Posts by Category: Honda

Honda March 30, 2019 posted by

Low Tech, Big Fun: 1997 Honda CBR600 F3 for Sale

When the original “jellymould” CBR600F Hurricane was introduced in 1987 the enclosed, sleekly aerodynamic fairing hid a dark secret: a steel frame. While racier competitors had switched to lightweight aluminum construction, the simple, effective CBR600 F3 stuck with the less expensive material until the CBR600 F4 was introduced in 1999. Although the styling was hyper-modern, it also helped Honda save money on manufacturing and development costs. Instead of a finished frame and engine cases, or carefully routed wiring and hoses, the whole functional mess could all just be hidden behind relatively cheap, sleek plastic. So while pragmatism may have driven the design and the ingredients were, on their own, not very exotic, the complete package was a world-beater when it was introduced.

Produced between 1995 and 1998, the F3 was an evolution of the earlier CBR600 F2. Compared to that bike, it offered adjustable cartridge forks, a Pro-Link rear, and and ram-air to feed the engine. The result was a few more ponies from the 599cc inline four and a 454lb wet weight. That might sound heavy for a 600, but it was just a couple pounds heavier than a ZX-6R or GSX-R600 of the same period, and actually a good bit lighter than the aluminum-framed YZF600. At a claimed 105hp, peak power wasn’t best-in-class either, but the CBR offered a smooth spread of power with no real dips or flat spots, the perfect balance in a road engine and pretty handy on track as well.

The CBR600 was always pitched as a more versatile mount than competitors from Suzuki and Kawasaki, a bike that was at home in the canyons, in the city, and could even do a bit of commuting or light touring. The CBR600 was never really about the numbers, it was about the complete package, a sort of Goldilocks solution to the Supersport problem. It didn’t make the most in-class horsepower. It wasn’t the lightest. It didn’t have much in the way of headline-stealing innovation. It didn’t even have any acronyms plastered across the fairings!

It also made a perfectly good foundation for a racebike, winning multiple AMA SuperSport Championships, and didn’t seem to suffer at all for its relatively ordinary underpinnings. Eventually, the entire class became more and more track focused, and led to the development of the CBR600RR that was sold alongside the CBR600 F4i as a direct alternative to the high-strung offerings from Suzuki, Kawasaki, and Yamaha. But for a while, Honda’s versatile CBR meant you really could have your cake and eat it too.

This particular machine needs a bit of maintenance before it time-warps you back to your youth, but the miles are shockingly low for such a practical machine, and it looks to be in exceptional cosmetic condition. It may never be as desirable as a CBR900, but I these are certainly functional classics and much more attainable, since prices for the bigger machine are currently spiraling upwards and nice examples are hard to find.

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Honda CBR600 F3 for Sale

Hello, up for sale is my 1997 Honda CBR600F3 with 2,916 orig miles.  Clean title in hand in my name. Bought it 4 years ago and spent lots of time and money trying to make it near perfect (it’s the same model, year and color as what I had in college so it was me trying to relive my youth). Sadly, my bad back in combination with it being too dangerous for a slow, fat guy like myself to ride in Vegas forces the sale.  I have all receipts and replaced parts baggies/boxes for every OEM part I put on it. I saved the old parts to prove it wasn’t wrecked. Feel free to contact me to see it in person 850-five 86-38two8.  Not showroom perfect but damn nice for a 1997! PS: front chock included!

The bad: carbs need to be cleaned. Ran fine in 2014 and I did drain bowls before tear down but no luck in getting it started. Needs battery too as no point in buying one and letting it rot.

The good: over $1,000 in brand new parts. No cracked fairings at all!

  • Brand new oil and filter
  • Brand New Dunlop Q3s with not 1 mile on them – $285 mounted
  • New Ariete 90degree valve stems in gold – $29
  • Powder coated rims in gold – $175

The following all new OEM parts

  • Front lower chin – $35
  • Left side lower fairing – $374
  • Alternator cover and gasket – $69
  • Parts below over $400
  • Various OEM decals still new in OEM packing for spares – $149

The CBR600 may have been anything but exotic, but that was exactly the point: it was an everyman sportbike, and it was damn good at being that. The shape has aged pretty well I think, and the non-standard gold-painted wheels really flatter the Erion Racing-inspired colors. It’s a shame that this attempt to capture the seller’s youth has been put up for sale, but his loss is your gain! Can you really put a price on reliving the dreams of your youth? Apparently you can, and those dreams are going to cost you $3,950.00. That Buy It Now price is obviously on the high-end for an F3, but if this one is as nice in person as it looks in pictures, I think you’d be hard-pressed to find a better example with so few miles.

-tad

Low Tech, Big Fun: 1997 Honda CBR600 F3 for Sale
Honda March 27, 2019 posted by

Learning Curve – 1992 Honda CBR400RR

Most often Rothmans livery is seen on two-stroke race replicas, but this middleweight is a 399cc inline four.  It’s a grey market import from Japan, registered in Florida and looking excellent with just under 7,000 miles.

   

1992 Honda CBR400RR for sale on eBay

 

Sometimes referred to as the “baby ‘Blade”, the CBR400RR was developed several years earlier, but restyled in 1992 to accompany the Fireblade to the showroom.  It was also built like a larger bike, alloy twin spars of the chassis and swingarm ready for much more than the factory 59 hp.  Faired scoops deliver fresh air to the engine, by way of four 26mm flat slide carbs.  Showa suspension all around, preload-only adjustable, leaving room for enhancements.  Grown-up dual discs are 276mm, and dry weight is just 360 lbs.

 

This CBR has low miles and is nicely presented.  Some corrosion is almost to be expected but is not readily apparent.  Expert readers will have to comment on the correctness of the fairings and livery, but it’s at least complete.  No word on the reason for the sale, but from an island on Florida’s west coast, this owner has an hour’s slog through Fort Myers to get to some open riding.  Just a couple of comments from the eBay auction:

Beautiful NC29 1992 CBR400RR in Rothmans paint.  Low miles, runs great, very clean, new battery and chain. Florida title ready to go.  Direct Japanese grey market import.

Designer Masanori Aoki was a youngish pro when he led the CBR400RR effort, staying with Honda through the 1800cc Gold Wing, and more recently the Rune factory-custom.  Designed as junior machine for learning riders, the CBR gained a great following in the sporty grey market.  Though committee-designed and conforming to Honda’s value-engineering principles, it’s still a high-revving, lightweight, and beautiful package.

-donn

Learning Curve – 1992 Honda CBR400RR
Honda March 25, 2019 posted by

Late-century modern: 1999 Honda CBR 900RR

This is what a sportbike should still look like, if you ask me. Loud, high-contrast, aggressive graphics wrapped around a stubby, purposeful chassis carrying more engine than makes sense. There are, of course, a ton of newer bikes that hit the right aesthetic notes, but none have the same Air Jordan vibe of the mid-late ’90s bikes. This 1999 Honda CBR900RR hits all those perfect notes, and is in excellent condition so the madness can be fully appreciated.

1999 Honda CBR900RR for sale on eBay

It has clearly been garaged and well cared for, and the seller says he recently checked the valves and made sure the carbs are clean. It has also apparently been lowered. It’s not a flawless bike after 20 years and 14,000 miles, but it’s an excellent rider that stands above most other CBR900RRs you’ll run across.

From the eBay listing:

This bike is probably the cleanest CBR900 you will see in awhile ,it is all stock except Yoshimura bolt on and braided steel brake lines…it has been lowered about an inch or two…it has a threaded adjuster bikes has a spot or two on fairings…small blemish….all who see it say its like new. Runs perfect as it should, valves were checked by me as were carburetors…I have over 30 years exp….has Yoshimura bolt on exhaust, braided steel brake lines ….any questions call 407-791-3584

By the time this bike was built, the model’s star had faded somewhat, as the Yamaha R1 had bowed the year before and managed to scare the pants off anyone with the brass to go near its limit. When the Honda CBR900RR debuted in 1992, it had landed with a similar seismic impact. It had the stature of a 600 but an engine that very closely approached the power of its rivals’ 1,000cc offerings. With less weight to pull around and snappy handling thanks in part to a 16-inch front wheel, the 900 made everything else seem a little flabby and out of touch.

The later CBR900s had a very slightly punched out engine, a stiffened chassis and bigger brakes than the original. An angular single headlight had replaced the original’s iconic round-eyed visage.

If you’re looking for a really nice now-classic sportbike to liven up your weekends, this thing looks like the ticket. Since it’s a later model, it might not approach the collectibilty of the originals, but it’ll stand out anywhere you take it.

Honda March 14, 2019 posted by

Repsol Replica in California: 1994 Honda NSR250R SP MC28 for Sale

Pretty much the only way this Honda NSR250R could be more desirable would be for it to be in Rothmans colors. Honestly, I’m not even the biggest fan of race-replica schemes, but nobody does them like Honda, and the Repsol colors are a close second. But even in its “generic” colors, the MC28 version of Honda’s two-stroke sportbike represents some of the most advanced technology of the time, from the obvious, ELF-designed Pro-Arm single-sided swingarm to the very trick PGM-IV electronic ignition system.

That single-sided swinger increased weight, compared to a more conventional design, but Honda’s PGM-IV was incredibly advanced. The bike still used a pair of carburetors to fuel the 90° liquid-cooled two-stroke v-twin, but every other component was cutting edge, taking sensor input from the throttle position, gear-selection, and rpm to create three-dimensional ignition maps for each cylinder and adjust Honda’s RC “Revolutionary Controlled” Valve.

There was no conventional ignition key on the MC28. Instead, you need one of Honda’s credit card-sized… cards that also housed the bike’s ignition map. De-restricting the MC28 is particularly difficult, since, ideally, you’d need to locate one of the factory HRC cards with a full-power map, or you’re stuck with the government-mandated 45hp. The SP version of the NSR seen here added a dry clutch to hook the 249cc twin to the six-speed cassette gearbox, along with lightweight Magtek magnesium wheels for reduced unsprung weight and a bit of additional flash.

From the original eBay listing: 1994 Honda NSR250R SP for Sale

1994 Honda NSR250SP
Credit card model
HRC parts
Repsol colors
TSR expansion chambers and exhaust
TYGA triple crown
Ohlins shock
TYGA digital gauge
Racetech forks
Nissan disc brakes
Michelin tires
Excellent condition
Runs fantastic

Call or text for fastest response. 949-290-5162. Thank you, Brian. 

Great bike, but so many questions. Why is the mileage listed as “NA”? It’s located in California, but does it have a California title? Has it been de-restricted, or is it still rocking the Japanese-market 45hp? All of these things could conceivably influence the value of the bike significantly, and the $10,400 Buy It Now price suggests that the answer to the last two questions could be “no,” but it’s definitely worth messaging the seller if you’re interested in the bike.

-tad

Repsol Replica in California: 1994 Honda NSR250R SP MC28 for Sale
Honda March 9, 2019 posted by

Twice as nice: 1979 Honda CBX

The mighty CBX is one of those bikes that don’t really make a lot of sense to some riders. While a liter bike in size, that size is really the problem. Rather than a twin or even a four-banger, the CBX is a bona fide six lanes wide when viewed from the front. A wild and strong statement by Honda when it was released, there is much about the CBX that is stuff of legends. This was the cusp of the 1980s, and Honda was firing a shot across all bows; they had engineering and technology and were not afraid to use it.

Italian firm Benelli created the first factory inline six cylinder motorcycle, but Honda upped the tech ante and mass produced it. Starting in 1978, the early models were six-banger versions of the bikes of the time: standards. Today the standard is known by the more evocative alias of naked, but that is only because after the discovery of ABS plastic nearly every motorcycle since has been a molded canvas of one stylist or another. I’m not discounting the aerodynamic (or aesthetic) benefits of bodywork, but bikes like this CBX provide that hanging it all out where it can be seen really makes a lasting impression.

From the seller:
Beautiful and very clean 1979 Honda in Pegasus Silver with 2,075 miles since restoration. Please note, true mileage before complete restoration is unknown. Starts very easily and runs strong. Everything is ready to go riding or to be a great collectors piece.

Very reasonable reserve. Here is what is known about the bike.

I had been seeking a 100% stock and complete 1979 CBX in Silver for many years to add to my collection of 12 bikes. (Wife calls it a disease.)
Bike was owned by a gentlemen in Florida who passed away around 2010. Bike had a complete nut and bolt restoration completed by Tim’s CBX International in Georgia. (Verified by Bill @ Tim’s). Tim’s early restorations, when OEM Honda parts were more readily available, are regarded by many as the best CBX restorations to be found. The paint work is fantastic. Chrome is bright.
Spouse eventually sold the bike to Louis Mintrone, distributor of CBX parts in Florida in 2017. I purchased this Bike from Louis Mintrone in 2017.

More from the seller:
I shipped the bike to Preston Marks of CBX Motorworks. Although the bike had very few miles since restoration, I had Preston go completely through the bike again as it had set for awhile. Carburetors were Flushed, Rebuilt and Sync’ed. All fluids including brake fluids were flushed. Amsoil motor oil and brake fluids were used. Many rubber intake boots, seals and gaskets were replaced. New Battery installed. New Swing arm bushings were installed. New Bridgestone Battlax tires, in the correct size were mounted and balanced.
Bike is in stock conditions with a few small exceptions. Brake lines are braided Stainless steel instead of the stock rubber hoses. Brake lines are better than Stock so I kept them. Dyna coils and electronic ignition were installed during the restoration to eliminate the weak stock coils and ignition points. Progressive Shocks are installed in the rear for better handling. I have the original OEM shocks (see photograph) that is included with the sale.

I located a reproduction owners manual and a stock tool kit that is included. The tool kit is complete with the exception of the OEM Shock spanner wrench is missing.

Issues that are know are very , very minor. The right side exhaust muffler has some minor rust “pin holes” on the very bottom of the exhaust collector. Very minor but it is there for full disclosure. (see Photo). Left side muffler is solid. Also a small fin, under the motor and next to the drain plug is chipped. (see Photo) Very minor but again, full disclosure. That is everything known. Bike is available for preview.

Sold with a clean Texas title. Title mileage is marked “EXEMPT” as is standard in Texas for vehicle of this age and again, mileage before restoration is unknown. Since the bike has been in my collection, it has been stored in a climate controlled garage, under a cover with a Battery tender.

More from the seller:
I am selling the CBX because after many years of enjoyment, I am selling my entire collection of 12 motorcycles. This bike is the next to last to be sold. This CBX and my Norton Commando are the last 2 bikes to be offered for sale. It is time for someone else to enjoy.
The bike is located in a Northern Suburb of Dallas. Should you want more information, message me with your phone number or email address and I will get back to you.

Shipping is the responsibility of the buyer. As I have done my best to describe this beautiful bike, it is 40 years old so no warranties. Upon pick up of the bike, if it is not as described, I will refund all deposits.

The CBX is old enough to have a loyal following of riders and collectors who get it. And prices for these mammoth machines proves it. Prices are regularly in the teens for well-preserved or restored examples, and today’s specimen has been gone through not once but twice! The forecast for CBX models continues to remain strong. They may not appreciate in value as quickly as certain homologation machines but with great examples (and parts!) becoming a bit more rare you will find that good examples will always find a home in the market. This is a long-term buy if you’re looking to flip, but an awesome showcase and an interesting, classic rider. The advert claims only 2,000 miles on the restoration, but total mileage unknown. As always, RSBFS recommends you do your homework and ask questions. But there is no doubt that this example is clean, clean clean. Check it out here as there are only a few more days left to go. Bidding has been moderate, and there is still a reserve in place. Good luck!!

MI

Twice as nice: 1979 Honda CBX
Featured Listing March 7, 2019 posted by

Sponsored Listing: Moto3 Honda NSF250RW for Sale!

Why buy a race replica when you can pick up an actual race bike? Today’s Sponsored Listing from our friends over at Amatumoto GP Motorbikes is a Honda NSF250RW, and it’s no stripped-down streetbike in race plastics, it’s an evolution of the machine that won last year’s Moto3 Constructors Championship in a very competitive field. If you’ve never watched Moto3, the racing is very close, with bikes nose-to-tail at 145mph.

For years, the “lowest” of the three tiers of Grand Prix racing used to be the domain of tiny little two-stroke 125cc machines that weighed less than an average adult American male. This of course gave the class differentiation a nice symmetry, with 125cc, 250cc, and 500cc machines. But in 2012, the smallest class shifted to a formula using 250cc four-strokes to match MotoGP’s move away from two-strokes. Bikes are limited to singles with a bore of no more than 81mm, four valves, a rev ceiling of 13,500rpm, and a minimum weight for the combined bike and rider of 326lbs.

Unlike Moto2, where the entire field uses a single engine [formerly Honda, now Triumph] to keep costs down and ensure close racing, Moto3 allows a variety of engine builders to participate. While physically much larger than a two-stroke of similar displacement, the Honda single still needed to be as light and compact, while taking advantage of every opportunity to save weight, increase power, and centralize mass. To that end, the 249cc engine has its cylinder head reversed, with the ram-air intake to the front and the exhaust exiting to the rear. Other manufacturers have experimented with this configuration with varied success, but here, the main goal appears to be mass-centralization.

The engine is canted backwards in the frame 15°, allowing the engine to be placed further forward in the chassis and maximize airbox volume, with a bore and stroke of 78 x 52.2mm, below the class maximum bore size. The engine is backed, naturally, but a six-speed cassette gearbox for quick ratio changes to maximize the small engine’s potential, and the package weighs in at a claimed 185lbs dry.

From the Seller: Moto3 Honda NSF250RW for Sale!

Do you want a Moto3 Honda NSF250RW? Our company can get the most exclusive bikes of the market. Only for VIP customers, museums or exclusive collectors! Contact with our team and inform yourself. Only 2 units available – RESERVE NOW

In our VIP club you will find the most exclusive race and road bikes, also you can offer your bike for manage the sale. We work with customers to worldwide and we want offer the best service and products.

At Amatumoto Grand Prix Motorbikes Store, we take pride to have in our stock great exclusive bikes used on the races. That said, we understand that the collector of bikes hobby is enjoyed by some of the most passionate and diverse enthusiasts on the planet. Simply put: there are just too many awesome styles to fit in to one showroom. No need to worry though, as we’re happy to search for the bike of your dreams. Just give us a bit of pertinent information and we’ll keep an eye out. Amatumoto can build a READY to RACE bike… with engine, exhaust, wiring on demand with the specs that choose our customers.

Contact us via our website: http://www.gpmotorbikes.com/

If you’re a track day junkie or a racer, this is your opportunity to buy a very serious piece of hardware. Just add sponsor decals!

-tad

Sponsored Listing: Moto3 Honda NSF250RW for Sale!
Honda March 2, 2019 posted by

A Nordic Natural: 1988 Honda VFR750R RC30

The multiple motorcycle auctions in Las Vegas in January each year are somewhat of a bellwether for prices overall. Sure, pricing is a bit over-inflated due to peer-pressure, bidding competition and the general excitement of the auction atmosphere, but what sells high at these auctions will generally do well on the open market. If you’ve never been, you should definitely consider going – at least once. The lights, the noise, and the thousands of bikes that cross the block over multiple days and multiple auction houses are a sight to behold. It also gives you an appreciation for what is hot, and what has cooled off (or failed to make the cut). But you didn’t need to attend – or even follow – this year’s auctions to know that the RC30 is hot. Possibly the most collectible of the 80s vintage homologation racers, the VFR750R tops the bucket list of many, and remains on a rocket ship trajectory in terms of value. If you want one you will have to stand in line, and bring your wallet.

1988 Honda VFR750 RC30 for sale on eBay

The RC30 is known for good looks, sharp handling, and glorious sound. The latter comes courtesy of a mass-centralized V4 engine, utilizing gear-driven cams for precise valve control – which contributes to that legendary and iconic whine. The flatter sound of the RC30 exhaust is the result of a 360°crankshaft. The approach results in greater traction due to the more widely distributed power cycles (when compared with a conventional 180° crank). Everything that makes beautiful noises also helps with the sharper handling; pull the bodywork off of an RC30 and you quickly realize how packed in tight everything is. Mass centralization is the real deal, and the more you can concentrate weight centrally and down low, the easier the bike will be to flick from side to side, etc. And while those who are lucky enough to see an RC30 in its naked form will call that magical V4 beautiful, the good looks really come from the beefy aluminum twin spar frame and endurance racing inspired bodywork. The twin headlamps are straight out of the 80s, and they went straight into the book of classic looks. The single sided swing arm completes the package, and proved its worth during wheel changes at the racetrack – especially during those endurance events.

From the seller:
Selling my rc30 vfr750r, very low mileage (3553km) and extremely well take care of. 100% working order. Been standing in the living room as eye candy since bought in 2002.
Got first bought in Germany by the original owner,then driven to Monaco and back, after that parked in his office. I then later purchased it. (2002)

The bike is located in Norway (Sarpsborg).
Contact me for more info/pictures.
Price is 500,000 nok (Norwegian Kroner)
We can help with shipping.

Most RC30 we find these days are collector bikes. It is pretty rare indeed to find a RC30 thrasher, and few are regular riders. This particular bike has but 3,500 KM (2,200 miles) and appears to be in complete, original order. Which brings us to problem #1: as RC30 enthusiasts are not limited to North America, this wonderful example is located in Norway. US-based buyers might want to start consulting shipping and importation guides now. Problem #2: RC30s are no longer $15k, $20K, $25K or even $30k. The asking price on these models continues to rise. This particular example is asking well neigh on $60k. And the worst part for those that have a hankerin’ for homologation is that the asking price is not really out of line with where the market is going. We have seen higher asks – much higher – and not just at auction. Check it out here. Look over the pictures. And then decide if you want to board the RC30 price elevator. We have seen nothing but up for these models with nary a dip in valuation over the years. If you want in, you best commit before these are $75k and then $100k bikes. Good Luck!!

MI

A Nordic Natural: 1988 Honda VFR750R RC30
Honda February 24, 2019 posted by

Nickel Defense – 1986 Honda VF500F

Mid-1980’s Honda covered the flanks of their bigger VF-series sportbikes with the sharp-handling VF-500F.  This example had low miles before an unplanned break in the action, but has had inside storage and is looking for a new home.

1986 Honda VF500F for sale on eBay

While Honda’s double cradle of square tubing might not be futuristic, it provides a stable platform for the DOHC V-4 which is pretty state of the art.  The very oversquare 498cc engine makes 70 hp and revs to almost 12,000 rpm.  Showa forks are air-adjustable and incorporate Honda’s TRAC anti-dive system.  Under the seat an adjustable Kayaba monoshock limits the aluminum swingarm.  Brakes are triple 255 mm disks, with four piston calipers up front.  Livery for 1986 involved a red seat and fork, but the blue and red were more HRC than earlier models.

This VF500F is garaged but it sounds like higher priorities have gotten in the way.  The left rear turn signal could use a new mount, and the right front fairing has a scrape, but otherwise it’s all there.  Low miles for the age and along with a little re-commissioning maintenance, it just needs a shining up here and there.  Notes from the eBay auction:

Clear title. Nice bike. Well maintained and owned by a certified Honda mechanic. 15,549 miles.  Unfortunately my hubby Mr. Hondaholic, is incapacitated at the moment so I (his wife) am selling this for us.  Been garaged and kept on trickle charger (Gets fired up routinely).  Only thing I can see wrong with it is the right rear blinker is taped up and there is an abrasion on the left side of fairing.

1986 was the last year for the V-4 500, replaced by the CBR600 in 1987.  Reviewed as a nice handling roadster, the compact riding position and finicky cold running were the only squawks.  While not perfect, the scrape on the fairing is limited to the blue area and as re-finishable as it could get.  Good chance to get into a great V-4 and help out a fellow rider.

-donn

Nickel Defense – 1986 Honda VF500F
Honda February 18, 2019 posted by

OG Race rep: 1981 Honda CB1100RB

It’s hard to fathom exactly how far motorcycle design has come in the last 38 years without a concrete comparison. I could spill superlatives and adjectives for the next 600 words and still not touch it. Instead, please Google “Ducati Panigale V4R” and compare what comes up to the bike you see here. I’ll wait.

1981 Honda CB1100R for sale on eBay

With that out of the way, consider that these two machines are versions of the same thing, but separated by a generation. The 1981 Honda CB1100RB was, at its birth, the scariest thing your dentist could afford. With precious few concessions made to comfort or practical daily use, it was, as the Panigale is now, built for well-heeled enthusiasts to see how fast they could mess their leathers.

Even by today’s standards, the thing is pretty stout. The big, air-cooled four pushes out 115 horsepower — as much as a late ’90s Honda Civic — but weighs less than your fridge. On terrifying, narrow early-’80s rubber, there is absolutely no need for more. It will still out-handle, out-brake and out-accelerate your feeble mortal mind.

To earn its ‘R’ badge, the 1981 Honda CB1100RB eschewed a pillion seat, gathered a long list of lightened engine internals and bigger carbs, and got air-assisted forks and prodigious brakes. Modern reviewers still rave about how seamlessly the whole package works, and how eagerly the bike goes, stops, turns, and eats tires, chains, brakes and sprockets.

This example appears to be in excellent, clean condition, despite having close to 50,000 kilometers on the dial. The seller provides little detail, but says it runs as it should and retains its original exhaust.

From the eBay listing:

For sale

Honda CB1100R B type

very rare bike

very good condition, runs perfectly

Original exhaust

Recent service, New tyres and brakes

French registration

The asking price is a shade under $15,000, which is in keeping with similar models we have seen over the years. With fewer than 1,100 of these beasts produced, the price gets you a bike you will not see at Cars and Coffee or your local ride in.

OG Race rep: 1981 Honda CB1100RB