and competition have passed them by, the fact remains that Moto Guzzi is Europe's oldest motorcycle constructor still in operation. We will politely ignore the number of starts and stops and owners endured throughout the years, and focus instead on the highlights. Place this 1000S against, say, an original 900cc Ninja (a watershed bike by all sport bike standards), and the Moto Guzzi will be blown away in most performance contests. Yet that Ninja was introduced nearly a decade before the 1000S. Such tales tell of what is important in the long run, and this Guzzi looks absolutely classic and solid while today the Ninja resembles a love child from the age of plastic (although we love it dearly). Guzzis have a solid look, and a solid feel and a long term presence - and this does not come by accident.

1991 Moto Guzzi 1000S for sale on eBay

Powered by a lumpy, booming, 1000cc V-twin, the 1000S follows the classic Moto Guzzi recipe: Big slugs at low RPM, 2-valve head with big valves for good airflow, air cooled with carburetors for simplicity, and the classic crankcase webbing on the outside to give the whole motor/trans assembly a carved out of billet look. The lines are long and muscular, and there is just enough chrome to make the whole package stand out - without looking tacked on. Wire wheels add to the retro factor, but they are also robust and light. With its big tank, long seat and "old fashioned" round headlamp and stick-up square tail lamp, the 1000S looks like a bike from another era. And it many, many ways, it really is. Twin shocks work without any progressive mechanism, and beware the jacking effect of the shaft drive mid-corner. All problems of another era, pulled (unwillingly) in to the 1990s.

From the seller:
I have decided to part ways with one of my 1991 Moto Guzzi 1000s bikes.
This one is the sought after green frame and graphics
It is also the Big Valve model.
It has a little over 24k miles,
It runs excellent, just needs a new home.
Tires are like brand new, looks amazing.
This bike is show ready or ride the heck out of it, it’s also an amazing runner!
One of the coolest bikes around for sure and rarely on the market.
I have another that I will be posting up for sale as soon as this one runs, along with others.
Clean and clear title,
I will gladly store the bike until shipping or pickup is arranged.

The first thing you will undoubtedly notice is the color. What is it about Italians and their love of colors not usually found in the palette of other manufacturers? Ducati celebrates the green frame 750 SS, Bianchi bicylces offers their own unique green color. Moto Guzzi dabbled in the color as well, creating a striking - yet relatively rare - shade of the spectrum. Aside from the retro aspect and the color, one cannot help but notice how clean this bike is. Stare at the pictures and drool away. This bike is seriously sano, and is well represented. It is also located right here in the U.S. of A. That's right - no overseas locales, strange importation deals, or foreign currency. Win!

Like a solid stock market choice, the older Guzzis are appreciating steadily. Classic lines are always in demand, and this particular example is no exception. With a Buy It Now of $21,000 USD, entry to this party is not cheap. But quality and longevity are rarely the basis for bargain hunters. Look carefully and remember back when you saw such a unique color combo Guzzi in this type of condition. You may argue with the "sport bike" part of it, but this example is every bit a RSBFS worthy addition. Check it out here, and then share your thoughts. This beast screams "want!" to me. Does it rev up the retro longings in you? Good Luck!!

MI

Cool As a Cucumber: 1991 Moto Guzzi 1000S
Featured Listing January 3, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2004 Moto Guzzi MGS-01 Corsa

1.3.2019: Dave has renewed his Featured Listings and is adding a couple more in the next few days, stay tuned. Thanks for supporting the site and good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

If there was ever any question about RSBFS bringing you the best classifieds online every day, this Featured Listing of the ultimate Italian unicorn should erase all doubts. Nor is this gem hidden in some far-flung corner of the globe, but rather in the continental U.S., Seattle, WA. If you've been drooling and dreaming about a MGS-01, there will never be a better opportunity than now - this very nearly brand new beast awaits a new home.

Featured Listing: 2004 Moto Guzzi MGS-01 Corsa!

Moto Guzzi made a statement the way only Moto Guzzi could: building a racer to go after the legendary 916 racebike. As audacious as that sounds (and given the winning streak of that other Italian machine), Guzzi pulled out all the stops to meet the goal. While in difficult straights from a financial and business perspective, Moto Guzzi still had the kind of legendary cachet to make a splash on the world's stage. Employing well-known design and speed merchants Ghezzi & Brian with a miniscule 9-month commission, the MGS-01 (Moto Guzzi Sport - model number one) Corsa (race only) made its debut at the Intermot show in Munich, Germany in 2002. The result stunned the press and the public, and set tongues wagging about a massive comeback from the world's oldest motorcycle manufacturer in continuous production.

From the seller:
How do you even begin to describe this bike? The bike that was never meant to be?? This bike was purchased in November 2006 by a collector and has been stored away until 2014 when Moto International “woke it up” for its first time. It was taken around the block and then placed back into environmentally controlled storage again until it arrived here at SUB last week. 1225cc of Italian Thunder, one of a kind for sure. Bike comes with rear stand, a garage cover and a spare set of race bodywork.

2004 Moto Guzzi MGS-01 Corsa – under 5 miles – ZGULRRA004M10045 – $55,000.00

Contact: Dave at Seattle Used Bikes (dave@seattleusedbikes.com)

While potentially tame by today's standards, one look at this large cubic centimeter v-twin belies anything but. Passe use of air cooling shows deep roots, but with a deep oil sump and large oil cooler hidden behind the headlight area the MGS-01 is an Italian take on the air/oil cooled first generation GSX-R. Technology rears its head in the form of the 4-valve heads and includes special hi-temp metallurgy to ensure high RPM longevity. The big slugs that slide through the ceramic-lined cylinders are specialty items from Cosworth. Ultimate power came in at 122 HP at 8000rpm, with a 83 lb/ft wall of torque at 6500 RPM. The tranny is an upgraded six-speed unit. The frame was a one-off, suspended by Ohlins front and rear, and riding on specialty OZ Racing wheels. Braking is brick-wall solid stopping power thanks to radial mount Brembos with floating rotors. Although shaft drive is retained, this is a no-holds barred racebike.

There are some who may not view this as a legitimate racer - which flies in the face of Mike Baldwin winning an AMA championship on a Guzzi 850. The DNA is there, the roots are there, but unfortunately the finances and follow-through were not. Moto Guzzi, first acquired by Aprilia - who was later acquired by scooter conglomerate Piaggio - continues to market a few motorcycles based on the successful V7 concept, but the MGS-01 was the last of the real thunder. And while the world held its collective breath for a new model to appear with lights and horn, sadly none arrived. Thus, the racer (the wealthy gentleman's track day bike) is all that remains of the project. An estimated 150 Corsas were scheduled to be built, with as few as 50 to be sent to the US. In typical Italian fashion numbers are very hard to corroborate - but rest assured that you are looking at something very rare and very special indeed.

This particular example has but 5 miles - total. Long a collector museum piece, VIN number "...0045" was brought to life in 2014. This is as close to new - with veracity of having been run - that you can get, and far better than most of these (few) models we have seen. The price is very much in line with historical numbers, and represents a bargain compared to where this bike will go. This model is part myth, part miracle and utterly magnificent. The legend of the MGS-01 has grown since inception, as has the waiting list for an available example. If you are in the market, RSBFS recommends you contact Dave quickly - this is one bike that will not hang out for long. Good Luck!

MI

Featured Listing: 2004 Moto Guzzi MGS-01 Corsa