Posts by tag: Liquid Cooled

Ducati April 4, 2019 posted by

Godfather: 1998 Ducati 916

In 1994 Ducati unleashed the equivalent of a nuclear weapon in the face of a sport bike field full of conventional weaponry. That year Ducati introduced the legendary 916 – and commenced an enviable run of WSBK world titles (four within a five-year span). Simultaneously offering a quantum leap in twin-cylinder performance (horsepower, rev limits, packaging), the 916 was also stunningly beautiful. Even today the lines on a 916 are distinctive and striking. From the twin narrow headlights, to the high mounted exhaust cans, to the single sided swing arm with endurance-styled quick-change rear wheel, to the straight-sectioned chrome-moly chassis, nearly everything on the 916 forced us to rethink what we knew about how motorcycles were designed and how they performed.

1998 Ducati 916 for sale on eBay

The original 916 spanned from 1994 through 1998 – eventually making way for the 996, and ultimately the 998. But even in the first generation of this model, Ducati spared little expense on components. The 916 was a fair sight more expensive than contemporary Japanese machines, making it more exclusive. But far from a glittering farkle with no real purpose, the glory of the 916 was that it worked. It worked for all of the moto magazine editors and testers. It worked at the racetrack. And thanks to its good looks, it worked on the showroom as well. Ducati created a massive following with the 916 as designer Massimo Tamburini played off speed and style like his own personal yin and yang. To say it was a winner is stating the obvious… after it already happened.

From the seller:
I have a nice 1998 ducati 916 that has been part of my collection for about 4 years
bike is nice and near mint shape has about 7732 miles .bike always starts and rides nice
valves have been adjusted in this machine. comes with a clear title. bike does have some add ons as you see in the pics
vin#zdm1sb8s6wb013367
asking 8500

Today the 916 is not quite the performance explosion it was 25 years ago; time, after all, will catch up with all of us. But there is no denying that it stands strong and proud despite the time that has passed. There is no embarrassment when showing up on a 916 – whether it is a local bike nite event, a weekend canyon ride, or even a track day with your buddies. The 916 looks great, pulls strong and handles well. You just need to remember that this WAS cutting edge during its time – but technology inexorably creeps forward. Take the brakes, for example. The 916 shipped with top-shelf Brembo calipers clamping down on huge disks. But modern riders won’t confuse them for monoblock calipers and radial master cylinders. Nor will the 114 horsepower astound a modern liter bike rider. Again, it was more than adequate in the day, but by today’s numbers is not truly remarkable. But even today few motorcycles have represented the total package of looks, performance and commercial success.

Today’s example is a clean 1998 model (last year of the original 916 run). It has but 7,700 miles on the clock, which equates to fewer than 400 miles a year. There are a few add ons that I can see – the Termis and ubiquitous open clutch cover are but two – but nothing appears to have been hacked or unconditionally changed. I could do without the stickers, but those can be non-destructively removed. The seller even refers to a recent maintenance (a four-valve desmo adjustment is not an insignificant task when replacing shims), although there is no mention of when the belts were last changed. Still, this is a good looking specimen of a fantastic motorcycle. The 916 is a collectible motorcycle, and prices are on the rise. The earliest, cleanest and rarest examples of the 916 have risen most quickly, but even the base model is growing in value. This one has an opening ask of $7,999, with reserve in place. The ad text states an $8,500 asking price, so it looks like the reserve might be set close to the opening ask. Check it out here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Godfather: 1998 Ducati 916
Honda April 2, 2019 posted by

Tropical Depression: 1988 Honda CBR250R

Deep in the vaults of exotic hardware purposely kept from the shores of America include examples such as this magnificent 1988 Honda CBR250R. There were extremely rare in the US during the late 1980s and 1990s – which is amusing since the venerable 250 Ninja was imported during the same period of time. But the CBR250R was the far sharper of the two, and was destined for the small-cube crazy home market of Japan where quarter liter racers dominate. The US had to make due with a relatively tame parallel twin that practically shrieked “entry-level-economy.” But in the collector market today, the CBR250R has become easier to find, as evidenced by the number listed on these pages over the years. Still, they should be considered to be quite rare and finding one in good condition is the same thrill as with any other unique bike.

1988 Honda CBR250R for sale on eBay

The CBR250R does some shrieking of its own, but that is largely due to the sheer number of revs this bike requires in order to produce forward movement. A liquid cooled inline four cylinder with four valves per pot and a 11.5:1 compression ratio, the CBR250R relies on a 18,000(!) redline to achieve a respectable 40 – 45 horsepower. With full sport bodywork, twin headlamps and a single, beefy front disk (certainly enough to stop this 330 pounds dry machine), the CBR250R was marketed as part of the Hurricane lineup in some European markets. Given that the Hurricane model range scaled up to the mighty 1000F, you might think of this as more of a squall.

From the seller:
This very rare MC19 CBR250R is the 963rd bike produced for the 1988 production run. It was purchased about a year ago with 318km on the speedometer (about 190 original miles). It was imported by a dealer in UT and purchased in running condition. It still had the original 1987 date code tires on it, which were badly cracked, so a new set of Avon tires were installed. The carburetors were removed, re-jetted and installed on new OEM intake manifolds. The rear sprocket was changed from 54 to 52 and finally to 50 teeth, in order to reduce highway cruising rpms by about 1,000.

These bikes weigh 350lbs wet and are rated at 45 horsepower at 14,500rpms. The redline is at 18k rpms and the engine will run up to redline quite willingly. With stock gearing the bikes were rated at 110 mph top speeds.

This bike sat in Japan for 30 years, perhaps at a dealership or in a personal collection. It has a fair amount of patina on alloy parts and in little nooks and crannies in the engine bay area. If you love to polish aluminum, you can make this bike really shine again. The frame is aluminum.

These bikes were never imported/sold in the US and only after they are 25 years old can they be brought into the country and legally registered in CA and elsewhere. Yes, the bike IS registered with its 11 digit serial number!

I do have PDF files of the service manual in English and there are a few spare parts, including the rear sprockets. The oil filter is a common Honda part. The thermostat was replaced with a 180 degree unit, which keeps the little engine cooler than when they have the stock 190 degree unit installed.

A new choke cable was installed. These bikes have electric fuel pumps and inline filters.

A few paint scratches are evident here and there. The original OEM factory windscreen is checked but not cracked. One of the forward fairing tabs is broken, but held in place with the original modified nut-plate.

Riding these bikes is an unreal experience, especially when you rev it up past 14k rpms. You can easily imagine yourself as being Mike Hailwood at the IOM races, with the little four screaming out unimaginable rpms through the gears.

Due to recent ankle surgery, I am no longer able to ride the bike as before, so sadly must let it go to an appreciative new owner. Current miles are about 2,995 km, which is about 1,800 miles. This is one of my favorite bikes of all times… and I have owned hundreds of Hondas of all types and sizes. I will miss it dearly and will enjoy the memories that it gave me over the past year.

This particular CBR250R has an interesting history and shows how rare these bikes are… and how small our collecting community really is. This bike was sold on the pages of RSBFS a few years back, as highlighted in this post by Tad. And while the VIN number remains the same, the mileage has grown from 192 up to 1,800. What has not grown is the price – the Buy It Now figure is right at the $6k mark, just like the earlier sale. I’ve grabbed one of the photos from that post (above), as the current seller has not included very many. There are a few more sharp, high-res photos available via the older post – although please note they do not necessarily represent the bike as it sits today. Check out the current advert here, and then imagine what 18,000 RPM sounds like as you strafe the apexes of your favorite canyon. Good Luck!!

MI

Tropical Depression: 1988 Honda CBR250R
Honda March 25, 2019 posted by

Late-century modern: 1999 Honda CBR 900RR

This is what a sportbike should still look like, if you ask me. Loud, high-contrast, aggressive graphics wrapped around a stubby, purposeful chassis carrying more engine than makes sense. There are, of course, a ton of newer bikes that hit the right aesthetic notes, but none have the same Air Jordan vibe of the mid-late ’90s bikes. This 1999 Honda CBR900RR hits all those perfect notes, and is in excellent condition so the madness can be fully appreciated.

1999 Honda CBR900RR for sale on eBay

It has clearly been garaged and well cared for, and the seller says he recently checked the valves and made sure the carbs are clean. It has also apparently been lowered. It’s not a flawless bike after 20 years and 14,000 miles, but it’s an excellent rider that stands above most other CBR900RRs you’ll run across.

From the eBay listing:

This bike is probably the cleanest CBR900 you will see in awhile ,it is all stock except Yoshimura bolt on and braided steel brake lines…it has been lowered about an inch or two…it has a threaded adjuster bikes has a spot or two on fairings…small blemish….all who see it say its like new. Runs perfect as it should, valves were checked by me as were carburetors…I have over 30 years exp….has Yoshimura bolt on exhaust, braided steel brake lines ….any questions call 407-791-3584

By the time this bike was built, the model’s star had faded somewhat, as the Yamaha R1 had bowed the year before and managed to scare the pants off anyone with the brass to go near its limit. When the Honda CBR900RR debuted in 1992, it had landed with a similar seismic impact. It had the stature of a 600 but an engine that very closely approached the power of its rivals’ 1,000cc offerings. With less weight to pull around and snappy handling thanks in part to a 16-inch front wheel, the 900 made everything else seem a little flabby and out of touch.

The later CBR900s had a very slightly punched out engine, a stiffened chassis and bigger brakes than the original. An angular single headlight had replaced the original’s iconic round-eyed visage.

If you’re looking for a really nice now-classic sportbike to liven up your weekends, this thing looks like the ticket. Since it’s a later model, it might not approach the collectibilty of the originals, but it’ll stand out anywhere you take it.

Honda March 2, 2019 posted by

A Nordic Natural: 1988 Honda VFR750R RC30

The multiple motorcycle auctions in Las Vegas in January each year are somewhat of a bellwether for prices overall. Sure, pricing is a bit over-inflated due to peer-pressure, bidding competition and the general excitement of the auction atmosphere, but what sells high at these auctions will generally do well on the open market. If you’ve never been, you should definitely consider going – at least once. The lights, the noise, and the thousands of bikes that cross the block over multiple days and multiple auction houses are a sight to behold. It also gives you an appreciation for what is hot, and what has cooled off (or failed to make the cut). But you didn’t need to attend – or even follow – this year’s auctions to know that the RC30 is hot. Possibly the most collectible of the 80s vintage homologation racers, the VFR750R tops the bucket list of many, and remains on a rocket ship trajectory in terms of value. If you want one you will have to stand in line, and bring your wallet.

1988 Honda VFR750 RC30 for sale on eBay

The RC30 is known for good looks, sharp handling, and glorious sound. The latter comes courtesy of a mass-centralized V4 engine, utilizing gear-driven cams for precise valve control – which contributes to that legendary and iconic whine. The flatter sound of the RC30 exhaust is the result of a 360°crankshaft. The approach results in greater traction due to the more widely distributed power cycles (when compared with a conventional 180° crank). Everything that makes beautiful noises also helps with the sharper handling; pull the bodywork off of an RC30 and you quickly realize how packed in tight everything is. Mass centralization is the real deal, and the more you can concentrate weight centrally and down low, the easier the bike will be to flick from side to side, etc. And while those who are lucky enough to see an RC30 in its naked form will call that magical V4 beautiful, the good looks really come from the beefy aluminum twin spar frame and endurance racing inspired bodywork. The twin headlamps are straight out of the 80s, and they went straight into the book of classic looks. The single sided swing arm completes the package, and proved its worth during wheel changes at the racetrack – especially during those endurance events.

From the seller:
Selling my rc30 vfr750r, very low mileage (3553km) and extremely well take care of. 100% working order. Been standing in the living room as eye candy since bought in 2002.
Got first bought in Germany by the original owner,then driven to Monaco and back, after that parked in his office. I then later purchased it. (2002)

The bike is located in Norway (Sarpsborg).
Contact me for more info/pictures.
Price is 500,000 nok (Norwegian Kroner)
We can help with shipping.

Most RC30 we find these days are collector bikes. It is pretty rare indeed to find a RC30 thrasher, and few are regular riders. This particular bike has but 3,500 KM (2,200 miles) and appears to be in complete, original order. Which brings us to problem #1: as RC30 enthusiasts are not limited to North America, this wonderful example is located in Norway. US-based buyers might want to start consulting shipping and importation guides now. Problem #2: RC30s are no longer $15k, $20K, $25K or even $30k. The asking price on these models continues to rise. This particular example is asking well neigh on $60k. And the worst part for those that have a hankerin’ for homologation is that the asking price is not really out of line with where the market is going. We have seen higher asks – much higher – and not just at auction. Check it out here. Look over the pictures. And then decide if you want to board the RC30 price elevator. We have seen nothing but up for these models with nary a dip in valuation over the years. If you want in, you best commit before these are $75k and then $100k bikes. Good Luck!!

MI

A Nordic Natural: 1988 Honda VFR750R RC30
Suzuki February 6, 2019 posted by

Partly Lucky: 1992 Suzuki RGV 250

Pity the US-based two-stroke fan. Few models were ever officially imported into the US, and those that did hit our shores only lasted for a couple of years. And while we should be happy we ever got them at all, vitally missing were the hard-edged smokers and the big bore machines. Casting eyes northward, we could watch our Canadian neighbors ring-a-ding-ding and pop and smoke with glee – but this was all from the tree of carnal knowledge for stateside riders. Until bikes started to get old enough to import, that is. And even with used-bike age laws, there are still large areas of the country where these machines are verbotten (you Californians, otherwise too cool, got staunched on this one). As the laws of supply and demand go, where there is no supply there is capacity for high demand, which leads us to today’s 1992 Suzuki RGV250.

1992 Suzuki RGV 250 for sale on eBay

Suzuki smokers started life out at parallel twins, but it was soon realized that the vee configuration offered several benefits. Perfect primary balance, for starters. A smaller, narrower profile aided in aerodynamics. And finally, the configuration lent itself to moving weight around in the chassis as Suzuki sought to achieve the perfect weight distribution. So effective was the RGV that Aprilia first bought engines from Suzuki, then built their own clones under license, and then finally engineered their own modification to the platform. For Suzuki models, figure about 55-60 wild horses – once the tach swings up towards 11,000. That is for an exported model, such as this Canadian steed. Home market bikes are restricted and have less. With a dry weight in the 280 pound range, there is plenty of motive power to make this fun.

From the seller:
Absolutely superb VJ 22A in really nice condition. Well maintained and well taken care of, wheels and asymmetrical swing-arm recently powder coated, forks not rusted no pitting, all consumables ready to go (brakes, chain, sprockets and tires). The carburation has been cleaned out, jets changed in 2018. The bike is located in Quebec city Canada and comes with a Quebec ownership (equivalent of a title). The bike comes with a box of spare parts (lower engine case, clutch lever, some handlebar controls). All in all an excellent machine very well preserved. I am more than willing to either take care of the export process/shipping or help out with it. I can even drive across the border and meet on the US side. For the US buyer, I provide all necessary documentation to ensure smooth transition past the border but whatever pertains to your county DMV is the buyer’s responsibility.

The well-sorted twin is encased in a chassis complete with GP-racing amenities: twin-spar lightweight aluminum frame rails, nifty asymmetrical banana swing arm, stacked exhaust pipes, and trick (for the time) upside down forks. This was meant to be a racer for the streets, and with the proper livery one could imagine playing Kevin Schwantz at every roundabout. Which leads us to the primary issue with this particular offering: It has quasi-Lucky Strike colors, but is missing some key graphics. This leads to questions regarding whether it is a true LS, or simply a bodywork swap. Perhaps it is a legit LS but was rebuilt as the result of crash damage (the box of spare parts that comes with the sale could indicate same). The 22,000 km (sub 14,000 miles) on the all metric clocks is not that concerning, but as always, interested buyers are cautioned to do their homework.

This particular RGV is located in Quebec City, which means that US buyers will need to perform some paperwork in order to legally bring it in. Fortunately this seller appears to be familiar with this process, and has offered both shipping options as well as trailering the bike into the US. As always, registering the bike in your home state is the responsibility of the buyer. When it comes to the DMV, Californians need not apply (unless you know a guy). But for many US buyers, this is a legitimate way to own a quarter liter two stroke built during the height of two stroke tech. Check out the auction here. Bidding is only up to $2,850 with reserve still in place, but depending on where that is set this could be a relative bargain to get yourself into the game. Some restoration work will be in order to complete the Lucky Strike graphics, but if the mechanicals are in decent shape you could hoon this to the moon. Good (partial) Luck!!

MI

Partly Lucky: 1992 Suzuki RGV 250
Suzuki February 2, 2019 posted by

Wolf of Wall Street: 1986 Suzuki RG500 Walter Wolf

Before we start and this gets out of hand, you *might* remember when you could buy one of these for $12. Or $1500. Or maybe even $10k. Those days are gone. The fact is this sub 10,000 mile RG500 Walter Wolf edition Gamma is on eBay for just a tad shy of $33,000. And while the market will vote with the wallet, it doesn’t really matter if this bike sells. You see, the market has already spoken in the form of the motorcycle auctions held in Las Vegas in late January. There, record prices were realized for all sorts of stuff that you might remember selling for a lot cheaper. The market is up, and the stuff we like to collect is rising on that tide. Thus, we are looking at a very expensive 1986 Gamma in rare clothing.

1986 Suzuki RG500 Walter Wolf for sale on eBay

Beneath the purple, red and gold paint and beyond the white faced gauges, a Walter Wolf Gamma is really just a Gamma. That is to say, it is a marvelous twin-crank, square four two stroke that rips like it came straight off the racetrack. This was the unobtanium treat that US buyers were categorically denied. Enterprising enthusiasts soon learned to import the RG as a used bike – often from just over our northern border – and hooligan behavior ensued. Along with blue smoke and the sound that only a two stroke on the pipe can make.

From the seller:
Rare Suzuki RG500 Walter Wolf Limited Edition!

If not familiar with the Walter Wolf, the bikes were never sold in the US. Approximately 100 were sold in Canada. This example here was imported from Alberta BC. This bike sits in my collection and is in excellent condition, with only 15665 km (9734 miles). The bike is free of common stress cracks around the various panel mounting points. Tires have good tread although I would recommend replacing if plans are to ride the bike.

The instrument housing foam shows some deformation, however a new replacement will be included along with a service manual. This bike is an excellent clean example of a Walter Wolf to ride or put in a collection! If not familiar with the value of Walter Wolf’s, included in the pictures is a recent sale. This bike showed 33400km.

Walter Wolf was a Canadian business man and something of a motor sport legend. Originally from Austria but self made in Canada as an oil man, Wolf poured his money into racing – investing in Frank William’s Formula 1 team and running his own Wolf Racing F1 operation. He had the money and the drive, and sponsored both automobile as well as motorcycle racing. Today, the Wolf brand is celebrated by a couple of different branded products – such as this wonderful Walter Wolf RG500, a tribute of Wolf colors and logos. The Walter Wolf Edition RG500 (there was also a 400 and 250 model) was released to the home market (in power restricted format) as well as Canada (estimated 100 units) and Western Europe. There are slight differences between each of the market-specific models largely due to local regulations (i.e. headlights, turn signals, etc). Japanese market bikes utilize a specific WW gauge package, while Canadian bikes make due with stock RG units. Logo placement is also slightly different between the markets.

Real and authentic WW models are few and far between. We have seen WW replicas on these pages before, so buyers do your homework, research and analysis up front. With only a graphics package separating a rare Wolf from a regular RG, it is not that difficult to build a replica. Today’s WW RG500 looks pretty clean, has enough miles to be a rider without so many as to be clapped out. Check it out here, although the pictures are (unfortunately) low res. I’m sure there will be many comments about how absurd the price is, but the seller counters with a photo directly from the Mecum auctions. Haters will hate, but the Las Vegas auction is the bellwether for collector pricing – and as of today, prices are running high. Hard to tell if there is enough here to ignite the kind of bidding war that drive top auction prices, but for now there is a very rare and cool Walter Wolf edition RG500 Gamma waiting for you on eBay. And you didn’t even have to go to Vegas. Good Luck!!

MI

Wolf of Wall Street: 1986 Suzuki RG500 Walter Wolf
Honda January 27, 2019 posted by

Legend: 1994 Honda NSR 250R SP MC28 Rothmans

A perennial mainstay on the pages of RSBFS, the Honda NSR250R should require no major introduction. Often considered the darling of the quarter liter smoking set, the 90 degree vee twin is named similarly to – and looks quite a bit like – Honda’s race-only NSR250. However the similarities are only imagined, as the two bikes share no parts in common. That being said, the NSR250R road going machine is a typically Honda-engineering wonder, sought after by riders and collectors, and a blast to ride. Today’s example, a 1994 MC28 model wearing original Rothmans livery, is a prime specimen.

1994 Honda NSR 250R SP MC28 Rothmans for sale on eBay

The original NSR was released as the MC16 back in 1987. Over the next (nearly) ten years, the model evolved in form and function. From a variety of swing arms and different suspensions to various states of tune, dry clutches and the PGM-I through PGM-IV ignition systems, the NSR changed with the times and what Honda believed the needs of the riding community to be. Not all changes were popular, although offering the bike in a variety of race-worthy livery was always a favorite. The Rothmans colors, emulating the tobacco-sponsored racers, remains among the most striking of the options. Often copied by way of knock-off body panels or re-spraying existing plastic, it is not easy to come by an original bike in these colors in this condition. Here is more from the seller:

From the seller:
1994 Honda NSR 250R SP MC28 Rothmans !
Original stock 1994 MC 28 SP U.S.title, plate, reg. very low original Km’s.

This is a original un-molested all stock 1994 Honda NSR250R MC28 SP. This is an *original* low Km Rothmans SP, NOT one that has been put together from parts.

The bike has the correct VIN, it has the correct R3R subframe sticker and even has the original rear fender decal with R3R code and matching VIN to the frame.

1,500 were made and not many survive in low Km’s original condition. Prices for 28 SP’s in Japan are already over a million yen for less than perfect examples. Not much is left.

More from the seller:
This bike has 6695 km or about 4100 miles. This bike has both original key cards and the code sticker. It also has the original tool kit.

Bike has all the original and correct SP parts including Magtek’s, forks, dry clutch engine. All original OEM Honda bodywork. The bike had a small dent on the tank, various scratches and scuffs and I had everything touched up, saving the original decals and clearing over some of them. You can still see some rash on right clip on, exhaust can etc from a light tip over. I still have all the original pictures of how the bike looked when it was in Japan.

As you can see there is some corrosion on the fork legs as is common with most of the bikes from Japan, but otherwise it is very corrosion free. Still has a small sticker from Red Baron on lower right frame (easily removed). The inner small white plastic piece in the right side tail cowl is in poor shape, but that is easy to remedy. I am leaving the bike as near original as possible and will leave it to a new owner to restore/clean it up as they see fit.

The original rear fender is cracked, but repaired, you need to look under it or remove the tail cowl to see it. The right lower fairing stay that mounts inside the bodywork is cracked (where they all break) and could use a repair, but its all there and a minor nuisance.

The bikes starts, runs and rides as it should.

More from the seller:
100% stock, restricted, not modded in anyway. All electrical works, no error codes. Has a new battery installed and had a recent service, brake fluid, coolant, etc. Tires are quite older and should be changed if you plan to ride it.

Honda Fun Fact: The name “NSR” is based on the fact that these bikes utilized a then-new process known as nikasil-sulfur lining in the cylinder bores. This process provided a hardened cylinder for better longevity, without the weight of iron or steel liners. The technology was effective, but nikasil-sulfur makes for a terrible motorcycle name. Hence the “NS” part of the NSR was born.

This NSR is available now on eBay. It is a Buy It Now listing rather than an auction, and the seller is asking $17,500. That is big money for a NSR, although the low miles and original condition helps it along nicely. Check it out here for the details, including the opportunity to purchase a livery matching Honda Cub EZ90 to ride alongside! Good Luck!!

MI

Legend:  1994 Honda NSR 250R SP MC28 Rothmans
Ducati January 24, 2019 posted by

Got my Filas on: 2003 Ducati 999R

The 2003 Ducati 999R Fila Edition was just one of a bunch of special edition bikes Bologna kicked out in the aughties to celebrate its myriad World Superbike successes. The Fila bikes were produced to hat tip Neil Hodgson picking up the storied marque’s 200th win, and were  more than just a branded sticker package. Instead, the 200 examples came with the R’s carbon fiber bodywork, sexier suspension bits and upgraded engine internals and a more aggressive fuel system.

2003 Ducati 999R Fila Edition for sale on eBay

That all meant the commemorative edition kicked out a bunch more power, was more confident in the twists and told the story of its successes in battle. While Ducati could be accused of kicking out some truly asinine specials in the mid-2000s, this is not one of those times.

This bike is number 30 of 200, and is in 100% stock condition. In 16 years it has seen just 22 miles (yes, twenty two), and has been stored without oil or gas in it, though the internals have been misted to keep them from seizing. The pictures are not hugely detailed, but they seem to back up the seller’s claims about the bike’s spot- and blemish-free condition. The tires appear to be original and still have the nubs from the mold.

From the eBay listing:

Ducati 999R Fila Edition
Numbered 0030
Bike is brand new 22/miles
Museum quality and is actually where bike was delivered from. Came from the Barney Besal collection. You can research the bike on youtube and internet both to get all the information on it you need.
Bike is spotless not one scratch
Bike is dry stored- no oil, gas, anything but has been fogged to protect all internals.
Bike is 100 factory no addons
Bike is no reserve but will not be cheap either. I have found another bike even rarer that i would like but am going to have to liquidate around 10 bikes to achieve it.
Any question message me.
Shipping i can assist in as well
No reserve

At $28,000, this Ducati is far from a steal, but it occupies a rarefied position among replica bikes, and for the dedicated Ducatisti, it’s a serious collection booster.

Got my Filas on: 2003 Ducati 999R