Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Bimota July 26, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

The Purist: 1993 Bimota DB2 for Sale

The Bimota DB2 is a bit of an odd duck [pun!]: the company’s claim to fame was building high-spec, light weight, race-inspired sportbikes powered by Japanese engines. Those engines came from bikes that were overbuilt and often significantly heavy, so Bimota found a significant performance increase by building motorcycles as much as a hundred pounds lighter than the original machines that donated their powerplants. But Ducati, with a few exceptions, has always had the whole handling thing pretty much nailed, and the DB2 isn’t much lighter than the Ducati 900SS that donated its engine to the endeavor.

Bimota’s naming system flies in the face of motorcycling convention. You’d probably think a Bimota SB6 would be powered by a 600cc engine. It’s not. Instead, it’s packing 1100cc of Suzuki heat. “SB6” means the bike in question is the sixth Suzuki-powered Bimota. The number has nothing to do with displacement. Because Italy. The original Ducati-powered DB1 proved to be a big seller and, at around 600 units, qualified as nearly volume production.

Luckily, the DB2 was a bit lighter than the 900SS at a claimed 373lbs dry. The one-piece tank shroud and tail section was held in place by a few fasteners, and was wrapped around a plastic fuel cell, all of which helped keep things simple as well as light. It was powered by Ducti’s 904cc air-cooled Desmodue v-twin from the 900SS that produced 86 claimed horsepower. That charismatic engine was suspended in a trellis frame similar to the original Supersport unit, matched to a sexy tubular swingarm, with stout Paioli forks and an adjustable Öhlins shock out back.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Bimota DB2 for Sale

1993 Bimota DB2 VIN#ZES1DB21XPRZES018. 408 DB2s were manufactured and this is one of the 285 full-fairing models. I purchased this bike in 2014 and have put less than 1,000 miles on it since then. After picking it up it was fully serviced by DucPond (Ducati Winchester, VA) with valves, belts, fluids and a new clutch basket and plates. Most recently in Feb 2020 it was back for belts and fluids at DucPond. Bike has the air cooled Ducati 2 valve motor in it. This is a very light bike with remarkable handling and great brakes – only bike I have ridden with true floating front discs. Reliable, easy to work on and tons of options available for it. It runs strong and pulls very nicely.

Everything works on the bike. The low fuel level light comes on and off regardless of the fuel level – common to these bikes I think. If I was keeping it I would put fresh tires on it (the ones on it are past their shelf life); change the brake fluid again; and replace the blinker relay with an adjustable one (they blink too fast). Bike charges fine and has a newish battery in it. No warranty expressed or implied – it is 27 years old, but I would happily ride this bike anywhere. As a 27 year old bike it is not perfect and has a few flaws which I have tried to highlight in the pictures. The paint is probably as good as the factory, but has blemishes in it. Clear title in my name.

Not on the bike but included are the steering dampener and original airbox. It comes with two sets of keys and the original books. Separately I have a lot of spares for this bike, that are not included with the sale here but I will consider a good offer on them from the purchaser of the bike. Bike shows 1978 miles and if the below is correct, then total mileage would be about 5,000 miles.

Prior to my ownership what the previous owner stated (these are not my words). There is a letter in the paper work indicating acceptance of the bike as a gift.

“This motorcycle was completely restored in 2001 when it had approximately 3000 miles and donated to the Larz Anderson Transportation Museum in Boston, who elected to auction it to focus on their older collection of pre-war cars.

Enhancements performed in 2001:

“944cc big bore kit, stainless steel engine studs, carburetor jet kit, new timing belts, carbon fibre belt covers, braided brake lines, polished wheels, mufflers, intake manifolds, new chain and sprocket, adjustable brake and clutch levers, tinted windscreen, Euro headlight, new speedometer and tachometer, painted frame.”

Bike is located in Northern VA.

Bidding is very active on this example, which is no surprise considering it hasn’t even cracked $10k yet. I have to be honest: the Bimota DB2 is one of my favorite Bimotas, but I’m not a huge fan of those graphics with their dripping paint/urban camo design. I’d happily live with them though, even in the garish white/purple [?!]/white scheme that was also available. It’s one of the purest expressions of Italian motorcycling, a light, nimble machine with striking looks and just enough power to be fun. The DB2 is easy to run as well, at least as far as the two-valve Ducati engine is concerned. Don’t be put off too much by the scary Italian reputation: a well cared-for Desmodue is good for 100,000 miles or more, and servicing isn’t all that expensive, or difficult for a handy home mechanic.

-tad

The Purist: 1993 Bimota DB2 for Sale
Suzuki July 20, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Devil in the Details: 1994 Suzuki RGV250Γ for Sale

If you love classic racing graphics on your sportbike, but feel guilty about supporting tobacco brands, this Pepsi-liveried Suzuki RGV250Γ could be just the ticket! Just try not to think too much about the obesity epidemic sweeping the country… Maybe the best bet is probably to find a defunct brand that won’t benefit from your cruising around on a sleek, rolling billboard plastered with their logo.

On paper, the Gamma and its 80s and 90s quarter-liter competitors from Honda, Yamaha, and Kawasaki all looked very similar: two cylinder liquid-cooled two-stroke powerplants, six-speed gearboxes, stiff aluminum frames, triple disc brakes, and wheels shod with the stickiest modern rubber. But they all managed to have their own individual character to appeal to brand loyalists and discriminating enthusiasts.

The Honda may have been the most refined of the bunch, but the Suzuki was the crazy one, with lively handling and a 90° 249cc two-stroke v-twin that was later borrowed by Aprilia for their RS250. All bikes in the class had some sort of power valve to boost midrange flexibility, and the RGV used Suzuki’s SAPC, an acronym for “Suzuki Advanced Power Control” that electronically controlled a power valve and the ignition timing. A distinctive asymmetrical “banana” swingarm provided clearance for the bulging expansion chambers on the right side of the bike.

From the original eBay listing: 1994 Suzuki RGV250 for Sale

1994 Suzuki RGV250 VJ22This very special bike was purchased from the renowned Pete Boccarossa collection. Visit Superbikeuniverse.com to see the listing. I’ve owned it for 3 years. He started the journey to build the ultimate RGV250, I finished it. From Pete’s original listing it was rebuilt with a new crank, pistons, and mild port work. Suspension upgraded with a 2013 GSXR 600 rear shock resprung for a 185 LBS rider, 2008 GSXR 1000 front end with forks resprung, front wheel, and radial mounted brakes. Custom rear brake hanger with brembo rear caliper. Katana 5.0 by 17 rear wheel. Tyga carbon fiber rear hugger. Lance Johnson painted a Kevin Schwartz Pepsi RGV livery that looks awesome. Upon acquiring the bike, I made addition upgrades including brand new Tyga stainless Steel GP expansion chambers with carbon fiber canisters, new Tyga triple trees, new Tyga rearsets, new Brembo front master cylinder, new front braided brake lines, new Michelin Pilot RS tires front and rear, new front brake pads, new fork seals, Suzuki kit 23d10 race SAPC, I sourced from Japan a very rare kit SP close ratio transmission, and complete SP dry clutch. Prior to install, I purchased all new OEM clutch plates and gaskets from the Tuning Works. Dyno used to assist jetting and dialing in carbs. I’m summary, it’s an amazing one of a kind RGV250 that runs as good as it looks. It has a clean Florida title and registration in my name. Sold as is. Inspection by appointment. Contact me with any questions. Full payment due 7 days at close of auction. Buyer responsible for shipping, I will help on my end. Good luck on bidding! 

There’s another day or so left on the auction, and bidding is up just above $10,000 with the Reserve Not Met. It looks very clean, but it’s not perfectly original, with lots of aftermarket parts, including those questionable turn signals that aren’t even aimed correctly… The kit gearbox is very nice, and the later GSX-R parts are good quality, but I can’t help but wonder whether or not the forks and radial front brakes might be overkill for a 300lb motorcycle. Overall, it seems like a very slick bike for the right buyer.

-tad

Devil in the Details: 1994 Suzuki RGV250Γ for Sale
Bimota June 29, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Added Lightness: 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale

Bimota’s tried-and-true formula is on display in the exotic SB6: take a powerful Japanese lump, hang it from an innovative frame and top-quality suspension, and then wrap it in wildly futuristic bodywork. In this case, the “lump” was from Suzuki, the liquid-cooled 1074cc inline four and five-speed gearbox that powered the final iteration of their GSX-R1100. Straight-line performance increases came from the Bimota’s extreme weight loss program: the donor GSX-R weighed in at 487lbs dry, compared to the SB6’s 419lbs.

Aside from the swoopy, carbon-fiber bodywork, the most distinctive feature of the SB6 was the massive aluminum frame that was designed around Bimota’s “Straight Connection Technology” that, put simply, linked the steering head as directly as possible to the swingarm pivot. The concept was simple enough, but difficult in practice, since the improved chassis rigidity came at the expense of packaging: the thick aluminum spars block access to several critical components. This example appears to use a set of white-faced dials that look like the Veglia components used on contemporary Ducatis, but earlier bikes used the donor GSX-R1100’s dash and gauges.

Note that the seller’s description below refers to “batteries.” You’re not reading that wrong: the SB6 had two 6-volt batteries wired in series. I’m sure this made sense at the time, possibly to distribute the weight of heavy lead-acid batteries more efficiently, but is definitely a hassle now. Not to mention that I’ve heard from someone who used to work on them that the battery tray had a bad habit of falling out!

In addition, in true Lotus-ish fashion, anything not absolutely necessary was left off in the interest of saving weight. That means the exhaust is almost as self-supporting as the tail section and has a habit of cracking at the headers. Hey, do you want to be a Bimota owner or not? The SB6 was a pretty big hit for boutique Bimota: approximately 1200 of the first-generation bikes were built, although production of the later SB6R was unfortunately cut short, with just 600 produced.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale

1995 Bimota SB6. Rare, NO RESERVE  excellent condition, runs well, 15k original miles, new batteries, bike has been stored in a heated hanger, selling for senior owner that no longer rides. Clean California title, never laid down. Paint is excellent, rare color combo. Front windshield has minor scratch. Small mesh tear in rear fairing, super easy fix. We at buyers expense can ship worldwide. Questions 503-999-0790 bike has not been detailed, it will clean up very nice. Rare opportunity to acquire a iconic Bimota! These bikes are very undervalued and will do nothing but go up in value .

Bidding for this Italian exotic is up to around $4,200 at the time of writing. Recent examples I’m aware of have sold for shockingly low figures, although I don’t imagine that will last forever. These are relatively simple, compared to modern motorcycles, and parts to keep the Suzuki engine easy to source, but keep in mind that these low-production exotics were a bit fragile. In addition, although they embodied sound engineering concepts, they didn’t always work as well on the road as they did on paper and had a bit of a shed-built reputation in terms of build quality. None of that would deter me from buying one, but I’ve always .

-tad

Added Lightness: 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale
BMW June 24, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Bahnstorming: 2007 BMW R-Series R1200S

BMW’s R1200S is a “sportbike” in the same way Ducati’s 1000SS DS is a sportbike: it’s designed for folks who love the brand and want something fun to ride in the canyons, not the type that are going to be cross-shopping the latest literbikes or ripping the lights and mirrors off to do track days. Let’s be honest: that’s perfectly fine for most people, since both of the aforementioned bikes can certainly cut it on track, and probably show their taped-up taillights to much faster machines when handled by a skilled pilot.

This is the second-generation of what was BMW’s sportiest model, prior to the arrival of the S1000RR that turned the sportbiking world on its ear, and was introduced in 2006. Looks are similar to the earlier model, but a bit more angular and technical looking, a little more svelte. That’s no bad thing, as the original was a little bit porky by sportbike standards and the new version weighed in at a claimed 488 or so wet, down from the 505 of the preceding model. The new trellis frame that replaced the aluminum beam frame of the original certainly looks like it helped to save some of that weight.

So it was a little bit heavier than a Ducati Supersport, but it also made more power and torque. Displacement was up a little less than the 100cc’s advertised by the name, to 1170cc from 1085cc with twin plugs per cylinder. Power was up to 122hp from 98hp with a torque curve as flat as a tabletop. Power from the longitudinally-mounted flat twin is transferred to the rear wheel via a six-speed gearbox and the expected Paralever shaft drive system. Öhlins shocks were optional at the rear and at the front, since the bike retained BMW’s Telelever system that remains one of the few mass-produced alternative front-ends available in modern times. The R12000S handled well and, unlikely as it seems, you have to work very, very hard to deck out those cylinder heads that stick out awkwardly to the sides.

Given the shaft-drive models’ reputation for being able to rack up big miles with minimal trouble, this example is barely broken in by BMW standards: it’s covered just 2,250 miles so far. The bike includes a nice aftermarket Remus muffler that should make the bike sound a bit sportier, and the wider 6″ rear wheel should mean a wide choice of sporty rubber.

From the original eBay listing: 2007 BMW R1200S for Sale

BIKE IS IN LIKE NEW CONDITION. Oil and filter change done this past winter. 110 miles of riding have been added since. Bike was always stored indoors in a heated office. 
The owner died 2 months ago. He was a close friend of mine. I am selling this for his wife. I have ridden the bike about 15 miles to make sure of its condition. Starts and runs perfectly. He took it on a 60 mile ride the week before he died. I have owned dozens of BMW’s over my 69 years and this is as close to new as you will find. No marks, dings, or scratches on the bike. Always meticulously cared for.
Options include: 
Heated grips
Ohlins shocks front and rear
Full Remus exhaust system
6″ rear wheel
Gowing custom leather seat
ABS -(it was an option)

The bike comes with ABS. I have been told there are 2 versions. I will attempt to find which version is on the bike. 

I also am adding to this auction the large tank bag that is designed for this bike. Also included that is not listed above is a bunch of knick knacks BMW gave to the original owner upon purchase of an R1200S. Send me a message and I can send you pics of the knick knacks. I can’t ad pics to the add. All used up

The options on the bike include ABS so I am assuming it is the lightweight version that can be turned off for track days, tho the bike has  never been tracked. 

Apologize to all. The bike has 2810 miles on it, not 2250. Not sure how I made that mistake. 

Also – This bike has never been down in any way. The tire rubber and kickstand bottom are the only things that have ever touched ground…

I just received this note from a long time owner of a R1200S:

“Just so you know, there is only one ABS available on these bikes. Your bike with Ohlins, heated grips, ABS and probably the wider rear wheel is the Sport Option.
Standard model did not have Ohlins, ABS or heated grips. And yes, the ABS can be turned off.”

The seller also includes a video of the bike starting from cold and being ridden around some country roads, showing off the nice, mellow growl of the Remus aftermarket exhaust. At the time of writing, the listing is up to $7,900, with just 24 hours left on the auction and pretty active bidding. Maybe not the sexiest bike, but a pretty cool machine if you need one bike to do it all, with a bit of Germanic quirkiness thrown in for good measure.

-tad

Bahnstorming: 2007 BMW R-Series R1200S
Cagiva June 20, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: Texas Titled 1994 Cagiva Mito for Sale

Update 7.16.2020: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc
Riders like Valentino Rossi don’t spring from the womb in neon leathers, ready to drag a knee on the way out the delivery room. It takes time to hone their skills on smaller bikes as teenagers, before moving up to Grand Prix machines. The Doctor came up the way you’d expect, from 125s to 250s and on up to 500s, back when two-strokes ruled the grid. And back when he was more Doogie Howser, MD than Dr Gregory House, he earned his first championship win in 1994 on a 125cc Cagiva Mito like today’s Featured Listing.
Introduced in 1989, the Mito featured a lightweight aluminum beam frame, from which was suspended a water-cooled, 125cc two-stroke single with bore and stroke of 56 x 50.6mm, along with the expected six-speed gearbox. What you might not expect on a 125 two-stroke is an electric starter, a nice sophisticated touch. Dry weight was just 284lbs, helped along by the lightweight aluminum frame and in keeping the the bike’s sporty image. It also means the little sportbike is surprisingly agile and quick, with a top speed of just over 100mph. This is a serious piece of kit, and a version was even available with a seven-speed gearbox to better make use of the narrow sliver of power from the little engine.
This example is a Mark II version of the first-generation bike, as indicated by the upside-down forks and the single Brembo Goldline caliper up front. If you want a Mito, it’d be hard not to hold out for one of the later machines styled by Massimo Tamburini to look like a Ducati 916 that was washed in hot water and shrunk a bit, but those are very much in demand and can be pricey, when they can be found at all. This earlier version may not have the Tamburini version’s big-bike associations and looks, but it’s still a very good-looking machine and doesn’t scream “learner bike” like many other 125s.
From the Seller, 1994 Cagiva Mito for Sale:
Bike starts and runs and rides well. Is all stock (minus the front brake pump and oil pump delete). I have all original parts.
The bike is a clear Texas Titled (Bonded earlier this year) 1994 Spanish market Cagiva Mito 125cc with 26,301 on the clock.
I have a 4 minute youtube video as well, showing a depaneled tour of the bike, plus cold and hot starts (skip to 2:19 if for the hot and cold starts)

$4,500.

The seller is asking $4,500 for this little smoker and, to be clear, it has some cosmetic issues. As you can see from the photos, there is some cracking of the panels around stress points, and some discoloration of the frame from a bit of fuel that’s spilled. Note that the carbon fiber wrap on the swingarm is actually original, and the bike has 26,301 kilometers on the odometer, which is about 16,000 miles. On the positive side, this little machine is complete and as you can see from the included YouTube video, it appears to run well. The Mito is pretty rare in the US, and the seller is upfront and honest about the bike and its condition. It might need some TLC, a respray, and a bit of elbow grease to get it looking its best, but it looks like a solid little machine for a good price or it could be the foundation of a fun restoration project.

-tad
Featured Listing: Texas Titled 1994 Cagiva Mito for Sale
Ducati June 14, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 1995 Ducati 916 for Sale

6.26.2020: Iconic shows this bike as sold. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

An awful lot of ink has been spilled concerning the Ducati 916. No surprise, considering it’s generally considered one of the most significant sportbikes of the modern era. But the 916 also managed to become a cultural icon, with revolutionary looks to match the scorching performance. It’s instantly recognizable, even by non-enthusiasts, a bike that adorned teenage bedrooms and the garage walls of grown men, and even managed to earn a starring role in a number of feature films. The 916 was so spectacular, in fact, that any followup was doomed to fail: Ducati fans never really embraced the completely redesigned 999 that followed, so the later 1098 ended up looking like a modernized 916.

1995 Ducati 916 for Sale at Iconic Motorbikes

A booming Italian v-twin in a world populated by inline-four sportbikes from Japan, the 916 was gorgeous, fast, temperamental, and expensive. Ergonomics were pretty brutal, but who cares when you were riding something that looked and sounded like this? The liquid-cooled, four valve Desmoquattro engine displaced 916cc and produced a claimed 114hp, along with all that famous v-twin torque that helped it compete with four-cylinder sportbikes that could rev much higher. The dry clutch might have been a pain in traffic, but the audible rattle added to the sensory overload and just made the bike seem that much more exotic.

The only issue when discussing Tamburini’s masterpiece as a collectible is that it’s actually not all that rare: Ducati produced just over 18,000 of the original 916 across all years, variants, and markets, and that’s before you get into the 996 and 998 that offer similar looks and improved performance. If you want a truly collectible modern Ducati, you’re probably looking for an SP, SPS, or R bike. Of course those machines are difficult to find and command much higher prices, and even the most “ordinary” Ducati 916 is really anything but.

From the Seller: 1995 Ducati 916 for Sale

This 916 (VIN: ZDM1SB8S1SB004750) has 2,808 miles. Upgrades include a Fast by Ferracci exhaust with a matching Ferracci Stage 1 EPROM chip, that was installed in 1996, a Yoyodyne clutch slave cylinder, Öhlins shock, and a Ferracci carbon fiber rear hugger and chain guard. The bike includes extensive documentation, including notes from the original sale, maintenance records, receipts, and period magazines and articles. The sale also includes the owner’s manual, shop manual in a binder, world dealer guide, limited warranty paperwork, and a bike cover. This Ducati was last titled and registered in Wisconsin in 2010. The gas was drained 6 months ago and the bike was kept on a battery tender as the owner planned on displaying it in his house.

This is a very clean example of Ducati’s iconic 916 and has extremely low miles, as well as solid documentation. Frankly, it’s gorgeous. Prices for the 916  have been low for a few years, but are finally headed upward. It’s pretty clear that the original Tamburini bikes represent a solid investment with historical significance and incredible sex appeal.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1995 Ducati 916 for Sale
Honda June 11, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

Vee Four: 1995 Honda RVF400R NC35 for Sale

Modern 400s are generally geared towards new or budget-minded riders, but can still be very capable sportbikes: I spent a session or two recently chasing one around Buttonwillow, and it turns out a Ninja 400 can work up a surprising turn of speed. In spite of that, they’re still pretty basic machines, specification-wise. But a couple decades ago, bikes like the Honda RVF400R NC35 gave nothing away to the most exotic roadgoing machines, other than a few cubic centimeters of displacement…

A race-bred V4 engine with a “big-bang” 360° crank, gear-driven cams, a distinctive single-sided swingarm and a rear wheel held on by a single large nut… there were no compromises on the NC35, other than those slightly tacky plastic snorkels jutting out of the tank that feed fresh air to the airbox. The 399cc only put out a claimed 59hp and most of the power is produced up near 13,000rpm, but what is available at lower revs is pretty usable and the bike won’t feel as sluggish as the meager power might suggest.

This example isn’t a particularly museum-quality bike: the tail section doesn’t look original, the no-name exhaust isn’t stock, and those polished wheels definitely aren’t going to be to everyone’s taste. The carbon intake tubes do look much nicer than the plastic originals, but again: not original. All of that also means the $11,990 asking price might be a bit on the high side for a bike that’s more an interesting rider than a really collectible example of Honda’s baby V4 sportbike.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Honda RVF400R NC35 for Sale

In 1994, Honda introduced the RVF400, or NC35. Successor to the VFR400 (not confusing at all), the NC35 was two things: a mini-me of the legendary RC45 and one of the greatest 400s ever built. Just like its 750cc big brother, the NC35’s fit and finish was top-notch, and the model had all the trappings of a full-size superbike in a potent 400cc package.

Odometer is in kilometers (16,209 kms or 10,075 miles)

Ride away at a price you’ll love. Our selection of pre-owned powersports are certified to the highest maintenance standards, ensuring that all of our customers are not only riding in style, but that they’re also riding with safety in mind. Since 2018, we’ve dedicated our efforts to guiding and advising our clients about the best units on the market. We offer a wide range of options, and our professional team is here for your every need.

The RVF400R is pretty uncommon here in the USA, but not impossible to find if you look around, or have the means to import one. If the seller is willing to negotiate on that price, it could be a pretty cool rolling restoration while you track down original bits from overseas, or a really fun project if you raid the Tyga parts catalog for bodywork and performance upgrades…

-tad

Vee Four: 1995 Honda RVF400R NC35 for Sale
MZ June 5, 2020 posted by Tad Diemer

German Exotica: 2005 MZ 1000S for Sale

Sadly overlooked now, the MZ 1000S is a seriously versatile bit of German exotica. The Motorrad und Zweiradwerk name may not be familiar to most, but the marque has plenty of racing history and pedigree. Unfortunately, most of it is in the distant past, and that fact likely hurt sales of the expensive motorcycle from a brand largely unknown by modern sportbike enthusiasts. Brief background lesson: MZ [then “MuZ”] two-stroke racebikes using pioneering expansion-chamber technology developed by Walter Kaaden dominated the smaller racing classes between 1955-1976, a streak that was really only broken when MuZ Ernst Denger defected and took the company’s racing secrets with him to Suzuki…

By the 1990s, the company was largely forgotten by modern riders, except as a producer of outdated, smoky machines really only suitable for sale in countries behind the Iron Curtain. A reborn company with a line of motorcycles built around a common platform and powered by Yamaha’s 660cc 5-valve single and 5-speed gearbox got good reviews and soldiered on for a few years, but the MZ 1000S was the company’s first real foray into big four-stroke motorcycles.

Conceived as a sport-touring machine, it looks far more exotic than most bikes that typically fit that job description. Chunky and very angular, the design doesn’t come across as overly busy or contrived. It just looks classy and confident, a little mature. It was well received by the motoring press, but the 1000S was expensive and maybe a bit too conservative for its price tag. Power came from a 998cc parallel twin that meant character and a meaty powerband, as well as compact dimensions. The expected vibration was quashed by modern balance shafts, and a six-speed cassette gearbox seems to have been included for bragging rights, since quick trackside gearing changes don’t otherwise seem to fit into the design brief.

The MZ 1000S, along with a pretty wild-looking naked version, were sold for just a few years before production ceased. Many have been well-maintained and are available for a fraction of what they cost new. This one has a shade under 2,400 miles and is fitted with some good quality if slightly gauche aftermarket exhausts, but includes the originals if these aren’t to your your taste.

From the original eBay listing: 2005 MZ 1000S for Sale

You are bidding on a 2005 MZ 1000S sportbike with extremely low miles, in great condition, and ready to ride. I have owned a couple of these in the past, and got this one back from a gentleman that owns 4 of them, whom I sold this one to about 4 years ago. The bike has only 2383 miles on her and is ready for the road. Here are the details.

As I mentioned, I sold this bike to a friend that has 4 others,and recently got it back from him. Unfortunately, I am trying to “thin the herd”, and need to concentrate on my other projects.

The bike has a new battery, all brake & clutch fluids were just changed, along with new synthetic motor oil & filter. Bike fires right up, and runs great though the 6-speed cassette transmission. These bikes are rated at 100HP, but really designed as a “sport tourer”, as opposed to a full on sport bike. Fully adjustable suspension both front & rear, as well as dual Nissin front disc brakes which makes for great handling & stopping. The previous owner installed the Jardine muffler set and they sound great! Have the original mufflers that will go with the bike.

Some minor nick ,and minor scratches in the paintwork here & there, but nothing major. Looks great all around. All lights,gauges work as they should.

There is a cult following for these worldwide, and a lot of the consumable parts are readily available (brake pads, oil filters, chains, etc.), and any model specific parts are available from Grahams Motorcycles in the UK. Over the years,anything I have needed to order for various other MZs, I have received from Grahams within 7-10 days. Fantastic German build quality, and craftsmanship for a reasonable price. There are a lot of Chinese bikes that cost more than this bike, and can’t hold a candle to it!

The bike has a clear title, original owner’s manual, and a copy of the factory workshop manual.

Overall, a really nice bike that needs to be ridden, as opposed to sitting in my garage while I work on other projects. Offered at a very fair “Buy It Now” price,or feel free to shoot me a serious offer.

Don’t be scared off by servicing or parts availability: these are supposed to be easy enough to work on, assuming you have a mechanic willing to deal with a bike they’ve never even heard of, and many components are still available from overseas. Look, you obviously won’t get a warranty with this bike, but miles are very low and At $4,350 you honestly should take a chance on this one if you’re a fan of practical sportbikes with rarity and tons of character.

-tad

German Exotica: 2005 MZ 1000S for Sale