Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Aprilia December 18, 2014 posted by Tad Diemer

Track Day Monster: 2013 Aprilia RSV4 Factory APX

Update 12.18.2014: The seller has added more information on this bike, enough to refresh our post. The listing ends, coincidentally, on Christmas day. Happy Holidays to buyers and seller! -dc

2013 Aprilia RSV4 Factory SBK R Front

Wow. Well, I’m not even sure where to begin with this one: a full-factory Aprilia RSV4 Superbike. From the specification, to the upgrades, to the asking price, this is all well into jaw-dropping territory.

Introduced in 2008 and powered by a 65° V4 engine that just squeaks in under the 1000cc mark, the bike has won more races than hearts: in spite of very positive reviews from the start, the RSV4’s sales haven’t exactly set the world on fire, in spite of continual improvements. While the Aprilia RSV4 may not be the sexed-up media darling the Panigale is, it’s a hugely competent motorcycle on both road and track, winning Fast Bikes Magazine’s Sport Bike of the Year award the past three years running.

2013 Aprilia RSV4 Factory SBK R Side

On paper, the RSV4 doesn’t necessarily impress: it doesn’t make the most power, it isn’t the lightest in its class, and doesn’t have the highest top speed. But a complete package that includes compact dimensions and an emotional, flexible engine combines with Aprilia’s cutting-edge APRC electronics suite to make a good machine even better, and put nearly race-spec electronics and traction control in the hands of ordinary riders.

But of course, the price gap between “nearly race-spec” and “race-spec” is huge…

2013 Aprilia RSV4 Factory SBK Rear Suspension Detail

The list of specifications for this machine is incredible, and reads like the cost-no-object checklist. Probably because it is a cost-no-object checklist. From the original eBay listing: 2013 Aprilia RSV4 Factory APX SBK for sale

About Aprilia Racing (Noale, Italy)
On the 22nd February 2008, Aprilia unveiled the RSV4 'Race Machine'. With 4 cylinders, a displacement of 1000cc and over 200 bhp. The excellent work done at the Noale based racing department has enabled Aprilia to win seven world championship titles in six years. It's not by chance that, in just ten years, Aprilia has won 28 of its 54 world titles and the Piaggio Group has taken a total of 32 world titles in just a decade. This makes it one of the most victorious brands on a global level in motorcycle racing. Many recent prominent racers have raced and won with Aprilia such as Biaggi, Capirossi, Rossi, Melandri, Simoncelli, Stoner and Lorenzo. Aprilia’s 54 world titles, hundreds of wins on tracks worldwide are proof of the technical skills and winning attitude at the racing department that deserve the public attention of the premier motorcycle racing World Championship (MotoGP), which Aprilia will enter next year. This premier eighteen-race series visits fourteen countries, four continents and includes pan-global television coverage.

APRILIA RSV4 FACTORY APX SBK
100% RACE READY

Engine Configuration
Aprilia SBK-R EVO 1.1 Race engine designed in compliance with FIM SBK race regulations.
Tuned by Aprilia Racing, including test bench activities for engine validation.
Engine and components designed to be used for race track competition only.
*All documentation, chassis/engine number(s) available to verify authenticity*

Vehicle Management
Possibility of fast parameter modification with Aprilia Racing Palm system and handlebar switches.
Vehicle management strategies via APX2 control unit include:

MAX engine speed limiter which can be configured for each individual gear
Pit lane speed limiter (programmable)
ETC (Electronic Throttle Control)
VTP (Variable inlet Trumpet Position)
TCS (Traction Control System)
Adaptative TCS (Adaptive Traction Control System)
Distance Based (parameters configuration system based on distance)
Engine Braking (gear by gear programmable engine brake)
Power Reduction (gear by gear power reduction system)
Wheelie Ctrl (wheelie control system)
Launch Ctrl (assisted starting system)
Backlash Ctrl (backlash control system)
Quick gearshift (assisted quick shift system)
Lap time detection (with the use of an optional finish line on the bike)

Data Management
Acquisition of engine and vehicle working parameters for optimized vehicle management and strategies.
The FIM 7-channels data acquisition system includes:

Gas (OEM sensor)
RPM (OEM sensor)
Water temperature (OEM sensor)
Front brake pressure (optional sensor)
Front suspension (optional sensor)
Rear suspension (optional sensor)
Lambda (optional sensor)

APRILIA RSV4 FACTORY APX | SBK Specifications
(S) = Standard equipment installed at Aprilia Racing Factory-Noale
(U) = Upgraded equipment installed in the U.S

Aprilia V4 SBK-R EVO 1.1 Race Engine (S)
APX2 ECU with 7 Channel Data Recording & ABM Base Software (S)
Aprilia Racing Engine Setup Palmtop Computer (S)
Aprilia Racing Dashboard (S)
WSBK Aprilia Left Handlebar Push-Buttons (S)
WSBK Aprilia Handlebar Grips (S)
SBK Billet CNC Ergal 7075 Adjustable Clip-Ons (U)
Billet Ergal T6 PTFE Coated Race 1/4 Turn Throttle (U)
SBK Plexiglass Windscreen (S)
WSBK Aprilia Carbon Upper + Lower Fairings (S)
WSBK Aprilia Carbon Rear Hugger (S)
SSTK Aprilia Carbon Rear Fairing (S)
SBK Carbon Air-Intake Ducts (S)
SBK Carbon LH Heel Guard (S)
SBK Crash Pads (S)
WSBK CRT Ohlins 110mm Steering Damper (S)
23L SBK Aluminum Racing Fuel Tank (U)
Aluminum Race Subframe (U)
H2O Performance SBK Racing Radiator + Oil Cooler (U)
Akrapovic Full Titanium 4:2:1 Exhaust System with SBK Carbon-Titanium Silencer (S)
WSBK Swingarm from the Official APRILIA RSV4 World Superbike (S)
WSBK Swingarm Linkage (S)
WSBK Swingarm Chain Tensioner (S)
Ohlins Racing Upside-Down Adjustable Forks equipped with TTX25 Pressurized Ohlins Racing Cartridges (U)
Ohlins Racing TTX36 Rear Shock (U)
Brembo Racing GP Billet Radial Brake Master Cylinder 19x18 (U)
Brembo Racing SBK Front Brake Discs 320x6mm Narrowband (U)
Brembo Racing GP Billet Monobloc Narrowband Front Brake Calipers with Titanium Pistons (U)
Brembo Z04 Racing Compound Brake Pads (U)
SBK SS Front Brake Lines (U)
WSBK Brembo Billet Rear Brake Caliper (S)
SBK Brembo Narrowband Rear Brake Rotor (S)
WSBK Brembo Rear Brake Master Cylinder + SS Brake Line (S)
Aprilia Racing Rear Wheel Speed Encoder (S)
Aprilia Racing Gear Shift Sensor (S)
WSBK Aprilia Footrests/Rearsets + Shift-rod Linkage (S)
Pulse P2 Race Battery (U)
STM Slipper Race Clutch (S)
Regina Racing 520 SBK Drive Chain (S)
AFAM SBK Rear Sprocket (S)
Marchesini Forged Aluminum 7-Spoke Wheels (S)
Dunlop N-TEC Superbike Slicks (U)

Note: **New N-TEC SBK Slicks or other race tire of your choice will ship with the bike**

2013 Aprilia RSV4 Factory SBK Dash

Honestly, I want to like the RSV4 more than I do: it’s fast, exotic, and has maybe the best-sounding exhaust note available at any price. But the styling bugs me: in typical Aprilia style, the details are overwrought and fussy. The stubby tail is very cool and minimal, but what are those little blades on the top for? And why three headlights? But the simplified fairing of the race bike looks much better, and in Alitalia replica colors, even the roadbike looks good…

2013 Aprilia RSV4 Factory SBK R Side Rear Wheel

The asking price is $149,000 and that's a huge amount of money to pay for a motorcycle. But this represents a rare opportunity to buy a full factory Superbike and, for the price of a nice Mercedes, you can live out your late-career Max Biaggi fantasies. Just add race fuel, and skill.

-tad

2013 Aprilia RSV4 Factory SBK L Side

Track Day Monster: 2013 Aprilia RSV4 Factory APX
Ducati December 17, 2014 posted by Tad Diemer

Classy Twin: 1993 Ducati Superlight for Sale

1993 Ducati Superlight R Side

In 1992, Ducati introduced a limited-edition of their air/oil-cooled 900SS called the Superlight that featured distinctive Marvic composite wheels, cast-iron front rotors, a vented clutch cover, bits of carbon fiber bodywork, a solo tail section, and high-mount pipes to increase cornering clearance. Unfortunately, there was no engine performance increase as delivered. Available in yellow or red most years, depending on what part of the world you were in.

The "manufactured rarity" and a negligible performance increase weren’t really enough to spark much interest at the time. It wasn’t even all that rare, with 861 made in 1993 alone. Later years lost some of the lightweight bits, changing to the standard wheels and regular rotors on the front brakes, making it even less special, and turning the Superlight into a solo-seat SS with high pipes.

1993 Ducati Superlight Front

The older 900cc engines certainly won’t set the world on fire in terms of performance and they do tend to run out of breath long before redline, but that midrange boom more than makes up for a lack of high-rev histrionics. And if 75-ish rear-wheel horsepower doesn’t sound like enough, Ducati’s two-valve twin does respond well to basic tuning, and there are big-bore and high-compression kits available to boost power significantly. The engine has been in production, in one form or another, since the early 1980’s and is, in spite of Ducati’s temperamental reputation, extremely durable when properly cared for.

With too many made to be particularly collectable, too little power to really impress, and later models missing the actual super-light parts, the Superlight suffered from a "manufactured collectability" that has kept values relatively low, although I’d expect prices of nice examples like this one to be next in line for a price spike among Ducati collectors.

The biggest draw of the Superlight is that many were purchased at least partly as investments and have been correspondingly well-maintained, making them some of the best-looking and best-cared-for 90’s Ducatis available.

1993 Ducati Superlight R Side Front Wheel

There are some additional pictures over at the original eBay listing: 1993 Ducati Superlight for Sale.

But unfortunately, there is virtually no information about the bike's history listed, just some reprinted specifications. There are a few minor scratches and scuffs as shown in the pictures, but nothing you couldn’t live with, or easily repair if you wanted the bike to be perfect. I’d probably just fix the little tear in the seat and leave the scratches alone, since I’d plan to ride rather than show the bike. I’d certainly leave the color alone: the 900SS is one of the very few bikes that look good in yellow. In fact, I actually prefer it for this era’s style, especially with the very slick half-fairing found on the CR models.

1993 Ducati Superlight Top Triple

With just over 6,000 miles on this particular bike, mileage is low enough to be very desirable, but not so low you'd be afraid to ride it, or need to put tons of money into replacing bits that have gone south from sitting for too long. Although the Superlight isn’t quite the limited-edition that Ducati implied, they’re definitely less common than the high-mileage SS and CR’s that tend to litter eBay and Craigslist, and early bikes with genuine lightweight bits should be plenty of fun strafing back roads with your riding buddies.

-tad

1993 Ducati Superlight L Side

Classy Twin: 1993 Ducati Superlight for Sale
Moto Guzzi December 14, 2014 posted by Tad Diemer

Gentleman’s Express: 1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS

1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS L side

Moto Guzzi is famous for manufacturing quirky, long-legged sports machines like this Daytona RS. The Daytona featured Guzzi’s 992cc four-valve, SOHC engine that was also found in the bizarrely-styled Centauro. Fans fast Moto Guzzi’s from the 1990’s are probably most familiar with the Sport 1100, the lower-spec, lower-cost version of this machine that was fitted with the bigger two-valve pushrod motor. The fuel-injected engine had a higher, 9,000rpm rev-limit as shown on the white-faced tach but the powerband reportedly featured a frustrating flat-spot at 5,000rpm, right where you’d expect to find yourself on the road. This flat-spot was exacerbated by the standard, not-particularly-slick Guzzi five-speed gearbox that made it difficult to simply ride around the problem.

1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS Dash

While the frame and chassis were big improvements compared to earlier Moto Guzzis, by the late 90’s, the rapid pace of sportbike evolution had left them in the dust and the Daytona was too heavy, too clunky, and too slow to keep up with the new kids on the block. Ducati’s sadomasochistic sex appeal and cornering poise allowed it to compete against the Japanese but, compared to its direct rivals, the Daytona RS was really a “slow, old bus.”

With stable handling, good brakes, high-end suspension components, and a generally epic engine, it wasn’t a total loss though. Dripping with character and blessed with a booming exhaust, the Daytona RS was more of a GT and less of a raw sportbike. A flawed masterpiece for sunny morning rides through the canyons while you hold the bike a gear low to keep the revs ahead of that annoying flat-spot, riding a bike that makes you feel special.

1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS R side Engine

This Daytona isn’t perfect, but looks to be well cared-for example and includes some interesting features, and the fact that it needs a bit of cosmetic attention wouldn’t bother me, as it’d be a chance to go back to a more traditional eagle logo on the tank. While the bike originally was available with a passenger pad and pillion pegs, this bike’s solo tail is possibly for the best: passenger accommodations were supposedly very poor...

The bike features head-guards, although I’ve never seen this particular, abbreviated style before. On two-valve Guzzis, these actually do more to protect the spark plug leads than the heads themselves, allowing victims of low-speed crashes to get back on the road running on both cylinders. The four-valve engine’s plugs are more recessed, but the guards should still protect the heads themselves in a crash.

1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS L Termi

The sound of any uncorked Guzzi twin is truly epic, and the genuine Termignoni pipes fitted should give this Daytona the ability to shatter windows from blocks away.

I’m curious about those front brakes: they look like six-piston calipers. The bike was originally equipped with the standard package of Goldline four-piston Brembos common to many Italian bikes of the era, although the Italians are notorious for fitting non-standard bits partway through a production run, so perhaps these are original?

1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS FI Detail

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS

1536 original miles, clean title with paper work, I was told by a collector that only 308 were made. The bike is in very nice condition, runs extremely strong, but will need to be repainted due to the fact it was dropped over in the back of a truck and has some scratches and 2 indentations in the tank. The turn signal are tucked under the tail fairing, but are still there. This is the solo seat version with a dual Termignoni carbon fiber exhaust system. The motorcycle has just been serviced and will be getting new fork seals before this auction is over.

There are two days left on the auction with no takers yet at the $6,000 starting bid. While the $12,000 Buy It Now price might seem steep for a 90’s Guzzi, this bike shouldn’t be confused with its more common two-valve sibling: the Daytona RS is really the ultimate incarnation of the spine-framed Guzzis. Although this example has a few minor cosmetic issues, the low miles and general quality of the bike make it a tempting place to start if you’re looking to complete your collection with one of the best-looking Guzzis of the era.

-tad

1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS R side

MZ December 6, 2014 posted by Tad Diemer

The People’s Sportbike: 2001 MZ Skorpion Sport Cup

2001 MZ Skorpion Cup L Front

If you’re looking for something a bit different that won’t break the bank to buy or maintain, the MZ Skorpion offers something different for folks who don’t mind being on the receiving end of the occasional double-take, a 660cc sportbike with just one cylinder… Built from 1994 to 2004 and a very popular choice for club racing in “Sound of Singles”-style classes these days, they offer handling and versatility in an unintimidating package that stresses finesse over raw power.

2001 MZ Skorpion Cup L Rear

MZ, formerly known as “MuZ” was an East German company that dominated two-stroke racing, until defecting racer Ernst Denger fled to the west, taking their expansion-chamber tuning secrets with him to Suzuki…

There’s a bit of “people’s bike” DNA still here, and the entire MZ range of the time featured the same Yamaha 660cc five-valve single, here wrapped in fully-faired sporbike bodywork. Instead of chasing top speed and horsepower numbers, a single-cylinder sportbike offers useable midrange performance, reliability, and character.

2001 MZ Skorpion Cup Dash

Like some Communist dream of a sporting motorcycle for the proletariat, the MZ is good-looking, handles well, and fast enough to challenge all but the best riders, assuming their egos can cope with the mere 48hp produced by the thumping single, a bike with racy looks and a working-class heart.

From the original eBay listing: 2001 MZ Skorpion Sport Cup

The MZ Skorpion Cup is a very unique and super fun alternative to all the other 600 sport bikes out there. This one is a super clean version and sure to bring a smile to your face everytime you throw a leg over it and go for a ride.......street or track? You decide........these things make great lightweight road race bikes or can be the perfect track day bike!! And your buddies will not be riding one! This bike is ready to go with all new fluids and brakes and perfect Michelin Pilot tires. You will not be disappointed!!!  Why be NORMAL when you can ride an MZ Skorpion cup bike?

Yamaha XT660 single engine
Grimeca Brake with new Dunlop Race pads
Factory steel braided brake lines
Michelin Pilot tires
Factory adjustable rear sets
Factory Clip ons
Rare Yellow color
Solo seat and rear passanger seat included
All fluids just changed

The seller also includes a picture of the included passenger seat to replace the solo cowl, and a nice aftermarket M4 slip-on that should make a pretty cool, thumpy dirtbike snarl when fitted. Because of course you’ll be fitting that: there’s really no point in trying to be subtle when you’re riding a bright yellow sportbike.

2001 MZ Skorpion Cup L Rear Wheel

This bike isn’t perfect, but it is in excellent, road-ready condition with very low miles. And while a Buy It Now price of $4,000 is on the high side for these, it's still well within the impulse-purchase range. With a very unusual combination of rarity and bulletproof reliability, this is the ideal bike for the rider who wants to be different, but lacks any interest in designer-brand namecheck tomfoolery, the kind of rider who also probably drives an old SAAB 900 when their VW Bug is laid up for the winter.

Someone who appreciates the funky.

-tad

2001 MZ Skorpion Cup R Front

The People’s Sportbike: 2001 MZ Skorpion Sport Cup
Suzuki December 2, 2014 posted by Tad Diemer

Nut-and-Bolt Restoration:1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750 for Sale

1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750 L Side Front

This is about as close as you’ll get to a time-capsule GSX-R750 in a daily-rider package. It’s been fully-restored after a life on the road, making it ideal for someone who wants the very best Gixxer they can find, but is looking for something to ride rather than a bike to simply park up and admire.

Suzuki made plenty of GSX-R’s, but few survive in anything like this kind of condition. It's one of the most significant sportbikes ever built, and represents a real paradigm shift: before the Gixxer, most racy road bikes were replicas of race bikes that were based on road bikes. The GSX-R basically took the last part out of the equation: it was a road bike based on a race bike, a production endurance racing machine for the masses.

1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750 R Side

Introduced in 1985 and nicknamed the “Slabby” for its slab-sided styling, the original GSX-R came in one flavor only: 750cc’s. The engine eschewed liquid-cooling to keep weight down and the bike used an aluminum beam frame, state of the art brakes, and a monoshock rear suspension. It looks so familiar today because it basically invented the formula still being used for today’s sportbikes.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 GSX-R750 for Sale

The cleanest and most correct 86” GSXR 750 around! Every part on this bike has been cleaned and refurbished or replaced with OEM direct parts! I have every Suzuki label from the parts put on to prove it along with all of the parts and maintenance receipts. Direct OEM new and NOS parts are VERY expensive for these bikes. I have over $12k invested in parts alone.

1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750 R Side Front

For more details, check out the original listing: the seller includes a pretty detailed list of what went into the restoration. The fairing has been treated to high-quality work to make it better than new, and both solo and dual seats are included. The engine was completely rebuilt and he does have a NOS OEM exhaust available if you don't like the Vance & Hines pipe on there currently. Basically, that seems to be the story here: if you see something that doesn’t look stock, he probably has the original part, in better-than-new condition to go with the bike. He even has a spare set of tires to fit the 18" wheels.

Here’s hoping the seller isn’t trying to recoup his investment in terms of the reserve price: one day, bikes like this may be very valuable, but they’re not quite there yet. No reason listed as to why he’s selling it after investing so much time and energy in the build, but his loss is your gain: unless you're looking for a zero-mile time capsule still in the shipping crate, or want to hold out for a blue and white one, then this is your ride. Or this is your “sit in your living room and admire.” Or your “seal up in a temperature-controlled, hermetically-sealed vault.” Whichever.

-tad

1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750 L Side

Nut-and-Bolt Restoration:1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750 for Sale
Honda November 30, 2014 posted by Tad Diemer

Start Small: 1994 Honda RS125 Race Bike for Sale

1994 Honda RS125 L Side

While it's a hard pill to swallow for newly-minted track-day heroes with visions of tire-spinning corner exits, the best way to learn to be fast is by building good habits in an environment where every single pony counts. Hitting the track on a GSX-R1000 will allow a newer rider to lap at some mind-bending speeds, but you can be pretty lazy on a bike that powerful and still feel like you’re going fast. Then a rider who really knows what they're doing sails past you on a 600...

So it may be a blow to the ego, but riders who want to learn how to go fast should start small. How small? How about Honda RS125 small?

1994 Honda RS125 R Side

Racing a 125 is about managing momentum and making the most of what very little horsepower is available. Shepherding that power is an endless game of charts and graphs, gearing and air density to maximize power in the garage, and a constant battle with the wind on track, minimizing air-resistance to maximize efficiency and speed.

Then there’s the pack of other riders to contend with, all battling for the same space on track, drafting you for that extra bit of speed.

Although a rider’s physical size does make a difference, don’t think that if you’re not built with jockey-like proportions, you can’t ride a 125. Bigger guys do need to be very careful with weight placement: with bikes weighing in at 160lbs dry, many bigger racers will outweigh the machines they’re riding. But this has a nice side benefit, as 125’s tend to do less damage to themselves when they crash, skimming along the ground instead of digging in and tumbling, shedding bits as they go...

1994 Honda RS125 Dash

The RS125 was introduced in 1988 and went through several iterations during its life. It was a pure racing motorcycle available to professionals, amateurs, and privateers, an over-the-counter race bike. 125's are generally considered a "gateway drug," a stepping-stone to bigger bikes: learn to be fast on these, then move up to 250's and so on. Many World Champion Moto GP riders got their start on one of these little two-strokes, including Loris Capirossi and Dani Pedrosa, who each won the 125 World Championship on a 125 Honda.

Compared to the Yamaha TZ125, the Honda is generally thought of as being more user-friendly, better set up right out of the box. But while Honda’s 125 may be great for entry-level racers, don’t mistake “user-friendly” for “low-maintenance”: these are two-stroke GP bikes, pure racers, and pistons get replaced every 300 miles. Other parts last longer, but these bikes require more care and feeding than a modern four-stroke.

1994 Honda RS125 Carb Detail

From the original eBay listing: 1994 Honda RS125 for Sale

Very nice, clean and original Honda RS125 factory race bike. I bought this in the late 90's in Japan from the original owner/rider.  It was run at the famous Suzuka circuit track(see tech inspection stickers in photos)  just a few times before being garaged and has not been raced since.  I have fired it up a few times over the years and drove it around my industrial complex to keep it in running order but mostly it has sat on a shelf in my office as a display/conversation piece.  It is very rare to find one of these in clean unmolested condition.  Most race bikes for sale have been abused, crashed or pieced together with a patchwork of different parts and not suitable for a collection or track day event.  The Honda RS125's dominated the competition during this period winning 5 World Championship Titles from 1990-1996.  This bike has very minor scratches, a few track rock chips on the lower fairing and a 3" crack on the right side of the windscreen (see pictures),but shows incredibly well for a race bike of this age.  Unless you find one of these new in the crate, this may be your best opportunity to pick one of these up in this condition.   Race bikes don't have titles in California but will be sold with a bill of sale.

Buyer to pickup in Torrance, CA or I may be able to deliver to a local freight company (I will not crate or box due to fragility of fairing)

1994 Honda RS125 Cockpit

From the description, this is currently more of a display piece and is in very nice physical condition for a bike that was meant to be used hard, and it shouldn't take much work to get it back into fighting shape. Bidding on this is active but is currently only up to $2,500 and the reserve has not been met, but you'd better move quickly if you're interested: there are just a few hours left on this auction!

If you're an acolyte at the Temple of Lean, handy with a wrench, and want to experience the thrill of a genuine race bike that won't kill you if you look at it funny, this would be a great place to start.

-tad

1994 Honda RS125 L Side Front No Fairing

 

 

Start Small: 1994 Honda RS125 Race Bike for Sale