Posts by tag: Liquid Cooled

Yamaha August 9, 2016 posted by

Unfairly Overshadowed? 1984 Yamaha RZ500 for Sale

1984 Yamaha RZ500 R Front

Many of the weird and wonderful bikes we like to feature on this site appear in time-capsule condition, as if Doc Brown put them in a trailer behind his time-traveling DeLorean and towed them from the distant year 1985 into… The future! Others are patched-up wrecks described as having “patina” with “90% tread left on tires.” This particular RZ500 falls somewhere in the middle, and looks like a nice, clean, bike with a reasonable asking price.

Crazy, right?

1984 Yamaha RZ500 L Front

Yamaha’s RZ500, also known as the RD500LC in some markets, was one of two 500cc race-replicas designed to ape the overall specification and style of the top-level two-stroke racebikes of the era. But unlike the Suzuki RG500 “Gamma,” the Yamaha pulled a bit of a Honda with their roadgoing exotic, taking a brilliant idea and then engineering the hell out of it, ending up with a bit of a muddle. The powerplant was a liquid-cooled 50° two-stroke V4 with twin cranks. So far, so good. A pair of YPVS power valves and oil-injection helped boost performance and make the bike a bit more practical. Seems like a smart choice. Sophisticated anti-dive forks and an unusually-mounted rear shock allowed for serious handling and tight packaging, respectively. Then a balance shaft was included to handle unwanted vibrations… In theory, this should have helped make the bike run smoother and make it more civilized while simultaneously allowing a lighter frame for improved performance, but it didn’t really work out that way. The resulting bike was both heavier and less powerful than the Gamma and although the RZ has its fans, reviewers and prices reflect the Gamma’s superior performance versus the RZ500’s more practical street bias. The upside is reasonable prices compared to the Suzuki, and that singular two-stroke sound and feel.

1984 Yamaha RZ500 Tank

So what’s the big deal with the rising popularity of these two-stroke sportbikes? A bit of nostalgia and a bit of performance. These tinny-sounding streetbikes began to disappear after the mid-1980s here in the USA where ever-tightening emissions laws strangled the smoky little beasts into an early grave. Top-level racing of the era saw two-stroke machines competing exclusively and that link to race-bred machinery is a powerful thing in the minds of motorcycle enthusiasts. There’s also the axiom made popular by Colin Chapman, founder of Lotus: “Simplify, then add lightness.” And two strokes are both of those things: with fewer moving parts, they’re simpler and lighter, while theoretically making twice as much power as a four-stroke of equivalent displacement. So while a 500cc two-stroke might make similar power compared to a 1000cc four-stroke, the resulting package is much lighter, meaning the bike will turn quicker, brake better, and generally offer more feedback to the rider. Two-strokes require more maintenance, which isn’t a problem for race bikes or committed enthusiasts, and they also produce more pollution, which is something many motorcycle fans are happy to… Ahem. Overlook.

1984 Yamaha RZ500 R Side Detail

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Yamaha RZ500 for Sale

In great condition. Runs after one kick. Never downed. Never raced, 8700 Miles. Tuned by Lance Gamma

Engine: 499 cc liquid-cooled V4 two stroke Power: 64.2 kW (88 PS) @9,500 rpm Torque: 65.4 N·m @8,500 rpm Transmission 6 speed Weight 205 kg/452 lb (dry)

1984 Yamaha RZ500 R Side

There’s a $9,000 opening bid with no takers as yet and a $10,000 Buy It Now price for this bit of two-stroke history. This example isn’t cosmetically perfect, with a little bit of surface rust here and there on the steel frame, but appears complete and mechanically well cared-for: “tuned by Lance Gamma” certainly adds some value. Although as always, I wish these sellers would include more details about the bike’s history and exactly what “tuned” means: did he adjust the carburetors, or do a performance rebuild of the motor and set up the suspension? Having been under the care of a well-known and regarded tuner is great, but a bit more detail might help the bike sell…

-tad

1984 Yamaha RZ500 L Fairing

Unfairly Overshadowed? 1984 Yamaha RZ500 for Sale
Kawasaki July 29, 2016 posted by

Vivid Green Oddity: 1984 Kawasaki KR250 for Sale

1984 Kawasaki KR250 L Side Front

Well here’s a real curiosity, another bike from the era of experimental engine configurations. Prior to the introduction of the KR-1 featured earlier this week, Kawasaki’s quarter-liter two-stroke sportbike reputation was upheld by this bike, the KR250. Although it’s powered by what is technically a parallel twin, the Kawasaki KR250’s engine is configured more like half of a square four. It’s basically a pair of singles, one behind the other, with separate cranks, and the design is referred to as a “tandem-twin” to differentiate it from more conventional parallel-twins.

1984 Kawasaki KR250 R Side

Although it complicates construction a bit, it likely helps the bike remain very narrow and improves packaging, as exhaust routing and expansion chambers no longer have to run underneath the engine as they do on most parallel-twin engines. In this case, they both exit on the right side of the bike: one down low, the other partly through the tailpiece in flamboyant 1980s style. The round taillamp set into the kicked-up tail and those bolt-on-overfender-styled hand-fairings are a nice touch. And that stepped seat appears to be a factory part!

1984 Kawasaki KR250 Dash

That unusual engine was backed by a six-speed gearbox and put out 45hp, good for 112mph when pushing the sub-300lb machine. Like other two-strokes of the period, it was lightweight, reasonably quick, and handled well. Later versions added the KVSS “Kawasaki Exhaust Valve Sycronization System” to help with the typically flat two-stroke midrange. They apparently could be difficult to get started, even when new, but are otherwise no more difficult to own than any other smoker of the period. The KR250 isn’t worth all that much in other markets but is extremely rare here in the US, which counts for a lot if you’re a fan of the weird.

1984 Kawasaki KR250 R Rear

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Kawasaki KR250 for Sale

Very good running condition sharp response of 2-stroke engine is still well. Can shift all gears very smooth. Brakes are working fine. Electricals are all working. Has Kawasaki genuine fairings but repainted by previous owner. Has hairline cracks and chips on fairings, so look carefully all pictures and video. Fuel tank has some small dents. Used motorcycle with scratches and wear as this is 32 years old. Speedometer looks KAWASAKI genuine parts and shows 36,300km = about 22,600 miles, but actual mileage is unknown. Will needs new tires and fork seals.

The bike is just imported from Japan. Not registered yet in the U.S. This bike is sold without title, as is with NO warranty NO refunds NO return.

The seller also helpfully includes this short video of the bike sounding very fierce. This is another no-reserve auction and bidding is very active so far, but it apparently started at $0 and is creeping up by inches. Currently, it’s at around $1,200 with a couple days left. The seller mentions that the bike has been repainted by a previous owner and I can’t vouch for the originality of that color scheme, but I think that red and green paint looks terrific. Like Christmas on two wheels, if Christmas was a heavy smoker with a nasal voice who just showed up in a shipping container from Japan.

1984 Kawasaki KR250 R Side Front

Parts will obviously be challenging, getting it worked on difficult, and this definitely won’t provide the performance of a modern sportbike, but I bet it’d be hard to find something that will generate more discussion at your local bike night short of a Bimota Tesi.

-tad

1984 Kawasaki KR250 L Side

Vivid Green Oddity: 1984 Kawasaki KR250 for Sale
Honda July 22, 2016 posted by

Grand Prix in Miniature: 1993 Honda RS125 for Sale

1993 Honda RS125 L Side3

Growing up, my only experience with two-strokes was in leaf blowers: I didn’t ride dirt bikes, and two-stroke sportbikes were long gone by the time I got into motorcycles. A thudding v-twin sounds like sex, and the technology that allows a four to scream to 16,000rpm boggles my mind while the noise makes my hair stand on end. But the tinny snarl of a two-stroke engine? Basically it reminded me of Sunday morning hangovers…

But I’m an adult, and adults can admit when they’ve been wrong about something. And I really want a two-stroke race bike like this Honda RS125.

1993 Honda RS125 Rear Wheel

Of course, there are problems with my revised worldview. First of all, I’m a bit too big for something like this: an RS125 weighs something like 160lbs, meaning I weigh more than the bike, and my 6’2” height means it might be a little bit… Cramped, to say the least. That’s not so say that larger riders can’t ride them. It’s just that 180lb rider needs to be very careful about body positioning as their weight will more dramatically affect handling than it would for a smaller rider. In the plus column, their light weight means 125s crash better than heavier bikes…

1993 Honda RS125 L Side Rear

The RS125 wasn’t based on a road bike: it was a pure racing machine, an entry-level, over-the-counter tool that professionals and privateers could order from Honda to cut their teeth on in wheel-to-wheel competition. Powered by a liquid-cooled, two-stroke single with nearly square dimensions of 54mm x 54.5mm and backed by a 6-speed gearbox, the bike was good for 32hp and a 130mph top speed with the rider flat on the tank. Very, very flat on the tank…

Riders like Loris Capirossi and Dani Pedrosa got their starts racing RS125s, and if it was good enough for them, it’s good enough for you, or your kid to go racing.

1993 Honda RS125 Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Honda RS125 for Sale

Original Honda Grand prix racer RS125.

Hard to find and very fast !

Please see picture for more detail.

Bike runs, (not race ready Not race for 20 or more year)

Will ship worldwide.

1993 Honda RS125 Tank

The starting bid is $5,000 and there are no takers yet, with five days left on the auction. This example is a little rough around the edges, but those bare plastics just mean you can get wild with graphics, replicate your favorite historic racing team’s colors, or just leave them bare. The listing is very spare, which is a shame, since it’d be nice to know about the bike’s maintenance history and any parts that come with it. These are racebikes, and you’re unlikely to find what you need to tune and maintain them at your local Honda dealer, so included spares are a big selling point.

And that’s really the issue with two-stroke sportbikes of this era in general: spares are getting thin on the ground. I’d expect that, at some point, someone will start making parts for them as two-stroke sport bikes of this era are becoming more desirable but, until that happens, be sure to do your homework if you plan to do more than display your RS125.

-tad

1993 Honda RS125 R Side

Grand Prix in Miniature: 1993 Honda RS125 for Sale
Yamaha April 18, 2016 posted by

Jewel-Like Race Bike: 1980 Yamaha TZ125G for Sale

1980 Yamaha TZ125G R Side

The Yamaha TZ125 was an evolution of the company’s TA125, a privateer GP machine in miniature. It might look like a glorified scooter but, although the TZ’s displacement was small, it came with sophisticated specification to match much bigger machines: liquid cooling, dry clutch, disc brakes, and a six-speed gearbox.

1980 Yamaha TZ125G L Fairing

The highly-strung engine made a claimed 30bhp at a screaming 12,000rpm and the entire package weighed in at a featherweight 159 lbs meaning that, if I bought one, I’d weigh more than the bike. With a power-to-weight ratio of something like a modern, air-cooled Ducati, the TZ125 could reach almost 130mph, no joke considering that some lawn mowers pack more displacement…

1980 Yamaha TZ125G Dash

Today’s example might present a bit of a dilemma to potential buyers: although it has been built to run, it’s almost too perfect to beat up in wheel-to-wheel competition.

From the original eBay listing: 1980 Yamaha TZ125G for Sale

I obtained this 125cc Yamaha production race bike about 12 years ago from a Suzuki factory team race mechanic who used it for track days. According to him, it had never been raced and by all appearances this was true. There was no evidence that it had ever been crashed, abused, or even tipped over. The brake rotors showed minimal wear. Much of the original factory spares kit was included.

Nevertheless, I did an extensive restoration to bring it up to like-new standards. I disassembled everything but the wheels and the engine/trans bottom end.  The frame, swing arm, triple clamp, and fairing mounts were powder coated. The fairing, seat, and tank were professionally painted to original, and a new Gustafson windscreen was installed. All of the polished aluminum parts were repolished. New Avon vintage-style racing tires were mounted (not yet balanced). The top end of the engine was rebuilt with new parts and the cooling system re-done. New clutch plates were installed. The brakes and master cylinders were rebuilt and now use silicone fluid. Most of the external rubber parts were replaced, as were the fork seals and fluid.

I started the bike and ran it briefly to make sure that it ran strongly and shifted properly. Everything was as it should be. I shut it off, drained its fuel and coolant, and have used it only for shows and display in my collection since then. Now it’s ready for its next owner, whether you want to race it in AHRMA vintage events, use it for track days, or display it proudly. It has won a number of show trophies.

Included are much of the NOS parts from the original factory spares kit (Yamaha packing list included) and many used parts in excellent condition. This comprises about 90 part numbers. I would guess that there is about $3,000 worth of these parts. Additional items include a custom-made rear axle stand, the original owners manual (sadly, missing its cover), the parts microfiche and a hard-copy printout of the parts list.

1980 Yamaha TZ125G Rear Suspension

Those spindly, bicycle-looking tires give the TZ125 a look that’s more “vintage” than the actual age would suggest. These are very rare bikes, but interestingly Airtech does produce replacement fairings if you happen to want to actually race it as God and Yamaha intended. 

Bidding is up north of $4,400 with the Reserve Not Met and just a couple days left on the auction, so fans of skinny little racebikes should move quickly if you want to add this to your garage!

-tad

1980 Yamaha TZ125G L Side

Jewel-Like Race Bike: 1980 Yamaha TZ125G for Sale
Honda March 17, 2016 posted by

Featured Listing: 1992/1993 Honda CBR250RR for Sale

Update 3.18.2016: VIN confirms this is a MC22. -dc
Update 3.26.2016: Sold for full asking price. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

DSC_0005

Today’s CBR250RR is another one of those grey market oddities, a bike that’s extremely rare here in the USA, but not considered particularly exotic elsewhere. Built from 1990 through 1996 and nicknamed the “Baby Blade” for obvious reasons, it was a small-displacement stepping-stone bike for riders before they moved up to a larger bike like a 600. But unlike here, where learner bikes are quickly discarded or skipped entirely by riders who foolishly think of 600 supersports as “starter bikes,” these are high-quality, sophisticated machines, a far cry from the relatively crude CBR300 of today.

DSC_0006

Instead of that bike’s simple and torquey single-cylinder engine, the CBR250RR used a 249cc liquid-cooled inline four that made 40hp and would rev safely to a shrieking 18,000rpm. Backed by a six-speed gearbox, the package was good for over 100mph. It wasn’t as light or as raw as an equivalent two-stroke, but it offered up a far more refined and durable experience. A 250 two-stroke is really its own thing, and the CBR was intended more as a high-quality learning tool before moving on to a larger CBR600 or 900.

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Today’s featured listing is either a 1992 or 1993 model and looks like it’s in very good, mostly original condition.

From the seller:
Honda CBR250RR for Sale

It’s a CBR250RR.  It’s titled, but the year doesn’t coincide with what year it probably is.  I believe it’s a 1992 or 1993 model.  When I originally picked it up, I had my mechanic go through everything.  The only major thing was cleaning the carbs, adjusting the inlet and exhaust valves and spot welding the exhaust can where the springs latch.  We removed the heat-wrapping that was there also.

It’s essentially stock minus the full exhaust (stainless steel).  There doesn’t seem to be any distinct markings on the full system, so I am unsure which brand it is.

The front cowl is ABS, the side fairings are fiberglass and the rear tail is OEM.

I bought the bike with 8,1XX kilometers and it’s currently at 12,7XX kilometers.

It’s been a weekend street bike, I have several other bikes that I ride in my rotation, this one is the one I’m willing to let go for greener pastures.

I do have the manual for the bike, it’s in Japanese.

Bike is currently located at Speedwerks in Delaware.

Will pay for anyone who wants a pre purchase inspection done.

$Price: 4,700 or best offer SOLD.

DSC_0007

These are difficult machines to put a price on. Their origins are relatively pedestrian, although they epitomize what Honda has always done, offering up engineering sophistication to buyers at all levels. And although they were always intended as entry-level bikes, they provide performance and handling not generally found in this type of machinery here in the US. For riders who subscribe to the “Slow Bike Fast” philosophy, these represent a pretty ideal balance of performance. A similar experience can be had on Honda’s CB1 for less money, but the 250RR is just that much cooler and more unusual: you’re definitely going to pay a premium for rarity with a bike like this, but for fans of small bikes with stratospheric redlines, it’s hard to beat a 250RR.

-tad

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Featured Listing: 1992/1993 Honda CBR250RR for Sale
Yamaha January 15, 2016 posted by

Fast Flyweight: 1980 Yamaha TZ125 G for Sale

1980 Yamaha TZ125 Bodywork

In an era where 200bhp, 200mph superbikes with MotoGP electronics packages can be had for less than the cost of a Honda Civic, this little Yamaha TZ125 might seem a bit like a joke, not much more than a racy moped. A moped with a dry clutch, a six-speed gearbox, and a pair of disc brakes!

1980 Yamaha TZ125 L Engine

But the TZ125’s 30bhp motivates a claimed 159lbs and can push the bike to almost 130mph, with no rider aids other than your right wrist, so while power is seemingly modest, that makes this bike more of a scalpel and less of a butter knife.

1980 Yamaha TZ125 R Engine2

The TZ125 was the liquid-cooled follow up to the air-cooled TA125, an over-the-counter privateer racebike with cutting-edge technology: check out the top mount for the rear shock right behind the steering head. This one has a metric ton of patina, as it’s basically a time-capsule racebike in miniature, complete with period safety-wiring!

From the original eBay listing: 1980 Yamaha TZ125 for Sale

1980 Yamaha TZ 125 G with the factory spares kit in it’s wooden crate. It’s being made available for sale after being displayed in a collection from the time it was purchased new at the Yamaha dealership and the Certificate of Origin will be given to the new owner. This bike has never been ridden and only started after assembly at the factory and before being shipped to the U.S.  This is an absolute museum quality factory built race bike that you can actually own.  A rare and unique opportunity and investment with a modest reserve price, so bid to own it, you won’t be sorry.  Good luck!

1980 Yamaha TZ125 L Front

So obviously, with zero miles on it and the original packing crate included, this bike will probably appeal more to collectors than lightweight speed freaks and aspiring racers. Unfortunately, bidding is pretty slow so far, with the reserve not met at $9,000. That’s not really a huge surprise: this is a race bike with no actual racing history and, while a production run in the neighborhood of 3,000 makes this relatively uncommon by roadbike standards, that’s a pretty big number for a race bike.

-tad

1980 Yamaha TZ125 R Front Bare

Fast Flyweight: 1980 Yamaha TZ125 G for Sale
Ducati December 10, 2015 posted by

Featured Listing: 1994 Ducati 888 SPO Limited for Sale

Update 12.14.15: The seller has accepted a deposit on this bike. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

1994 Ducati 888 SPO R Side Front

Located in Chicago, today’s Featured Listing is a very clean Ducati 888 SPO Limited, a rare version of Ducati’s first really modern superbike, a bike that gave them back their racing mojo and a model that has begun to steadily increase in value in recent years.

Until the advent of the rubber-cambelt Pantah, Ducati was living on borrowed time. And while the new version of their L-twin allowed them to reduce manufacturing costs, something more powerful was definitely needed to keep pace with the sportbikes from Japan, since the Big Four had finally managed to add handling and light weight to their unburstable four-cylinder sportbike formula, basically making everything from Europe look pretty antiquated.

1994 Ducati 888 SPO R Side Naked

In order to remain relevant in racing and in showrooms, Ducati developed a liquid-cooled, fuel-injected, four-valve version of their rugged L-twin and stuffed it into the brand-new 851 in 1987. The new “Desmoquattro” made 93hp at the rear wheel and gave Ducati a serious weapon for superbike racing. The bored-out 888 that followed displaced, you guessed it: 888cc’s.

1994 Ducati 888 SPO L Rear

The 888 SPO Limited has a few subtle differences as compared to the SPO including more carbon fiber, frame-colored wheels instead of black, and the suspension hoop wasn’t yellow. Intended to homologate the Desmoquattro for AMA Superbike racing it made a stout 104hp at the rear wheel, not too impressive compared to the near-200hp of a modern Panigale. But combined with the wide powerband that used to be the hallmark of big v-twins, these are plenty fast in the hands of a good rider.

1994 Ducati 888 SPO L Front Naked

This example appears to have been carefully maintained, although if the seller is saying it could use a set of cam belts, I’d plan to do that immediately. Aside from a couple chips, this thing looks so clean you could practically eat off it, even the bits normally hidden under the fairing, and includes the very desirable GiaCoMoto “spaghetti” style exhaust. Basically, if your Ducati superbike isn’t running a spaghetti exhaust, you’re just not one of the cool kids. This isn’t simply a set of expensive carbon tubes, it’s a full 50mm free flow exhaust and should make a serious roar.

1994 Ducati 888 SPO Cans

From the seller: 1994 Ducati 888 SPO for Sale

The 1994 888 SPO Limiteds were the very last 888s before the 916 and very few were made. This is #61. While it has had 17,698 miles of enjoyment, the bike is in amazing condition. The last valve adjustment was 3000 miles and 4 years ago. New belts wouldn’t hurt, but the bike has been stored inside when not ridden. The original carbon fiber fenders and clutch cover have been impeccably refinished by Artistimo. The stock fasteners were all re-plated with the factory yellow Zinc oxide. It has the original Ohlins shock.

Upgrades include the Corbin seat, Speedymoto adjustable clip-ons, 18ah Shorai battery, and the rare 50mm Thunderball/GiaCaMoto “spaghetti” full exhaust system.

Splitting hairs (pictured);
1. Chip to the left side fairing near where your toe would be.
2. Small ding at the bottom right front corner of the fuel tank (from the throttle tube)
3. Small rock chip to the left of the “D” on the front fairing.
4. Tiny scratch on the right exhaust canister (which I will try to polish out). No burning/discoloring, and look at those nearly spotless headers!
5. Rearsets are OEM, but silver ’93 SPO ones instead of the black ones of ’94.

No one believes this bike is 20+ years old or has been ridden and enjoyed. Anyone who has seen any of my bikes knows the standards I keep them. The fork adjusters are spotless…even the wheels are outstanding. This bike is clean. $12,500

1994 Ducati 888 SPO L Front Naked

While the 888 isn’t as pretty as the iconic 916 that followed, it’s far more interesting. A connoisseur’s choice, a bike with real history, particularly in SPO form. Also: the more humane ergonomics mean you won’t need to visit your chiropractor after a long morning ride.

1994 Ducati 888 SPO Top Triple

If you’re looking for a bike to enjoy, this seems like an ideal machine: low-ish miles, but it’s definitely been ridden and kept in fine-fettle. Well-cared for, but with a couple minor blemishes so you wouldn’t be afraid your boots will scuff the rearsets or mark the exhausts. And that GiaCoMoto spaghetti exhaust system is the ultimate safety feature: the cagers will know you’re coming for several miles before you come into view!

-tad

1994 Ducati 888 SPO L Side

Featured Listing: 1994 Ducati 888 SPO Limited for Sale
Kawasaki October 25, 2015 posted by

Two-Stroke Sequel: 1989 Honda NSR250R MC18-II for Sale

1989 Honda NSR250R R Side Front

An update of the earlier 1988 MC18, the 1989 Honda NSR250R model saw evolutionary changes to the bodywork and styling of this small-displacement sportbike. But the most impressive feature was the highly-evolved PGM-II electronic control unit.

1989 Honda NSR250R L Side

As brutally simple as two-strokes are in concept, there is real art in the tuning, and Honda’s PGM-II orchestrated the bike’s cutting-edge technology, using throttle position and engine RPM to create a “three-dimensional” ignition map to maximize performance of the tiny terror and reduce the lightswitch power delivery common to two-strokes.

1989 Honda NSR250R Dash

The 90° liquid-cooled 249cc v-twin was backed up with a six-speed cassette gearbox and, from the factory, these were limited to 45hp by Japanese law. But there was plenty of additional power waiting to be unleashed and with a sub-300 lb dry weight, there are huge amounts of performance on tap for back road warriors and track junkies alike.

1989 Honda NSR250R L Front

There is a Buy It Now price of $7,500 listed and, considering the recent influx of bikes just old enough to avoid the 25-year ban, I’d say he’s aiming a bit high: like many more recent imports, this example does have some scrapes, scuffs, and cracks, and it’s not one of the more desirable SP or Rothmans bikes.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Honda NSR250R MC18 for Sale

I am selling my 1989 Honda NSR 250R MC18-II two stroke motorcycle. For those unfamiliar with this bike, it is the street version of Honda’s legendary 250cc Moto GP race bike, the NSR250. Despite it’s small displacement, this is not a beginner’s motorcycle! The two stroke engine is very powerful for its size and the bike weighs in at less than 300lbs. On a twisty road, it will leave larger displacement bikes in the rear view mirror. Plus the sound, feel, and power delivery of the two  stroke engine is unlike any four stroke motorcycle. The bike is in overall great condition, with 4,775km (<3,000 miles) on the clock. There are a few minor scratches on both the bodywork and one exhaust silencer (see pictures) but no other significant damage. The bike kick starts from cold on the first try and runs/revs very smoothly (see video).

Honda never sold this bike in the U.S. as the EPA banned most two stroke powered road vehicles in the ’70’s. As such, they are extremely rare. There are a handful of these bikes in the U.S., some here legally, and others illegally. In general, two strokes less than 25 years old are still banned by the EPA, so use caution if you are looking at a similar bike that is newer than 1990. This bike was imported legally by myself directly from Japan, and I have all the US Customs paperwork to verify its legality. I also have a clean and clear Virginia title in my name, which has an 11 digit VIN that matches the bike’s frame number.

Photos: The first seven photos show the bike from various angles and the speedo/odometer in km. The remaining photos show the following marks & scratches: right front fairing, center front fairing, left front fairing, right indicator, left body fairing, right exhaust silencer, & rear seat fairing.

The seller also includes a short video clip of the bike being started from cold. When new, these weren’t built to the absolute highest standards and some parts didn’t weather well. In addition, they were often purchased by young people whose riding skills were often outstripped by their enthusiasm and when a limited budget has you choosing between maintenance and beer, the latter is going to win out more often than it probably should.

1989 Honda NSR250R Tail

As always, remember to check your local laws before bidding. Or salivating: this influx of recently-imported two-stroke sportbikes really has me wanting something like this, even if it’s limited to “off-road use.” That ugly little tacked-on headlight is just begging to be replaced with some smooth, track-only bodywork.

-tad

1989 Honda NSR250R R Side

Two-Stroke Sequel: 1989 Honda NSR250R MC18-II for Sale