Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Suzuki March 12, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Slingshot Superbike: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

When I got into bikes, it was easy for me to indulge my existing bias towards European machinery, since Japanese bikes were garishly colored and festooned with neon graphics, with silly names [Ninja? Katana? Really?], owned by posturing riders who thought t-shirts, sweat shorts, and high-top sneakers were appropriate riding attire. Welcome to New Jersey, circa 1990. I've since learned the error of my ways and, although I still prefer European bikes, the second generation of the Suzuki GSX-R750 is one of my favorite motorcycle designs of any era.

Sure, the double-cradle frame design was fairly primitive and had been superseded by modern aluminum beam units like Yamaha's Deltabox, and Suzuki's oil-cooled inline four experiment ultimately gave way to the liquid-cooling used by the other superbike manufacturers, but Suzuki made the somewhat outdated package work just fine on both road and track. The Gixxer always had a bit of a bad-boy image that makes them far more collectible today than Yamaha's more technologically advanced machine.

The second-generation machine is often referred to as the "Slingshot" to differentiate it from the earlier "Slabbie" models, supposedly in reference to the quartet of semi-flat-slide carburetors, but I've never seen any part of the things that actually looks anything like a device used to fling small projectiles. It retained Suzuki's Advanced Cooling System that was meant to simplify and add lightness by eliminating a coolant-filled radiator and kept temperatures under control using a high-capacity oil system.

Bore was larger and stroke shorter than the earlier bike to increase the bike's appetite for revs and make the powerplant more suitable for competition. Although that backfired a bit when racers complained of a lack of torque, and Suzuki's homologation GSX-R750RK reverted to the earlier bike's bore/stroke dimensions. Wheels went from 18" to a more modern 17" and the fairings were redesigned, but it kept the twin-headlamp endurance-racing style of the original bike. Dry weight for this version was a claimed 419lbs, and the bike made 112hp.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

“Excellent condition Classic Superbike”

1989 Suzuki GSXR750 with clear title in outstanding condition. 10k miles on new motor. Same year (89 short stroke) motor as original. All gauges and directionals work. Mild restoration including brand new NOS stock upper and seat cowl. Freshly painted rear wheel with new wheel bearings and brand new Battleax tire.

Some of the mods are as follows.

  • 38mm CV Carbs jetted perfectly with filters and Yoshimura carb cover
  • Freshly painted 1992 Rear wheel/cush drive/shock with 180 Bridgestone
  • Toby steering damper that really works. Also forks and Shock recently serviced 
  • Brand new NOS stick Suzuki upper
  • Brand new NOS Suzuki rear seat cowl
  • Full Yoshimura Duplex exhaust with header wrapped header

This bike is a great running bike I've had fun with. It's not a perfect bike cosmetically bit very close. Some nicks here and there nothing bad, no dents in tank etc. Still represents VERY well for its age and can be put into a collection as is. I do have the lowers in very good condition and will post pic of them shortly. Also included is side mounted oil catch tank.

These bikes are near impossible to find in this condition so don't miss out! Will ship but buyer to arrange all details. I can be here to meet the shipper but that's about it.

The low miles on the motor are nice if you're looking for a bike to ride, but may turn off numbers-matching purists. The change to an updated, wider 5.5" rear wheel allows that 180-section tire to be fitted, since the original was a 160. Not too hard to find today, and should make for a more agile bike, but not as cool-looking. And note that the seller does have the fairing lowers, although they're not pictured at this time. I believe removal facilitates cooling of the oil-boiler engine and improves ground-clearance, but I think the bike does look much better with them on. Overall, this could be a very nice, usable superbike for a buyer looking to relive their youth but not fussy about complete originality.

-tad

Slingshot Superbike: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale
Bimota March 11, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 1998 Bimota SB6R for Sale

Today's Featured Listing is a bit of a flashback. We posted this very clean Bimota SB6R in April of last year and, although it didn't sell at the time, the owner has been doing what you should do with an Italian exotic: enjoying it, racking up an additional 1,300 miles. That means it's still collector-bike low with just 4,250 miles in total, but the fact that the seller has been riding it should be a big selling point for anyone looking to buy a 90s Bimota. Too many of these bikes sit, admired and displayed instead of being used in anger, slowly succumbing to neglect. Sculptural they may be, but Italian bikes were meant to be ridden.

Bimota made its name building cutting-edge racebikes, but the SB6R is first and foremost a roadbike. Utilizing Suzuki’s powerful and bulletproof liquid-cooled GSX-R1100 engine that displaced 1074cc, the SB6R wasn’t really eligible for many racing classes. But it was used the very best, competition-worthy components available at the time, with triple Brembo brakes, a Paioli fork up front and an Öhlins shock fitted almost horizontally, and was built with Bimota's usual attention to detail, using  Lotus-founder Colin Chapman's philosophy: "light makes right."

With a claimed 156hp from the eminently tunable Gixxer motor pushing a claimed dry weight of just 419lbs, the SB6R is a massively capable roadbike that can easily keep up with modern machines. Keep in mind that the SB6R weighs nearly 100lbs less than the famously fast GSX-R that was powered by the same engine. The flexible powerplant is backed by Suzuki's five-speed gearbox that takes advantage of the bike’s huge midrange and 74 lb-ft of torque.

As always with a Bimota, the frame is the real star of the show, something casual observers might overlook at first, with all the curvy carbon fiber bodywork on display. But once you notice those massive aluminum spars, they become the bike's defining feature. The design utilizes Bimota’s "Straight Connection Technology" concept that prioritizes as direct a link as possible between the steering head and the swingarm pivot. It’s not the most practical way to design and build a frame, but Bimota's goal was ultimate performance, and the matching, asymmetrical swingarm even has "bimota" embossed in one side for an extra does of craftsmanship.

Make no mistake, this was one of the fastest and most exotic motorcycles of the 1990s. Just 600 were ever made, and the model’s life was cut tragically short when Suzuki discontinued the GSX-R1100, then Bimota's first bankruptcy ended any dreams of a GSX-R1000 powered follow up. It's a shame, because the earlier SB6 was one of their best-selling models and I much prefer the looks of the later SB6R. This example has serial number 000023 and includes a lightweight Corse exhaust, a very nice bonus. If you want a different exhaust for your SB6R at this point, pretty much your only other option would be something completely custom.

Featured Listing: 1998 Bimota SB6R for Sale

I have come once again to your fine forum to move a jewel. I know you have featured a few of these, so I wont go through the Bimota propaganda and just get to the meat of what I have done. The usual Bimota story, well heeled individual purchased and rode very little, used more as a object d'art, rather than a mode of transportation for the majority of its life. She is now ready for riding. This thing rips, even with my 6'4", 220 pound, Yeti-like mass aboard.

  • Equipped  with the Bimota Corse Titanium exhaust
  • Kevlar brake lines
  • Michelins
  • Rebuilt carburetors, new needle valves
  • New NGK plugs
  • Oil and filter
  • New fuel pump from Bimota Classic Parts
  • New petcock from Bimota Classic Parts
  • All new Motion Pro fuel lines
  • New fuel filters
  • Cleaned fuel tank
  • The fuel system is now up to original Bimota factory spec.
  • This bike pulls like a freight train.
  • 2 small cracks in the gauge lens
  • Ridden and on the road
  • Every system functional
  • No issues
  • All paperwork in order.
  • 2 Original Bimota keys.

Price: $11,500
Contact Chris: gsxronly@aol.com or 407-492-5854

I can’t stress enough how this one’s recent mileage is critical. Many low-mileage collector bikes have spent a lot of time sitting, and will require hefty sums to get them truly road-worthy again: seals, hoses, gaskets, o-rings, gas tanks, tires... It all adds up. That’s fine if you just want to display your exotic, and Bimotas certainly look good standing still. But these really were meant to run, and if you want a collectible you can also take out on weekends to blitz the back roads, this one’s $11,500 asking price is a relative bargain, considering that the SB6R cost a whopping $35,000 in 1998!

-tad

Featured Listing: 1998 Bimota SB6R for Sale
Featured Listing March 7, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Sponsored Listing: Moto3 Honda NSF250RW for Sale!

Why buy a race replica when you can pick up an actual race bike? Today's Sponsored Listing from our friends over at Amatumoto GP Motorbikes is a Honda NSF250RW, and it's no stripped-down streetbike in race plastics, it's an evolution of the machine that won last year’s Moto3 Constructors Championship in a very competitive field. If you’ve never watched Moto3, the racing is very close, with bikes nose-to-tail at 145mph.

For years, the “lowest” of the three tiers of Grand Prix racing used to be the domain of tiny little two-stroke 125cc machines that weighed less than an average adult American male. This of course gave the class differentiation a nice symmetry, with 125cc, 250cc, and 500cc machines. But in 2012, the smallest class shifted to a formula using 250cc four-strokes to match MotoGP’s move away from two-strokes. Bikes are limited to singles with a bore of no more than 81mm, four valves, a rev ceiling of 13,500rpm, and a minimum weight for the combined bike and rider of 326lbs.

Unlike Moto2, where the entire field uses a single engine [formerly Honda, now Triumph] to keep costs down and ensure close racing, Moto3 allows a variety of engine builders to participate. While physically much larger than a two-stroke of similar displacement, the Honda single still needed to be as light and compact, while taking advantage of every opportunity to save weight, increase power, and centralize mass. To that end, the 249cc engine has its cylinder head reversed, with the ram-air intake to the front and the exhaust exiting to the rear. Other manufacturers have experimented with this configuration with varied success, but here, the main goal appears to be mass-centralization.

The engine is canted backwards in the frame 15°, allowing the engine to be placed further forward in the chassis and maximize airbox volume, with a bore and stroke of 78 x 52.2mm, below the class maximum bore size. The engine is backed, naturally, but a six-speed cassette gearbox for quick ratio changes to maximize the small engine’s potential, and the package weighs in at a claimed 185lbs dry.

From the Seller: Moto3 Honda NSF250RW for Sale!

Do you want a Moto3 Honda NSF250RW? Our company can get the most exclusive bikes of the market. Only for VIP customers, museums or exclusive collectors! Contact with our team and inform yourself. Only 2 units available - RESERVE NOW

In our VIP club you will find the most exclusive race and road bikes, also you can offer your bike for manage the sale. We work with customers to worldwide and we want offer the best service and products.

At Amatumoto Grand Prix Motorbikes Store, we take pride to have in our stock great exclusive bikes used on the races. That said, we understand that the collector of bikes hobby is enjoyed by some of the most passionate and diverse enthusiasts on the planet. Simply put: there are just too many awesome styles to fit in to one showroom. No need to worry though, as we’re happy to search for the bike of your dreams. Just give us a bit of pertinent information and we’ll keep an eye out. Amatumoto can build a READY to RACE bike… with engine, exhaust, wiring on demand with the specs that choose our customers.

Contact us via our website: http://www.gpmotorbikes.com/

If you're a track day junkie or a racer, this is your opportunity to buy a very serious piece of hardware. Just add sponsor decals!

-tad

Sponsored Listing: Moto3 Honda NSF250RW for Sale!
Aprilia March 7, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Bol d’Or Replica: 2007 Aprilia RSV1000R for Sale

Endurance racing doesn't have much of a following here in the US, but it's popular in Japan and Europe, and the French especially seem to love it. If you're not familiar with the Bol d'Or, it's a long-running 24-hour race held in France, literally the "golden bowl." The second-generation of Aprilia's v-twin superbike managed to update the bulbous styling without aping its most direct competitor over at Ducati. The new bike looked thoroughly modern, with viciously angular shapes and striking graphics, although this RSV1000R Bol d'Or Replica pretty much redefines "bold." The lilac, white, and red design shouldn't work, but I think it compliments the angular bodywork, and it definitely stands out in a crowd.

Under the skin, the bike used an updated version of the durable and powerful Rotax 60° v-twin, with a restyled beam frame that compliments the wedgy fairing. Honestly, I much prefer the smooth curves and industrial artistry of the original frame, but I guess Aprilia thought it would clash with the new bodywork. Power was up to 143hp, although the bike used a single plug per cylinder in place of the Mille's two. It also gained a few other magnesium engine bits and other evolutionary tweaks.

In an interesting twist, the RSV1000R was actually the standard version of the bike, with the Mille R's role being taken over by the Factory. But being "entry-level" is no bad thing, as the standard bike was pretty high-spec to begin with, and should keep even the most experienced rider entertained. Power was identical to the Factory, and the R got an Öhlins TiN fork up front and a fully-adjustable Sachs shock out back, with radial Brembo calipers. The whole thing weighed in at 472lbs wet, pretty much on par for a big v-twin sportbike of the era.

Reliability-wise, there really isn't much to worry about with the RSV-R, and they can cover pretty serious miles with minimal muss, which isn't something you'd expect from an Italian superbike. There are the usual hydraulic clutch issues, the water pump seals can leak, and apparently the charging systems aren't the most robust, but I can't remember a bike I've researched that didn't seem to have that issue. You think sportbike manufacturers would look into that...

From the original eBay listing: 2007 Aprilia RSV1000R Bol d'Or Replica for Sale

Extremely rare, very well kept, one owner (adult owned), limited edition Bol d'Or in excellent condition. All work done by certified Aprilia dealer, including recent 18,000 mile service/valve check, performed at EuroCycle Las Vegas. Always garaged, no accidents and spent entire life in southwest weather. Akrapovic Aprilia Racing slip-on exhaust, Ohlins steering damper, new battery, plenty of tire tread and fresh fluids. Clean title in hand, along with both keys, passenger seat, racing cowl, owners manual and tool kit.

Well, for a change, the seller isn't exaggerating: the Bol d'Or is pretty rare, especially here in the US. With 19,700 miles, it's not a garage queen, but the Rotax motor is famed for being durable and low-maintenance, so that wouldn't put me off in this case. The listing could do with more photos, but the bike looks complete, with a few nice extras, including what appears to be aftermarket rearsets and a pair of Akrapovic cans should liberate some of the v-twin boom without deafening everyone within five blocks like some other systems would. The stealth-fighter style has managed to age pretty well, and these generally attract a lot of attention

-tad

Ducati March 6, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Tripping the Light Pantahstic: 1982 Ducati Pantah 600SL for Sale

Ducati's original "round-case" v-twin may be one of the most beautiful engines of all time but, while tower shafts and bevel gears may be a very precise way to operate valves, they sure aren't an economical one. Think about the shimming that must be done during assembly; it's a very labor-intensive way to construct an engine, not at all suited for mass-production. The Ducati Pantah that followed showed the way forward, and is the grandfather of all modern Ducatis. Introduced in 1980 in 499cc form as the 500SL, it grew to 593cc in 1981 as the 600SL seen here. The styling is very distinctive, like nothing else being produced at the time, and handling was up to the standards expected of Ducati.

But before the Pantah, there was one of Ducati's most infamous misfires, corporate thinking that led to a failed experiment with parallel twins. It all made so much sense: a parallel twin has similar two-cylinder character and compact dimensions that improve packaging, while a single head saves production and material costs, as well as weight. What could go wrong? Well basically everything. The 500GTL might have looked like a winner on paper, but pretty much rejected everything that fans of the marque loved, and was famously unreliable as well. Luckily, Ducati engineer Fabio Taglioni had continued to develop a new v-twin, just in case...

The new engine incorporated toothed rubber belts to drive the overhead cams instead of tower shafts and gears, or the chains that were popular in other high-performance motorcycles of the period. This made assembly and mass production of the new engine a relative snap, but passed the costs on to the owners: regular belt changes are a traditional part of the Ducati ownership experience, although that particular maintenance chore can be handled by a home mechanic, and even the two-valve Desmo valve adjustment isn't all that difficult.

On the plus side: the push towards standardization and mass-production also meant that Ducati's signature Desmodromic positive valve actuation now appeared on all models, and not just their SuperSport machines, giving the 600SL pretty good power for a two-valve v-twin of such small displacement.

From the original eBay listing: 1982 Ducati Pantah 600SL for Sale

If you are a collector of classic and iconic sportbikes - or would like to become one - here is something you might want to investigate. The Ducati 600 SL Desmo "Pantah" was the first of the next generation of Ducatis, powered by an updated L-twin desmo motor with valve actuation done via toothed rubber belts instead of the traditional bevel drive. The belt driven valvetrain was instrumental to production volume for Ducati, as the older bevel drives required a great deal of time-consuming, skilled adjustment during assembly. Belt driven valves made true mass production a reality.

Was in storage for the past 10 years (with no petrol in the tank). Will need tune up/oil change. Carburetor was rebuilt 2 years ago.

Nice original condition motorcycle come with its original no rust Conti pipes. Will need very little work to bring it back to mint show room condition. Comes with spare Desmo Belt.

These used to be very affordable bikes, but the seller is correct: these are now definitely collectible and, considering how many were made, you don't see them up for sale all that often. The $10,000 Buy It Now price is ambitious, but maybe not totally outrageous, considering the general condition. However... this one does have 69,000 miles on the odometer, which means it definitely isn't low-mileage. The Pantah engine is pretty rugged, and parts should be available to maintain or restore, or you could even box up the original engine and build a hot-rod 900 that should bolt right in with just a few modifications...

-tad

Tripping the Light Pantahstic: 1982 Ducati Pantah 600SL for Sale
Kawasaki February 28, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Lean and Green: 1990 Kawasaki KR-1S for Sale

The entire class of 250cc two-stroke sportbikes has alwasy been forbidden fruit for US-based sportbike enthusiasts. The last real road-burning stroker was the RZ350, a bike that can certainly hang with much more modern machines and punch well above its weight, but the 18” wheels and bikini-fairing mark it out clearly as a bike from a much older era. In recent years, it’s become pretty common to see NSRs, RGVs, TZRs, as well as the much less common Kawasaki KR-1S up on eBay, as importation laws here allow bikes and cars older than 25 years to be brought in and used on the road, although state laws regarding actual registration vary wildly.

Overseas, and especially in their home market of Japan, the quarter-liter sportbike class was hotly contested and although, in principle, a two-stroke is mechanically relatively simple, these little machines ended up being at the cutting edge of motorcycle design, as each manufacturer tried to eke out any small advantage over the others. But despite Honda, Suzuki, and Yamaha's serious interest in small two-stroke sportbikes, Kawasaki chose to mostly sit the whole thing out, producing just 10,000 KR-1s during the entire run from 88-92, and the bike saw no significant updates during four years of production, nearly an eternity by standards of the class.

Maybe that’s because they got it very right the first time, and the bike certainly wasn’t lacking performance, with a class-topping 139mph tested top speed from a KR-1S. It was fast, with excellent, if slightly twitchy, handling. Claimed weight was 270lbs dry, and the liquid-cooled, 249cc parallel-twin slung beneath the aluminum beam frame made the expected... 45hp, as required by Japanese regulations, although it was obviously capable of much more and was highly tuneable. A six-speed gearbox helped riders make use of the available power and a KIPS powervalve system helped make the available power a bit more accessible.

Three versions of the bike were produced, the KR-1, KR-1S seen here, and the extremely rare KR-1R. The S model had wider wheels at both ends, compared to the regular KR-1 and, unlike other bikes in the class, the R model didn’t feature magnesium wheels, a dry clutch, or much else in the way of fancy accessories, although it did have larger carburetors and a close-ratio gearbox. Just a few hundred were supposedly produced.

Note that the bike is currently located in La Chopera, Spain, so be prepared to deal with shipping if you're not currently enjoying your vacation home in Madrid...

From the original eBay listing: 1990 Kawasaki KR-1S for Sale

Well preserved. Some minor scratches and fairing defects.

The seller also includes the usual copy/paste specifications, if you're interested, although some history might be nice. Has it been serviced? Is it ready to run? Good information to have, since parts for these are pretty scarce, considering the age and low production numbers. There's not much time left on the auction, and bidding is only up to $2,550, so maybe take a chance and see if he'll take a lowball offer?

-tad

Lean and Green: 1990 Kawasaki KR-1S for Sale