Posts by tag: Liquid Cooled

Suzuki May 15, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1983 Suzuki RGB500 Gamma Racer

8.28.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

In our efforts to bring you, the reader, the very best of the best, RSBFS humbly offers you an honest-to-god, fire-breathing privateer Suzuki RGB500 GP bike! This is no ordinary Gamma converted for track usage. This is a bespoke racer – originally offered by the factory to independent racers of means – now available to allow interested parties to play out their Randy Mamola fantasies. When new, prospective buyers needed to provide significant backing and a racer’s resume in order to qualify for the relatively few bikes on offer – making this a rare and unique prospect for collectors.

Featured Listing: 1983 Suzuki RGB500 Gamma Racer

The resemblance of the RGB to the street-going Gamma is strictly intentional; the road bike was based on the successful GP racer. The racer was based on the desire to win GP events and provided Suzuki with invaluable marketing clout and the kind of credentials that only competition can bring. Thus the RGB was designed with a now ubiquitous square four, 500cc two stroke power plant. Consisting of two parallel twins mated together, the twin-crank engine utilized disk induction (as opposed to reed valves) on each bank of cylinders. And while the earliest engines resembled a cube, the more evolved editions featured stepped cylinders, with the rear bank elevated over the forward block. This presents a visually unique mechanical view, while offering cooling, weight placement and packaging enhancements. Liquid cooling was standard to minimize tolerances and maximize horsepower. The steel chassis offered a trick anti-dive front fork, Full Floater single shock rear suspension and a (very) necessary steering damper.

From the seller:
1983-1984 RGB 500 GAMMA – Extremely Rare Collector Racing Bike
A quick note before presenting its history: this Suzuki RG 500 Gamma is a “competition client” racing bike. This means that every year the manufacturer (Suzuki) offered private race teams a simpler version of their factory world winning bike used in the 500cc World Championship by its factory team. This version did not have all of the latest evolutions that the factory team had, but it was close enough to be used by private teams in World, European and National championships.

This is a NON STREET LEGAL bike. This “competition client” therefore DOES NOT HAVE A TITLE and NEVER DID. Of course a complete and detailed bill of sale / invoice will be provided to the buyer as proof of ownership.

More from the seller:
THE HISTORY
ONLY A FEW SOLD- TO PRIVATE TEAMS

In fact the chassis was not raced in 1983- Claude Fior who made (another) revolutionary bike/frame for the 1982-83 500cc European Championship – bought new this “competition client” racer only to use its 4 cylinder 500cc engine since he needed a motor. French Endurance World Champion racer Jean Laffond went onto winning the 500cc European Championship race at Le Castellet / Paul Ricard with this Fior/Suzuki this year.

At the end of the season they sold the bike (new chassis with the winning engine) to Franck Freon who had won several races in the 1983 French 500cc Promosport Championship and the Yamaha 350 RDLC Cup. Freon only raced a few times in 1984/85 with his RG 500 Gamma finishing 3rd at the Carole track in the 500cc French Open and 2nd at the same track in the 500cc French Championship sharing the podium with Christian Sarron and Thierry Espie.

Freon was on his way to move from 2 wheels to 4 wheels by wininning the Magny-Cours ELF Winfield Racing School at the end of 1985. He raced cars on 3 continents the next 18 years winning races in Formula Renault in France, Firestone Indy Lights Series in the US also winning the 24 Hours of Daytona, the 12 Hours of Sebring, twice the GTS class at Petit Le Mans in Road Atlanta and competing 10 years in a row at the 24 Hours of Le Mans climbing 5 times on the podium among others.

More from the seller:
The bike is located in Paris, France at Franck Freon’s father’s motorcycle store where it has been displayed in the showroom since being retired in 1985. It was started regularly in the 90s’ and 2000’s but never rode or raced again. It’s complete, the engine is free and it was 100% running when it was used last. Of course it’s in need of a restoration since it’s now a 35 year old racing bike. We took many photos so you can see for yourself. Matching engine/chassis numbers. Simple history since brand new.

This is a collector racing bike – no real title exists. A certified invoice with the chassis number and engine number will be provided.

Asking price: $39,000

This is a very interesting offering with known provenance. Claude Fior is well known in chassis design circles and for the use of the Hossack-style front suspension (see pic below), and while this is not a Fior frame his connection with this bike is historically significant. And Franck Freon – while not necessarily a household name – is a successful racer both in the US as well as Europe. These facts make this a significant offering – not to mention that the bike is coming from The Man himself. There is provenance, and then there is proof. This offering seems to provide for both. In terms of rarity, “B” model Gammas certainly rank up there, with an estimated 25 or fewer units offered per type/year. Pricing is right in line of the few examples we have seen recently. Some recommissioning will be necessary for those intending to run the bike in anger, but a solid go-through should be considered mandatory for any track-bound weapon. Good Luck, and unleash your inner Mamola!

MI

Featured Listing: 1983 Suzuki RGB500 Gamma Racer
Suzuki May 14, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1989 Suzuki RGV250 SP

Here we go. RSBFS comfort food in its finest form and coming from one of our most trusted allies in Moto2 Imports. Like a big bowl of mom’s mac and cheese, there is little that can sate us like a pristine 1989 Suzuki RGV250SP. If you have followed us for any length of time, you know the numbers on these babies chapter and verse, but a good chorus is always worth repeating.

1989 Suzuki RGV250 SP Pepsi For Sale at Moto2 Imports

In ‘89, Suzuki’s two-stroke v-twin GP replica spat out the best part of 60 horsepower from a deliciously peaky powerplant that was endowed with years of GP paddock trickery. The paintwork aped Kevin Schwantz’s RG500 race livery, and outsized brakes and USD forks showed this thing intended no half-assery. It was also a damn sight cheaper than the legions of 1,000cc sportbikes prowling showrooms, and in the right hands could be made to keep up, at least when things got twisty.


Because these things were never sold in the U.S., thanks mostly to the EPA, but in part because we don’t have Europe’s tiered licensing laws, young riders on these shores were left with a bunch of uninspiring sub-500cc machines, or a suite of not beginner-friendly 600s. Wannabe racers in this country never learned the true joy of a featherweight, unforgiving two-stroke ripper.

This 1989 Suzuki RGV250 SP is as nice as they come, and wears nicer suspension front and rear and a close-ratio gearbox to separate itself from the non-SP machines. Everything on the bike is original with the exception of a set of stainless steel front brake lines, and it will be supplied fully serviced. It has a clean US title, so registering it should not pose a problem.

From the seller:

1989 Suzuki RGV250 VJ21 SP in factory Pepsi color scheme. The bike has 5,755 miles (9,265km) and has been prepped by our partner Speedwerks. The fairings and tank are all OEM and in very good (~9/10) condition. Chassis is similarly nice. The SP model features close-ratio gearbox and upgraded front/rear suspension, however contrary to popular opinion, the VJ21 SP did not come with a dry-clutch. Bike is all original, minus braided front brake lines. Tank interior is clean. The bike has been serviced and is in excellent running condition. Bike will come with a US title. Price is $9,999 or best offer and buyers can contact us at info@moto2imports.com or (844) 44-MOTO2

Even today, there isn’t much that weighs as little as this bike and packs a similar wallop, especially if you want blinkers and a license plate. If you really want to separate yourself from the ranks of FZ07s and Gixxers at your local cruise, look no further.

Featured Listing: 1989 Suzuki RGV250 SP
Aprilia May 10, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1998 Aprilia RS250 MK2

Update 5.14.2019: SOLD in just 4 days! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Gary in Utah has several bikes Featured on RSBFS right now. Check them out too:

Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

One of our favorite collectors is back, and the plush offices of RSBFS are abuzz with gossip concerning what new gems will surface next from Gary’s vast rare bike archives. Today’s bike is a great example of what I’m talking about: A super clean Aprilia RS250, unmolested and with a street title. And while we have seen a lot of hot-rodded, modified or converted Cup bikes, this Mk2 version of the venerable v-twin two stroke is stock and original. Let’s check it out.

The RS250 – as is well known, is based on Suzuki’s successful RGV250 architecture (also known as the VJ22). And while Suzuki supplied the parts, the preparation and tuning is all Aprilia: from the intake and airbox through to the expansion chambers and silencers and the ECU in between. The chassis is an in-house unit design, a twin spar aluminum frame with gorgeous welds and substantial bracing. The swingarm follows the haute couture trend of an asymetrical, curved section on the right hand side in order to allow the pipes to tuck more neatly and provide additional ground clearance. Call it a gull arm, call it a banana arm – the goal is the same. In the case of the Aprilia, the arm is polished and more gorgeous welds are prevalent. Forks are courtesy of Showa, with the rear shock unit provided by Sachs. Both are adjustable.

From the seller:
What can I say about this RS250? It has 3,883 miles ((6,248 kilometers). It is in mint mint mint condition without a scratch, ding or dent. No flaws! Never been crashed, or tipped over. All original and all fairings and components are 100% genuine Aprilia OEM factory. This bike is as new as they come. One owner bike. I’d like to see $12,500 for this beauty. . Will come with all new fluids. Runs like the day it was new. 17 digit vin number.

The RS250 is pattered after the 250cc road racers that made Aprilia famous. One look at that draft-busting streamlined tail gives you the impression that this apple doesn’t fall far from the same tree that sired Valentino Rossi or Loris Capirossi’s rise to fame. But this example is a street bike, can be licensed in all states that allow this ridiculous level of fun (hint: not California unfortunately), and provides you with both the means of transportation as well as transporting you to a higher plane of riding where you can let your inner Max Biaggi loose. Keep the canyons tight and the revs up, and your riding buddies will all but disappear.

This bike is being offered at $12,500. Check out all of the high res pictures, as they tell a terrific story. Gary has sold numerous bikes through RSBFS over the years, and the feedback has been overwhelmingly positive. So you have a fantastic model that is rare in the US, sitting in all original condition (with fewer than 4,000 miles!), and a known seller. If you are in the market, this one should tick all of the boxes on your wish list. So drop Gary a line, and then brag to all of your friends about your new bike – as soon as they catch up to you, that is. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1998 Aprilia RS250 MK2
Aprilia May 7, 2019 posted by

Lots to know: 2007 Aprilia Tuono 1000 R

While we all love to drool over (and collect) some of the most iconic motorcycles in history, the truth is that many of our beloved dream bikes are simply not suitable to ride every day. Some of the more lust-worthy models are simply too rare to ride regularly without access to spares. Some are far too fragile and not meant for commuter work. Others are torture racks in the extreme, best to be ridden short distances on a sunny weekend. So what is an enthusiast to do? Simple: Seek out a reasonably rare and exotic commuter that won’t kill your back or send your chiropractor’s daughter through med school, yet is still capable of kicking some tail in the twisties. Make it powerful without being obscene, comfortable without being a loafy couch, and above all make sure it stands out and doesn’t scream “commuter bike!” This is what the Tuono is all about.

2007 Aprilia Tuono 1000 R for sale on eBay

Like the Monster from Brand D, the Tuono is essentially a naked variant of an already successful sport bike. In this case, the Aprilia RSV 1000R. Utilizing a one liter, 60 degree v-twin, the RSV motor is good for nearly 140 ponies in stock form. But in the case of Aprilia, the R spec in the name is actually the base model (the Factory model is the top spec offering). You get the same RSV power plant the same twin-spar chassis (although in aluminum color, not gold), and Showa forks and Sachs rear shock (as opposed to Ohlins). But with 140 HP on tap and Brembo Gold Line parachute assist, there is no doubting the capability of this standard cruiser. The partly-polished frame rails are offset by limited bodywork (not quite naked, not quite faired) and purple/blue wheels. Wide bars provide ample leverage and a more upright riding position than the RSV’s lower clip ons. This bike stands out from the Japanese and German crowd, all while making booming noises in a song all its own.

From the seller:
Here is a bike that really has no rivals. Whatever competition the Tuono has taken part in, it has emerged the uncontested winner and most impressive protagonist. Unrivaled on the naked racing scene, the Tuono has even taken on the fastest superbikes on their home ground – the racetrack – and won.

On the road the Tuono is in a class of its own. On the racetrack it is a proven winner. Hungry for success, the Tuono has been an exceptional flag-bearer for Aprilia’s motorcycle design philosophy even outside its native Italy, and has demonstrated its prowess in epic races like the Isle of Mann TT and the Macao GP. Now the Tuono 1000 R Factory has picked up where the victorious Tuono Racing left off, with even better technical characteristics and performance.

With the arrival of the new Factory version, the fastest naked on the track and the meanest on the road clearly demonstrates its racing spirit. The Tuono 1000 R Factory delivers power that is simply unthinkable for any other twin, with a chassis that is more sophisticated than ever and easily on a par with the best superbikes. The new Tuono 1000 R Factory is a truly professional machine for all those riders who demand the state of the art in technology and the absolute maximum in performance. Expert riders with a taste for the exceptional will know how to appreciate the record-beating performance of this stupendous street-fighter

A new engine, new suspension, ultra-light wheels and a host of carbon fibre components have boosted performance and reduced weight to a new record for this type of bike. As with the RSV 1000 R Factory, from which it has been derived, the Tuono 1000 R Factory is designed and built for “total ridability”, a concept that has always characterized high performance Aprilia motorcycles.

The seller has done a good job copying Aprilia marketing info (and specs), but really doesn’t tell us too much about this particular bike. The word “Factory” is listed as part of the sub heading in the ad, but this does not appear to be a Factory model. That is not a bad thing, as the standard Tuono R is supremely capable on its own. Combine the R spec with a claimed 30,000 miles (when was the last time you saw those kinds of digits on an exotic that wasn’t a Guzzi?) and you have a veritable bargain commuter rocket in the making. Opening ask for this relatively clean machine is a scant $2,500, with a reserve in place. Minor mods include what appears to be a rear fender delete, but not much else that isn’t reversible. No mention of service history, so time to do some homework if interested. This could be a budget exotic to launch your summer riding season if played well. Check it out here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Lots to know: 2007 Aprilia Tuono 1000 R
Ducati April 25, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1992 Ducati 851 Strada

Update 4.27.2019: Sold in just two days to an RSBFS reader. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

The Ducati 851 is the father of modern Ducatis, from the world-changing 916 to the astonishing Panigale V4R. Without this boxy, lithe very red machine, those bikes would not be. The 851 arrived in 1987, with a very hopped up version of Ducati’s venerated Pantah engine. The air-cooled 90-degree, two-valve twin in the Pantah was updated with liquid cooling, four-valve heads and fuel injection for the 851, and Ducati shot back to the top of racing leaderboards.

Spitting out 93 horsepower and gobs of torque in a 430-pound chassis, the 851 was a statement that Ducati could use its agricultural engine tech to devastating effect. In 1990, the bike took home the World Superbike title, among a raft of other accolades over its five-year run.

This 1992 Ducati 851 Strada is from the last year before the 888 broke cover, and it has been kept largely unridden in a climate-controlled storage facility. Though it hasn’t crossed 3,000 miles since it was purchased as a leftover in 1995, all the major services have been done on a strict interval. Aside from the Fast by Feracci carbon cans, it is a stock machine.

From the seller:

This is a rare find, super low miles, Ducati 851 Superbike. This bike was purchased used from Bellevue Suzuki Ducati in 1995, at the time it was under 1000 miles on the clock. It has not seen much more use by its current owner as it was purchased to round out the collection of Ducati Superbikes, the 851/888/916. All three bikes have remained in owners collection until recently when he let the 888 go up for sale. Now we have been asked to find proper homes for the 851 and 916 still in his possession. Both the 851 and 916 have been kept serviced and stored in a heated shop/garage space. Run from time to time, oil changed and belts replaced at regular intervals. Other than the ever popular Fast by Ferracci carbon exhaust and a tank protector this beauty is all original. Ducati 851’s rarely come up for sale as it is, let alone one as clean as this one. Hurry, it will not last long. We have it scheduled for complete safety inspection and a 2-year service which will include oil, filter, hydraulics, coolant along with new timing belts. The owner has kindly provided some service records as well. It does have a clear WA title, all original keys and manuals included.

Here is some of the early press about these;

Ducati came of age in the late 80s, using ideas that the Far East thought as antiquated and as such not worth pursuing, the Italians enjoyed staggering race successes, and with it many sales to the public, motorcycling hasn’t been quite the same since. Chris Pearson samples the bike at the beginning of it all

Based upon the 1978 Pantah bottom end, the design was the first real modern day Ducati Superbike and successfully bridged the gap until the arrival of the 916 some seven years later. The first sight of the all-new Ducati road bike was caught at the Milan show in the autumn of 1987 although the prototype race bikes had provided more than their fair share of clues and insights into what was waiting just around the corner. Developed as a direct descendant of the Daytona winning twin from 1987, the production version of the 851 differed little from that prototype race machine. Ducati’s intentions for the new model were clear from the outset being offered in both Strada (road going) and Kit (race track) specification, for those wishing to put their 851’s directly on to the track. 200 examples of the latter were hurriedly assembled to satisfy the homologation required for the inaugural 1988 World Superbike championship, a roadster based race series that Ducati were more than keen to be a part of.

The basis of the 1987 spec Ducati 851 lived on until the end of 1993, gradually growing in capacity up to the 888cc model of 1992, proving so dominant on the rack that the planned update, the iconic 916 series, was held over for more than a year finally making its debut towards the end of 93 ready for its full onslaught in 1994.

Credits cards accepted, up to $150.00 documentation charge may be added.

You’d be hard pressed to find another 1992 Ducati 851 in this kind of shape anywhere for any price. At $9,200, we have a low-mileage perfectly-preserved example of the superbike that put Ducati back in the conversation.

Featured Listing: 1992 Ducati 851 Strada
Ducati April 25, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1995 Ducati 916

Update 4.27.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Some of the most collectible bikes at the moment have only recently come into their own. You see there is a direct link to a bike’s age and how hot it might be for collectors. Only the rarest of the rare bikes appreciate in value on the showroom floor; elements such as original public reaction, total number of units produced, in-country availability when originally released, current condition, age and mileage all complicate the formula. Nostalgia is a pretty reliable condition, and if all other criteria are met then you can bet somewhere between 20 and 25 years on a motorcycle that was hot when introduced and still in good condition will pique the interest of fans and collectors again. Such is the case with the Ducati 916 – a bombshell of a motorcycle if there ever was one. As potent and fast as it was beautiful and unapologetic, the 916 was more of an assault than a revolution. Accolades from the press followed – as did the WSBK trophies.

Featured Listing: 1995 Ducati 916

Introduced in 1994, the bikes imported into the US were officially 1995 model year units. And if launching a groundbreaking new model is not stressful enough for a small company, imagine if your Bologna-based manufacturing line caught fire and burned to the ground just as you were getting up and running. That is exactly what happened to Ducati – right as demand for their gorgeous new powerhouse was at its peak. Ducati was forced to set up a new temporary production line for the 916, basing it on the grounds of MV Agusta’s plant in Varese, Italy. Bikes from this production line – while technically identical to those of later production back at home in the Bologna factory – are interesting and rare artifacts and known as “Varese” bikes. How can you tell? The year is the first clue. The second is in the VIN number. If you look at the VIN, the character 11th from left (or 7th from right) is the manufacturing plant code. Most Ducatis have a “B” in this space, for Bologna. The early models built in the MV Agusta factory have a “V” for Varese.

From the seller:
1995 Ducati 916
VIN Number: ZDM1SB8S2SV000849

This iconic Ducati 916 was purchased new in October 1994 from the Brother’s Powersports in Bremerton, WA and has only had one owner. The 916 in original condition, paint is in fantastic condition, no fading, no corrosion or oxidation to be found anywhere. Some popular upgrades include Fast By Ferracci carbon exhaust with upgraded fuel chip, Cycle Cat adjustable rear sets and handlebars The original clip on’s and foot pegs were provided. This 916 is in excellent cosmetic condition it has absolutely shows no signs of ever been dropped or tipped over. It has been loved since it came out if it’s crate Always stored in temperature controlled garage when not in use and often serviced with new fluids and belts for good measure and joy of ownership. We have it scheduled for complete safety inspection and a 2-year service which will include oil, filter, hydraulics, coolant along with new timing belts. The owner has kindly provided some service records as well. It does have a clear WA title, all original keys and manuals included.

Only 2,266 original miles!

Price: $17,999.00
Contact: dave@seattleusedbikes.com

It is estimated that approximately 2,663 Ducati 916s were assembled at the Varese factory, before full-scale production was renewed in Bologna. And while there is no technical difference in Varese bikes, there is a lot of anecdotal evidence that these bikes received greater attention in that they were assembled more by hand as the production line in Varese was temporary. Regardless, Varese bikes are the most rare of the base model 916, and provides a further interesting story into this exotic and hyper twin.

This particular 916 Varese is a one owner machine, having traveled fewer than 2,300 miles in its 24 years of existence. It is being offered by well-known friend of RSBFS, Dave of Seattle’s Used Bikes. This example is not totally stock, yet many of the stock bits come with the sale, allowing collectors to return it back to original glory if desired. The Fast by Ferracci pipes are nearly a requisite change over stock, and with a fuel chip, rear sets and handlebar upgrade, this is a bike that is made for riding. The bike has been serviced throughout its life, and the seller is offering up a 2-year service to ensure that this bike is up to snuff for whatever lies ahead; be it straightaway, decreasing radius left hander, or just a parking place on a pedestal somewhere indoors with an audience. Check out the pics, and then drop Dave a line. This is one good looking and authentic bike – and early 916s are riding the wave of interest and appreciation. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1995 Ducati 916
Kawasaki April 18, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1990 Kawasaki Ninja 750R

This Featured Listing is for our friends at Iconic Motorbikes. Thanks as always for supporting the site guys! -dc

This is not the bright-green, dual headlight monster most people call to mind when you say, “750cc Kawasaki Ninja.” Instead of the truly featherweight lairiness of the Kawasaki ZX-7R, the 1990 Kawasaki Ninja 750R delivers a still-potent punch with much better manners than its race replica stablemate.

The Ninja 750R originally was designed to compete with the likes of the Honda Interceptor and the Suzuki GSX-R 750, but from the get-go it had higher bars and a slightly less spine-eroding seating position. It was fast enough to keep yourself entertained, but cushy enough to go two-up. It also bears the distinction of being the last fully-faired Japanese sportbike to rock a steel frame.

This one, offered by our friends and site sponsor Iconic Motorbikes, is in close to immaculate condition, with just north of 9,000 miles on it. It has apparently been sitting for some time, but was put away and stored properly, so new tires and perhaps a new chain should be all it needs to fall right back into duty as a big mileage puller. The red-black-silver livery is much less noisy than the racebike’s, and is a nice nod to the GPz 900 that graced Top Gun.

From the seller:

1990 Kawasaki Ninja 750R – Excellent Condition – Only 9032 Miles
Here we have one of the cleanest Ninja 750R’s we’re yet to come across.

This 1990 750R is a solid 9.5 out of 10 and 100% stock! Harder and harder to find in this condition and even more difficult to find unmolested!

Perfect for a collector or a rider however if you’re planning to ride, plan on tires and some recommissioning costs as she’s been sitting for quite some time. Thankfully the bike was put away dry and stored properly so costs will not be excessive and we’d be happy to help!

At $6,050, the bike is priced according to its condition and scarcity when compared to the faster ZX-7R. For that, you’re getting a great, classic sport tourer with tons of years left.

Featured Listing: 1990 Kawasaki Ninja 750R
Yamaha April 9, 2019 posted by

Small Bites: 1990 Yamaha FZR 400

Always a gem in original guise, the Yamaha FZR400 stands alone as the smaller-than-middleweight that was officially imported into the United States. Unlike the current crop of small-bore US bikes, these 400cc scoots were often reserved for European countries only; power-hungry America was not seen as a viable market by most manufacturers. This was partially borne out by the FZR400 – it was drastically out-sold by the FZR600 and FZR1000 here in the US. Because of that, the FZR400 is relatively rare. But more than just rare, the FZR400 is a fantastic performer…provided you bring reasonable expectations to the table. Today’s example is a 1990 model and looks great.

1990 Yamaha FZR 400 for sale on eBay

When compared to some of the other 400cc set (especially the Honda NC24/27/30 series), the FZR400 is often seen as less technologically advanced. The engine is somewhat conventional and resembles a slimmed down 600cc mill: a liquid cooled, inline four cylinder with four valves per cylinder and a brace of four CV carbs. But with a made-to-fit aluminum frame and (in the case of the later generation ’90 model) a larger aluminum box-section swing arm and larger brakes, the FZR400 is a made to order canyon carver right from the showroom floor.

From the seller:
1990 Yamaha FZR-400 ~ 100% original and unmolested, with only 5022 miles. This is straight out of Mr. Kitty’s personal collection. NEVER raced or modified. Only year in this color combination and Deltabox swingarm. New Pirellis front and rear, just did a head-to-toe service! Carbs, NGK plugs, air filter, anti-freeze flush, brake system flush, and oil change using Bel-Ray semi-synthetic. No rattle can or touch-up paint has ever touched this bike! This little Fizzer is not only rare but ready to ride! Clean Clear NY title ~ $6000

Shipping at buyers expense, NYS residents pay sales tax.

It looks like we have seen this bike before. Back in 2017 Aaron wrote this post on what looks to be this exact bike. It had about 10 fewer miles back then, and finds its way back on the open market with the same pictures. The seller’s eBay account has changed, so it is possible that the bike changed hands somewhere along the way. Either way, the bike looks fantastic in the pictures, and with the rare blue/black livery should really stand out in person. With a recent service and new tires, this is a low mileage Fizzer that is ready to shred. We KNOW that RSBFS readers love these machines – they are sweet handling, unique and tremendous fun! There appears to be some slight marks on the pipe, but nothing that looks like rash. Check it out here, and then jump back to the comment and share your thoughts on the “more common” of the 400cc sub-middleweights. Good Luck!!

MI

Small Bites:  1990 Yamaha FZR 400