Posts by Category: Honda

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We have 15 years of archives. Please note that posts over a year old may have been updated to point to similar bikes available to bid on eBay.
Honda March 7, 2021 posted by

Late Comer – 1990 Honda CBR250RR

Hard to imagine Honda without a 250 in the line-up, and in any given year there might’ve been a four-stroke single, twin, inline four, plus two-stroke single and twin !  For the highest redline, go for the CBR250RR, here seen in the first year for the RR, with just 2,500-and-change miles and faithful cosmetics.

1990 Honda CBR250RR for sale on eBay

The CBR250RR was all new for 1990, though continued with the 250cc four-valve zinger, supplying 45 hp which was more determined by legislation than the 19K rpm redline.  You’d be hard pressed to fit your pinky and ring finger into one of the four Keihin carburetors, though the alloy perimeter frame looked just like the bigger CBR’s.  Suspension looked basic up front, with 37mm conventional forks, but out back the monoshock rode on an aluminum asymmetrical swingarm.  Even tire sizes increased a bit from 1989, and brakes were almost overdone for the mission, with triple cross-drilled disks – 275mm and two pistons up front.

Seeming to be privately owned, this CBR looks to be exemplary, though they come up so infrequently we’ll have to rely on our local experts on the type.  At this ask there are hardly enough pictures to justify a response, except to request more information.  Also ask about the two different odometers pictured.  Comments from the eBay auction:

If you’re looking at this you obviously know how rare these are in the US – let alone one with around 3k miles. 

This is the famous JDM CBR250RR with the 250cc inline-4 with a 19k redline. It screams like an F1 car and you’re still well within the speed limit. Great bike for learners and or advanced riders. Runs great like all Hondas.

Serious offers only as these are not being imported very often and not in this condition, let alone low mileage examples. The bike is all stock other than the rear seat (which I have for the bike) and the tank pad which is rare on these bikes. No one has molested this one!  Comes with Tyga cover.

Never offered outside the Pacific rim, the CBR250RR didn’t generate many english-language reviews, though Aussie reviewers liked what they saw in their 1996 import.  Motorcyclist looked into the subject in 2019, and came away amazed that an almost 30 year-old bike could keep pace with current small sports.  The stature of the 250RR might not suit everyone, and sometimes just learning to ride where the powerband starts at around 13,000 rpm can be a project.  Probably not any reader’s first or only Honda, this CBR is still a piece of work in its own right.

-donn

Late Comer – 1990 Honda CBR250RR
Honda March 6, 2021 posted by

Fan Favorite: 1986 Honda VF1000R

Let’s set the record straight right up front: The Honda VF1000R is not as rare as true homologation machines such as the RC30 or the RC45. It was not as hard to come by in the US as the NC30 or grey market two strokes such as the NSR250 or NSR400. Yet it still has a place on these pages as it is undeniably cool, packs a massive performance punch, and to find one in today’s condition is quite simply a treat. Interested? Read on!

1986 Honda VF1000R for sale on eBay

The VF1000R gains it’s good (if not slightly porky) looks from a long line of Honda endurance racers, and the model was meant both celebrate – as well as homologate – the gear-driven V-4 for production-based racers worldwide. The fact that the VF1000R was itself an accomplished endurance racer belies the fact that homologation never happened; the metamorphosis of the VF1000F block to accommodate gear driven cams was unusually complex – and heavy. The move to geared cams added significant weight, and the bloat did not stop there. Newly revised cylinder heads raised compression and altered the airflow into the chambers, resulting in an engine producing approximately 10 HP more than the lowly “F” model – and weighing about the same amount more.

From the seller:
Out of a Bob Weaver Collection from New York is this 1986 VF1000R classic from the past.
The was the fastest production bike of its time. This is the rare desirable 2 headlight version low VIN # and was the 23rd bike produced for this year. The pictures will state it all. This is not a clapped out old bike that you can buy for a few thousand dollars. Paint and condition is great. Most of the things you would have to mess with on an old bike has been done: New fork seals/oil, tires, brake pads, air filter, spark plugs, coolant, thermostat, brake fluids, carb rebuild, starter clutch, battery and hard to find fuel pump. Has been serviced by local dealer. Ready to ride.

This is not a beginners bike or a bike for a small person. This is big, heavy, fast bike and not for the timid.
This is a beautiful 80’s bike that is now on every sport bike collectors list and prices are climbing quickly. Get yours before its too late.

The dual-headlight VF1000R model is the last version in the line of a relatively short production run (the model launched in 1984), and really brought the Euro look to America. Remember, the early 1980s were a time that D.O.T. did not really allow two headlights on a motorcycle; by 1986 this was still a novelty. The overall livery of the bike helped to disguise some of the R model’s weight; all told you are looking at a 600+ lb sport bike. According to reviewers at the time, a lot of that weight is concentrated high up, making for some interesting riding dynamics. The seller is correct in that these are really not for the inseam or muscularly challenged. Nor is this a great first bike: With 122 HP and on tap and a 150 MPH top end, things can go wrong in a hurry.

While the VF1000R was not homologated nor offered in any sort of “Limited Edition” packaging (read: it was a mass produced Honda motorcycle), it remains relatively rare today. These were expensive in the day, and were outsold by the cheaper F model in the years they overlapped. To find one in excellent condition these days is not an every week occurrence. This particular example is far from a zero mile affair (the ad states 28K on the clocks), but does come out of a known collection. The pictures show an honest example of the breed rather than an abused rat bike. The VF1000R looks as stunning today as when it first dropped in 1984, and will continue to look great for decades to come. The Buy It Now is set at a rather high $10,750, but as these are sought after models the market may indeed go in that direction. Check out all of the details here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Fan Favorite: 1986 Honda VF1000R
Honda March 3, 2021 posted by

Class Leader – 1993 Honda CBR600F2

The second generation CBR600F2 was a giant step forward for the middleweight, with a sharp eye on the invoice’s bottom line.  This example has somehow been protected from the overuse and outdoor life of so many bargain sportbikes, with just over 12,000 miles and lovely cosmetics.

1993 Honda CBR600F2 for sale on eBay

Updates started with the engine architecture, significantly more oversquare than the F, with flatter valve angles and flow-optimised heads to claim a nice round 100 hp.  The twin-spar chassis was executed in steel tubing, holding the engine from top and rear, and containing cost.  Conventional forks had been upsized to 41mm, and the adjustable monoshock supported a Pro-Link swingarm.  Brakes were mid-sized at 276mm, with weight and yen-saving slide calipers ( dual pistons on the same side ).  Wheel sizes were also bumped up from the F, and the cast alloys were RC lookalikes.  The full fairing presented fresh if not ram air to the airbox, and was closed in the knee area, sending engine heat overboard.

Coming out of Vegas-based Eurocycle, this CBR doesn’t come with any history, but does have rarely seen turn signals, reflectors, and the tail has been tidied up just a bit.  The color saturation had me thinking re-paint, but nothing else about this bike has been updated.  A one-liner from the eBay auction:

100% FACTORY ORIGINAL AND UNDAMAGED.

The Honda 600 regularly appeared at the top of magazine review “shootouts”, and later showed up on best used bike compendiums.  With many riders thinking lighter weight and better skills, these mid-size bikes are coming into a re-newed focus.  By model number it’s not rare, but with so many run into the ground, a really nice one might be a thing.

-donn

Class Leader – 1993 Honda CBR600F2
Honda February 28, 2021 posted by

Shiny Side Up – 2003 Honda RVT1000R / RC51

Honda built the RC51 to access the displacement advantage afforded two cylinder Superbikes in the FIM World Championship, and Colin Edwards went right out and snapped it up. Here’s a lightly ridden and slightly tarted up SP2 from the mid-Atlantic area.

2003 Honda RVT1000R / RC51 for sale on eBay

Honda’s L-twin packed a real punch with 136hp, thanks to 10.8-to-1 compression and two fuel injectors looking down each 62mm intake.  Cooling air had an easier time getting to the engine bay since the water radiators were side-mounted, this also sent heated air out of the fairing.  HRC had a lot of design input on the twin spar alloy frame,  adjustable cartridge forks and Pro-Link monoshock.  Wheels and brakes are Honda’s own, 320mm front disks and light-looking 5-spoke alloys.  Form follows function on the bodywork, with room sculpted into the fuel tank for knees and bars, and the pillion all but forgotten.

This owner likes things clean, with not a mark on this RC51.  Almost got out of hand with the polishing, but the chainguard and heel guards are easily returned to stock , not so sure those are the factory wheels though.  No list is provided, but evident are a two-into-one exhaust, Corbin seat, adjustable levers, tinted Zero Gravity windscreen, new tires, low profile front turn signals, and rear turn signals in the tail light.  Just a comment or two from the eBay auction:

The bike has 9,317 miles on it. Runs strong with no problems.

RC51 has stock sprockets, heavy duty chain.  Also has a two into one exhaust pipe.

Hard to notice – Small crack in the plastic just under the seat on the right side.

While Honda won their first season with the RC51, Ducati answered with a new testastretta engine for the 996R in 2001, though it took the entire season for Troy Bayliss to clinch the championship.  Honda responded with the SP2 for 2002 and won nine out of the last ten races ( five events ) for the roses.  Honda sent their factory race yen in another direction for 2003, and returned to a four-cylinder, even though the RC51 stayed in production until 2006.  Some of these mods might not be to every fan’s liking, but the year, low miles and outstanding condition might make this bike worth looking into.

-donn

Shiny Side Up – 2003 Honda RVT1000R / RC51
Honda February 17, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing: 1993 Honda CBR900RR

Update 2.17.2021: This bike was relisted in late July and we’ve just learned it has SOLD to an RSBFS reader. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

From the mid-1980s through the late 1990s, superbike development burst forth hot and heavy from the engineers behind the big three Japanese brands, with each redesigned or all-new bike of the time period resetting the genre’s limits and possibilities. Tadao Baba’s Honda CBR900RR is perhaps the best exemplar of that trend, as it re-wrote record books as it changed what it meant to be a near-liter capacity bike.

Up until the Fireblade’s release in 1992, any capacity over 750cc meant you were getting into porky waistlines and putting a priority on out and out speed over accurate handling. But riding on a 600-sized chassis with 16-inch wheels to quicken turn-in, the 110-horsepower, 450-pound CBR900RR was from another plane. It undercut the Yamaha FZR1000 on the scales by 34 pounds.

This 1993 Honda CBR900RR is in immaculate shape, with a bunch of tasty modifications to increase style, function and comfort, and a raft of NOS parts to aid maintenance. We love the red-black-silver livery, which is a nice break from the ubiquitous HRC red-white-blue paint scheme that was splashed across every magazine test of the time.

From the seller:

1993 Honda CBR900rr, complete stock bike minus original exhaust but has many period-correct parts to make up for that.
Aftermarket parts:
Full Akrapovic Exhaust System
Heli Bar clip ons
Race Tech front springs
Ohlins rear shock
Brand new Sargent seat
Targa solo seat cowl
original seat, rear seat, clip ons and front springs come with bike
has original 37,700 km which is 23,425 miles
only 2 owners since new, never in rain, no accidents , uncut rear fender, and original
turn signals
I have some many parts some of which include, extra gas tank top end, extra forks,clutch plates, wiring harness, pistons, NOS new zero gravity tinted windshield, NOS lockhart tank bra and a few more items that could be included for a few extra bucks.
Has been stored in a climate controlled environment for last 5 years and not ridden, fresh gas and oil was put in this week and she fired right up. Will need a rad flush and brake fluid flush as it hasn’t been on the road for five years.
Looking for $8,000 USD
Bike is located in Vancouver, Canada and I can assist with shipping

These days, every literbike is pretty close chassis-wise to its 600cc brandmates, but when this bike dropped that was a revelation. Thanks to their reputation for speed and their legendary status, early, well-kept CBR900RRs will only get more valuable.

Featured Listing: 1993 Honda CBR900RR
Honda January 24, 2021 posted by

A Tale of Two Turbos: 1982 Honda CX500T (x2!)

With attribution (and apologies) to Charles Dickens, this was the best motorcycle, this was the worst motorcycle. This was an age where technology soared, yet this was an age where average triumphed. This was the time of lag, this was the time of boost. This was the Spring of hope, this was the Winter of despair. This was the early 1980s, and this was the Turbo era.

Forced induction has paved a long and storied road in the automotive world. For motorcycles, it represented more of a novelty cul-de-sac. And although started by Kawasaki farming out the Z1R TC model to a tuner and selling it in showroom without a warranty, the first fully-fledged, factory created and supported Turbo bike came from Honda: the 1982 CX500T. Utilizing the robust CX500 twin platform, Honda did some minor bottom end beef-up and some major electronics engineering on a computerized fuel injection and delivery control module to ensure engine longevity. The result is the space-ship resembling, very heavy, long turbo-lag inducing unicorn that you see here. Sadly, despite all of the technological innovations that Honda threw at the CX-T model, public interest in the beast never took off. And neither did values for these models, although that is definitely changing. Read on about these two bikes!


1982 Honda CX500T #1

From the seller:
CX500 Turbo Has Been On Display For 17 Years In My Climate Control Museum.
It’s Been Pulled Off The Display Floor And, Over Last Month, As Time Permitted I Have Had The Following Service Items Performed By My Master Mechanic –
-Storage Fuel removed and replaced with Non-Ethanol Premium Fuel.
-New AGM Battery Installed
-New Oil & Filter Change
-Both Front And Rear Brake Calipers Serviced – Disassembled Cleaned & Brake Fluids Flushed From The Long Time sitting Idle While On Display
-New front brake pads on both sides. The OEM ones were hard squeaked some and we have everything apart already.
-Both fuel Injectors Professionally cleaned by Mechanic
-Air filter check and was OK
-New OEM spark plugs installed

This bike looks absolutely awesome, and has been bid up to nearly $10k as of time of writing with the reserve still in place. There are a lot of bidders, and even more watchers. The activity is certainly pushing the envelope in terms of price point for these rare bikes (which should represent a *very* welcome trend for Turbo collectors), and this one may end up a new high-water mark for the model.


1982 Honda CX500T #2

From the seller:
1982 Honda. Condition is “Used”.
I’m Selling my CX500Turbo because I have to many bikes and someone needs to enjoy this one.
Bike is in immaculate condition for a 39 year old machine.
Only 3100 miles
All original paint
Original tires
Runs and drives perfect
Recent work completed includes all master cylinders and calipers rebuilt, injectors sent out and cleaned, new fuel pump, oil and filter changed.
I can take more photos if needed. Also have a video I can text of bike running with a walk around.
Chance to own a very rare motorcycle that has been climbing in value.

This particular example has very few miles for the age, and looks to be in good shape overall. There appears to be some paint cracking on the front fairing, and the original tires would make me nervous as a rider. This one has a bit longer to go at auction, with no reserve and the latest bid at over $7k at time of writing. Again, this is elevated territory for these techno-wonder machines, and we might see this one climb even higher before the auction ends.


Dickens closed out his famed novel (A Tale of Two Cities) with: “It is a far, far better thing I do than I have ever done…” Looking back at the monumental moment when Honda rolled out this amazing motorcycle, you can forgive the Engineers if they thought along the same lines. This was truly a remarkable undertaking, and endures as the most complex and technological effort of the Turbo era. To see not one but two great examples available at the same time – and being bid up to the current prices – bodes very well for these machines in the future. Check out the pics and videos for 1982 Honda CX500T example #1 here, and jump to 1982 Honda CX500T example #2 here. Enjoy, and Good Luck!


1982 Honda CX500T example #1 gallery

1982 Honda CX500T example #2 gallery

MI

A Tale of Two Turbos: 1982 Honda CX500T (x2!)
Honda January 20, 2021 posted by

Fun Factor – 1990 Honda NSR250R

Short days turn thoughts to a light winter project that might actually be completed by riding season.  Re-commissioning a later NSR250R would have a substantial reward at the end of that rainbow.

1990 Honda NSR250R for sale on eBay

Honda packed a multitude of updates into the 1990 MC21, though the little V-twin was stuck with 45 hp, the PGM-III ignition also controlled the RC power valve.  The 1990 chassis was a much beefier extrusion, and the gull-arm’s asymmetry allowed an expansion chamber to scoot underneath.  A kick starter was still how you got going, but the new wheels were both 17’s.  The fairing had just a few additional vents and scoops,  while keeping the weight with half a tank just a hair over 300 lbs.  Factory expansion chambers mean you’d never spot one here without a kmh speedometer.

This Colorado example has been stored for a while, and amassed 28,111 kms or 17,467 miles.  Maybe a knowledgeable reader can chime in on the livery and RR-ness, since most of my references show the Repsol scheme to use a teal backround applied to later model SP’s.  Either way the paint does look sharp except for where the tank got bonked, and maybe the rear wheel was victim of a failed brake caliper.  The Washington tag leads me to believe this bike was on RSBFS back in 2013, in a sales compendium viewable – here –.   And just a note from the eBay auction:

1990 Honda NSR250RR with Repsol livery.

Winterized 5 years ago, has been sitting covered in a shop since.

The NSR250R made it easy for rest-of-world riders to have a ball without a second mortgage, and the PGM-III top speed regulator was easily defeated.  This one looks like a great project, new expendables plus a couple of things sent to the paint shop and the new owner will be ready for spring.  Bidding is active but there are a couple of days left to check it over and get in there !

-donn

 

Fun Factor – 1990 Honda NSR250R
Honda January 15, 2021 posted by

Have One Curated for You – 1993 Honda CBR900RR

Though designed more for the road than the racetrack, the CBR900RR FireBlade had a long and winning competition history.  This Oregon example was ridden initially, then displayed for many years, and is now ready for its next rider.

1993 Honda CBR900RR for sale on eBay

Design engineer Tadao Baba had a new kind of superbike in mind, and worked up a 750-sized chassis to fit a stroked engine displacing 893cc’s.  With four 38mm Keihin carburetors and double overhead cams, the almost-liter-bike engine delivered 122 hp.  Weight saving was always on page one, with an all alloy chassis and swingarm, and conventional Showa cartridge forks which were said to be lighter.  The 16-inch front wheel was a bit easier on the scale and turn-in effort, and areas of the fairings are perforated to reduce drag and maybe a gram or two.  The final tally was 454 lbs. ready to ride, startlingly close to the CBR600F2, and 65 or so lbs. lighter than the next lightest superbike.

Evidently coming out of a private or maybe dealer’s museum, this CBR is almost spotless and the “never down” claim is believable.  Even in the alternate livery, the colors are bright and the lowers are so shiny the tarmac’s reflection looked like a defect for a moment.  Just a few marks on the generator cover might touched up.  The owner has a good video walkaround – here – and some comments from the eBay auction –

1993 Honda CBR-900-RR – 1st Year – 

-Only 6 lbs. more than the CBR600RR of the same year

-This bike is in 9.9 out of 10 Excellent condition – never down/crashed etc. 

-I am the 2nd owner. Delivered from the factory in the rarest of the two multi-color options

It was perfectly mothballed before going on museum display about 10 years ago. I’m out of floor space in the museum.

-All OEM Bodywork in excellent condition

-Comes with OEM tool kit & owners manual

It’s been pulled off the museum display floor, and over the last month, as time permitted I have had the following service items performed by my mechanic –

-New AGM battery installed

-New oil & filter change

-Front & rear calipers serviced – cleaned & brake fluid flushed from the long time on display

-New non-ethanol fuel installed

The CBR900RR wasn’t a WSBK or AMA SuperBike weapon, but Honda saw that “win on Sunday, sell on Monday” brought customers in, where the FireBlade could win them over.  Winning ways in AMA Formula Extreme and GTO Endurance racing didn’t hurt.  Honda nudged displacement up slowly through the -90’s, and kept weight under control.  But the first year, when the bike was on everyone’s 10 best list, has an undeniable appeal.  This CBR is already attracting a lot of attention, at least bid-wise, and it’ll be interesting to see how the bids compare to the reserve.

-donn

Have One Curated for You – 1993 Honda CBR900RR