Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Kawasaki January 31, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: Street-Titled 2018 Kawasaki H2R for Sale

Update 3.8.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

There is obviously no practical reason to own a 300hp, track-only motorcycle that isn’t eligible for any racing series of which I’m aware. Maybe something involving quarter miles and ETs? Reviewers of the Kawasaki H2R generally don’t even seem to regard the bike as a particularly good track-day weapon: it’s just too heavy, and that fat rear tire needed to keep the power on tap from going up in smoke slows steering significantly. So you can’t race it, it's almost too fast for track-day antics, likely eats tires like they’re free donuts at a sales meeting, and you can’t ride it on the street… or can you? Apparently, you can, with a bit of DMV chicanery, since this Featured Listing Kawasaki H2R comes with a street title!

The original H2 from the 1970s seemingly has nothing in common with this iteration, other than the name: it was an unfaired, upright machine with handlebars and a long, Schwinn-style "banana" seat that was powered by a two-stroke triple, while the new bike has room for just one and is powered by a supercharged 998cc inline four. But the spirit is there in spades, since both bikes were about speed, speed, and more speed, and all other considerations be damned.

People often forget that there were two different versions of the H2 when the name was resurrected by Kawasaki: the regular road bike and the H2R seen here. The regular bike is a… regular bike: it has the usual turn signals, mirrors, and a really cool projector-beam headlamp in the center of the fairing that looks like it shoots some sort of death-ray. It also made a claimed 200hp, which is impressive, until you consider that Ducati’s V4 Panigale makes well north of that, and even several of the v-twin Panigales got shockingly close. BMW’s S1000RR, Aprilia’s RSV4, and most of the other liter bikes hover around 200hp as well.

And all that power is dulled a bit by the bike’s 475lb wet weight, which is significantly higher than those bikes. Of course, the Kawasaki still has a massive midrange hit of supercharged torque, but on paper, the literbike brigade makes the regular H2 look… a bit regular, although I'm reliably informed it's anything but in practice. But it doesn't matter anyway, because this isn’t the regular H2.

The H2R upped the game by saving weight by deleting the lighting and mirrors, replacing them with some extremely expensive carbon-fiber winglets to increase downforce, a set of slicks, and 35psi of boost. The increased positive pressure results in 300 claimed horses that announce their arrival through a stunningly gorgeous and deafeningly loud titanium exhaust that will require earplugs for your unborn descendants: the H2R is so loud that Performance Bikes Magazine wasn't even able to test one in the UK, as it wouldn't meet the dB limits at any track in the country.

It's also worth noting this H2R benefits from the most recent electronic revisions from Kawasaki in 2017 including an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and autoblipper. Cosmetically it has updated upper wings and the "matte mirror" paint.

From the Seller: 2018 Kawasaki H2R for Sale

For sale is a 2018 Kawasaki Ninja H2R, complete with a clean street title in hand. The H2R only has 60 miles on the clock, and hasn't been rode enough to register even one hour on the service interval tracker (it tracks based on time spent above 8000 rpm). Bike was broken in per Kawasaki's specs on a dyno, at which point it was immediately serviced at the dealer. I took it out for a few minutes on the track and otherwise it has sat on front and rear stands plugged into a battery tender.

Includes all original accessories: front and rear OEM stands, Chicken Hawk tire warmers, and Dr. Beasley's wax kit. Also includes one unused front tire and three rears (OEM-spec Bridgestone slicks), complete with spare rear wheel (you'll need it for a track weekend!). The bodywork has been completely ceramic coated and the edges of the lower wings have a clear film on them for protection.

This is a tremendous bike and is virtually new, with the added benefit of a street title so you can easily turn around and take it on the street rather than wait for the next track day.

Regarding pricing, because H2Rs are so fantastically rare and streetable H2Rs even moreso, I find it difficult to put a price on it. I am not desperate to sell, but I've had a few opportunities come up, so I'd like to see if anyone is interested in one of the most incredible bikes out there that is only some tires and a mirror away from being street-legal.

For perspective on rarity, the VIN number on this bike ends in 10. I was told by a Kawasaki rep that Kawasaki skips VIN number 1, and this was the last 2018 H2R built worldwide. Unfortunately this is purely anecdotal but if you look for photos of H2Rs, there are so few images of them with the 2017+ revised wing design that it is not hard to believe.

Located in Indiana, USA but am happy to cooperate to find shipping within the US.

This isn’t the first H2R we’ve seen with a street title, so it can’t be all that difficult to manage, assuming you don’t live in California or New York. I’m assuming it has a normal VIN to help things along, and this has been done in the past with the Ducati SPS, which apparently wasn’t road-legal either, but came with lights and signals and a VIN, making it more of a, “Of course you’re not going to ride this very fast, very loud exotic racing motorcycle on the road, even though it has headlights and turn signals and treaded tires…” [wink, wink] Obviously, do your homework if you intend to buy it and actually use it on the street, as your local DMV may have some problems with this one, depending on where you live. But other than that, I love the idea of an over-the-top track-day weapon you can use to commute to work on Fridays.

-tad

Featured Listing: Street-Titled 2018 Kawasaki H2R for Sale
Suzuki January 31, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

2FAST4U: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

The seller isn't mincing words here in the listing for this Suzuki GSX-R1100: "This is no poverty sale so low ballers and under 10 feedback stay away... this is too much bike for you."  So apparently if your eBay feedback is low or you like to grind someone for a good deal, a 30 year old motorcycle with 138hp is too much to handle? Good to know. Luckily, I'm not much of a haggler, so I'm sure I'll be fine trying to wrestle this beast through a set of corners.

Of course, rumor is that the K-Model GSX-R1100 was too much for anyone to handle, but not because of the power: handling wasn't the best and both Phil Mellor and Jamie Whitham crashed riding the GSX-R1100K at the Isle of Man TT in 1989, resulting in a ban of big bikes for years afterward. Some people blamed the bike's geometry, some the suspension setup, and many different fixes and parts combinations have been tried to sort out the bike's handling woes, but the bike maintained its reputation as a heavy, ill-handling brute, which ironically has probably helped the bike's mystique, considering similar Yamaha FZR1000s go for much less at the moment.

At 462lbs dry, it wasn't the heaviest GSX-R1100, but it's pretty portly. Personally, I think it's the best-looking version of the big Suzuki, and this iteration of the bike are sometimes known as "Slingshots" in reference to the semi-flat-slide Mikuni carburetors, although I've seen them off the bike and disassembled and I still can't see anything that looks like a slingshot in there.

These days the GSX-R1100's handling shouldn't be a problem, considering the kind of riding the new owner is likely to do on it. The bike has plenty of straight-line speed and stability for weekend blasts, you just want to make sure you plan ahead and don't try to change lines mid-corner. Certainly, it's not lacking in power: the K-Model was powered by the 1127cc version of Suzuki's inline four, still with oil-cooling. That beast of a motor, aside from the styling, is probably the primary reason for buying a "Slingshot" GSX-R1100.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

1989 GSXR 1100. Well kept killer bike. New tires ,brakes , clutch, carbs just redone. Paint is showroom cond. 200psi in all cylinders. This is when bikes were bikes. Very rare to see in this cond. top seat pad has some delamination, Top tree is a little dull from keys (common). XL jacket inc, with stand, 1000.00 bonus. This is no poverty sale so low ballers and under 10 feedback please don't bid. The pics say it all!

1989 GSXR 1100. Well kept killer bike. New  tires, brakes , clutch, carbs just redone. Paint is showroom cond. 200psi in all cylinders. This is when bikes were bikes. Very rare to see in this cond. top seat pad has some delamination, top tree is a little dull from keys (common). XL jacket inc, with stand, 1000.00 bonus. This is no poverty sale so low ballers and under 10 feedback stay away... this is too much bike for you. The pics say it all

It's a shame about the picture quality on this listing, since it looks like it's in pretty good shape and, with 21,000 miles, is pretty much just broken in. Bidding is up to $3,250 with another six days left on the auction, so dive in and take a chance, or maybe request some betting images from the seller!

-tad

Moto Guzzi January 26, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Italian Oddity: 1987 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario for Sale

Even if you're an Italian bike fan, this one might have flown under your radar. But that's what we do here at RareSportbikesforSale.com: let you know that interesting bikes like the Moto Guzzi V65 Lario exist. I especially love 80s Moto Guzzis because they're generally pretty durable and very affordable. They won't set the world on fire with their performance, but they're quirky, stylish, and pretty good handlers, if you allow for the fact that it's a 32 year old motorcycle on 16" wheels.

The bike could work up a decent turn of speed, with 60hp and a five-speed gearbox that meant the bike could do an honest 110+ with good handling for the time. Oddly, Moto Guzzi's 643cc "middleweight" was a more mechanically sophisticated machine than their big Le Mans. It was still air-cooled, but had four-valve Heron-style heads, with the four valves operated by pushrods and rockers, similar to the setup used in the later four-valve Daytona. Heron heads, if you're not familiar, have flat surfaces instead of domed or hemispheric combustion chambers, with recesses cut for valves and spark plugs. Instead, Heron-head engines generally use dished-top pistons to allow room for the fuel/air charge. This means the heads are easier to produce, and Heron heads have been used in a number of automotive applications, including Jaguar's V12.

Unfortunately, the 4-valve "small block" Guzzis have a reputation for catastrophic failures. Digging around the Guzzi forums, the problem likely stemmed [ahem] from the two-piece valves that tended to fracture, although the cam and valve springs have also been blamed. Who knows? You might get lucky and the bike will be fine, or a combination of softer valve springs, a set of Suzuki 250N valves, and careful use might see you through, but… caveat emptor.

Hopefully by now that's either been an issue and rectified, or never will be a problem, but I do get a bit nervous when I see a low-mileage example come up for sale. Easy to check though, with those cylinder heads sticking out proud of the bodywork like that, and the owner may be aware of them being checked recently or repaired. Bottom line: if you buy one, try out the updated valves and springs recommended by the Guzzi message boards and ride it with your fingers crossed until it breaks, then see about finding a two-valve engine from a different model. I believe the 750cc Nevada engine is a popular choice for this, if you can find one.

I love the huge, white-faced Veglia tachometer on a bike that probably doesn't even need a tach, the padded "safety" dash, and the button key. If you've never seen an original Guzzi key from the era, the fob basically folds over once the key is in place, forming a sort of knob you turn to switch on the ignition [see above]. Bodywork is swoopy and very 80s, but will provoke questions wherever you go. First and most common: "Moto Guzzi? Who makes that?"

This isn't pristine, but is in very nice condition and should make a great, quirky weekend ride if you want something interesting and don't have a ton of cash to splash. If you're looking for a budget classic, the V35 and V50 are obviously not as fast, but sweet-handling and much more reliable. All-in-all, it's a funky little bike, but there are reasons they don't go for very much and have low miles. If you like to tinker, it might be worth a shot.

From the original eBay listing: 1987 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario for Sale

I bought this bike in 1993 and I am the second owner. Very low miles always starts up no problem, idle is a little rough when cold but fine when warmed up, carb balance is difficult to maintain on these even with the right tools. Previous owner had megaphones on it and said he had changed jets to suit, I put the original exhausts back on and messed with jets but couldn’t find any better set up than what it has now, it runs great accelerates very well  and it is pretty fast for an old 650.

The only issues I have had are leaking fuel lines and carb/intake connections, all of which have been replaced.

There are a few cosmetic issues that I tried to show in the photos, mainly with cheap plastic and paint. The fairing has a crack across it which has been repaired with a fiberglass patch across the back leaving a small step, this could be buffed and painted but the crack is only visible from the underside. The belly fairing also has a stress crack down the front; nothing has been done to it. Some of the engine paint is peeling under the carbs due to the fuel leaks and on the bevel gear housing; the front forks have a few scratches due to tag stickers and their removal. Some of the red wheel paint is flaking but this is an easy fix.

The air cleaner box has been removed and K&N filters installed and the seat replaced with a Corbin single. The only other mod was to replace the remote choke lever assembly with individual carb mounted levers. I have the remote assembly.

It has the original tool kit, a few spares, including the megaphones, at least two keys and a clear title.

I can deliver to a shipping point within 50 miles of Columbia SC.

The price is right, the bike is funky, and it makes Italian v-twin noises, although there's more sound than fury. The biggest limiting factor could be the 16" wheels: rear tires are particularly hard to find in the correct sizes, and some of the bigger Guzzis suffered handling issues when fitted with the smaller hoop. They look a little strange too. 18" wheels supposedly fixed the bigger Gooses, so maybe that's an option here, if you don't like the way the Lario goes around corners. Parts may also be hard to come by, although these days you can probably get used bits from Europe via eBay.

-tad

Italian Oddity: 1987 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario for Sale
Yamaha January 21, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Resurrected: 1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

Having spoken with a couple people about the Yamaha FZR1000 of the late 80s and early 90s, I’ve gotten the distinct impression that, however competent it may have been, it really wasn’t cool in the way the Suzuki GSX-R1100 was. I think someone went as far as to say they were kind of the “nerdy” choice, at least among ballistic superbikes, so it figures I'd be into them.

It is a bit ironic that the FZR would be considered less cool than the GSX-R, considering that it was a much more advanced machine in many ways. The big Suzuki was a bit of a dinosaur, with an effective, but relatively primitive double-cradle frame, while the Yamaha was built around their light and very stiff aluminum Deltabox design, the first time the concept had been applied to a liter-plus bike.

Both bikes offered a broad spread of locomotive thrust, and did just fine with five-speed gearboxes, although the FZR managed to be as fast as the GSX-R, while giving away displacement to the Suzuki. And even though the GSX-R, originally eschewed liquid-cooling as a weight-saving measure, still ended up being pretty portly. The original 1987-1988 version of the FZR1000 used a 989cc version of Yamaha’s Genesis five-valve engine, although it lacked the EXUP valve that would become another of the FZR’s signature features. Five-valve technology has proven to add additional complexity for minimal returns and isn’t often seen anymore, but the engine’s steeply-canted design and under-tank airbox set the standard for sportbike packaging.

I think ultimately, the FZR was a victim of its own success. The Genesis was smooth, powerful and possibly a bit too refined. People generally don’t buy big sportbikes because they want refinement, or because they need them. It’s the same mistake Yamaha made with their RZ500: Suzuki’s Gamma was wilder and woolier, and stole the RZ’s thunder. Here, the Gixxer’s bad-boy reputation means that it’s an appreciating object of lust, while the Fizzer can be had for relative peanuts.

For now anyway.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

On the auction block is a 1988 Yamaha FZR1000. This is a really nice motorcycle that was recently resurrected after sitting for an unknown extended period of time. All fluids have been changed, including fork oil since seals were replaced. Coolant was flushed, oil was changed and all brake fluids, clutch fluids were changed as well. All brake calipers were rebuilt, clutch master cylinder and slave cylinder were replaced. Tires were just replaced 200 miles ago, after the wheels were freshly powder coated and bearings and seals were replaced. Battery is a new, sealed unit. Carbs were rebuilt, with all new gaskets, o-rings and needle valves. Air filter is new. Windscreen and mirrors were replaced, only because they were fragile or porous. Fuel valves were both replaced, as were fuel lines. New chain and sprockets. Runs and drives as it did when new. Low mileage example that looks to never have been dropped or crashed, but as with any bike 30 years old, not perfect. A lot of work done to get this one right. Tried to show as much as possible in pictures, but if there are any questions, please ask.

This FZR1000 is a classy bike and looks very nice from the pictures. Maybe a bit too nice to use as a budget sport-tourer... There are the minor imperfections you'd expect in an original bike that hasn't been restored, but it appears very complete. The FZR doesn't have Suzuki's wild, bad-boy reputation, but had very competitive performance and I happen to really like the clean blue-and-white graphics. The FZR may never achieve the desirability of a GSX-R1100 but, given how the values of all bikes of this era seem to be on the rise and how scarce really clean examples are, now's the time to jump in if you want to recapture your youth or just want a very cool, versatile retro ride.

-tad

Resurrected: 1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale
Sport Bikes For Sale January 18, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Some Assembly Required: 1994 Britten V1000 SCALE MODEL for Sale

Look, I know it sucks: you're never going to own a Britten. You're never going to ride one. Honestly, most people will never actually see one in person. Maybe someday, someone will build a run of nearly perfect replicas built to the original specifications. But even if they do, you probably won't see one of those, either. But you can buy this scale model of the Britten V1000, and that's not a bad thing.

The V1000 is the ne plus ultra of scrappy underdog stories, and reminds me of the first Iron Man film, “Tony Stark was able to build this in a cave! With a box of scraps!” John Britten had use of a shed and a bit of help, but lacked Stark’s resources and his V1000 certainly looks as impossible as a suit of flying armor, with an even more unlikely color scheme.

Just ten bikes made, with the lurid metallic blue and pink version being perhaps the most iconic. Looking absolutely alien, even to this day, the Britten V1000 took conventional thinking and pretty much threw it out the window. Nearly every single component was radical and innovative.

Suspension consisted of a carbon-fiber Hossack front end dampened by an Öhlins shock, with the rear Öhlins unit mounted in front of the engine and connected to the carbon-fiber swingarm via pushrods. The bike is basically frameless, and uses the engine as a fully-stressed structural member. A minimalist carbon-fiber structure links the heads and provides a mounting point for the front suspension. The swooping, minimalist bodywork is also carbon-fiber, and was designed to provide significant downforce, while vents in the nose ducted air to an underseat radiator. The wheels were made of carbon-composite.

The powerplant itself was perhaps the most conventional component of the bike, although it did feature programmable engine mapping and data-logging that can be accessed via laptop, something unheard of at the time. It was a narrow-angle 60° v-twin designed entirely by Britten, displacing an on-the-limit 999cc that produced a claimed 166hp and included the usual raft of race-spec internals, but interestingly lacked balance-shafts. The five-speed gearbox from Yamaha was one of few significant components not produced in-house by Britten, although I've read there was an optional six-speed box available as well.

The result weighed just 304lb and recorded a top speed of 188mph at Daytona. The V1000 was successful in competition, winning various events between 1991 and 1994, mostly in twins-only series, since it was obviously never going to qualify for production-based racing. A shame, since one can only imagine it would have stacked up well against Ducati in WSBK.

From the original eBay listing: 1994 Britten V1000 MODEL for Sale

This Kit is 1:12 Scale of possibly the greatest Motorcycle ever raced.

This is number 115 of the first 200 ever produced to fund the development of the Britten.

Check out the kit's influence on YouTube

These kits are an investment: there will never be any more produced since the factory was destroyed in the devastating earthquake at Christchurch NZ southern Island.

This kit is complete and unassembled.

Early kits included a supporters product pamphlet. It is included.

The metal is silver pewter of the best quality with brass screws.

The only plastic is the screen and control lines it has rubber tires.

Check with the seller for Postage cost.

THIS ITEM IS LOCATED IN AUSTRALIA

200 kits were produced to “fund the development of the Britten”?! Just how much did these kits cost originally? The seller is asking $1,200, and I’ve no idea what this might really be worth now, but it’s a pretty cool piece of history. Speaking from experience, this combination of metal, plastic, and rubber isn't something you'd want to try and throw together unless you've got some skill. Unfortunately, part of its collectible value is that it hasn't been assembled, presenting the potential buyer with a conundrum: keep it in the original box, or commission a build of the thing. Or hey, if you're an experienced modeller, go right ahead and build it yourself for the ultimate desktop fantasy.

-tad

Some Assembly Required: 1994 Britten V1000 SCALE MODEL for Sale
Triumph January 16, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Goldilocks: 1999 Triumph Daytona T595 for Sale

After the John Bloor resurrection of the Triumph brand and some experimentation with both three and four-cylinder engines, it became clear the triple supplied the right blend of weight, power, and perhaps most importantly, character that provided an alternative to the run-of-the-mill fours then dominating the sportbike scene. The original Daytona used a spine frame common to all Triumph models of the period that compromised weight distribution and handling, but the newly revised Daytona T595 introduced in 1997 used an all-new tubular cast-aluminum frame that lowered the center-of-gravity and improved handling.

The new Daytona was still a bit heavier than the Japanese 750s and less powerful than the 1000s and 1100s, but that was exactly what Triumph intended. It filled a similar niche as the earlier bike, with a bit of a Goldilocks mission statement: not to hot, not too cold, it was just right. Build quality and finish were, as before, higher than the competition, with ergonomics  that were still very sporty but more relaxed as suited the roadgoing mission statement.

Handling was good but the racy swingarm was clearly a stylistic decision, as the bike had no racing pretensions and single-sided swingarm is generally heavier than a conventional unit. Power was a claimed 128hp that gave a top speed of over 160mph. The original Triumph performance exhaust adds value here, as aftermaket parts can often exacerbate the 3,500rpm flat spot and the early Sagem fuel-injection apparently works best with this pipe.

The graphics proclaim this a T595, although 1999 saw the introduction of the 955i that displaced the exact same 955cc as the earlier version and was mainly intended to clear up the misconception that the Daytona was a 600cc machine. Assuming the year is correct, it's likely from before the changeover to the new name. Black is always a classic choice, but the bike looks especially sharp in silver, or the retina-searing "scorched yellow" that somehow suits the otherwise elegant machine.

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Triumph Daytona T595 for Sale

99 Triumph Daytona for sale. Has been sitting in the back of garage for years. All fluids need to be changed and bike needs to be serviced. Bike needed a rectifier when put away. Deployments and life got in the way of enjoying this beauty. Any questions about the bike feel free to ask. GRD Cycle in White Plains MD swapped the frame for me due to a hairline crack. I have the paperwork of original purchase and frame replacement. Triumph carbon fiber accessories and trim included. Original Triumph pipe and high mount Triumph pipe included. (High mount pipe adds some hp & shows off single side swingarm wheel) Racing belly fairing, bike stand & passenger seat included also. Clear title in hand.

The Buy It Now price is set at a very low $2,499 with a starting bid of $1,499 and no takers yet, which might be a result of the bike's current non-operational status, although a rectifier shouldn't be too difficult to source. The title is claimed to be clear and the paperwork documenting the replacement frame should hopefully ease the fears of buyers, considering that this was a well-documented issue and a factory recall on the earlier bikes. It's hard to get a good bead on the bike's condition from the photos: black can be tricky to photograph effectively, but it appears to have suffered a bit in storage or had a minor tip over, with a couple scratches and damaged signals. The bike is also missing its belly pan in the photos, but is claimed to be included in the sale. It needs a bit of love, but the important parts are there and the miles are extremely low.

-tad

Goldilocks: 1999 Triumph Daytona T595 for Sale