Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Derbi May 14, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Cheap Thrills: 2003 Derbi GPR 50 for Sale

Looking for a cheap bit of two-wheeled fun? The asking price for this Derbi GPR50 is just $1,700 and, while performance won’t blow your hair back, this little race replica looks the part, handling should be good. Ergonomics are shockingly reasonable, even for adults: I’ve sat on a Malossi replica version of this bike and it isn’t really cramped at all, and the owner of that bike is well over six feet tall and built like a linebacker. It even has ample storage under the “gas tank” for a helmet, or a big bag of groceries, making this a practical hooligan tool for both shopping and terrorizing unsuspecting commuters. The fuel cell is located centrally, and the filler cap is under the locked passenger seat.

Aside from the lawnmower-sized engine, the specifications are pretty sportbike-y: the little two-stroke has an electric starter, oil-injection, and six-speed gearbox suspended in a twin spar steel frame with a Showa upside-down fork up front and a Showa shock out back, with hydraulic discs and steel braided lines at both ends. The package is good for around 65mph flat out with no tail wind, although big-bore kits are available that bump displacement to 75 or 80cc, with a subsequent boost in “power” from around 6hp at the wheel to closer to 10hp. That may sound underwhelming, but it represents a more than 50% improvement in power, and the stock bike is already capable of freeway-ish speeds.

The race-replica color scheme might seen cheeky, but Derbi has plenty of real racing credentials. The majority of American motorcyclists have probably never heard of them, but the Spanish company has been around since 1922 and was competitive in Grand Prix motorcycle racing for many years, winning a number of world championships in 50cc, 80cc, and 125cc classes. They’re currently owned by the tentacled horror of the Piaggio group, and produce mopeds, scooters, and small-displacement road bikes, although they were racing in the 125cc Grand Prix class as late as 2010.

From the original eBay listing: 2003 Derbi GPR50 for Sale

2003 Derbi GPR 50 for sale.  This is a moto GP replica of their racing bike.  Excellent condition, with only 2972KM.  Stored in inside for last 9 years.  Still runs great and starts with no problems.  Would be a great first time motorcycle, and can reah 120km/h on 50 cc 2-stroke engine. Item is located Near Brockville Ontario, Canada.  If winning bid is from outside Canada, I will do my best to assist you in the exporting process. It is for sale locally so I reserve the right to end the auction early.

There aren’t many detailed photos, but this Derbi does look very clean and has covered just 3,000 miles from new. It is located in Canada, which could complicate things for a US buyer, depending on your home state. Sure, it’s not very fast, but even in stock form this might be a hoot on a kart track, and that $1,700 Buy It Now price would even make it a pretty hilarious pit bike. Move quickly though, because there are just a few hours left on the auction!

-tad

Cheap Thrills: 2003 Derbi GPR 50 for Sale
Featured Listing May 11, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 1990 Kawasaki KR-1S C2 for Sale

As rare as the 250cc two-stroke sportbikes are on these shores, the Kawasaki KR1-S is the rarest of them all, limited edition models of bikes like the NSR250R SP aside. Considering Kawasaki made some of the hairiest two-stroke sportbikes of the 1970s, it’s surprising that Kawasaki seemed largely uncommitted to the class, making just enough to satisfy the demands of the Japanese market. Only 10,000 KR-1s were built during the bike’s entire production run from 1988-1992. Compare that to the more 100,000 NSR250Rs that were built, and you can see why these so rarely come up for sale.

There were no significant updates to the KR-1 during its lifespan, but this was no half-hearted attempt from Kawasaki: the quarter-liter two-stroke class was ruthlessly competitive during this period and there’d have been no point in even participating if that had been their attitude. Instead, it seems like the bike was good enough to go head-to-head with the NSR, TZR, and RGV right out of the box.

Specifications were similar to other bikes in the class: a liquid-cooled parallel twin displacing 249cc making the expected 45 government-mandated horses was hung beneath the beams of the aluminum frame, with only the airbox in between the spars. Keep in mind that this, unrestricted example should make significantly more power. Kawasaki’s proprietary KIPS powervalve system helped widen the powerband and the little smoker was backed up by the de rigueur six-speed gearbox. The complete package was claimed to weigh in at a gossamer 270lbs dry.

Three versions of the KR-1 were available: the base KR-1, the KR-1S that included wider wheels at the front and rear, and a few hundred examples of the KR-1R featuring larger carburetors and a close-ratio gearbox. From a performance standpoint, the entire 250cc class was separated by the thinnest of margins, but all were extremely competent motorcycles. Of course, each emerged with a slightly different character, and the Kawasaki KR-1S was the fastest of the bunch, with a tested 139mph top speed that’s very impressive for a 250cc machine even today and lively handling that made the corners interesting as well!

From the Seller: 1990 Kawasaki KR-1S C2 for Sale

1990 Kawasaki KR-1S C2. I am relisting and selling another bike out of my prize collection. Journalist called the KR-1S the most exotic and fastest of all the 250 2 stokes of that era. This KR-1S is a UK model. Which means UK CDI power box, mile per hour speedo. Non-restrictive. Always been in street bike form. Not a converted back race bike. This is truly a rare bike. Unlike NSR’s, TZR’s and RGV’s and even Aprilia RS’s that come up for sale now and then, you very rarely see one of these for sale especially in the states. I have owned this bike for over 12 years. I have spent many of thousands of dollars on upgrades. I mean many! I installed a pricey set of Dyna mags magnesium rims. The old KR-1S aluminum rims came with a 17” front and an 18” rear. These are 17” front and back. Light weight magnesium and make sporty tires more available. I have put on a set of Michelin pilot sport tires. Green D.I.D.  O-Ring chain with gold aluminum sprocket. Beautiful high end custom steering damper. Then I had made a JMC fulling braced swingarm with eccentric adjustment. Beautifully polished. I was told at the time that this was the only top braced swingarm that JMC has ever made for the KR-1S. I installed a huge custom made “Pace” radiator made for the KR-1S. This radiator is huge, and solves the problem of any overheating. If anything I have to tape of part of the radiator when it’s cool out. But a nice position to be in. Silicone radiator hose are used. Then I purchased a nice new set of Jolly Moto pipes with Carbon silencers. Bikes sound great and pulls better. I had the rear shock rebuilt and the shock spring powder coated green to match the bike. Front forks have been recently rebuilt with all new bushings, oil and seals. Rebuilt both the front and rear calibers with new stainless pistons, bolts, and seals. I had them powder coated too. Custom made steel braided brakes lines with aluminum fittings. They look like new. I also installed new light weight disks front and back.  Have a fortune in light weight titanium, stainless, and aluminum bolts throughout.  All the lights and switches work. The bike has about 16,600 miles on it. So a far as I know the motor has never been touched.  I had plans to rebuild the motor and including all the parts to do it.  I have everything needed to build it included. But now I have gotten old and don’t have time for this project. I recently have tuned it up, changed all the fluids. Adjusted the power valves, etc. Bike does still run strong but mileage is getting up there for 29 year 2 stroke. The original bodywork on the bike is not too bad for its age but not perfect either. I had a few tabs and small cracks repaired. The tank has a couple tiny little chips, but is in remarkably in good shape for its age. No dents. The tank is clean inside without rust. The body panels have a few scratches and touched up spots.  Still not all that bad for its age either. Please refer to the pictures for more details. I am including the stock rims with a brand new fresh powder coat on them. The stock pipes, radiator, manuals, and various other parts as seen in my list and pictures. Lots of stuff.

The following is a list of some of the parts that are included with the bike, but not complete. No much to list. Please refer to pictures.

  • 4 brand new piston sets, including, rings, pins, clips, and small ends
  • Complete set of crank seals and crank bearings, plus new rod sets. Everything needed to completely rebuild the crank like new.
  • 3 gaskets set, plus one extra head gasket
  • New Water pump part set
  • New carb sets including floats
  • Power valve seals
  • New billet aluminum power valves and power valve wheels
  • 1 extra new front disk
  • Numerous new seals and bearing that go into the motor
  • Stock pipes in good condition
  • Stock swingarm with fresh paint and new bearings and seals. Like new
  • Stock radiator in excellent condition
  • Stock wheels with fresh powder coating, sprocket,  and cush drive
  • All the old wheel bearing, wheel spacers, front and back disks, sprockets, brake lines, and caliber parts. The old original nuts and bolts that were replaced with titanium and stainless, aluminum

The bike is sold without any warranty or guaranties. Buyer assumes any risk of purchase. Any crating, shipping is the responsibility of the buyer. I will assist if possible. Also available to visit and examined in person. Bike comes with a current California registration (Good until May 2020) and title!  Bike is located in Southern California. Has all the correct serial and engine numbers, but is listed as a 1980 instead of a 1990.  Only cash or certified cashier’s cheque, Bank Wire from US bank accepted. Please don’t make me a low ball offer. You might think that wow I am asking way too much for this bike? I say “fine, don’t buy it then”. What I can say how often you see one of these for sale in this condition, with all these extras and titled too? Try to find another in the states? These bikes are only going to increase in value as time passes. History has shown this. Plus I am including thousands of dollars in extra parts.

Selling Price is USD $17,500. Serious buyers feel free to e-mail for more pictures and information. mr2stroke@usa.net 

These do show up from time to time, but clean ones are very rare here in the US, and they almost never have valid California titles, making this one quite the unicorn! The seller is open about the fact that it might be getting about time for a rebuild, but the bike includes everything you’d need to do that. Just add labor! The originality is great for collectors, and the stash of extra parts is appealing for anyone looking to keep this rare, Japanese-market bike on the road for years to come. It won’t come cheap, but this has clearly been owned by a knowledgeable enthusiast and that makes a big difference for a bike like the KR-1S.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1990 Kawasaki KR-1S C2 for Sale
Featured Listing May 10, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 1998 Honda RVF400R NC35 for Sale

Gary in Utah has several bikes Featured on RSBFS right now. Check them out too:

Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Update 5.15.2019: Now on eBay!

As prices of Honda’s V4 homologation bikes climbing ever higher with every 0-mile example that crosses the auction block, the only way for ordinary folks to get a taste of these classic Japanese superbikes is by picking up one of their smaller siblings. Sure, with just 399cc to play with, the VFR400R NC30 and the RVF400R NC35 aren’t as powerful, but they could easily be mistaken for their larger, more expensive stablemates and use the same engine configuration.

1998 Honda RVF400 for sale on eBay

I still think it’s a shame that bikes like this no longer exist. While electronic safety aids and engine management systems have continued to evolve, most bikes under 600cc have just one or two cylinders these days and are tuned for midrange power and reliability, not screaming revs. But there were no compromises with the NC35 and, while the claimed 59hp is obviously not going to scare anyone weaned on a modern 600, you have to work to access it: most of the power lives up around 13,000rpm, accompanied by the characterful drone of the “big-bang” firing order created by the 360° crank.

The very nature of the powerplant is uncompromising: a V4 is great for aerodynamics, power, and weight distribution, which is why the format is used by a number of modern superbikes and is common in MotoGP. But they tend to be a bit heavier than an equivalent inline-four and are a pain to work on because everything is so densely packaged. Contrary to appearances, the NC35 does not have ram-air, although the prominent intake snorkels do feed fresh air to the airbox. Gear-driven cams also speak to the engine’s racing intent, and the bike is still popular among track-day junkies as an entry-level superbike because of its sublime handling.

And while it might look like a reskin of the earlier NC30, the bike was heavily updated in other areas and they share very few major components. Styling continues the “baby superbike” theme, with a pair of smaller, cat’s-eye lamps in place of the RC45’s larger, round units, and the rear tire is skinnier. The NC35 used upside-down forks and switched to a 17″ rear wheel, which should save modern riders the headache of sourcing 18″ rubber. Thankfully, the NC35 used a conventional 17″ front wheel, instead of the RC45’s oddball 16″ hoop.

From the Seller: 1998 Honda RVF400R NC35 for Sale

Second up is this 1998 NC35. It is a very honest solid bike. I concentrated on trying to find low mileage, unmolested original bikes. They are getting very hard to come by. This NC35 has 8,667 miles (13,947 kilometers). I bought it from a dealer in Tokyo. They did a full service for me on the bike before taking delivery. The fairings and components are all Genuine Honda OEM except for the rear sets and the custom red tape on the wheels. The fairings are mint and the fuel tank is as well. The only flaw is the rub mark on the left rear cowling. The wheels and front brake rotors have mild corrosion on them and could use a good cleaning and powder coating. The bike is in original unrestored condition with no body or paintwork. Looks very nice as is sits but would make an excellent candidate for restoration since there are no cracks in the fairings or dents or scrapes in the gas tank. Bike runs just like new and is ready to ride. Bike will come with Utah state title and is titled as a streetbike for road use. Comes with one key.

I’d like to see $10,900 or best offer for this example.

Feel free to contact me at 801-358-6537 or by email: rmurangemasters@aol.com

The Honda RVF400R was only available in the US via grey-market imports from overseas or Canada, and the usual registration headaches can apply if you’re in a state with stricter laws, so be sure to do your homework. This example is being sold by the very knowledgeable Gary in Utah with a Utah title, looks very sharp, with low miles and a tempting price. Yes, these are much more expensive than they were just a few years ago, but $10,900 gets you a very cool bit of Honda history in a practical, reliable package. Honestly, I’m a huge fan of the NC30/35 and it’s one of the few Japanese sportbikes I would love one in my garage… Assuming I could get a CA registration for it.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1998 Honda RVF400R NC35 for Sale
Ducati May 8, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 2008 Ducati 1098S for Sale

Update 5.8.2019: Back on eBay and price dropped again. Good luck to buyers and seller! Links updated. -dc

Made for just a couple years between 2007 and 2009, the Ducati 1098 was a more conservative approach to their top-flight superbike after the radically-styled 999 threatened to upset Ducati’s apple cart. It’s almost like the bikes were released out of order, and that the 1098 should have been the direct successor Tamburini’s 916, as it had the same slab-sided bodywork, undertail exhaust, single-sided swingarm, and side-by-side headlights. Today’s Featured Listing 1098S is typical of many Ducatis, in that it’s been lovingly maintained, has low miles, and has had an entire catalog of aftermarket parts thrown at it.

So the 1098 was introduced to reinvigorate Ducati’s superbike fortunes and the bike indeed proved very popular and sold well, so why was the bike only made between 2007 and 2009? Well rules changes in WSBK conveniently allowed an increase in displacement to 1200cc and the 1098 was quickly succeeded by the 1198 that displaced… 1198cc. In the early days of World Superbike, v-twins got a decent displacement advantage that kept them approximately equal to the inline fours that had 25% less displacement. But with the inline fours allowed a full 1000cc for the 2007 season, Ducati had to work hard to stay competitive, and there was a noticeable jump in power between the 999 and the 1098, from 138 to 160hp, with the new bike punching out a stout 90 lb-ft of torque.

Ergonomics took a bit of a backward step from the surprisingly user-friendly 999’s adjustable seat and pegs, but you do have to suffer for art… This example, as stated earlier, has had a raft of aftermarket parts thrown at it, most notably a set of full carbon-fiber bodywork, including the tank. That’s not a wrap, it’s actual carbon fiber, thoughtfully lined to prevent damage from modern gas that seems to particularly plague Ducatis of this era. The entire, detailed list can be seen at the end of the seller’s listing.

From the Seller: 2008 Ducati 1098S for Sale

Gentlemen’s Express: DUCATI 1098S Full Carbon, Low Miles, Perfect Condition!

My Ducati 1098S Show bike is available for sale. It has been a prized part of my collection, but it’s time to move on to a new platform. This bike is exceptional in every way.  Stunning full carbon body and tank, Galfer Superbike Racing Brakes, Driven Racing Quick Change Sprockets, and much, much more!

The modifications to this bike were targeted in three areas; weight reduction, aesthetics and performance.

This bike draws a crowd everywhere it goes.  Extremely well cared for with full maintenance performed every winter. An impeccable machine with outstanding performance. It’s what all sports bikes should be, and given the extreme weight reduction it went through it still competes with today’s current sports bikes! There was a liberal use of titanium bolts (caliper bolts, rotor bolts, fender bolts etc., and the entire rear racing drive is all aluminum. The bike sits on two new brand new Michelin Pilot Tires and has the Ducati Racing ECU.

With less than 7800 miles, its just broken in. Everything works as it should, you will not be disappointed adding this to your collection or as a rider! This bike was over $35,000 to build (pretax), and comes complete with a Bursig Paddock Stand! All maintenance was just completed (as was done every winter) and is shown below along with the build list.  No rock chips, dings dents or scratches. It also has two Tec mounts – one for radar and one for a cell phone. Currently set up for an Escort 360 Radar unit and Smart Phone Blue Tooth Interface. The radar unit is not included. 

This bike has always been adult ridden, never wheelied (but it wants to), never down, has never seen rain never been raced or tracked.

Anyone that knows this generation of Ducati knows how beautifully the body flows. The exhausts sound awesome as does the open dry clutch. And the braking system is literally being used on superbikes across the country today.

The bike is available for inspection and pick up in East Texas (Tyler) or pickup at our performance shop in Dallas. We will also help prepare the bike for your shipper at your expense. We can recommend a great one we use for domestic white glove shipping, door to door.

Please note an immediate deposit of $500 is due upon purchase with full payment made within 5 business days. 

Serious parties only, please. If you want to discuss the bike, or arrange a viewing, send me a note with your phone number and name and I will contact you that day or feel free to call at (214) 585-3354. 

Thank you for looking, and happy eBaying! 

1098S Maintenance Completed Includes:

  • New Timing Belts $104.64
  • Changed Oil & Filter $42.00
  • Changed Filter $19.95
  • Changed Front Fork Seals $86.53
  • Changed Front Fork Oil $32.00
  • Changed Air Filter $58.99
  • Changed Coolant $28.00
  • New Front and Rear Tires $462.00
  • Replaced Rear Axle Hub with NOS $700.00
  • Changed Brake Fluid [Front and Rear] $24.00
  • Check Steering Head Bearings $0.00
  • Check Swingarm Bearings $0.00
  • Check Wheel Bearings $0.00
  • New Shift Return Springs $39.00
  • New Lightweight Battery $119.00
  • Fresh Dry Clutch Plates and Springs $368.00
  • Valve Stems $38.00
  • Shop Labor $821.00
  • Total $2,943.11

Upgrades Include:

  • New Galfer Superbike Rotors [Front] $812.00
  • New Galfer Superbike Rotor [Rear] $119.00
  • New Ferodo Carbon Ceramic Pads [Front and Rear] $211.00
  • Replaced Brake Lines with New Spiegler Thin-Wall Stainless $174.95
  • New Full Carbon Fiber Upper Cowl $599.00
  • New Carbon Fiber Side Panels $618.00
  • New Carbon Fiber Lower Cowl $299.00
  • New Carbon Fiber V Panel $111.00
  • Carbon Fiber Chain Guard $119.00
  • Carbon Fiber Rear Fender $106.00
  • New Carbon Fiber Solo Seat $439.00
  • New Carbon Fiber Rear Draft Panel $132.00
  • New Carbon Fiber Front Draft Panel $89.00
  • Carbon/Kevlar Fuel Tank $2,600.00
  • New Carbon Fiber Side Panels $185.00
  • New Carbon Fiber Heat Shields $85.00
  • Caswell Tank Seal to Protect Tank From Ethanol $54.99
  • New Puig Smoked Windscreen $92.50
  • New Puig Aluminum Screen Bolts $22.00
  • Full Dzus Quick-Release Body Fasteners $105.00
  • Puig 2.0 Short/Folding/Adjustable Control Levers $237.00
  • Rizoma Superbike Grips $112.00
  • Rizoma Frame Plugs $69.00
  • Ducabike Folding/Fully Adjustable Rearsets $580.00
  • Carbon Fiber Shift Rod $58.00
  • CNC Racing Carbon Fiber Racing Gas Cap $218.00
  • Ducati Corsa/Race ECU Flash $500.00
  • Termignoni Carbon Fiber Exhaust $854.00
  • Saddlemen Gel Seat $209.00
  • Ducabike Hydraulic Reservoir Covers $86.00
  • 520 GP Chain $189.00
  • New Driven Racing Quick Change Sprocket Carrier $219.00
  • New Driven Racing Rear Sprocket $89.00
  • New Rental Front Sprocket $54.00
  • Changed Gearing to 17/39 $0.00
  • New Aluminum Flange Race Cover $119.00
  • Chain Case Saver $39.00
  • Carbon Sprocket Cover $86.00
  • Black Billet Clutch Cover $129.00
  • Sprocket and Carrier Aluminum Nuts $98.00
  • Aluminum Front Axle Nut $36.00
  • Rear Aluminum Axle Nuts $89.00
  • Aluminum Flange Cone $64.00
  • ProTi 64 Titanium Rotor Bolts [Front and Rear] $119.00
  • ProTi 64 Banjo Bolts on Calipers $69.00
  • ProTi 64 Caliper Bolts [Front and Rear] $99.00
  • ProTi 64 Keyguard Bolts $39.00
  • Tech Mount Radar Mount $189.00
  • Tech Mount Cell Phone Mount $139.00
  • Escort 360 Radar $599.00
  • Skeletonized Fork Preload Adjusters $39.00
  • Fender Eliminator/Plate Mount Kit $119.00
  • Integrated Tail/Turn Light $89.00
  • Battery Tender Pigtail $6.99
  • Ducati Performance LED Mirrors $206.00
  • Bursig Paddock Stand $599.00
  • Shop Labor $3,500.00
  • Shop Supplies $72.00
  • Build Expenditure $16,991.43
  • Base Bike $18,000.00
  • Pretax Cost $34,991.43

The asking price for this very well-documented machine is a cool $25,000 $20,000. But if you’re looking for something truly one-of-a-kind, this 1098S should be almost as fast and less likely to kill you, with or without traction control.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2008 Ducati 1098S for Sale
Yamaha May 8, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Too Little or Just Enough? 1990 Yamaha FZR400 for Sale

The Yamaha’s R1M’s crossplane crank inline four makes 197 claimed horsepower. The brand-new, heavily revised BMW S1000RR supposedly makes 205. The new Ducati Panigale V4R? 221 horsepower. Where will it end? These bikes are technological marvels, with relatively minimal mass, power that would trump a world superbike machine of just a few years ago, and the electronics required to keep relatively novice pilots from launching themselves into next week when they sneeze and open the throttle a bit more than intended. But does that make these machines more fun? How much power can you really use on the road, and is anything more than 100hp really just gilding the lily?  Or did we hit “peak fun” with bikes like this 1990 Yamaha FZR400U?

On paper, pure performance is no contest, if that’s your definition of “fun.” The 399cc inline four that motivated the FZR400 was certainly much higher spec than you’d normally expect from a bike this size, and featured liquid-cooling, dual overhead cams, and sixteen valves. Unfortunately, there’s no replacement for displacement, and it all adds up to a claimed 64hp. The aluminum Deltabox frame helps reduce mass and the resulting 410 wet weight is light, but not shockingly so. Brakes are single-piston, but at least there are two of them up front.

But in spite of the fairly bland power-to-weight, the FZR was endowed with that magical agility possessed by the very best sportbikes. Handling certainly was a strong point for the FZR400, and these are famously competent sportbikes, although they often get overshadowed by Honda’s much more exotic VFR400R. That should be no surprise as, in many markets, the 400cc class was considered “middleweight” and was hotly contested on track and in showrooms. In the US, 400cc was definitely “entry-level” territory, and most companies gave only a half-hearted effort in selling their wares here: only the Honda CB-1 that shared an engine with the CBR400 and the Yamaha FZR400 made it here officially

As you can see from the pictures, it appears to be in very original condition, although the stalk-mount adapter for the left front turn signal is missing, and there’s plenty of surface corrosion and a few minor scuffs, as described by the seller below. The front calipers also look very freshly painted, which suggests regular maintenance of the parts that really matter.

From the original eBay listing: 1990 Yamaha FZR400U for Sale

This is a used 1989 Yamaha FZR400 with a clear title and very low miles, 28,375 mi. I don’t ride this, nor is it registered, so the mileage will not change. Selling to make space in my garage. I am the second owner of this ‘89 FZR400, it has spent the last 8 years in a climate controlled storage unit due to me being deployed. I had the fuel system flushed and the bike was serviced this past month, in addition it had a new battery installed. The tires are not dry rotten so I didn’t have them replaced. I can provide a video of the bike being started if you so desire. Being that it is a carburated model it takes a bit of choke to get it turned over. Now on to the pictures. As you can see there is some battle damage from a few different incidents. Since I have had it there was no use on it so the few chips and scrapes were done by the previous owner. There is some pitting on the forks and other aluminum bits. I didn’t see any cracks in the plastic, however keep in mind this has the OEM plastics on it. An oil change has been done recently,11Mar18, with Motul 5100 and K&N oil filter. Belly pan has some light scrapes and some distortion from the exhaust. This can be seen the photos. The heat distortion is the same that my ‘90 FZR400 has, the difference being my ‘90 has 1/6 the mileage on it. I can be present if you want the bike shipped, however I am not arranging shipping. I am not in a hurry to see this so, any low-ball offers will not be considered.

The seller refers to this as “very low miles” and, unless you’re talking about a car, I’m not sure nearly 30,000 miles qualifies. That being said, it’s not like this thing has been used as a commuter hack, so the miles wouldn’t necessarily put me off, either. Otherwise, it sounds like a solid bike, given the supposed care it’s received. After years of being the ideal budget-minded track or canyon ripper, these are starting to gain traction as collectibles. Certainly, they’re among the best-looking bikes of the era, with the classic Yamaha colors, twin headlamps, and chunky aluminum frame. Starting bid is $5,799.00 with no takers as yet. Prices seem to be on the rise for these, but the seller may be jumping the gun here and I’d say a $5,799.00 asking price is probably still a bit optimistic.

-tad

Too Little or Just Enough? 1990 Yamaha FZR400 for Sale
Featured Listing May 7, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 1980 Laverda Jota for Sale

Check out all of Joe’s bikes for sale on RSBFS! Many thanks for choosing us to help move your collection! -dc

When it rains, it pours, and the past couple weeks have seen us feature several different Laverdas. Bikes this old are usually a bit too “classic” to feature regularly on the site, but certain models are just too important not to include at RSBFS, and the hairy-chested Lavereda Jota like today’s featured listing is one of them. As a followup to their successful parallel-twin models, Laverda introduced a three-cylinder in 1973 after teasing prototypes for several years. It wasn’t just a twin with an extra cylinder grafted on, it was an almost entirely new design, with a twin overhead-cam head.

1980 Laverda Jota for sale on eBay

The earliest three-cylinder bikes used a large drum brake at the front, but that was soon updated to a twin-disc setup, although a drum was retained at the rear for a bit longer. Although it wasn’t tuned as aggressively as it could have been, the new, unimaginatively-named “3C” was one of the best-performing bikes available, with a 133mph tested top speed. But stock performance, however impressive, is never enough for some people, and UK Laverda importers Slater Laverda saw plenty of untapped potential and decided to build a bit of a hot rod.

Slater fitted factory racing cams and high-compression pistons, an updated exhaust, and SFC yokes for different front-end geometry. The resulting bike impressed Laverda’s management, and limited production began in 1976. Power for the 981cc engine was up to 90hp and the bike could clear 140mph, making it the fastest production motorcycle at the time. After success racing the bike in the UK, Laverda expanded distribution, and eventually the bike found its way to the US, although bikes originally intended for us were of lower-spec than the UK machines.

The Jota, named for a Spanish dance, is often characterized as a “man’s bike” but could more accurately be described as “a bike for tall people with strong hands.” The triples weigh in at nearly 500lbs dry, with a very tall seat 32″ high, no side stand fitted as standard, and a brutally stiff clutch-pull. Like all Laverdas of the period, they’re solid and overbuilt with power and handling to spare, but a Jota takes work to ride quickly. Or slowly.

Slight clarification of the seller’s information below: all of the early Laverda three-cylinder models, including the 3C and the original Jota used a 180° crank that basically fired “like a four with a miss.” The Jota was basically a hotted-up version of the regular production triple and used the same crank as the 3C. The “two up, one down” crank was great for power and made a pretty distinctive noise, but vibrated a bit more than than was considered acceptable. Later triples switched to a 120° crank after 1981 for increased smoothness, but purists feel like only the 180° bikes are the only “real” Jotas. Personally, I think the 120° bikes sound pretty cool too, but the 180° bikes are definitely more desirable to collectors.

From the Seller: 1980 Laverda Jota for Sale

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. These motorcycles were targeted by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best were available and that is what I purchased. 

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari. 

When you decide, as I did, that the rare, large Italian Sports bikes of the 1970s are a great place to be for collecting. You will for sure want to have a Laverda Jota in your collection. 

Make sure that your Jota is a real Jota with 180 degree firing order, which distinguishes the Jota from other Laverda models. Again, the 180 degree firing order means that the 3-cyclindar engine fires off when two of the cylinders are up and then 180 degrees later when one cylinder is up, it again fires. In other words, the Jota fires two times per 360 degrees and not three times per 360 degree rotation, like the lesser Laverda models. This is what gives the motor its unique power and especially its unbelievable thundering exhaust note. These are big, heavy, and handsome bikes. This one was restored by a Laverda guru a little over 10 years ago and was put in our collection shortly thereafter. If you are talking about these Italian bikes that are designed to look like they have big muscles the Jota certainly exemplifies that. Of course, any of the rare Italian 1970s and 1980s iconic bikes are always great garage art and most often wonderful bikes to ride. The Jota is a man’s bike and not meant for the faint of heart unless you are going to just put it in your living room to look at it.  

There is plenty of information on the Internet about the Jota. There is a very large international club for them. This Jota was restored to perfection and is still in wonderful cosmetic condition and riding form. 

This is certainly a bike for serious collectors and for those that don’t know all the details, the internet is just loaded with information. I can only suggest that you scrutinize the pictures and decide for yourself if this is another rare Italian collector bike that will eventually become as iconic as the Ferrari automobile. I spent a decade looking for the best one and this is the best one I have ever seen.

The real Jotas seldom become available and you should always get the best. When they are available, they are almost never in highly restored condition.  All my bikes are kept on trickle chargers ready to take a day’s ride at a moment’s notice. The Jota is one of those.  

I would suggest that you check out the other rare cycles that I am offering for sale by clicking on “other items for sale” in the upper right corner to see the other bikes being offered from my collection.  

Prefer phone calls 847-774-4857

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

The seller clearly knows bikes, and the collectability of the Jota is undeniable. The only Laverda model more valuable is the earlier SFC, and the Jota is a bit more civilized, although that probably isn’t saying much. Many Jotas came with a half-fairing, but I much prefer my big, burly bruisers to be naked! Wait, that came out wrong… Anyway, the additional wind-blast will be perfect for bulking up your neck muscles to match your newly-muscled hands: I’ve got a couple friends with Laverda triples and the effort required to pull that clutch still blows my mind.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1980 Laverda Jota for Sale
Featured Listing May 3, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 1981 Honda CB900F2B Bol d’Or for Sale

By the early 1980s, inline four engines went from being exotic and relatively rare to being widely available, even ubiquitous, at least among the Japanese manufacturers. Inline fours have more moving parts and that adds weight and complexity, big no-nos for motorcycles that historically relied on simplicity to keep weight down and minimize parts that could fail. But Honda’s original CB750 forever shattered that paradigm and started the superbike arms race that led to the Honda CB900F2B Bol d’Or seen here.

If you’re not familiar with the Bol d’Or, it’s a 24-hour endurance race held in France. The name translates to “golden bowl,” and Honda was obviously trying to add a bit of a sporty image by associating it with endurance racing. The CB900F2B is a bit of an odd duck, in that it lives in between the classic and modern sportbike eras, as I’m arbitrarily defining them anyway. Early 1980s bikes in general were the last hurrah for dual-shock frames and air-cooled engines, right before the stylistic and performance upheaval heralded by machines like the Suzuki GSX-R750 that set the template for sportbikes moving forward.

Built between 79-83, the CB900 was an improvement over the earlier four-valve, air-cooled DOHC CB750F, with an updgraded frame, larger diameter air forks, and triple disc brakes with dual-piston calipers up front. The updated inline four used an “undersquare” 64.5 x 69mm bore and stroke that gave 95hp, enough the push the 530lb wet machine to a claimed 135mph, although period tests saw 125-130. All of that is pretty underwhelming by today’s standards, but the bike was known for excellent handling at the time and it was enough to go head-to-head against bikes with more displacement and the long-stroke engine’s torque gave it a muscular midrange.

The F2B or Bol d’Or version of the bike had an even shorter run than the regular CB900F, and was made between 1981 and 1982. With its angular, multi-piece fairing, I get the feeling it was really a way to pump a bit of new life into an old model, since it’s basically the CB900F with some extra plastic. But the old saying “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” applies here, and reviews of the bike at the time were very positive.

Call me a pedant [just make sure you look it up before you do], but I’m way more comfortable buying a car or motorcycle from a seller who can at the very least spell the name correctly, and the seller of this rare Bol d’Or even gets the lowercase “d” and apostrophe correct, so we’re off on the right foot!

From the Seller: 1981 Honda CB900F2B Bol d’Or for Sale

45,454 mi – $6999.00


Check out this rare 80’s Honda Supersport This was a Europe and Australian market only model referred to as a Bol d’Or model. This one originated out of England, its original owner brought it here to Seattle when he relocated in early 80’s. The current owner purchased it in February 1986 with about 17K miles on it. It has a good paper trail of services performed over the past 30 years along with the $2100 work order we just completed bring it out of a 10 year hibernation.

The bike is not perfect but it is in very good condition and running order for a 38 year old machine. The current owner told us that when he purchased it there was a round 2 inch dent on the top of the tank, it bugged the heck out of him, something must of been dropped on the top by original owner. He decided to have a local restoration center do the repair and also clean up the tail piece from previous boot scuffs. In our eye it looks like the white stripe angle is a bit out of alignment with the fairing stripes. We understand that for some this may be a deal breaker, so we have not priced it as if it was a 9 or a 10 collectible Honda.

Here is what we took care of to prepare for sale

  • Replaced tires and valve stems
  • Replaced fork and dust seals with OEM parts
  • Rebuilt carburetors, properly cleaned all OEM jets and internals, replaced all rubber bits.
  • Rebuilt front & rear brake master cylinder, new cup and lid on front and full system flush
  • Checked compression (145 across the board), inspected valve clearance, replaced valve cover gasket and rubber bolt cushions
  • Completed minor service to take care of the basics

This is from a Honda enthusiast website which also verifies this bikes credentials

Honda CB 900 F2B

  • Period: February ’81 – February ’82
  • Engine number: SC01E-2206870 – 2225154
  • Frame number: SC01-4000342 – 4011049
  • Power: 95 PK/70 kW
  • http://www.hondaboldor.nl/cb900f2b/

Here is some more information on this model we found:

For many, however, the CB900F was the perfect ‘Universal Japanese Motorcycle’ (UJM), the ubiquitous, Japanese, across-the-frame four. Although blighted by the perennial Honda cam chain problem, these were steady, undistinguished motorcycles that improved gradually every year. Updates for 1980 saw needle roller swingarm bearings and an air-assisted front fork. Further improvements for the 1981 CB900FB (pictured here) included a larger-diameter fork (37mm) and dual-piston brake calipers from the racing CB1100R.

Among the other 31 improvements for ’81 were a stronger cam chain tensioner and different valves. Also available was the CB900F2B with a 16-piece, three-quarter fairing and leg shields, housing a clock and voltmeter. Although the CB900F lasted until 1983, by then it had been overtaken by the CB1100F. Where the CB900F excelled was as an everyday riding machine. Motorcycles were less specialized in the early 1980s and the Bol d’Or was forgiving, working well as a high-speed sportster, yet delivering the goods in the city or as a tourer.

The suspension and riding position provided a perfect compromise between sports riding and comfort. Factor in exceptional finish and reliability, all for around three grand, and you can see why the Bol d’Or was a success. It may have been bland but, as a representative of the era of the universal motorcycle, the Bol d’Or was one of the best.

Credits cards accepted, up to $150 documentation charge may be added.

Seattle Used Bikes
4905 Aurora Ave N.
Seattle, WA 98103
dave @ seattleusedbikes.com
Closed Sun/Mon Find us on Facebook, Instagram and the Web

1980s superbikes have long been extremely affordable, but that’s not the case so much anymore, as you can see from the $6,999.00 asking price for this CB900F2B. But that makes sense, since the original CB750s haven’t been cheap for years, and now these later 80s icons are starting to appreciate. This Bol d’Or is certainly one of the rarest, and I was unfamiliar with the model before this one popped up. Miles aren’t particularly low, but this appears to be in excellent condition, and the seller seems very knowledgeable as well, which always a good sign! Classy and reliable, with real-world performance and comfort, this would make an excellent practical classic.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1981 Honda CB900F2B Bol d’Or for Sale
Ducati May 2, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Simple Pleasures: 1996 Ducati 900SS SP for Sale

Ducati’s two-valve “Desmodue” may not be the most powerful engine, or the lowest-maintenance, but there’s a reason it’s stuck around from the 1980 Pantah all the way through to today. Besides the obvious budgetary reasons: some of that tooling is probably long paid off… Joking aside, today’s Desmodue is heavily evolved, compared to the original version, now punched out to 1100cc and packing dual plugs per cylinder and modern electronics. But the qualities of the original are still there, and make for a very entertaining ride. Ducati’s mid-90s 900SS SP may not have been a powerhouse and was handily outclassed by every Japanese sportbike available at the time, but the aging thoroughbred still offered stable handling, good brakes for the period, a punchy midrange, and plenty of dry clutch rattle.

At the time, the 916 was making headlines for its ferocious performance on and off track, but the Supersport of the same period was a much better motorcycle to actually live with. Compared to the painfully focused 916, the 900SS almost felt like a sport-tourer. Along with the Monster it gave Ducati a range of bikes with real racing heritage, but without the expensive maintenance, high-strung histrionics, and performance most riders didn’t really need anyway, especially on the road.

By 1996, the 900SS was available in two flavors: the cost-cutting 900SS CR that generally came with a stylish half-fairing, and the higher-spec 900SS SP seen here. The engines were the same, but the CR used non-adjustable forks from either Showa or Marzocchi on later machines, while the SP had a carbon front fender and three-way adjustable suspension up front and at the rear. There were other minor details as well, like a narrower 4.5″ rear wheel on the CR, versus a 5.0″ hoop on the SP. If you’ve got a CR, don’t despair: suspension swaps between models and even years is pretty simple, and upgraded valving kits for the Showa forks are available. Unfortunately, the famously horrible Marzocchi units on the later CR models are pretty much best abandoned in the wilds to be savaged by wild dogs.

Ownership isn’t necessarily as much of a headache as you’d expect. In spite of their reputation, the two-valve Ducatis are generally pretty bomb-proof, and you’ve got to be riding like a bit of an idiot to overrev one. First of all, no valve springs means no valve float! And second of all, in spite of an indicated 9000rpm redline, any remotely standard carbureted 904cc Ducati engine runs out of puff way before that. Power was a claimed 80hp with a pair of Mikuni CV carbs, and 75hp at the wheel from a strong example. More is available via head work and tuning, since these were originally built to race, although performance gains won’t be particularly cheap.

As for Ducati’s infamous lack of reliability: the valves do require regular maintenance, although they tend to stay in spec after the first couple adjustments. The toothed rubber timing belts require biennial replacement to prevent an expensive transformation from motive force to paperweight, but many competent home mechanics find these tasks aren’t too difficult to tackle. Italian bike electrical components, however, generally deserve their poor reputation, and it’s worth regularly checking connections and using a bit of dielectric grease to make sure your lights light and your starter starts.

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Ducati 900SS SP for Sale

Excellent Condition, always well cared for, Ducati Limited Edition  500 SS SP SUPERLIGHT.  Low production number 47 of 500 made.

Full fairing, floating cast iron rotors and original factory oil temp gauge. New tires, carbon fiber mufflers. Includes owners and shop manuals, Hand written previous Owner records of services dating back to 8/12/97 with 2363 miles. 

Fresh timing belt, starter relay. Runs excellent sounds even better. Also have stock pipes to go with sale. This is a beautiful , air cooled, dependable, dry clutch classic example that will put a smile on your face.

Bike is currently on consignment at local Dealer in S.F. Paperwork to be  handled by them upon sale. 

The 900SS used to be an amazingly affordable entry into Italian bike ownership, especially if you’re fairly handy with basic tools. The only cheaper Ducatis are the original Monsters, but both have started to climb in value, especially for nice, low-mileage examples. This one has 13k or so on the clock which, if it’s been maintained by the book, means it’s barely broken in. Higher-resolution pictures would be nice but, from what I can see, it looks to be a very clean example. Get one now, while they’re still fairly cheap, since clean examples are getting hard to find.

-tad

Simple Pleasures: 1996 Ducati 900SS SP for Sale
Ducati April 27, 2019 posted by Tad Diemer

Good Things In Small Packages: 2004 Ducati 749R for Sale

With the general level of competence from modern sportbikes, along with rules that don’t seem to favor limited-production homologation bikes, it’s easy to forget just how special some of them are. Bikes like the Yamaha OW01 might have looked nearly identical to the regular production machines from ten feet, but were often hand-built to a much higher quality, with high-performance engine internals, hand-welded frames, and other small changes that were intended to help the bikes perform in production-based racing clases. Ducati’s 749R is one such machine, and its superficial similarity to the regular production 749 and 749S belies just how much of a hot rod it was.

Not to say that the 749S wasn’t a good motorcycle. It was, and carried on Ducati’s less is more trend that started with their sweet-handling 748 that had just the right amount of power and superior agility, compared to the bigger 916/996/998. Much of that was down to the narrower 180-section rear tire, but it was a bit lighter as well, and the 916’s midrange torque made the bike faster than it looked on paper and race versions like the SPS could be a bit overwhelming.

Why was the 749R so trick? Well it was out of necessity: the 999 competed in various Superbike championships that generally allowed a degree of latitude in modifying the road platform for racing. The smaller 749 was destined for World Supersport against 600cc inline fours. Intended as a much more entry-level class, the rules were very strict to keep costs carefully controlled and allowed very limited modifications: even OEM wheels were required!

Basically, in WSS, if you wanted it on your racebike, you pretty much needed it on your roadbike. And to compete in terms of power output with a grid full of screaming fours, Ducati had to throw the whole catalog of performance updates at the 749R. Built between 2003 and 2006, the 749R had bigger valves made of titanium, high-compression pistons, a lightweight crank, and magnesium cam covers. Bore was up from 90 to 94mm and stroke was down to 56 from 71mm for a total of 749.5cc, with power climbing from 108hp to an eye-opening 121hp, although it’s obviously going to cost a bit more to service.

As you’d expect, suspension was top of the line Öhlins at both ends, and radial Brembo brakes offered the best available stopping power and feel. A slipper clutch was included for rapid downshifts free of drama and the bike uses a double-sided swingarm patterned after the World Superbike 999’s stiff, lightweight unit. Other details included a set of lightweight Marchesini wheels, an adjustable steering head, and carbon-fiber bodywork on the early bikes. All were solo-seat models, and so had adjustable ergonomics. But the R had a smaller range of adjustments, as the larger-diameter race exhaust took up some of the available space and, as previously mentioned, rules specified very minimal changes to the roadbikes, so the roadbike subframe needed to match the racebike’s.

From the original eBay listing: 2004 Ducati 749R for Sale

This is your chance to have one of the ultra limited collectible Ducati Superbikes for a fraction of what it cost new.
The bike is a 2004 Ducati 749R. Only 2348 miles
Almost all original including the stock tires. If you want to ride the bike you will need to replace the tires.
I just had the belts and fluids changed from a Ducati Master Tech. Bike has a new battery. Bike hasn’t been used at all since service was done. I only changed everything to make sure nothing would be needed other than tires if someone wanted to ride bike.
One small blemish on left lower fairing that has been touched up so really hard to see in photos but is there. Could easily be repaired and bike would show nearly perfect. Rear swing arm has small flaws from rear stand rubbing on black paint. The seat is doing the normal thing where the cover sticks to the base and looks a little weird. Normal on this generation of Superbikes.
Bike has no owners manual.
Has red key and one black key

There’s an $8,500 starting bid with no takers yet and plenty of time left on the auction. The 749/999 may be the least desirable Ducati superbikes, but they’re still Ducati superbikes, with all the performance, heritage, and style you would expect, and the 749R is one of the most collectible versions. This example looks bone-stock and very clean, with less than 2,400 miles on it. These were pretty trick bikes, straight from the factory, and would probably cost a small fortune to duplicate if you planned to build your own, so why not just pick this up, and save yourself the trouble?

-tad

Good Things In Small Packages: 2004 Ducati 749R for Sale