Posts by tag: Liquid Cooled

Kawasaki December 4, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1985 Kawasaki Ninja 600R

The seller of this early-run 1985 Kawasaki Ninja 600R recently completed a fastidious restoration of the bike, down to changing the aged rubber charcoal canister strap for an OEM replacement. He also sourced new gaskets for the anti-dive system in the forks, which took some parts hunting, elbow grease and careful planning. The forks got a new coat of paint and fresh seals when the rebuild was done.

1985 Kawasaki Ninja 600R for sale on eBay

The list goes on from there, including freshened carburetors and a couple invisible fairing repairs. The bike was evidently a solid rider before the current owner got ahold of it and made it into a running and riding museum piece. It has fewer than 7,000 miles on the odometer and was looked after properly over its life, so there shouldn’t be much cause to worry about engine internals.

These bikes were far ahead of their time when they were launched, and forecasted aggressive riding positions, handling-friendly 16-inch wheels, full fairings and weight savings. By the time the Honda Hurricane came along two years later, Kawasaki was already preparing to refresh the Ninja 600R. The early bikes, known as the GPZ600R in other markets, pushed out about 75 horsepower (some say 76), which was good for 135 mph. The engines responded to revs, and contemporary reviewers said the bikes felt a little flat until the party got going around 8,000 rpm. Keep the engine on the boil, though, and the 600R would sing, and was nimble, if not totally sure-footed, on the tiny 16-inch tires.

From the eBay listing:

Completely original 1985 Kawasaki Ninja ZX600A California.
This is the first year of the Ninja, this model is a first run #2460 made 12/84. It has just 6610 miles. It was purchased in California by the first owner (it has the CA vent box) . I am the second owner and have put no miles on the bike other than test rides.
This is a rare bike in original/collector condition. No resto-queen here, this is the real deal. You are not likely to find another in this condition, and if you do you’ll be faced with a great deal of work to get it into this ready to ride condition.
The bike starts and runs beautifully. I wouldn’t make it a daily rider, but if you’re a collector that likes to run your bikes – this is the one.
I found the bike in great condition, as the previous owner was an older rider who used the bike as a commuter and always stored it inside with proper storage habits.
The bike is in 99.9% original condition, with all original parts or updated OEM parts. It is the perfect survivor, the perfect collector (all original parts that were replaced are included).
This is my 4th nut-and-bolt restoration in the last 10 years (and likely my last). I’m moving to custom builds from here on out. In some ways it was the hardest restoration I’ve done, as I felt it was very important to keep the bike absolutely original and to be non-destructive instead of trying to reach “perfection”. I believe I’ve succeeded to the best of the situation – the following items have been addressed:
Fairing repair:
The previous owner dropped the bike in his garage, resulting in a the left turn signal hitting the wall, causing a silver dollar sized series of cracks around the mounting hole. The previous owner repaired the damage, but it was simply glued and the cracks were still visible.
I carefully grooved the cracks and seams, filled and repaired things properly with a professional plastic welding solution, I filled the area with vinyl body filler and sanded all things smooth.
It was professionally painted (only on the repaired spot) with perfectly matched paint and then clear coated to blend, and properly buffed. It is impossible to see the repair – except on the inside where you may see the weld seams when the fairing is off.
A similar process was followed on the nose cone, where a couple of scratches and rock dings necessitated proper attention. This repair is impossible to see as well.
Tank:
First, the tank has a very small, dime-sized impression on the back/top/left side (see photos) and the blue ring has age cracks (normal for an original bike of this age).
I have replaced the cap and repainted the outer cap ring (old parts included and in near perfect shape). I have also sourced and replaced an EOM fuel-level sending unit from England, as the old one failed due to corrosion.
The tank was fairly clean on the inside, but it was beginning to gather some rust on the surface. It was cleaned with muriatic acid and flushed, but still needed further cleaning – so I recently did a round with OTC rust remover. It’s very clean now.
New OEM petcock was installed as the original was beyond repair.
Forks:
If you are at all familiar with these bikes you know that they included a very complicated anti-dive system (known as ADVS) that used the front brake fluid pressure to dynamically control the compression dampening.
Great idea, but it was prone to leaking and corrosion over time – as there were many rubber parts inside. It is very common for the piston to corrode and leak out onto the fork – as was the case on the left fork of this bike.
As with the fairing, I carefully matched and repaired the paint on the fork, clear coated it, and completely overhauled the ADVS and fork seals with all new rubber (which is not easy to source BTW – OEM parts were found in England and Japan).
Everything was properly painted and overhauled – and all original fork stickers unaffected by the repairs. It is impossible to see the repair.
Brakes:
Just like all the other rubber on this bike, the brake calipers and levers were completely dried out and either seized or leaking.
I sourced all of the proper OEM seals for the calipers and primary/secondary cylinders and overhauled all, repainting a couple of items that showed corrosion.
The rotors were repainted and surfaces sanded and scuffed. Everything looks like new. New brake OEM brake pads have been installed on all three brakes as well (see photos).
Carbs:
The carbs were actually in perfect condition – but just like everything else, the rubber was dry. So, all new rubber gaskets were installed, and new fuel lines (I have placed a filter in-line as an insurance policy – not stock).
Misc:
Plugs, oil, filter, battery, chain, new charcoal box rubber strap (OEM), windscreen is original – outer face was sanded and polished, windscreen trim tabs replaced (OEM), etc. – no detail left out, all parts OEM.
Any small rust/dings were eraser sanded and airbrushed or spot brushed with the correct paint. These repairs are also impossible to see.
As you can see by the photos, everything on this bike is in great shape and very clean. It’s hard to believe a bike this old can still look this clean and perfect under the hood after all these years. It was a bit dusty, so I’ve cleaned literally every nook and cranny on the bike – including the entire motor (which was cleaned with bio-degreaser and toothbrush).
Please feel free to message me with any questions.

If the description doesn’t convince you, the pictures will. If you’re looking for a pristine version of the ancestor of modern sport bikes, look no further.

Featured Listing: 1985 Kawasaki Ninja 600R
Yamaha November 30, 2018 posted by

Buzz Buzz Buzz: 1984 Yamaha RZ 350

The last street-legal production two stroke sport bike officially imported into all 50 States of the US by a major manufacturer, the RZ350 holds a special place in the heart of motorcycle enthusiasts. It was Yamaha’s valiant move to bravely keep the two stroke spirit alive and kicking in the face of tightening emission and noise regulations. It was both a brilliant success and an ultimate failure; a short lived lifespan that stirred hearts as technology passed it by. Enthusiasts who reside outside of the US may wonder at the American fascination with this bike – after all it had been in-market outside of the US for years and would certainly not be considered rare. But unlike grey market imports, this was one model that we could truly call our own. And with bold Yamaha bumble bee graphics and American superstar Kenny Roberts signing the fairing of every one, this one was ours. The RZ350, for all its shortcomings, is a legend.

1984 Yamaha RZ 350 for sale on eBay

If you look at the bloodline, you can see the DNA that evokes the Yamaha RD models that came before. But designed as a modern approach to the “less is more” philosophy, the RZ added liquid cooling to the familiar parallel twin. The two-stroke powerband was (partially) tamed by the introduction of computer controlled power valves, varying the exhaust port height depending upon RPM and throttle settings. Oil injection was standard, eliminating messy mix ratio cups and associated refueling hassles. And there was a secret weapon: hidden in the smart looking exhaust pipes were a complex set of catalytic converters, just like you would find on your car. With the cats (and some air injection), the RZ could sneak into all 50 States of the Union, including the super-picky EPA stronghold of California. Sure, the cans were heavy, they were expensive to replace (i.e. crash damage) and they did not perform nearly as well as expansion chambers and stingers, but they made the bike possible in the US. They were also easily replaced, which is what most everybody did. Immediately.

The RZ350 was intended to compete with the current crop of middleweights; likes of the Kawasaki GPz550, the Suzuki GS550, or even Yamaha’s own Seca 550 and FJ600. In that space, the stock RZ was outgunned by the bigger four cylinder four strokes. But the little RZ had agility on its side, and once on the pipe could fare well. But it would never be a great all-’rounder, given the peaky nature of popcorn power. There were many aftermarket and tuner tricks to unleash the beast. Typical tricks of overbores, decking the head to increase compression, and porting were effective. The fact that the Banshee, a Yamaha ATV, utilized the same motor definitely helped with parts availability and knowledge base. But despite the potential, the little RZ was not to be long lived. After a scant two years (and only one in CA), the RZ was pulled from the dealer floors. The party was over, and the used party began. This is where we pick up the story on this bike.

From the seller:
Bought this bike in 2001. Have ridden this bike regularly for 17yrs. Always kept inside. Rebuilt engine because of mileage. I am over 60 yrs old AMI certified motorcycle mechanic for 41yrs. and ride like a grandpa and take care of my things the same way.

– Work Performance rear shock
– Engine Rebuilt 1500 miles ago
– .020 Pro-X pistons,windows cut to match intake
– TDR reeds
– stage 1 porting
– Toomey pipes
– stage 1 dyno jet kit w/2into 1 K&N air filter
– Wiseco Hot Rods crankshaft
– New clutch w/springs
– Full gasket and seal kit
– Race Tech front fork springs
– Chain and sprockets 1500 miles
– New seat cover and battery
– HID headlight
– Powder coated frame
– Bike Dynos out at 59.6 RWH on Dayton Dyno at my shop!
– Spec II Full race fairing
– Fuel tank has no rust, has small quarter size dent and touch up on right front side

Forty Thousand Miles. Let that sink in. Most RZs don’t get to that point, having been thrashed, abused, modified, seized and crashed. This particular bike has an amazing number of miles, but looks great. It is clearly no museum collector given the mods, but from a period correct standpoint – hell, from a fun to ride standpoint – this one piqued my interest. The .20 overbore either means the engine had been refreshed once before, or perhaps it was necessary to go that deep due to scratches in the bore. Regardless, that means for bigger pistons and more power. The K&N filter and Toomey pipes are perfect add ons, as is the full Spec II fairing. This bike has been stripped and rebuilt, as evidenced by the powder coated frame. But that just means you are potentially getting a nearly new bike out of the deal.

If you can get past the mileage (40k!) and the non-standard mods, what you are looking at is a great rider. This is a bike that deserves action rather than parking in a museum – although I must admit it looks pretty good. And with a long term owner and a capable wrench (just an assumption, but how many owners out there have their own dyno??), this bike could well be good enough to fill the two-stroke void in your stable. The best part is the price: compared to 90% of what we see on RSBFS, this chainsaw is a veritable bargain. The opening ask started at a reasonable $3k, and bids are flying fast and furious. The Buy It Now price is a mere $4,500, meaning that this bike will likely sell before the auction is over. Check it out here, but better be quick about it. It might already be gone. Good Luck!!

MI

Buzz Buzz Buzz: 1984 Yamaha RZ 350
Ducati November 30, 2018 posted by

Used Well: 1991 Ducati 851

The Ducati 851 is a long-standing icon in the sport bike world. Leading the charge to Ducati’s dominant run of WSBK titles, the 851 was as successful on the showroom/street as it was on the track. Simultaneously introducing liquid cooling, fuel injection and four valve desmo heads, the 851 was both the leading edge of where Ducati had been, as well as the foundation for the future. And the sound? All the booming twin noises you expect, with a very unexpected-for-a-twin high redline. Good looks never hurt either, and the 851 exhibits the classic lines of the 1990s sportbike. You gotta hand it to the Italians – they know how to build a supermodel that checks all the right boxes.

1991 Ducati 851 for sale on eBay

The development of “rubber band” Pantah motor was an evolutionary design in the 2-valve, air-cooled Ducati twin. The 851 motor took the Pantah guts and revolutionized the rest. Four valve heads were actually part of Massimo Bordi’s thesis at University; this project allowed him to make them a production reality with the assistance of famed engineering firm Cosworth. Liquid cooling was a no-brainer; better control of heat allowed for closer tolerances and ultimately more (and more reliable power). Fuel injection – a first for Ducati – heralded the future of electronics in motorcycles and in racing. This feature also allowed for tuning and tweaking, necessary to extract the maximum performance from the engine/exhaust combinations tested. Utilizing known techniques, the chassis was a birdcage affair of straight steel tubing. Original plans called for a 16″ front wheel (1987 and 1988 model years), which was all the rage for GP machines at the time. However stability issues cropped up, and the now standard 17 incher was fitted. Later 851s received Ohlins upgrades from the original design Marzocchi units, and Brembos adorned the hubs front and rear.

From the seller:
Up for sale is my 1991 Ducati 851. It’s original, it’s complete, it’s immaculate, well taken care of, always garaged and under cover.
All original with tons of work in last 7 years.

Work in 2011 at 15k miles. Motor refresh, new rings, hone, bearings checked, valves adjusted, belts, everything gone through. Upgraded clutch slave New SS brake lines front/rear New clutch with basket open cover New coolant hoses Rebuild rear Ohlins shock Fast by Ferracci stage 1 chip and high carbon pipes.

Work done in 2018 at 16k miles. New front upgraded 916 Brembo rotors/OE pads, Diablo Rossi III tires, OEM battery. The bike is wearing original seat, original pipes and rear pegs now.
You won’t find a cleaner original condition collectible worthy 851.

When introduced, the 851 was considered a bit of a high-strung, maintenance-intensive and potentially fragile offering – providing performance at the cost of reliability and/or longevity. History has clearly shown this not to be true, however. Yes, there are some unique service aspects to owning a Pantah-based Ducati, including frequent belt changes and valve adjustment intervals (when compared to your average sewing machine). However these are not the Fiat-related, oil leaking, rust buckets than many feared. These are actually quite robust and reliable steeds that continue to churn out the sound and performance expected, and readers should not hesitate to consider a higher mileage bike. We have, in fact, seen specimens with double the mileage listed here (16,000); provided belts have been changed and services rendered, this motor is well neigh bulletproof.

Today’s particular example appears to have been used well, as opposed to well used. It is a ’91 851 Strada (biposto). Yes, it has had some miles under the keel. But it has also had a decent amount of service, no doubt at the behest of an owner who keeps his machines healthy and in order. As part of the maintenance there have also been some upgrades. Like the factory, this owner has replaced components with newer available items, both maintaining and enhancing performance of the bike. Being a ’91 model, it wears the white frame and white wheels – a striking combination (’92 and onwards went to black hoops). Is it really the cleanest original condition 851 we have seen? I would chalk that up to a bit of poetic license as this bike is not strictly original from a purist standpoint. But it is very, very clean – and continues to evoke visceral, emotional responses you might not find in a more modern bike. Whether or not it is worth the premium asking price is another matter (seller is open to offers). Check out all of the details here, and then jump back to the Comments section and lets chat 851s and higher mileage Ducs. Good Luck!!

MI

Used Well: 1991 Ducati 851
Honda November 28, 2018 posted by

Royal Crown: 2004 Honda RC51

In the soda wars of the 1980s, Coca-Cola was the big dog. But others were keen to move in on the success of Coke, including Pepsi and RC Cola. Each had a slightly different take on the same theme, and competed for the same set of customers. Fast forward to the late 1990s and you could see the same situation developing in World Superbike racing. Ducati had the dominant platform with their legendary 916 (and 851 before that), winning 8 championships and effectively shutting out the other manufacturers. Given the rules and concessions afforded to twins in WSBK (displacement and weight, for example), other factories jumped on the copycat bandwagon. Honda in particular put their four cylinder screamers aside for a roaring v-twin designed to take the fight to Bologna. The bike that was developed became the very successful RC51. Winning the 2000 WSBK title the first year out with Colin Edwards, the RC51 also found success Stateside in the AMA under the guidance of one Nicky Hayden.

2004 Honda RC51 for sale on eBay

Officially known as the RVT1000R in the US, the RC51 was the spiritual successor to the RC30 and RC45; it was built to go racing and win races. And while four cylinder WSBK machines were limited to 750cc, twins were allowed up to 999cc – providing more torque and HP over a lower RPM limit. Designing a new 90 degree twin displacing 999cc, the RC51 featured four valves per cylinder, gear-driven cams and a unique twin injector per cylinder for better fueling across the rev range. And speaking of revs, the RC51 was somewhat limited on the RPM front to the 10k range in favor of longevity due to the large bore / short stroke arrangement. The chassis was pure Honda – aluminum twin beam – with striking side-mounted radiators. While this made for a wider arrangement than the 916, the side-mounted rads were effective and aerodynamic.

From the seller:
Solo seat, Santo pipes, Penske shocks, GPR steering stabilizer, Power Commander.

Very clean, runs great, sounds great, excellent condition. Title in hand. Ready to go.

An overall competitive package, the RC51 was met with great rider enthusiasm; this was partly due to the price. While uber-limited RC30 and RC45s sold new for $25k+, the “lowly” RC51 was a veritable bargain with MSRP one buck below ten grand. There was even a Nicky Hayden edition sold, consisting of cosmetic changes such as brushed aluminum frame and swingarm, number plates and stickers. There were two generations of this model, the SP1 offered from 2000 to 2001, and all others are considered SP2 editions with minor suspension and fueling updates and some geometry changes. By 2006 the twin-cylinder party was over for Honda – as was factory WSBK racing for the time being. When they reemerged from their WSBK absence the new platform was back to the old in-line four ways of the FireBlade. Thus the RC51 is not exactly homologation rare, but relatively low numbers were produced over a short period of time.

Like the cola wars that preceded it, there were many interpretations of the same flavor. The RC51 remains a unique example of Honda taking the fight to Ducati on their turf and for a brief moment, winning the war. The resulting bike was massively capable, with Honda’s penchant for reliability and build quality. While a bit porky from some angles, the RC51 is a mean racing machine, and remains a desirable mount for practically any type of riding. This particular example shows few miles (less than 6k), and has some nice add-ons such as tasty Sato exhaust, suspension upgrades and a Power Commander to aid in fueling/tuning. More importantly, it has all the elements of a Nicky Hayden Edition, although not noted by the seller. With an opening ask of $6,000 this bike is starting out in the fair money range, if not the upper side of that neighborhood. No takers thus far, but there is still a long way to go. Check it out here if you are looking to pick up an under-appreciated superbike with real racetrack creds. It may not be the most coveted of the RC set, but this one still looks, sounds and goes like an RC should. Good Luck!!

MI

Royal Crown:  2004 Honda RC51
Honda November 27, 2018 posted by

Last of the First: 1999 Honda CBR900RR

In the year 2000, Honda improved the CBR900RR, by then an aging living legend, to keep up with literbikes from the competition. The Yamaha had swept past Honda with the R1, and it was time for the CBR’s next evolution. But this 1999 Honda CBR900RR represents the last and most up-to-date version of the original CBR900RR, which lit path for late-century Japanese sportbikes.

1999 Honda CBR900RR for sale on eBay

By 1999, Honda had bored the engine out to 919cc, and re-thought the suspension, chassis and riding position to be slightly more relaxed than the cramped early bikes. Not only was the engine bigger, but it was blessed with lightened internals and Honda took measures to reduce friction in the rotating assembly. The bike clung to right-side-up forks and the funny 16-inch front wheel that helped make it a renowned handler.

This 1999 Honda CBR900RR appears to be in really good shape, save a couple marks on the chassis and some very light surface rust and dirt. It has a fair-enough 14,000 miles and wears stainless steel brake lines and a Yoshimura exhaust. The seller doesn’t say whether the stock set up is available, but then again, the ad is thin on the ground with detail.

From the eBay listing:

Ok…this is as clean as they come, all serviced including valves…runs beautiful…all stock but braided steel lines for braking, tires, and Yoshimura bolt on exhaust wich souds beautiful…not loud, at all, yet it has 2 inch baffle…well made.Has 14k miles and I am not using it so mileage will not go up , titled in my name…please note pics DO NOT serve this bike well it looks better in person.

This bike is as clean as can be…what a survivor…all serviced and all stock VIN and warning stickers even the very tiny fuel on and off …are intact….needs a good home…more info call 407-791-3584
If bike is paid for I could possibly deliver in the surrounding states for additional fee

The buy-it-now of $7,500 is a little optimistic for a bike that was built in its millions, though very clean examples that haven’t been crashed, stretched, had their wheels chromed or otherwise been stepped on are getting harder to find.

Last of the First: 1999 Honda CBR900RR
Honda November 22, 2018 posted by

Unmolested Hooligan: 1995 Honda CBR900RR

There’s little that can be said about the Honda CBR900RR that hasn’t been repeated in every forum, magazine, Craigslist post and lookie-there sportbike blog ad nauseam. By the standards of the day, they were a revelation. They were tiny, pinpoint-accurate handlers with big-bore power. For a few years in the Clinton era, there were few substitutes.

1995 Honda CBR900RR for sale on eBay

This 1995 Honda CBR900RR has been stored in a museum or collection setting for more than a decade, judging by the registration date on the Texas plates. It has done very few miles, is extremely clean, and appears to be 100 percent stock. Finding a CBR900RR in any kind of reasonable condition is becoming something of a feat, and this one looks like it has very little to hide.

From the eBay listing:

You are purchasing a

1995 Honda CBR900RR Motorcycle Purple/Yellow/white MV

EXCELLENT CONDITION. ONLY HAS 8465 MILES. FRONT RIM HAS SOME SCRATCHES. FROM THE M. VANN COLLECTION. HAS SOME VERY VERY MINOR SCRATCHES AND BLEMISHES CANT BE SEEN IN THE PHOTOS. BUY AS IS.

OTHER BIKES FROM M. VANN COLLECTION AVAILABLE CALL FOR DETAILS.

CLEAN TITLE. VIN# JH2SC2808SM302221

WE CAN HELP YOU ARRANGE FREIGHT TO ANY WHERE IN THE WORLD. (MUST ADHERE TO AND COMPLY WITH EBAY RULES)

WE HAVE HUNDREDS OF SHIPPING CONTACTS, SHIPPING CRATES AND PACKAGING MATERIALS TO PROPERLY PACK YOUR MOTORCYCLE FOR SAFE DELIVERY

BIKE IS BEING SOLD WITH RESPONSIBILITY FOR CUSTOMER TO PICK-UP. BUT FOR EXTRA CHARGE WE CAN HELP YOU SHIP IT ANYWHERE.

WE DO HAVE CRATES IN STOCK, CALL US TO GET A QUOTE. WE SHIP ALL OVER THE WORLD.

BUY AS IS.

At $7,999, the seller is for sure asking a premium for the unmolested condition. If you can part with the coin and are looking for a clean CBR900RR, though, this one checks a lot of boxes.

Unmolested Hooligan: 1995 Honda CBR900RR
Honda November 18, 2018 posted by

Power Play: 1983 Honda CX650 Turbo

The 1980s represented a wild period for motorcycle manufacturers. Everyone was throwing technology at the performance problem, and all Big Four vendors went full speed down the Turbo road. Little did they know it would be a dead end street. But while it lasted, the glorious promise of liter-bike power in a mid-sized motorcycle ruled the day. The mighty technological giant know as Honda was both the first – and the last – reveler at the boosted party, and built what many consider the most complete factory Turbo bike offered. Enter today’s rarity, the mighty 1983 Honda CX650 Turbo. Long since known as the roll-on king, the CX650T produced real-world, usable power in a whooshing rush that was unmatched by contemporaries. Offered for one scant year at a princely price, the 650 Turbo (just like the CX500 Turbo) failed to capture much wallet share of the riding public, and was discontinued. With it, the Turbo era was over.

1983 Honda CX650 Turbo for sale on eBay

Externally the CX650T resembles a futuristic Silver Wing, and the apple didn’t fall too far from that tree. Utilizing a slightly beefed up bottom end, the Turbo model makes due with many of the CX infrastructure elements – which should tell you how over built the CX lineup was in the first place. A single turbo blows through the four valve heads. Fueling is provided courtesy of computerized injection (hot and heavy stuff back then). Optimizing for torque rather than peak HP, the 650 is good for about 100 HP. But this is no drag racer. With shaft drive, air suspension, a heavy chassis, a beefy motor, nearly a of ton of electronics and the large fairing, the CX650 Turbo tips the scales significantly on the wrong side of 550 lbs. Honda wisely chose the “sport touring” theme with their Turbo bikes, partly due to necessity of packaging everything up.

From the seller:
17 mile cx650 turbo tiltle is in my name. This bike will need serviced..it does run and drive .i tested it and put 10 miles on it my self Oem stock tools ,air gauge ,owners manual,stock Oem tires with nubs
Front rear,only thing on this bike not Oem it the glove box cover,other then that .this bike is as it was sold new.

Turbo bikes are rare. With only 1,700 and change of the 650s ever made (and a reported mere 1,000 or 1,200 imported to the US), these beasts are not common. This particular bike sports only 17 miles… total! Low mile Turbo bikes are more the norm than the exception, but this is an extreme example. The only specimens that have fewer miles are those machines donated by Honda to technical schools for training and learning (those were never intended to be titled or ridden). But miles are not to be feared on a CX650 Turbo. These are robust motorcycles with few real issues. The key gremlins on the bike are electrical related. Stators are no longer available and the cause of many a charging system’s demise. Removable connectors under the seat can get corroded, run hot under load and can burn out. Other than those items, regular use will keep items such as the turbo waste gate operational and happy.

Turbo bikes have always been expensive relative to their same brand, non-boosted counterparts. That is part of the reason why they are rare; they simply were too expensive for the level of performance offered. And while they have been slow to appreciate (financial turbo lag?) they have been slowly climbing in price. Top condition, low mileage bikes are on the sharp end of the field – as is to be expected with any collectible. The seller is looking for an opening ask of $8,900, which thus far has scared away bidders. Nearly nine grand is a big ask for a CX650 Turbo in today’s market, especially as this is the opening ask of an auction. These are wonderful and unique bikes that deserve a good look if you are searching for a rider/collector machine. This one is priced a little high when compared to others we have seen, but is certainly not in absurd territory. Check it out here, and then jump back to the comments and share your Turbo stories. Turbos need love too! Good Luck.

MI

Power Play: 1983 Honda CX650 Turbo
Cagiva November 16, 2018 posted by

9/16ths Scale: 1998 Cagiva Mito

Legendary motorcycle designer Massimo Tamburini had a long and storied career. From co-founding iconic motorcycle manufacturer Bimota, to penning some of the most striking designs in motorcycling history for the likes of Cagiva, Ducati and MV Agusta, Tamburini has been responsible for many a rider’s dream machine. You might have seen some of his design genius in bikes such as the Bimota KB2, the Tesi 1D and the DB1. For Ducati he was involved with the 851/888 and the Paso and had a hand in the Supermono works. But his greatest contribution to motorcycling – his most admired design theme – was around the Ducati 916. Everything that came after it was simply a small step along this theme – including the 748/996/998 and the entirety of the MV Agusta F4 lineup. So strong was this theme that the design language translated to smaller machines as well, which is where we pick up the story on today’s fantastic Cagiva Mito.

1998 Cagiva Mito 125 for sale on eBay

Powered by a single cylinder, liquid cooled two stroke, the 125cc Mito was considered as an entry level sport bike for Europe’s small-bore crazed culture. Popular in areas where larger capacity motorcycles are prohibitively expensive due to taxes or license requirements the smaller scoots are immensely popular and technologically advanced. In the case of the Mito, that technology includes design elements straight off of the legendary 916, including twin headlights and the tail section. Nifty hardware includes the twin-beam aluminum frame, asymmetrical rear swing arm with preload-adjustable rear shock, Brembo binders (that’s a single 320mm unit up front), 40mm Marzocchi front forks (including steering damper), 7-speed transmission and an estimated 34 HP (stock) at 12,000 RPM. Tipping the scales some 15 under 300 lbs, this is a race track replica rocket provided you are of suitable stature with the skills to keep the revs on the pipe.

From the seller:
This machine is virtually new as it only was ridden 399 km since its conversion from a stock 70mph (110 km) bike to one that will show 112 mph(180km) on the speedo.Its collectibility is enhanced by its 7 speed gearbox and of course the styling, which was done in the spirit of the Ducati 916.Being a 2 stroke machine,many states allow small displacement bikes plates for highway use or find a track site to enjoy this super handling lightweight. The mods we performed were not optimized for competition, but were done to keep the reliability and add to the enjoyment of the bike.Recently upgraded, cleaned fuel system,and new battery was fitted.

The seller claims this particular Mito has been hot-rodded, but not much info is included as to what was actually done. Generally this is done via boring out the displacement and porting the cylinder. Expansion chambers and silencers are other popular mods to help two strokes breathe better and make more power. Other than the unknown mods, this is a low mileage example that appears clean in the few, blurry photos. This has all of the hallmarks of an Evo I machine, with both the 7-speed gearbox and the tri-spoke wheels. Later Evo II models went to a more robust 6-speed gearbox and a different set of wheels. Any Mito is potentially collectible – after all we do not see them every day here in the US – but there is not enough data to determine if the 7 cog bikes are any more valuable than the 6 speeders. Either way you are in good company; even the vaunted Barber Motorsports Museum proudly highlights the Mito in their extensive collection.

This is not an auction, but rather a straight-up buy it now listing. Pricing is a fair $6,500 (especially for the low miles!), although the states in which you can register this bike might not be one in which you reside. Even if not used on this street, this little Mito will eat larger bikes alive on a tight and twisty track. Smart buyers are encouraged to check first, ask lots of questions, and do your homework. So who *doesn’t* want to have a mini-916 in their quiver? It’s great for show, and from the mods sounds like it is ready for some GO. Check it out here, and let your inner child racer run free. Good luck!

MI

9/16ths Scale:  1998 Cagiva Mito