Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Kawasaki February 23, 2021 posted by Tad Diemer

Express Ticket: 1993 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-11D for Sale

I’m sure you all must be exhausted by the never ending stream of exotic Italian confections that have assaulted your senses this week. Rich, high-calorie recipes that include a bit too much of all the things that make motorcycles great. As a palate cleanser, I’d like to offer this very clean, very handsome, very appropriately painted, and very fast Kawasaki ZX-11.

Kawasaki’s entry into the 1990’s Horsepower Wars was introduced in 1990 and produced until 2001, when it was superseded by the reskinned and stroked ZZ-R1200. Power naturally came from a big inline four that displaced 1052cc and was connected to a six-speed gearbox. Aided by one of the very first functional production ram-air systems, the big four produced 150 crankshaft horses, enough to push the bike to a top speed of over 175mph.

Handling was neutral and very stable, exactly what you’d want from a bike this powerful. But although it was fast, the ZX-11 was no track bike: it was designed as a roadbike, with very reasonable ergonomics that made it far more of a gran tourismo, as the sleek, mature looks and lack of the period’s famously garish graphics suggest. The near 600lb wet weight helped provide stability at speed and pummeled road imperfections into submission.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-11D for Sale

100% OEM Condition… 1993 Kawasaki Ninja ZX11 D-1 in a very desirable Candleberry Wine Red with only 27,800 miles that comes out to 989 miles a year. This bike could easily qualify as a survivor (Pride in Ownership shows). Overall paint is in great condition. Exhaust and ECU are stock. Exhaust cans are very clean. Starts and runs good! Everything works as it should. No leaks, no smoke, no overheating. Plenty of tread on the tires. Decals and emblems are all original. Adult owned and cared for its entire life.

Original tool kit is under the seat. This is a very clean example and as the time progresses these are harder to come by in such great shape. As a matter of fact I’ve only ever come across a couple that were even close to this condition in years past. 

You will be very hard pressed to find one let alone in this condition. Free and clear title in hand. Bike has never been laid down or crashed. I purchased the bike from the original owner who was well into his late 70s. Hate to see it go. Price is firm. No rust whatsoever and garage kept.

I’ll include bar risers and a flat bar should the new owner decide to take touring comfort to another level. I will also include JTR488-45 rear sprocket. Zero Gravity tinted screen mounted, stock clear screen and a black out screens will be included.

Condition of this Candleberry Wine Red example appears excellent, although miles aren’t especially low. But it’s not surprising that the previous two owners racked up some miles, considering the ZX-11’sraison d’etre: ballistic mile-munching performance. I genuinely think these are very cool and, when prices were at their nadir, entertained fantasies of finding a clean example and fitting a set of soft luggage so I could blast up and down the West Coast. I’ve seen lower-mileage examples for less than this one’s $4,200 asking price in years past, but I have a feeling this will look like a very good deal in just a couple years’ time… Snap bargains up while you can still find them.

-tad

Express Ticket: 1993 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-11D for Sale
Kawasaki February 1, 2021 posted by Tad Diemer

KR1S KR0S: California-Titled 1991 Kawasaki KR-1S for Sale!

Here in the US, the entire class of 250cc two-stroke sportbikes was long nearly impossible to come by and, let’s be honest, probably not much missed by the majority of the riding public. In a land of GSX-R1100s being ridden by guys who considered a mullet and wraparound shades to be adequate protection, the market for 45hp two-strokes was always going to be pretty limited. But if you were just the right kind of motorcycle enthusiast, it must have been excruciating to read about bikes like today’s Kawasaki KR-1S in the pages of Fast Bikes and other European magazines of the period.

It’s easier to get a number of these formerly forbidden fruits here these days, now that they’re legal to import. After all, the Honda NSR250R was in production from 1987 until 1996 so, if you’re not too picky about which particular NSR you get, it’s not really all that rare a bike in its home market: nearly 100,000 were built in total. But Kawasaki’s entry into the class is rare, even in Japan, and was only rarely seen outside its domestic market. And even then, just 10,000 were built between 1988 and 1992, the bike’s entire production run.

By the time the 90s had rolled around, Honda, Suzuki, and Yamaha had all shifted to v-twins, but Kawasaki stuck with a parallel twin configuration, with the engine hung completely beneath the typical aluminum beam frame of the class. Like every other two-stroke two-fiddy, the KR-1 was light, agile, and involving to ride. Technology in the hotly contested class was cutting edge, and Kawasaki brought their KIPS powervalve and a slick six-speed gearbox to the party. Power was officially limited to a government-mandated 45hp, but the bike was naturally capable of much more when derestricted.

There were three versions of the KR-1 available: the base KR-1, the KR-1S seen here that included wider wheels at the front and rear, and a few hundred examples of the KR-1R that featured larger carburetors and a close-ratio gearbox. Top speed was a frankly incredible as-tested speed of 139mph!

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Kawasaki KR-1S for Sale

A Very rare 17 digit frame (Australia) CA titled 1991 Kawasaki KR1S 250 two stroke bike. Bike is in excellent condition. Bike will come with a lot of NOS parts and engine parts as well. Feel free to message me if you have any questions thank you very much.

The price for this two-stroke unicorn is a steep $17,900. Is it worth it? Well that’s hard to say: if that Cali title is easily transferred and if that cache of parts is extensive, I’m sure it will be to the right buyer. You may have heard that there are lots of well-heeled enthusiasts here in California with more money than sense… If you’re interested, move fast: there’s just about one day left on this auction!

-tad

KR1S KR0S: California-Titled 1991 Kawasaki KR-1S for Sale!
Ducati January 26, 2021 posted by Tad Diemer

Factory Race Bike: 1999 Ducati 748RS Corse for Sale

Back in the 90s, it was pretty clear that Ducati was a racing company that made roadbikes, not the other way round, and this 748RS is an example of that ethos. Today, Ducati’s R-designated bikes are typically homologation machines, designed to make certain components legal for production-based racing series. They’re generally in a higher state of tune than the regular or S-designated motorcycles, but are most definitely roadbikes. That’s not the case for Ducatis with an “RS” in their name and this 748 was built from the ground up to be a race bike. It wasn’t even issued with a title!

The Ducati 748 was intended to compete in World Supersport and AMA classes, maximizing the permitted displacement advantage to match the power of the screaming 60cc inline fours favored by the Japanese manufacturers. An extra 148cc wasn’t enough on its own, and the RS featured a raft of internal modifications required in order to produce the 124hp Ducati needed.

Radical cams, valves specific to the RS, a 54mm Termignoni exhaust, a close-ratio gearbox, high-spec suspension combined with lightweight bodywork and a simplified wiring loom to increase performance in every dimension. Today, these are sought-after collectibles, and often have extensive racing history. That’s certainly the case here, as this bike happens to have won an AMA Championship in the Pro-Thunder class!

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Ducati 748RS Corse for Sale

Ducati enthusiasts! I’m starting to list many bikes from my Ducati collection… This one is a very rare opportunity to own a piece of history… a Ducati race bike that actually raced and WON a AMA event!

This is a TRUE factory built race bike. This bike was 1 of 100 built in 1999 and one of only about 40 that were imported to the USA. It was purchased directly from the factory in Bologna Italy along with 3 others for the HMC Ducati Racing Team. This bike was 1 of 2 bikes prepared and used by Shawn Conrad. He rode both bikes to win the 1999 AMA Pro-Thunder Championship. Yes that’s correct… this bike was raced and won! 

He beat some big name guys such as Jeff Nash, Tom Montano, and Monte Nichols. 

The machine as it sits, is effectively new. The owner prior to me had it rebuilt from the ground up and any part not 100% has been replaced. The engine was rebuilt by Chris Boy’s team at Motocorse Ducati in Fort Lauderdale and has few miles and little time on it. Everything has been refurbished except the side panels which are original and “as raced”. This is again, a factory race bike and ready for your living room or to take racing or for track days. 

I have ridden the bike minimally just to keep it happy 🙂 Otherwise idled regularly. 

As with any pre-owned bike, you would want to do your own safety/mechanical checks before use.

And yes there are nicks and scratches as expected from a bike that was raced. 

No kickstand.

There is no title as this is a factory race bike. Ebay makes seller choose title status so I chose Clean. But again, factory race bikes didn’t come with titles. But I will create a bill of sale that transfers ownership and lists VIN/engine and description.

VIN and engine numbers correlate to the factory race bike history.

Here are some specs and parts as I’ve been told and researched. I’m not a mechanic, just a fanatic for the sight and sound of these bikes. Happy to take close up pics or look for specific things to answer your questions.

  • Full “Corse RS” spec motor with cams, ti rods, and factory installed slipper clutch
  • Superbike style wiring harness, keyless ignition 
  • Full Carbon Kevlar bodywork by Carbo-Tech
  • Dymag magnesium wheels
  • Harris fully adjustable rearsets
  • Full Termignioni 50mm exhaust
  • Brembo 18×20 radial front master cylinder 
  • EBC Pro-Lite full floating rotors 
  • ITG airfilter

Everything on the bike that matters is carbon fiber, underseat oil breather box, undertail plate, one piece airbox, air runners, large intake upper fairing.

This is a collectors item. It really is a piece of American Ducati Racing history!

Here is more info from online about this era…

The Ducati 916/748 was the poster child for performance motorcycles throughout its production, with the same sort of ubiquity the Lamborghini Countach enjoyed in its heyday. With so many of them made over such a long timeframe, it’s easy to forget how huge an impact the bike had when it was new: Tamburini’s creation may have been uncomfortable, temperamental, and expensive, but Ducati sold streetbikes so they could go racing, not the other way around. This makes today’s 748RS one of the purest Ducatis you can buy… aside from a used World Superbike machine.

The 748 was the baby-brother to the 916 and came in standard, S, R, and RS flavors. Naturally, the RS was the trickest of the bunch, a pure factory racebike with plenty of trick parts and a highly-strung engine with maintenance requirements to match. The 748cc v-twin was pitched against 600cc inline fours and the displacement bump allowed by World Supersport rules helped the Ducati compete, but heavily-revised internals were also required to keep them on relatively equal footing. Wild cams opened RS-specific valves needed to make the claimed 124hp, while a 54mm Termignoni exhaust ferried exhaust gasses to the undertail “mufflers.”

Happy to assist with your chosen shipper but cost and insurance is your expense. Happy to provide a video of bike starting and running. Please be respectful and only inquire with serious interest.  Located in Monterey, CA area.

Thanks!

The seller is asking $17,900 for this 748RS. That’s a bit more than the last one we featured, although this example is extremely clean, features a fully rebuilt engine, and has an AMA title to its name. If you’re a well-heeled Ducatisti, this would make a pretty great classic racebike, or an extremely cool trackday ride.

-tad

Factory Race Bike: 1999 Ducati 748RS Corse for Sale
Aprilia January 8, 2021 posted by Tad Diemer

Delivery Miles Only: 2002 Aprilia RSV Mille for Sale

Aprilia has been a major player in the superbike class with their RSV4, but it all started right here, with their Rotax-powered RSV Mille. Wisely eschewing the costs and development headaches associated with a proprietary engine, Aprilia turned to the Austrian specialists to produce a powerful, robust, and very compact powerplant.

It was designed to go head-to-head with v-twin superbikes, specifically the Ducati 998, but the RSV Mille wasn’t afraid to innovate. A vacuum-actuated “Pneumatic Power Clutch” mimicked the function of a slipper clutch to keep the rear wheel from skipping across the pavement during downshifts, and the v-twin’s unusual 60° configuration meant a more compact design for a longer swingarm within a shorter wheelbase for improved traction. And the new Aprilia even featured a new innovation for an Italian superbike, something called “ergonomics…”

The bodywork obviously wasn’t as elegant or as pretty as the 998, but it looked strikingly modern and the components were absolutely gorgeous: Öhlins suspension, an Öhlins steering damper, and forged aluminum wheels combined with tasty carbon bits all over the bike. And that frame, the gorgeous aluminum beam frame and swingarm combo that manages to make most other efforts look crude and industrial.

From the original eBay listing: 2002 Aprilia RSV Mille for Sale

2002 Aprilia RSV 1000 R Mille Troy Corser 2001 World Championship edition Race replica. Condition is “Used.” It was keep on a shelf for 18 years. In 2019 it registered and was rode 298 miles. Bike is super clean and very rare. Please contact with any questions.

You are probably wondering: what’s the asking price for this basically showroom condition example of the original Aprilia superbike? Well hold onto your hats, because it’s $10,995. That’s the priciest Mille I can remember seeing, and pretty much spoils what I love about them: their status as low-cost exotica. I think that these will someday be legitimately collectible, but this seller is jumping the gun a bit.

-tad

Delivery Miles Only: 2002 Aprilia RSV Mille for Sale
Moto Guzzi December 22, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

None More Black: 2002 Moto Guzzi V11 Scura Sport for Sale

“Scura” is Italian for “dark,” making this V11 Scura Sport Moto Guzzi’s answer to the eternal question: “How much more black could it be?” And the answer in this case is, “None. None more black.” The flat black treatment can look sinister or cheap, and sometimes both, but I think it works well here, showing off Guzzi’s massive, nearly automotive-looking v-twin lump.

And before anyone decides to scoff at Guzzi’s sporting credentials, keep in mind that they made very successful, if unconventional, sportbikes up until around 1980 and can claim many racing successes. That being said, their glory days were long past by the time the late 1990s rolled around, and Moto Guzzi wanted to do something about that with the introduction of an almost modern sports motorcycle. Enter the V11 Sport.

The styling was modern and retro at the same time, particularly if you opted for the absolutely lurid green and red color scheme that was meant to evoke the “Telaio Rosso” V7 Sport of the 1970s. I think the bike looks great in those colors, but it’s not for shrinking violet types… Suspension was of good quality and adjustable at both ends, aided by an updated frame design. The biggest news was the new six-speed gearbox that may not have been absolutely necessary in a nearly 1100cc v-twin package, but was necessary in order for the bike to be taken seriously and offered significantly improved shift quality for the shaft-drive powertrain.

The V11 is fairly heavy for a sportbike, but it carries its weight well and handling is excellent, once you get used to the shaft drive and longitudinal crank’s torque reaction. Unfortunately, Guzzi’s famous stability didn’t help at least one previous owner of this example: note the rash and dings on the right-hand exhaust and the fact that the right muffler is pushed noticeably inboard when viewed from the rear. At a glance, none of it looks too serious, but probably worth a closer look if you’re interested in this bike.

From the same Las Vegas dealer as this week’s Aprilia RS250: 2002 Moto Guzzi V11 Scura Sport for Sale

It’s a divisive topic, but I personally don’t mind heat-wrap on an exhaust, especially a murdered-out hot rod-styled bike like this one. But if you’re asking nearly $7,000 for a V11 Sport, it behooves you to at least make sure it looks presentable: that bit of flapping wrap on the right-hand side looks pretty terrible. The carbon looks dark and shiny, but there is some serious damage/wear on the red frame plates. The turn signals aren’t stock at either end, but are relatively tasteful and unobtrusive, and easily changed to match the new owner’s taste. The exhausts are Guzzi-branded performance parts and so should be throaty without being obnoxiously loud. Overall, a pretty high price to pay for a decent but slightly shabby example of a quirky-yet competent roadster.

-tad

None More Black: 2002 Moto Guzzi V11 Scura Sport for Sale
Aprilia December 19, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Dealer’s Choice: 2001 Aprilia RS250 for Sale

There’s nothing wrong with knowing your strengths, and Aprilia certainly knew theirs then stuck to them when they created the RS250. They crafted the gorgeous aluminum beam frame, swingarm, and the curvaceous bodywork, but left development of the engine to an outside party. That’s right, this little bit of flyweight Italian exotica is powered by a Suzuki two-stroke v-twin from the RGV250Γ. Hey, outsourcing engines worked for DeTomaso, Iso, Bizzarrini, and half the British sportscar manufacturers of the 60s and 70s…

Originally introduced in 1995, this bike wears the second-generation styling introduced in 1998. One of the few quarter-liter two-strokes officially available outside Japan, the RS250 also remained in production much longer: Yamaha TZR250 production ended in 1995, Honda’s NSR250R in 1996, and the Suzuki RGV250Γ held out until 1998. The bike was on par with those machines, with excellent handling and superlative brakes: the exact same triple Brembo setup was the same as the one found on the much heavier Ducati 916.

You’d be forgiven for thinking Aprilia worked some magic and breathed on the little v-twin: there is some “Aprilia” branding cast into a number of engine components, and the RS250’s claimed 70hp suggests a much higher state of tune than the donor Suzuki’s paltry 45hp. But there are a couple simple reasons for that: those Italian horses are probably a bit optimistic and measured at the crank, while Japanese market regulations required that bikes in the class produce a maximum of 45hp. Many probably made at least that at the wheel, and all could be tuned to make much more “for offroad use only.”

The very clean and thoroughly photographed example is being offered by a Las Vegas motorcycle dealership. So tell me: do you feel lucky? Well do ya, punk? I realize I’m mixing my Vegas references with my Harry Callahan, but you’re definitely gambling a bit with this example. I understand that dealers may not know all that much about the bikes they’re selling, but it’d be nice if they at least went through the motions: this listing includes nothing other than the dealership’s boilerplate legalese, and can be found here: 2001 Aprilia RS250 for Sale.

This particular RS250 appears stock, except for the carbon/kevlar-weave mufflers, although I’d personally hold out for one of the earlier Loris Reggiani replicas if I were in the market for an Aprilia. So what will it take to put this 15,404 mile bike with no indicated history in your garage? Well the dealer is asking $14,995 for it. Aprilia RS250 prices have continued to climb steadily in recent years, but that seems pretty steep. Luckily, I’m sure our commenters will chime in below and let me know.

-tad

Dealer’s Choice: 2001 Aprilia RS250 for Sale
Ducati December 4, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

The Real Thing: Ex-Bayliss 2003 Ducati GP3 for Sale

It’s not often real examples of top tier motorcycle racing machinery are made available for sale to the general public, but here we are. Got some coin to spend? You can have Troy Bayliss’ Ducati GP3 decorating your living room, which is pretty impressive when you have company over. I only know of one other guy who can make that claim…

Ducati had been very active in World Superbike since its inception, but absent from Grand Prix and later MotoGP competition, which had been dominated by two-stroke technology since the 1970s. Ducati of course was famous for their four-stroke v-twins and likely didn’t have pockets deep enough to develop prototype racing motorcycles with no roadgoing application, and weren’t contrarian enough to mirror Honda and their sisyphean attempts to make a competitive four-stroke.

Luckily, MotoGP rules changes in the early 2000s suddenly gave a huge advantage to bikes running four-stroke engines, and Ducati decided it was time to dive in with both feet. Knowing a v-twin would need an outrageously extreme bore/stroke and high revs to produce the power to be competitive, they opted to create a V4 that was effectively a pair of v-twins, with a “Twin Pulse” crankshaft that had pairs of pistons rising and falling at the same time. Ducati even referred to it as a “double L-twin.”

Sixteen valves were operated by Ducati’s signature desmodromic system and led to the “Desmosedici” name. Later machines flirted with exotic carbon-fiber frames and eventually a beam frame design, but this original GP3 uses a traditional and effective Ducati steel trellis by Verlicchi. This machine is in pretty stunning condition, but I’ll let the photos speak for themselves…

From the original eBay listing: 2003 Ducati GP3 MotoGP TB1 for Sale

2003 Ducati GP3 MotoGp ex-Bayliss
The beginning of the Ducati MotoGP history.
Frame TB1
Complete and fully overhauled, on the button, ready to be paraded.
Rare opportunity to acquire a piece of motorcycling history.
Private negotiation. OF COURSE IT’S NOT THE PRICE LISTED!
Bike can be inspected in the UK.
gianluca@stileitaliano.com

Wait, the listed $999,999 shown isn’t the actual price?! Dammit, I thought I had a shot at this one… It’s been a while since I’ve posted up a bike from Gianluca, but his history of offering the coolest bikes you can’t afford clearly continues with this one. The bike is currently located in Italy, but I’m pretty sure anyone seriously considering this won’t be remotely concerned by that.

-tad

The Real Thing: Ex-Bayliss 2003 Ducati GP3 for Sale
Ducati November 30, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Elemental: 1993 Ducati Superlight #838 for Sale

Until pretty recently, Japanese sportbikes were subjected to a pretty ruthless program of focused evolution, with significant updates to styling and mechanical components every two years. European sportbikes, on the other hand, often hung around well past their sell-by date, and special editions like the Ducati Superlight were often used drum up a bit of interest in a moribund model.

Put simply, the Superlight was a lightly modified 900SS. The engine was bone-stock, but weight was saved through the use of carbon fiber sprinkled here and there and a solo tail section. The biggest performance increase can probably be attributed to a set of Marvic composite wheels that contributed the lion’s share of the 15lbs saved, compared to the stock bike. It wasn’t especially fast then or now, but the 900SS is a simple, charismatic bike with excellent handling.

This particular example looks to be complete, with the lightweight wheels, open clutch, upswept exhaust, and numbered plaque, although the carbon has faded noticeably and the mufflers don’t appear to be original. The bigger issue is the nearly 40,000 on the odometer. That’s no problem for a 900SS, but I can imagine collectors might balk, considering the $9,000 asking price…

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Ducati Superlight #838 for Sale

Limited Edition Number 838. Outstanding condition, and just a bit of weathering, but overall very presentable and nice with 39,767 original miles. In 1992, Ducati took their 900 Supersport and added several choice extras to create a limited edition called the Ducati Superlight – 953 examples were built over 2 years. Unfortunately, for reasons unknown, in 1993 they removed almost all the extras, leaving just a fully floating rear brake to differentiate the limited edition from its less exclusive brother. We are proud to have a beautiful example of one of those ’93 models.

It’s easy to see why cynics scoffed at the Superlight a bit at the time it was introduced, since it was basically a just a 900SS with some bolt-on parts that saved a bit of weight. There wasn’t much of the package that was really all that special, other than the numbered plaque and the Ducati DNA already present in the Supersport. Personally, I think these look great, but I’d probably just find a nice yellow 900SS/CR and fit improved suspension so I wouldn’t have to worry about riding a depreciating asset every weekend.

-tad

Elemental: 1993 Ducati Superlight #838 for Sale