Posts by Category: Honda

Honda December 31, 2018 posted by

Winner’s One – 1992 Honda NSR250R-SP

Still time to turn over a new old leaf before 2019, and get on that 250 two-stroke you've been thinking about.  This -SP is an MC21, built for the middle four years of the model's run.  It comes with factory and aftermarket bodywork and with nothing to hide, is shown in various states of undress.

1992 Honda NSR250R-SP for sale on eBay

Honda developed the V-twin NSR-250R in the mid-eighties and some references say the "NS" in the model is derived from the NikaSil coating on the cylinder walls, helping keep the 45 hp engine alive under challenging conditions.  The MC21 used a PGM-III programmed ignition map and for 1992 had the "gull" swingarm, the right side being shaped over the expansion chamber making its way to the right rear.  Also, the MC21 reverted to same-size 17-inch tires, over lightweight Magtek wheels on the -SP.  The -SP also came with a dry clutch and cassette-type 6-speed gearbox, as well as special livery.

This NSR photographs beautifully from the right side, but the left fairing it shown off the bike with some road rash up high, and a cut-out for the exhaust system below.  It's shown mostly un-faired, and any other damage from that incident has apparently been repaired.  Not enough close-ups to see any corrosion which would be a concern coming from coastal Florida, but the owner says this in the eBay auction:

Unmodified PGM.  Bike has a dry clutch (brand new Tyga) fully adjustable suspension, newer chain and sprockets, Bridgestone Battlax tires, Magtek wheels.  The gas tank has a very small and hard to see flat dent in front of tank by fairing stay, otherwise tank is perfect.  Very clean, almost zero corrosion.  Original bodywork is on bike and is in good shape EXCEPT, prior owner cut lower fairing (included pictures) to clear exhaust at some point.  Also have passenger seat not on bike.  Have a complete set of aftermarket painted Chinese bodywork can include with sale.  Can take more photos or video of running and will answer any questions that I can.  Clean and clear Florida title currently registered.

Some owners would just as soon run the repro bodywork, and not worry over the factory originals.  An afternoon fitting them and getting to know your new ride, then start the search for a replacement left side.  Otherwise this example seems cared-for, with a new clutch, recent tires and water hoses.  Just one day in and bidding is active but hasn't found the reserve.  What a way to zing-ng-ng-ng in the New Year !

-donn

Winner’s One – 1992 Honda NSR250R-SP
Honda December 25, 2018 posted by

Christmas Bonus: 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale

Long before "mass centralization" became a popular marketing buzzword for sportbikes, Honda was investing its bubble economy-inflated budget in a bike that took advantage of that very concept, the exquisitely-engineered VFR750R, otherwise known as the legendary RC30. Honda was so invested in sportbikes at the time that it actually sold an I4 and a V4 range of bikes concurrently, with their CBR and VFR filling slightly different niches. But when it came to their homologation bikes, Honda took their hard-won knowledge from the street-oriented V4 bikes and used it to develop the bike seen here, the VFR750R.

If you're passingly familiar with Honda's roadbikes, "VFR" probably evokes images of practical and engaging sport-touring bikes that lean on the sport end of the spectrum. This is not one of those bikes. The RC30 was developed to win production-based racing classes, specifically the then-new World Superbike Championship, although the ELF-designed single-sided swingarm hints at the bike's endurance racing capabilities as well.

At the heart of the bike is obviously a compact V4 engine with a relatively narrow frontal area for good aerodynamics and very centralized mass, gear-driven cams for extremely precise valve control, and a 360°crankshaft that improved traction at the rear wheel, compared to a more traditional 180° unit. The concept of the 360° crank is that the combustion events are clustered close together, instead of spaced evenly throughout each engine revolution to allow the rear tire to "recover," increasing traction and improving tire life. It also gives the bike a flatter powerband and a distinctive soundtrack that can be appreciated, even if your skills don't extend to tire-spinning corner exits. The downside of a V4 is generally increased weight compared to an inline-four and tight packaging, especially with a 90° v-angle, as used here. Stripped of its fairing, the RC30 looks very dense and packed with mechanical bits, and V4s can be a bit of a bear to work on.

Reviews then and now describe it as an easy bike to take full advantage of, a bike that rewarded finesse, a bike that just did as it was told and allowed the rider to get on with winning. Power was unremarkable, weight was average, and nothing about the bike screamed "race winner." But win it did, even against stiff opposition from Ducati, Bimota, Suzuki, Yamaha, and Kawasaki, and Honda only abandoned the V4 formula when it decided that rules in WSBK favoring v-twins were onerous and biased. So they built a v-twin and showed everyone they could win with those as well, but it was clear their hearts would always belong to the V4...

The RC30 is a handsome bike, with nearly perfect proportions and a wealth of amazing details, although it doesn't have the easy wow-factor of something from Italy. It's not often you can accuse Ducati of cribbing styling elements, but the 916's taillights and distinctive single-sided swingarm look awfully similar to what you can see here. And unlike those Italian machines, every single component is carefully thought out to work as part of a complete package, and engineered to near-perfection.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale

  • Long term ownership and fewer than 5,000 miles
  • 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30
  • Frame Number: 2100129
  • Engine Number: 2100162
  • Legendary 16-valve gear-driven DOHC 90 degree V4 engine
  • Reportedly fewer than 3000 produced
  • Single owner since 1990
  • Fewer than 5,000 miles from new.

One of the modern era's few immediately collectible classics, the Honda VFR750R - better known as the 'RC30' - was created for just one reason: to win the World Superbike Championship, a feat it achieved in the nascent series' first two seasons of 1988 and 1989. And while American Fred Merkel was bringing Honda its first two WSB crowns, Britain's Carl Fogarty used an RC30 to win the TT F1 World Championship in 1988 and 1989, and the equivalent FIM Cup in 1990. No mere short circuit scratcher, the RC30 and its derivatives proved durable enough to win a hat-full of Endurance Classics too. That this latter requirement was also part of the design brief may be determined from the fact that a quick-release front fork and single-sided swinging arm - essential for speedy wheel changes - were part of an unrivaled specification that included a twin-spar alloy beam frame, 16-valve V4 engine with gear-driven cams, close-ratio six-speed gearbox and four-pot front brake calipers.

All of which did not come cheap: at the time of its launch in 1988 an RC30 cost near double that of other super-sports 750s. Despite the passage of time and progress of motorcycle technology, the RC30 remains a match for the latest generation of sports bikes but possesses an exclusivity that none of them can approach. 'No other bike from the late-Eighties is lusted after like the RC30', reckoned Bike, and few would disagree. And then there's the exhaust note – loud, of course, but soulful enough to bring a pit crew to tears.

This RC30 was only very recently liberated from its second and very long-term owner. Purchased in the UK in 1990, fewer than 5,000 miles have been put on the bike since it was new. Not long after acquisition, the superbike was taken to the Isle of Man where it was driven around the race track, but not actually raced. In 1991 the machine was brought stateside. Regularly maintained since new, the previous owner reports that the RC30 was taken to the local Honda dealer for a pre-sale service within the last couple of months.

Fresh from nearly three decades of single owner care, this legendary machine is offered in excellent condition throughout. The engine starts readily, idles smoothly and has an abundance of power. The clutch is silky-smooth and brakes and suspension are near perfect. I would opt for a new pair of tires before serious road use and am happy to negotiate your tire choice in to the price.

This is a rare opportunity to acquire a motorcycling icon of performance and provenance and a must-have for a discerning collection.

For additional information and photos go to ClassicAvenue.com

V4s are all the rage these days, but Honda really pioneered them for modern motorcycle applications. Because who the hell else would want to design around such a packaging headache? Obviously, Honda has a history of doing things just because they can, practicality be damned: their oval-pistoned racebikes grew out of a staunch refusal to adapt to the changing technology of the Grand Prix scene and simply build a competitive two-stroke. And although that particular experiment was a failure, it shows the lengths to which Honda will go when they believe in an engineering concept. Luckily, the V4 wasn't quite so complex and was ultimately vindicated by both in-period success and by the legacy it left behind. This example has very low miles and appears to be in very nice, original condition with an asking price of $44,900 and just one more day on the listing, so if you didn't get what you wanted for Christmas this year and happen to have a bit of your holiday bonus left lying around...

-tad

Christmas Bonus: 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale
Honda December 21, 2018 posted by

Eye of the Storm: 1987 Honda CBR600 F Hurricane

Winter is upon us with its stormy moods. A perfect time to sit inside by the fire and reflect. What better time to take a look at a pretty cherry CBR600F model Hurricane and revel in its ability to survive. Sure, I know what you're thinking: there is no way that a UJM that was mass produced in the tens of thousands will ever be rare. And I can see the point. The whole crux of the laws of supply and demand move us to a place where demand outstrips the supply - this is difficult to do with a commodity product. But this was a commodity more than 30 years ago. Today to find a well preserved CB600F model is not all that easy. It may not be Supermono or Tesi scarce, but certainly no easier than finding a clean Ducati "R" model, Superlight or the odd Bimota SB/YB series example. Today's Hurricane has traveled fewer than 500 miles per year of its life, and is looking spiffy for it's existence of relative relaxation. Let's dig deeper.

1987 Honda CBR600 F Hurricane for sale on eBay

The bikes we covet today are direct descendants of the 1980s, that watershed era when manufacturers experimented like hippies in the 1960s. Trying any number of cylinders in a variety formats, different types of induction, liquid cooling, four valves per cylinder, mass centralization, full fairings and air flow management, tire and wheel sizes, brakes and exhaust, the Big Four went crazy with bringing new ideas to market. Honda in particular exhibited A.D.D. during this period, offering air cooled, V-4 and inline four models with varying performance characteristics. But it was the Hurricane that open the door to the fully-faired repli-racer look that continues to this day in the 600RR line. That is a pretty amazing run for a very capable machine.

From the seller:
1987 Honda CBR-600 F Hurricane - Only 15K Miles - Also CBR 600 F - CBR600F
Mechanically this bike is a 9.9 Out Of 10 And Cosmetically It's a 9.8 out of 10
Excellent condition for a 32 year old ICON in the Motor Cycle World.

It'd be nice for it go to a collector who understands what it is and appreciates it's excellent condition. I just rode it yesterday for 15 miles out in the country and the bike pulls clean and runs - idles perfectly. Please note in the pictures & the video that some of the angles the sun makes the red color look faded out. It is all bright RED as it was when new.

Before this ignites a storm of another kind, we have seen this seller before. The consensus is that the bikes represent themselves better mechanically than cosmetically - but that doesn't mean everything offered is in the same condition. This bike looks very clean and in far superior shape to most any of the vintage Hurricanes we have seen. 15k on the clocks is higher than many would consider, but aside from some minor cosmetic damage if the bike is as stated mechanically what you have here is an excellent rider. Check out the pictures and video. And as alwasy, RSBFS recommends that you do your homework. Look closely, research the model, and ask the seller questions if any data or detail is unclear. This holds true regardless if you are buying a RC30 or a YSR50.

If you've weathered the storm thus far, you have seen a clean example of a 1987 CBR600F. And while this is definitely not everyone's cup of tea, this No Reserve auction has shown some decent action. There is no gold-plated Buy It Now option here. $100 bought you the first bid in this game, and the price has quickly climbed over $2k. How high will it go? There are lots of watchers on this one, but from the looks of things the price is still firmly in the bargain basement territory. I don't see really see this above the $5-6k mark, but there may be someone out there that just has to have a vintage Hurricane. Jump in if you're nostalgic for the bike you couldn't afford in high school, but don't expect to be making a brilliant investment. There will always be a market for a clean, older bike - even one that isn't in high demand - but the value appreciation will be slow at best. But who really cares? The value is in what you see, and who doesn't see something cool in a well-preserved sport bike artifact? Check it out carefully, and bid with gusto - after all, Christmas is just around the corner! And be sure and jump back to the Comments and share your memories of the Hurricane - because I know you have them. Good Luck!

MI

Eye of the Storm: 1987 Honda CBR600 F Hurricane
Honda December 19, 2018 posted by

Sponsored listing: Super clean 1995 Honda RVF400

Update 1.14.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Are you tired of your driver's license taking up room in your wallet? Allow us to present you with an elegant, if not exactly inexpensive, solution. Our friends at Speedwerks are offering up this fabulously clean 1995 Honda RVF400 on a clean U.S. title to those who appreciate revs and razor sharp handling and have no interest in a plodding Sunday cruise. The bikes kicked out about 60 horsepower from the 400cc V4, which isn't enough to scare even the likes of a mid-80s Yamaha Radian, but is more than enough to get you to and beyond seriously extra-legal velocities.

Getting that power requires revving the mini RC to the moon, but the engines are known to respond well to a little neck wringing. Where the bike shines brightest is where the road gets windy, with a scant 365 pounds to pull around, the stiff chassis and its then-state of the art suspension will help you approach riding nirvana. Or at least, they'll do a damn sight better job making your commute interesting than NPR does. The sacrifice, as with anything of this nature, is comfort, though the RVFs don't have the torture rack reputation some of their peers do.

Speedwerks says this thing wears its stock bodywork and is more or less unmodified from how it left the dealer. It wears sticky new tires on its 17-inch rims, and has refreshed fluids, brakes, a fork rebuild and new hardware. From the seller:

1995 Honda NC35 RVF400

Clean US Title, has been in the states for sometime now, we acquired it from a client in some legal trouble with ICE and a hot Asian chick.(long story)

In stock condition with stock bodywork. 16k miles.

Stripped down and cleaned/lubed. Liqui Moly Synthetic oil, antifreeze flushed, new NGK plugs.

Brakes bled,rotors surfaced, new pads, RK chain. Coated wheels, new bearings in front and new Bridgestone S20 evo's.

Forks rebuilt with new seals,bushings and liqui moly oil. fresh hardware throughout chassis.

Carbs and fuel system rebuilt, Derestricted, detailed and dyno'd.

Everything works,runs as new. $10,500

We'd love to hear the long version of what sounds like a sordid tale surrounding Speedwerks' acquisition of the bike. At $10,500, it's priced to chase away tire kickers, but it also much cleaner than your average eBay example, and way cooler than a used 600, which would be the nearest modern equivalent. Hit up Speedwerks at www.speedwerks.com or give them a ring at (302)672-RACE if you're intrigued.

 

Sponsored listing: Super clean 1995 Honda RVF400
Honda December 13, 2018 posted by

Island Hopper – 1996 Honda CBR900RR

Pretty much the gold standard for '90-s Superbikes, the CBR900RR ( aka FireBlade ) was a power-to-weight champion.  This one has the makings of a great value with excellent cosmetics, just over 4,000 miles, and reasonable starting bid.

1996 Honda CBR900RR for sale on eBay

 

Revolutionary in 1992, Revision 2.0 of the 900RR came in '96, with a slight bore increase for the carburetted straight four resulting in 919 cc's.  Improvements to the shifting internals got great reviews, and extrusions for the alloy twin-spar chassis were thinner and larger.  The riding position was incremented toward the street, and a change to the fuel tank shape helped the compact feel.  A race-derived front fender gave a little downforce to the front end and directed air up and into the fairing.

 

Hemmed in by Brooklyn and North Jersey, it's easy to see how a superbike could wind up with low miles.  This CBR presents very nicely, substantially stock and showing just a typical rub on the fairing near the (left) grip.  Not sure what an easy touch-up that would be, but just replace the levers with your favorite and at least they'll match, and you're off.  From the eBay auction:

Bike has a little over 4000 miles and runs like new. This bike is in showroom condition. I purchased this bike a few years ago from the original owner. All scheduled maintenance has been performed religiously and on time. You will never find another bike of this vintage in this great of shape. Awesome bike to add to your stable and to really enjoy. You can feel as if you’ve just stepped back into the 90’s! Any questions don’t hesitate to ask. This bike is not a restoration! It is all original and perfect.

 

As Honda's flagship, the FireBlade was gifted with outstanding build quality and attention to detail by their engineers. The owner seems realistic even though his claims of "perfect" and "showroom" might require an asterisk.  With its low miles and apparently limited damage history, bidding on a twenty year-old superbike might not be a leap of faith in this case.

-donn

Island Hopper – 1996 Honda CBR900RR
Honda December 6, 2018 posted by

Right Said Fred: 1986 Honda VF1000R

Organizations have been using star power to move product since the beginning of time. The religious world has deities, the stick and ball sports have performance heroes, arts and entertainment circles have famous people, and even the social media world has some form of acclaimed personas (not that I would know who they are). Big names connect consumers with the idea of being like somebody famous. 90% of the population cannot dunk a basketball, but that doesn't slow down shoe sales. And so it is with no surprise that motorcycle manufacturers attached star power to help move models and drive consumers into the showroom. It was rampant in the 1980s, and continues through to this day. Sometimes the connection was blatant; witness Kenny Robert's signature on the fairing of the RZ350, or Nicky Hayden's script on bespoke RC51 models. And sometimes the connection is implied, such as with the 1979 Suzuki GS1000 - often mistakenly referred to as the Wes Cooley edition. So as we gaze upon this magnificent 1986 Honda VF1000R, the colors evoke HRC's racing livery and we assume this to be an homage to the great Freddie Spencer. Star power that is implied - but not overtly stated - is still star power. And it still moves product.

1986 Honda VF1000R for sale on eBay

Developed with the technology to win races, the VF1000R was a massive technological wonder when it was released in Europe; especially when compared to the rather bland "F" model sold in the US. Four cylinders arranged in a 90 degree vee formation, double overhead cams spun by gears (oh the glorious sound!) working four valves per cylinder. The frame was of the perimeter variety to cradle the motor, but tech extended to both ends of this machine: Honda’s Pro-Link rising-rate rear suspension (a massive upgrade over twin shock setups) and up front the Torque Reactive Anti-Dive Control (TRAC) anti-dive front fork with nifty quick change axle (a nod to the endurance heritage). With a 16" front wheel - just like the GP racers - and bodywork and dual headlamp evoking Honda's endurance racers from Europe, the VF1000R was everything the American buying public could want in a repli-racer. And much, much more. Especially in terms of weight. The "R" model looked the look, but tipped in at a very porky mid-500 pound range wet. It also came with a significant increase in price over the "F" model. But you can't really argue with the look. Let's pick this one up here from the seller:

From the seller:
1986 Honda VF-1000-R - Only 33K Miles - Also Called Honda's Autobahn Baby

- Mechanically this bike is a 9.5 Out Of 10 And Cosmetically It's a 9.25 out of 10
- Excellent condition for a 33 year old ICON in the Motor Cycle World.
- It'd be cool for it go to a collector who understands what it is and appreciates it's wonderful condition.

More from the seller:
Before going on display in the Museum the following was done - Not in any order . .

- Installed new fuel petcock
- Rebuilt Carbs with all Honda OEM Parts
- Carbs all Digitally Sync to perfection
- Installed new brake pads front & rear
- Installed New OEM Air Filter
- New Spark plugs
- Valves adjusted
- Installed New rubber cushions in the rear drive hub
- Rebuilt Front forks - new seal - dust caps and used 15w fork oil

More from the seller:
Recently After Being Pulled From Museum Display This Last Month - The Following Was Done

- Flushed entire fuel system/carbs with fresh Non- Ethanol fuel and filled gas tank with the same
- New Battery & Battery Tender Hookup - which can also be used to run Electric gear
- New front and rear brake fluids flushed and replaced with Honda Pro DOT 4
- New Hydraulic clutch fluids flushed and replaced with Honda Pro DOT 4
- Replaced engine oil & filter
- Tires have 150+/- miles on them in 4 rides.

Everything checked fine on these rides and the bike is a blast to ride especially listening to the whine of the gear driven cams at the engine's 11,000 RPM redline.

PLEASE NOTE - It has been recently un-mothballed in a loving fashion by my master mechanic. The fuel system flushed with non-ethanol premium fuel. Installed a new battery along with a new battery tender hook-up. It started up in less then 10 seconds and runs great! There are no fuel leaks. It idles perfectly with the choke off. It Revs & Restarts fine. It is ready to go and needs nothing to go riding. And/or it's ready to go straight into another Museum.

The seller has also included a video of the bike in question, including a walkaround and some facts and figures:

The seller claims this to be a museum example, and indeed the pictures do show the bike parked in like company. But what does it mean to be a museum display? Cosmetically, I would imagine it needs to be in good shape. Mechanically everything should work, although for a static display that is not really necessary. In this case, the video includes a startup and showing full functionality. This seller has gone the extra mile to show off the bike, and seems to know quite a bit about this model.

At the end of the day this looks to be a solid example of a well loved model from the 1980s. So what's not to like? If I had to pick nits, I would point to the 33,000 miles as one - although the bike does not look like it traveled that far, nor is there a longevity concern. I would, however, expect the miles to be reflected in the price. For true collectors the non-stock F1 cans might be an issue, though I concede I do not have any experience sourcing original parts for this particular model (i.e. might not be an issue). There is minor rash on the top of the triple trees, and the tank protector is also not stock. All small stuff. The real tire kickers here should not necessarily be the collectors, but those who are looking for something from an earlier time that they can ride. R model VF1000s are not exactly blue chip investment material; not too rare, not too valuable, and unlikely to appreciate in the manner of a RC30. But it is a wonderful machine to ride, enjoy, and fawn over until the next caretaker picks up the mantle and unlikely to plummet in the coming years. This NO RESERVE auction is going on right now, and this bike remains a bargain at the time of writing. Check it out here. This is not the fastest, not the best handling, and certainly not the most rare bike on our pages - but it will not fail to put a smile on your face. Can you beat that? If you missed the budget RZ, don't miss out on this one. Good Luck!!

MI

Right Said Fred: 1986 Honda VF1000R