Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Suzuki September 25, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Going the Distance: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Race Replica for Sale

Well this is obviously not some perfectly-preserved replica, so if that’s a problem, just move along. Me, I’m always glad pristine originals exist in museums, so we can tell what those original, factory-supplied decals on the tank looked like before years of spilled gasoline caused them to flake and peel. But I don’t really want to own those bikes. Original carbon canisters that clutter up a Ducati’s clean lines? Massive exhaust cans that make a superbike sound like a sewing machine? Ugly plastic fenders and bulky signals and all that are optional, in my book. A bike is a blank slate. Sure, you can go too far and create something tacky and ill-advised. But this particular Suzuki GSX-R750 walks that line perfectly, with classic, if not original graphics, and great 80s endurance-racer style.

Flat-slide carbs now feed the air and oil-cooled inline four, but it otherwise retains the classic GSX-R oil-boiler powertrain. The inline four had twin cams and four valves per cylinder, but it saved weight by eschewing a radiator and water cooling system. Instead, Suzuki’s first couple generations of Gixxer used the Suzuki Advanced Cooling System or “SACS” that featured a double-chambered oil pump to circulate and cool the bike’s lubricant, along with oil jets that sprayed the undersides of the pistons.

The colors here match the black-and-red Japanese-market Limited Edition version of the bike, decorated with tasteful period sponsor logos. I don’t know if this Yoshimura setup is period-correct, but it looks the part, and makes the bike look more lithe and nimble, more modern. There may be fans of the huge, perforated cylinder that passed for an exhaust can on the original bike, but I’m not one of them. Stainless-steel braided brake lines are obviously a later edition, but look good and should improve feel from the old-school four-piston calipers. The Fox shock out back should get handling closer to modern standards, and I love the single-lamp endurance-style fairing.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Race Replica for Sale

INTRODUCTION:

You are looking at a 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 endurance race bike replica. This GSX-R750 was custom built to race spec but was never raced, it was mostly a show bike, this race build was inspired by the 1986 endurance race bike. The motor was fully race built from the crank up and a lot of performance bolt on parts were added or custom fabricated to replicate the endurance race bike of 1986. This bike is extremely fast and truly feels like a real race bike with the motor modifications and bolt on performance parts. But please feel free to read more about the specifics of this bike and see the pictures for detail. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us. U.S. and International bidders are welcome to bid on this motorcycle but must arrange shipping themselves…

BODY:

The body work is all original and is in good condition. There are absolutely no cracks on any of the body panels, but there are some minor nicks and scrapes on a few of the panels.  We took pictures of the body work before all the decals so you can see the decals are not hiding any cracks or paint flaws. The wheels are perfect with no rock chips or scratches anywhere. The frame and engine have no corrosion and are nice and clean. Overall cosmetically this bike is in very nice condition.

MECHANICAL:

The bike runs and rides perfect, and shifts smoothly through all 6 gears. A full service tune-up was performed which included new spark plugs, chain, air filter, brake pads, oil change, new tires, and fluids flushed. All of the lighting, switches and electrical components work as they should.

RACE PARTS:

Professionally fully built motor from crank up, balanced crankshaft, over sized Wiseco pistons, race cams, adjustable camshafts sprockets, extended hardened rocker arms, performance valve springs, titanium valve retainers, and camshafts were degreed top performance race spec. 34mm Mikuni flat slide carbs, velocity stacks and pod filters included. Yoshimura race exhaust, fox fully adjustable rear shock, progressive front springs and emulators, larger 4.0 rear wheel, 520 chain conversion, pro flo clip-ons, larger diameter front brake rotors, braided steel brake lines, 4 piston large calipers. this bike also comes with a full JDM lighting kit for street, which includes JDM turn signals, and front headlight kill switch with city light options too.

CONCLUSION:

This is a great opportunity to buy a 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 endurance race replica. This race build was inspired by the original endurance race bikes of the time and was built to closely resemble and perform as the original Suzuki team endurance race bike. If you would like any additional pictures or have any questions please feel free to email us. Domestic & International buyers are welcome to bid but must arrange the shipping themselves. We will however be glad to assist with any loading of the motorcycle.  We have helped with the shipping of motorcycles across the country and overseas for other customers in the past. Please feel free to bid as long as you make the shipping arrangements.

This is a very sharp bike, although the gauges are pretty faded and some other details show the bike’s age. Overall, it seems like a very nice rider, a bike to be enjoyed and shared, not bubble-wrapped or displayed in a museum. Bidding is very active and up to just north of $5,000 with several days left on the listing.

-tad

Going the Distance: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Race Replica for Sale
Suzuki September 22, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Pun Free Post: 1982 Suzuki GSX1000S Katana for Sale

One of these days, I’m going to write a Suzuki GSX1000S Katana post that incorporates all of the “edgy styling” and “sharp detailing” and “cutting edge design” jokes into one, long sword reference, every sentence carefully forged into a kind of Damascus steel masterpiece of bad puns. Today is not that day though. Instead, I’ll focus on the bike and spare you my attempts at metallurgical humor. Let’s be honest here: the Katana was not a brand-new bike, even though it certainly looked the part when it was introduced in 1981. In fact, the styling was really the only forward-looking element of the design, aside from a set of anti-dive forks.

The engine was Suzuki’s proven air/oil-cooled 1074cc inline four with standard five-speed gearbox from the GS1100, hung in a traditional frame with a twin shock rear suspension, and a 19″ front wheel matched to a 17″ rear. That familiar and bullet-proof mill featured DOHC, 16-valve heads and Suzuki’s TSCC “Twin Swirl Combustion Chamber” to put out 111hp, but the 511lbs dry weight obviously blunts performance somewhat.

It’s not that the Katana was slow, exactly. How could a big four-cylinder motorcycle with slippery, wind-tunnel aerodynamics ever be slow? But it was decidedly old-school, and the GSX-R that followed immediately in its wake showed the real way forward for the sportbiking world. With a bit of work, the Katana will handle well enough, but if you think “muscle bike” instead of “sportbike” you’re probably less likely to be disappointed. Top speed was a claimed 147mph, with tested speeds coming to within a few ticks of that, but it was reportedly pretty terrifying at anywhere near that speed. Best keep it around the ton and just enjoy the old school flexibility.

Slower speeds also permit you to bask in the attention you’re likely to attract, since this is the kind of bike that turns heads wherever you go. Styling was done by former BMW designer Hans Muth and his firm Target Design, and the result was hugely polarizing, but certainly not boring. Later bikes even got the pop-up headlight that looks like was always intended for that tiny nose cone. I’ve personally always been a huge fan of the gauge cluster, where the overlapping faces of the primary dials save space and generally look pretty trick.

Teased in 1979 and introduced in 1981, the bike came to the USA in 1982 powered by a smaller version displacing 998cc to stay under the 1025cc limit for Superbike competition, but but the full 1074cc version came hot on its heels in 1983. The seller simply refers to it as a “Katana” and it’s entirely possible we could have the 1000cc or the 1100cc version here.

From the original eBay listing: 1982 Suzuki GSX1000S Katana for Sale

I’m selling a beautiful Katana out of my personal collection! It is one of the first 1000 of production! The bike runs awesome, in good weather it will start and idle 90% of the time without the choke! It was totally gone through buy RR Restorations! New, brakes, battery and tires. The carbs, front and rear calipers and anti dive have all been professionally rebuilt! With only 11K miles I hate to see it go, but its time for someone else to enjoy it as I did! The bike come with a money back guarantee! However, your deposit is none refundable and buyer is responsible for return shipping! This is a beautiful bike that will turn head anywhere you ride it! If you have any questions please feel free to ask! Please free to make and reasonable offer! I don’t have to sell it, just what to make room for another! The bike runs, rides and everything works the way it should!

The buyer is completely responsible for shipping and the arrangements if needed! I will help the shipper in any way possible!

Katanas have proven popular as the basis for resto-mod projects, owing to their relatively low values, readily-available parts to maintain and tune the strong, reliable engine, and the wild design that even today looks like some dimension-hopping refugee from an alternate, much cooler future 2019 than the one we actually got. This one should probably be left alone though, with maybe just some updates to the fork and shock to keep the bike’s wayward high-speed handling in check. It’s not completely original, with the Kerker exhaust, but looks way too clean in general to chop up, even in the name of “improvements” and, at $7,000 is still a relative bargain.

-tad

Pun Free Post: 1982 Suzuki GSX1000S Katana for Sale
Bimota September 18, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 2007 Bimota DB6 Delirio for Sale

Please note the seller has opted to enable comments so interested parties can ask questions. Thanks! -dc

Bimota went in a strangely practical direction in the late 1990s, perhaps realizing that the well-heeled riders that could afford their machines cared more about quality and style than the did about lap times: even the fabled Tesi ended up with an air-cooled version of the Ducati v-twin engine, handlebars, and a set of risers. This DB6 Delirio might be their most practical bike to date, next to the… visually challenged Mantra, so “delirious” might be a strange way to describe such an eminently usable exotic. In concept, it’s a blinged-up Monster, but that’s no bad thing, assuming cost is no object for you.

So why buy one, compared to a Monster at half the price? You might prefer the looks of Ducati’s everyman exotic from a distance, but the cost-cutting measures required for mass-production can be found all over the place, once you start to look closer. The DB6 is a strikingly detailed bike, and I’ve long maintained that, if you’re not keen on the styling from twenty feet, just walk up to it and start looking at the craftsmanship on display: there are billet brackets for cables and hoses, and Bimota’s frame is a masterpiece of machined aluminum frame plates combined with gorgeous steel trellis components paired with a swingarm with a matching design. The result is exceedingly light, at 375lbs with oil but no fuel.

Horsepower junkies might be disappointed by the motive unit. Power comes from Ducati’s 1000DS “Dual Spark” engine with two valves and two spark plugs per cylinder. With just 92hp on tap, it isn’t a screamer, with power tailing off well before the engine’s safe rev ceiling, but it’s a blast to blat through the strong midrange, short-shifting up the box while enjoying the deep note from the Zard exhaust with distinctive, trapezoidal openings. It’s a bit of an oxymoron: a functional and perfectly usable Bimota. A fun bike.

The black frame is apparently very rare, one of just a couple here in the States. The specification of this example has also been updated to match the DB6R, with improved braking components that should make it even easier to stand this lightweight roadster on its nose. This also appears to have the earlier tachometer: others I’ve seen have a very functional Koso unit with a neat ring of light-up blocks that chase the needle around the dial, but I prefer the bespoke looks of this one. Honestly, given the engine’s characteristics, the gauge is pretty much superfluous anyway.

From the Seller: 2007 Bimota DB6 Delirio for Sale

2007 Bimota DB6 Delirio – Rare exotic. You will not see another one of these at bike night! This exact bike was the Bimota display bike at the 2007 Los Angeles Motorcycle Show. One of two DB6s in the US with a black frame. Bought from and serviced by Bimota Spirit in Raleigh, NC. If you know about these bikes, you know that Bimota Spirit is the “GO TO” company for anything Bimota-related. Only 3121 miles.

  • Custom Alcantara suede seat with embroidered Bimota logo
  • Ducati-powered, 1000cc
  • Slipper clutch
  • New battery installed on May 29, 2019
  • CRG bar end mirrors
  • Rizoma grips
  • Billet Aluminum Bimota brake and clutch levers – beautiful!
  • Zard carbon fiber exhaust
  • Bimota cover included

Carbon fiber pieces added:

  • Front & rear fenders
  • Solo seat cowl
  • Bimota clutch cover
  • License plate bracket
  • Side covers
  • Belt cover
  • Chain guard

Controls completely upgraded to DB6-R specs, all work performed by Bimota Spirit

  • 1 BREMBO radial clutch master cylinder
  • 1 BREMBO radial brake master cylinder
  • 507111010 1 DB6R clutch hose
  • 507180010 1 DB6R brake hose assembly
  • 507011010 1 clutch lever
  • 507080010 1 brake lever
  • 507080030 2 pin
  • 507080020 2 adjuster knob
  • 507080040 1 switch pin
  • 506482010 1 racing throttle
  • 507182010 1 throttle cable
  • OBERON 1 slave cylinder
  • RIZOMA 1 reservoir

Belt service will be done prior to sale to new owner.

Clear title. $15,900 obo. Bike is in Raleigh, NC. 919-844-5888. Ask for Michael.

With just 3,000 on it, this is basically a brand-new motorcycle! Obviously, looking at the $15,900 asking price, there are plenty of other bikes out there that offer more bang for your buck. But that’s really never been the point with Bimotas and the DB6 might be the perfect bike for the rider with limited space in their garage, or just an interest in an exotic that can be ridden daily and easily maintained. Seller is open to reasonable offers.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2007 Bimota DB6 Delirio for Sale
Sport Bikes For Sale September 14, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

The King in Yellow: 1996 Ducati 900SS/SP for Sale

Not too many bikes look good in yellow, and that very short list is mostly made up of Italians, Ducatis in particular. Red may be the most traditional color for Ducatis but the 916, Panigale, and this 900SS/SP look so striking in the bold yellow seen here, especially with the half-fairing that reveals most of the classic, air and oil-cooled v-twin. Most of the half-faired bikes here in the US were the lower-spec CR model with much more basic suspension, but some apparently did come that way from the factory, and I’d definitely configure my dream-build SP that way. Yes, I do have a dream-build SP, and it’s basically this one, with a two-up seat.

The Supersport was a mainstay of Ducati throughout the 90s, and was available in 900, 750, and even 400cc flavors, depending on the market. Here in the US, we got the 900, although 750cc examples do show up for sale from time to time, apparently sneaking in over the border. The 900SS came in two flavors: the SS/SP and the SS/CR. The motors for both versions were in an identical, as was most of the bodywork. As mentioned earlier, bikes could be had with a full or half-fairing and the SP generally had a carbon fiber front fender for, you know, weight savings. The aluminum swingarm doesn’t look quite as trick, but probably offered a greater performance benefit.

The biggest difference was the suspension. The CR or “cafe racer” came with non-adjustable suspension, because apparently cafe racer people don’t really care about handling all that much? Anyway, the SP or “sport production” came with a fully adjustable Showa front end and shock. Parts are completely interchangeable, so some CRs have been updated, but this example does have the plaque on the top triple that indicate this is an original SP.

It’s not completely stock, with a white frame, solo tail, and graphics meant to evoke the very limited-production Superlight, along with a low-profile LED taillight instead of the chunky 90s piece, but this 900SS still has the brackets for the passenger pegs, so it would be a relatively simple thing to put it back closer to stock. The Öhlins shock is a welcome update and the bike appears to be very nicely put together, as long as you’re okay with the non-standard paint.

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Ducati 900SS/SP for Sale

1996 Ducati 900 Supersport SP Half Fairing Monoposto 

I’m selling my 1996 Ducati 900 Supersport SP.
The bike was rebuilt by Johann Kaiser of Moto Motivo in Raleigh, North Carolina in 2017. 
The bike is powered by a 904cc desmodromic V-twin paired with a six-speed transmission. 
It features yellow bodywork with a white-colored trellis frame, and features include new Brembo brakes, upgraded Ohlins rear shock, cast aluminum wheels, and a carbon fiber exhaust and fenders.
The bike has a clean NC title in the seller’s name.
Has been garaged and has about 1000 miles after rebuild, and runs great.

You can find the bike on Moto Motivo’s website:
https://www.motomotivo.com/restorations

As mentioned above, I have a soft spot for these bikes. I’m a huge fan of the engine and the looks are a little bit retro and a little bit modern at the same time. It’s not really sleek, but solid and handsome, a practical sportbike that doesn’t overwhelm with power but can still handle well enough to entertain. With nice, original examples beginning to increase in value, the $6,000 asking price is a steal, if it’s anywhere near as nice as it looks in pictures. I’d look for a set of classic Termignoni cans to really finish it off and just enjoy the two-valve boom and midrange shove while bombing along a set of canyon roads.

-tad

The King in Yellow: 1996 Ducati 900SS/SP for Sale
Ducati September 13, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

A New Era: 1981 Ducati Pantah 500SL for Sale

The Ducati Pantah 500SL was a watershed moment for the company, a bike that seems a little underwhelming at first, but actually launched them into the modern era, with practical updates to the classic v-twin engine and striking looks that are hard to date, if you’re not familiar with the bike. Compared to most Japanese sportbikes of the time, the styling is decidedly wild, and the silver/red/blue graphics would look great on a modern bike like the Panigale.

Ducati’s old bevel-drive v-twins were designed to perform and gorgeously hand-crafted, but were hideously expensive to manufacture, assemble, and service. Not exactly a design suited to a company wanting to increase their production significantly. The Pantah took the original two-valve, air/oil-cooled design and updated it with toothed rubber belts to drive the single overhead cams, something that was increasingly common in the automotive world at the time, but largely unheard of in motorcycle manufacture.

The Pantah was introduced in 1980 as the 500SL, but quickly grew to 583cc for the 600SL in 1981. Power produced by the 499cc twin was a modest 50hp, but engine loved to rev and the Ducati was light compared to rivals at under 400lbs dry. This switch to the cheaper construction actually brought Ducati’s Desmodromic valve actuation to the masses, since the older bevel-drive bikes mostly used traditional valve springs, and it was only the Super Sport models that featured the race-bred technology.

From the original eBay listing: 1981 Ducati Pantah 500SL for Sale

It has come time to sell the last of my collection and this one is it. I’ve owned this bike since about 1996 or 1997 and have meticouluslly restored the bike with all original parts or the best parts available. I use the word restored a bit lightly here. The only 2 parts that have not been restored due to there great condition is the main frame(original paint) and front forks(original paint). Everything else has been repainted, refinished, restored, etc..

First 2 pictures are from a amateur photo shoot with bike from about 2 years ago.. The rest are from last week.

I’m offering this auction at very low starting price with NO RESERVE and hope it goes to the best home possible. Title is clear.

  • New paint and decals.
  • New windscreen
  • Wheels have been power coated and restored with all new bearing etc..
  • Electrical system gone through and restored
  • Rear fender delete modification with round light. (original light included)
  • New Conti replica short style exhaust(have extra set of silencers and will include)
  • Rebuilt front and rear shocks
  • Rebuilt and painted front and rear calipers
  • New Tires
  • Gauges restored
  • Polished engine cases and linkage polished
  • New Battery
  • All new original grips and levers and boots and cables
  • New seat bottom leather and original seat back leather
  • Headlight restored

I know I’m leaving out a bunch of things but its just to much to list!

Motor has been completely disassembled and gone through adding all new gaskets and adjustments. All work on bike has been performed by Moto Borgotaro in Brooklyn New York and Moto Pistole (now North Motorcycle). Everything except the blue paint and decals were performed by them. You can check out there websites for there caliber of work. 

Anything and everything you can think of has been redone on bike. Please ask any questions.

I will include in sale many extra parts and original owners manual and service manual. Vintage magazine with Bike of the Year from 1981.

Here is a link of the start up and walk around. Also you can see my other vintage Ducatis that I sold in the last few years…

I reserve the right to end this auction early due to its for sale locally as well.

Shipping is the responsibility of winning bidder. I can assist within reason.. 

This one is about as nice as you’re ever likely to find, and values of these 1980s bikes are definitely increasing after years, but although this is a No Reserve auction, the starting bid of $11,498 is both oddly specific and very high for a Pantah..

-tad

A New Era: 1981 Ducati Pantah 500SL for Sale
Aprilia September 11, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Reggiani Replica: 1996 Aprilia RS250 for Sale

I’m not always a fan of race-replica paint schemes: they’re obviously designed to be as eye-catching as possible, so they’re usually not very subtle… But the Loris Reggiani Replica Aprilia RS250 keeps thing pretty simple, with a distinctive scheme that flatters the bike’s simple good looks. It’s so understated that, for the longest time, I didn’t realize it was a race-replica scheme at all! Regianni rode Aprilias between 1985 and 1995 in the 250cc and 500cc classes, although the bored-out 380 v-twin wasn’t entirely successful against bigger machines.

Introduced in 1995, the Aprilia was a late-entry into the quarter-liter sportbike class, and one of few officially available outside Japan, since the NSR, TZR, RGV, and KR were sold only as grey or “parallel import” machines in many markets. Instead of trying to build a brand-new engine to compete in the hotly-contested class, Aprilia simply purchased complete Suzuki’s proven RGV250Γ “Gamma” two-stroke v-twins and installed them in their own chassis, with good suspension and possibly excessive braking ability: the RS250 is equipped with the same triple Brembo setup considered to be highly effective on much heavier bikes like the Ducati 916 and the hulking Moto Guzzi Sport 1100i…

Aprilia claimed to have tuned Suzuki’s 249cc engine and the official horsepower would suggest some serious Italian magic has been applied to raise the horsepower to the RS250’s claimed 70hp, but it’s all sleight of hand: the Japanese manufacturers generally quoted an output of 45hp to meet Japanese market regulations. In reality, they were easily capable of more, and the RS250’s Suzuki v-twin wasn’t very different than the RGV250’s powerplant and those Italian horses are probably optimistic, even when measured at the crank.

But that actually works to a prospective buyer’s advantage: parts to tune an RS250 or keep one running shouldn’t be any more difficult to obtain than they would be for an RGV and, while they weren’t common here in the USA, they were very popular overseas. Which is to say: make sure you’ve got some good translation software installed on your computer and be prepared for things to ship from Japan or Europe.

A 1998 restyle of the RS250 kept the same general character, but updated the nose and tail with a more pronounced teardrop taper and introduced a new, more “modern” dash. Function of the new gauges was pretty cutting-edge and included a lap-timer, although the style dated quickly. Personally, I much prefer the earlier style of bodywork and gauges seen here. The photos of this example aren’t of the best quality: resolution is low and the lighting is pretty terrible. But from the description, it sounds like it’s worth a look, and probably a message to the seller to request some better pictures!

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Aprilia RS250 Loris Reggiani Replica for Sale

Up for sale is a 1995 (titled as a 1996) Aprilia RS 250 Loris Reggiani Replica with only 5613 miles on it.  It is in very good condition for it’s age with only some small scratches on it but in great condition for a 20+ year motorcycle. All switches and controls work. Of all the RS 250 models the Reggiani Replica is one of the more collectible ones. The bike comes with a clear Florida title.  The only additions to it are a Battery Tender lead, Ohlins Steering Damper, and a smoked windscreen

The following services have been done to the bike:

  • New Battery
  • New Spark Plugs
  • New Black Stainless Steel front and rear brake lines
  • New rear brake pads
  • New air cleaner
  • New Pro-grips
  • New chain guide
  • Transmission fluid replaced
  • Coolant replaced
  • Injector Oil topped off
  • Carbs cleaned

Also included in the sale of this bike is a box of take-off spare parts from a customers RS 250 that he parted out. Basically $1000.00 in extra parts that you can either use as back-up spares or sale.

  • RH Switch gear
  • Grips
  • Flywheel
  • Voltage Regulator
  • Clutch Assembly
  • CDI Box
  • Oil Pump
  • Rear Brake master cylinder (NEW)

I am also including an Aprilia Factory service manual with the bike along with (2) keys.  I don’t have the owners manual.  The only reason I am selling the bike is the riding position is too extreme for me.  The shift pattern is also a race set-up with 1 up and 5 down.  It can also be switched back to the normal 1 down and 5 up if you need to have it that way.

Payment by cashiers check or cash. Check has to clear before bike can be picked up.  For sale locally so I reserve the right to end the auction early.

This Aprilia RS250 has just 5,613 miles on it, and comes with a nice stash of extras you can keep or resell to recoup some of the very reasonable $9,995 asking price. The unfortunate thing about all of these little strokers is that they’re such fun to thrash, but are rapidly increasing in value where it makes less sense to use them that way, which is a real shame.

-tad

Reggiani Replica: 1996 Aprilia RS250 for Sale
BMW September 6, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Silk Purse: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport for Sale

Before the introduction of the class-breaking BMW S1000RR, the company wasn’t really associated with cutting-edge sportbikes, unless you go back a few decades to the R90S. After all, an air-cooled, 180° ” flat” twin with shaft drive is a pretty inauspicious foundation for a true performance machine. A flat-twin is obviously very wide, which presents aerodynamic issues and limits cornering clearance unless the suspension is jacked way up. Air-cooling is simple and reliable, but the high compression needed for competitive horsepower generates heat that usually requires a radiator to control, and shaft drive is inherently heavier than a chain, making the BMW HP2 Sport a very unlikely sportbike, looking at the spec sheet anyway.

But German companies seem to have a knack for working around this kind of thing, as if they view it as an entertaining challenge. “Oh ja? Heir, halte mein Bier…” It’s been said that the Porsche 911 is “a triumph of development over engineering,” as it has a similar problem: sticking the entire powertrain out behind the rear axle is only marginally better than putting it all up front. But we know Porsche managed to make their ass-heavy car work brilliantly and, even though the HP2 Sport didn’t achieve quite that level of success, it did the job for which it seems to have been intended: it showed the world that BMW was serious about updating their image and competing head-to-head with rivals in Italy and Japan.

The engine may not have been blessed with a radiator, but temperatures were kept under control using a hybrid arrangement, with the heads cooled by oil, and the barrels cooled by air. It has radial valves, and four of them per cylinder, operated by dual overhead cams, while lightweight titanium connecting rods let the 1170cc engine spin up to 9,500rpm and produce a claimed 128hp. Liberal use of carbon fiber reduced the weight to a claimed 392lbs dry, so weight was on par with class competitors, even if power wasn’t. Adjustable ergonomics and the self-supporting tail section are very trick, quality touches in keeping with the bike’s very exclusive nature: just 500 were built.

It’s interesting that the biggest complaints about BMW’s alternative Telelever front suspension is a lack of feel, but that seems to have been eliminated here with higher-spec Öhlins shock and a matching unit out back. Forkless front ends are naturally very stable under braking, an asset for a bike with a pair of stout Brembo Monoblock brakes on the front wheel.

From the original eBay listing: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport for Sale

I am the original owner of this rare 2009 BMW HP 2 Sport. I bought it brand new in spring 2010. The bike has always been stored in climate control garage, never ridden in rain, and meticulously maintained. All maintenance records from new. Last fluid service approx. 1000 mi ago. Tires replaced in 2015, due to age at 4700 mi. All factory recalls performed. Runs perfect. Showroom perfect condition. Part of multi-bike collection, selling collection because I can’t ride them anymore.

listed for sale locally, I reserve right to end auction early if sold.

reserve price set below market value of recent sales

one of approximately 118 in US, 500 worldwide

sure to be a collectors item

clear/clean MD title

The BMW HP2 Sport is quirky and at the original list price of over $25,000 couldn’t really compete directly against natural rivals like the Ducati 1098, but it handled well and was quick enough in isolation. These days, prices are much lower and it’s a very rare and exclusive machine, with plenty of exotic materials inside and out and the high quality you’d expect from BMW. Bidding is very active, but up to just $10,000 with several days left on the listing.

-tad

Silk Purse: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport for Sale
Bimota September 5, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

If It Ain’t Broke: 1994 Bimota YB8 for Sale

Many of the Yamaha-powered Bimotas like today’s YB8 look suspiciously similar, and while I’m sure there are physical differences in the frames and fairings, I’d also bet that many parts are interchangeable between them. The YB8 used an updated YB6 frame, along with Yamaha’s 1002cc, five-valve inline-four and EXUP exhaust system from the FZR1000. During this period, the 750cc-powered YB4 was homologated to win races in WSBK, while the YB8 was a more road-oriented “unlimited class” sportbike.

Of course, being a Bimota, it used lightweight bodywork designed to come apart easily and allow access to the oily bits sandwiched between the gorgeous, aluminum frame spars. Wisely, Bimota borrowed more than just the FZR1000’s engine and gearbox: it also uses their wiring harness and gauges, as well as other assorted bits, to help put “Italian reliability” jokes and concerns to bed. The Bimota YB8 weighed a claimed 396lbs dry, a whopping 52lbs lighter than the FZR1000 and an obvious benefit of the bike’s single-minded design and construction. I’ve no doubt Japan could have built something similarly light at the time, but they seemed to be obsessed with silly things like “versatility” and “durability” when designing their roadbikes.

Power was up significantly from the FZR’s claimed 125hp as well to 149hp, although that was largely down to the Japanese manufacturers’ “gentleman’s agreement” to limit horsepower and top speeds. A few Japanese performance cars were suspiciously fast for having just “276hp,” so I’ve no idea how “de-restricted” the YB8 actually is, but just dropping 50lbs from an otherwise stock FZR would provide a huge boost to performance, and tuning wasn’t really Bimota’s strong point anyway.

Handling and looks were the goal and the YB8 delivered, with a claimed top speed of 173mph. 150hp is still pretty stout by today’s standards, and the 86lb-ft of torque, combined with the wide, flexible powerband of the 20-valve EXUP motor mean the bike should still be real-world fast. Adjustable Marzocchi components at both ends mean very stable handling, while Brembo calipers and 320mm floating discs up front combine with the bike’s light weight to offer nearly modern levels of stopping power.

Just 252 were built between 1990-1991. The bike was upgraded in 1993 to the YB8E that replaced the original 38mm Mikuni CV carburetors with fuel injection, although this example is dated from 1994 and appears to retain the original carburetors. Roll with it: we’re talking about Bimota here. Maybe 1994 is when it was first registered?

From the original eBay listing: 1994 Bimota YB8 for Sale

Rare and gorgeous Bimota YB8 with 6,000 miles

Carburetor version

This bike origin France has known only one owner. It has just been revised from top to bottom after a few years of inactivity. All consumables and fluids are new.

Original paint, very rare option or shock absorber and Öhlins fork.

Sold with the documentation of time, tools, certificate of conformity. French registration, can ship worldwide.

Located in Vitrolles, France.

The asking price is for this very clean looking YB8 is $13,900. Plus shipping and handling, of course. Bimotas of the era seem to trade for a good bit less when they show up for sale here in the USA, although this one appears to be nearly perfect and is ready to roll after a refresh. If you’re looking for a classic Bimota, the extra cost might pay off, assuming the bike is as good as it looks.

-tad

If It Ain’t Broke: 1994 Bimota YB8 for Sale