Author Archives: Mike

Aprilia December 6, 2019 posted by Mike

Featured Listing: 2003 Aprilia RSV Mille R Haga Replica

Update 12.6.2019: Todd has just renewed this Featured Listing for his Mille R Haga Rep. Thank you for supporting the site and good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

It’s ironic to find such a nice, clean and unmolested replica racer street bike in this 2003 Aprilia RSV Mille R when the inspirational rider for the bike itself was nicknamed “win it or bin it.” Noriyuki Haga – a long-standing staple of World Superbike and occasional 500cc GP racer – spent one season as the sole rider for Aprilia during the 2002 WSBK season. The end result was 4th place in the championship and this Play Station livery, limited edition replica.

Featured Listing: 2003 Aprilia RSV Mille R Haga Replica!

Under the wild graphics and matte paint, the Haga replica is predominantly a standard Mille R. That means about 140 ponies ready to rocket you down the straightaway of your choice. At the end of the straight clamp down on the Brembo binders and enjoy the Ohlins suspension as the bike takes a set and carves its way to the apex. At corner exit dig deep into the power reserves of the 998cc 60 degree twin and do it all over again to the soundtrack booming from those wonderful Akrapovic cans. Parked at your favorite hangout, the Haga replica draws a crowd with cool livery, electric blue anodized upper clamp and Haga’s own signature. The numbered limited edition nomenclature is no joke; only 300 examples of the Haga replica were created, with only 60 imported into the United States.

From the seller:
2003 MINT RSV 1000R Mille Haga Replica (#118) 6959 miles – Dallas TX

I purchased this bike in 2003 from a gentleman in Frisco TX with 2300 original miles on it. He was selling it simply because he needed to get out from under the payments. I’ve owned it since then and it’s lived its entire pampered life in a heated and air-conditioned garage. Its near mint condition and nothing has been modified, not the engine, the suspension or the ECU. It’s never been laid down or wreaked and never been on a track. Its now got 6959 total miles.

Just sits in my garage and it fires right up and sounds great. Please call or text me if you want a near perfect Mille R Haga Replica.

Asking Price: $8,750

Contact Info: Todd Cole – 214.552.3552 txt / cell

More from the seller:
INSTALLED UPGRADES:
Sato Racing black adjustable rear sets, carbon fiber rear tail light housing, Sargent Super Cell Atomic Foam seat, Powerlet battery charging outlet (BMW style) for ease of maintaining the battery without having to remove the seat every time, carbon fiber side screens (both left and right), carbon fiber rear fender, carbon fiber chain guard, gold racing chain, new tires (front and rear).

UNINSTALLED UPGRADE PARTS INCLUDED:
Also, I am including some items I’ve purchased but not had time to install: RC2 Racing clutch and brake levers, Rhino Moto weighted black slider bar ends, Rizoma aluminum and rubber grips, 90-degree aluminum air stems, new factory replacement front head light assembly complete with bulbs that are already factory mounted, Aprilia bike cover included too.

More from the seller:
Repairs:
Back seven years ago I had to have the local Aprilia Dealer (RPM Cycles) replace the gas tank. It had started leaking a little bit and RPM Cycle said that the gasoline here in the USA is a little more corrosive to the Italian plastic (from what it was designed to handle) and it had warped around the fuel pump mounting area. The fuel tank was certainly not a cheap repair and it had to be ordered from Italy. I’ve also had the front rotor floater buttons replaced.

Nicks and Blemishes:
The left Akrapovic exhaust can decal is missing some ink, the upper front fairing white decal has two stone nicks in it, the front plastic headlight assembly has two cracks in it (one half inch the other quarter inch), the left rear swingarm has a scratch on it from me trying to get the bike up on a rear stand by myself.

Maintenance:
My local Aprilia dealer (RPM Cycle in Carrolton TX) has maintained the bike for as long as I have owned it. Oil changes, tuning the carburetors, tune ups, etc.

The Aprilia Mille R is an outstanding motorcycle. The one-year Haga replicas takes all of that capability and up-levels it with a graphics package and tribute worthy of its DNA. This is a collector motorcycle that deserves to be ridden; this is no fragile, cobbled together one-off but a reliable and factory supported rocket ship. It is rare in the way that makes ownership fun – it is different in the ways that matter, but completely stock and maintainable in the manner of a mass produced motorcycle. And at an asking price of $8,750 – which is right on the money of the model – this is a rare machine that won’t break the bank. Check out all of the pics and then give Todd a shout. He’s waiting for your call. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 2003 Aprilia RSV Mille R Haga Replica
Honda November 24, 2019 posted by Mike

Ride like the wind: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo

In the early 1980s Honda was flexing some serious technological muscles. Sure, they nearly single-handedly created the big bore standard with the CB750 in the 1970s, but the avenues they pursued in the 1980s were a fantastic mix of avant-guarde ideas seeking performance. Imagine the breadth and scope of Honda’s R&D department during this time: From the simple, air cooled single FT500, the wild six cylinder CBX, the sublime V45 Interceptor, the more conventional Hurricane, two strokes like the NSR250 or 400, the narrow angle v-twins, and even the mighty GoldWing touring rig. Every engine configuration was different. And on top of that blows in the amazing CX500 Turbo – the world’s first fully-backed factory Turbo effort. Heady stuff indeed.

1982 Honda CX500 Turbo for sale on eBay

With everything that was going on, Honda leveraged an existing platform for the Turbo. In this case, it was the CX500 series, better known as a cruiser in US parlance, but available in a number of different forms (including sport tourers and sporty models) in world markets. This is the same platform that spawned the GL500 SilverWing, the smaller displacement touring bike. So obviously the bones of the Turbo were mighty flexible. But simply bolting a turbine wheel to the exhaust pipe does not a functional motorcycle make. Honda went all out in the quest to tame the bugaboos lurking in the mythological sphere of boost. Tricks included a tiny IHI turbocharger, liquid cooling (already present in the CX series), computerized fuel injection with knock detection that could retard timing, an improved 4-valve cylinder head, forged pistons, different connecting rods and a beefed up bottom end including a stronger crank. With a reported 82 horsepower, the 80 degree, pushrod V-twin had come of age.

From the seller:
1982 Honda CX 500 Turbo. This is a clean titled original condition vehicle as pictures show. It runs very well with no issues. All lighting and accessories operate as designed. Motorcycle was used for land speed record attempts. 3 official records were set with documentation included. Steering damper, boost gauge, AFR meter are installed. Final drive gearing has been changed for top MPH. Original gearing included. Motorcycle is fully legal and can be ridden normally on the street.Tires were new and motorcycle was running when stored. Fuel has been treated and battery has been maintained. Vehicle is sold as is.

Also included is a spare parts bike, engine and many extra parts.

Did you read the seller’s text? Maybe you want to go back and read it again. Yes, this bike was used for land speed record attempts. In some ways, this is a very strange choice. With a top speed of 125 mph, the stock CX500 Turbo is not going to set the salt alight. There is no indication of what the records might have been, but I would love to see them. No notes on what has changed on the bike other than gearing, a steering damper, and an air/fuel ratio meter. Beyond the text, I spy an extra boost gauge and fuel pressure monitor. None of that is a deal killer in my book, although Honda Turbos are pretty heavy on the handlebars at slower speeds – I’m not certain the damper is necessary if you are riding in a legal manner. This one even comes with a spare parts bike!

We have seen a spate of Turbos on RSBFS as of late, and I’m amazed at how dirt cheap they are for the technology Honda invested in their production. These are rare motorcycles that stand out and really do perform, yet they remain unloved and underappreciated. Prices have come up slightly over the years, but we are still near the bottom if you are in the market for something worth holding on to. Check it out here – and contemplate if you need to pick up yet another hobby, such as land speed record collecting. Good Luck!!

MI

Ride like the wind: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo
Featured Listing November 21, 2019 posted by Mike

Featured Listing: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC

Update 11.20.2019: Joe’s bikes are being sold at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction. The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

In the wonderful world of Turbo motorcycles, there are the “make your own” types, and the factory turbo offerings. But this special model, the mighty Kawasaki Z1R TC, not only blurs the lines between the two camps, it is also the very first in the factory turbo column. You see, the Z1R TC was sold through Kawasaki dealerships as a new model. However it was not (technically) a factory effort. The offspring of a mixed marriage, ex-Kawi exec Alan Masek convinced the Big K brass to ship bikes to his Turbo Cycle Company (TCC). Given the sluggish sales of the warmed over Z1R, this was no big feat. TCC applied an American Turbo Pak kit to the stock machines, and shipped the resultant mutants to select dealerships with a $1,400 premium tacked on to the sticker price. Appearing to be a factory effort – but devoid of the factory warranty – the Z1R TC went on to gain an incredible reputation for speed, on/off switch turbo boost behavior (Jeckyl & Hyde anyone?), and questionable longevity. For Kawasaki it was a huge win with very little risk. Today, these rare bikes are coveted by collectors world wide.

Featured Listing: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC!

The original Z1R TC bikes went out the door in stock Kawasaki colors; they were literally converted by TCC and kicked out of the shop. As the operation matured, several changes occurred. The first was a change to the exhaust plumbing and collector – in an effort to tame the boost. The next change was a new wastegate that limited boost to 6 PSI (the Gen I bikes had a fully adjustable wastegate). And finally the classic 1970s paint scheme emerged. These are all Gen II bikes, and can be identified by the “Molly Designs” logo on the tail section. With the new graphics the Z1R TC finally had the appearance to show off the induction upgrades. Today these Molly graphic bikes are the most desired of the Z1R TC set.

From the seller:
You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. Many years ago when the best of the best was available, and that is what I was buying, these motorcycles were targeted for my collection by me.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened with the Ferrari market.

An exception is the Kawasaki Z1RTC.

More from the seller:
The rare bike in this ad is the 1978 Kawasaki Z1RTC. To me it is one of the greatest and rare motorcycle you can collect. It is a very limited production motorcycle especially in the Molly Graphics configuration. It is unbelievably fast and has an exhaust that is a thrill to listen to as it winds up through the gears. I purchased this Z1RTC from the original owner and it has not been taken apart or restored or manipulated. The original owner explained to me that this ZR1TC turbo is a Stage 3 which is the best of the best for Z1RTC turbos. The original owner told me he took the bike to a drag strip only once and turned 9.9 seconds in the quarter mile and described the feeling by saying, “it felt like his eyeballs were pinned to the back of his head”

The Z1RTC is all original except for the upgraded pressure gauge. Always kept on a trickle charger and ready to fly down the road.

They are only original once.

I would suggest that you check out the other rare cycles that I am offering for sale.

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

While the Z1R TC put Kawasaki on the map, not all was tea and roses. This was a serious motorcycle that demanded the best riders. Boost was not easily manipulated and the remainder of the stock Z1R pieces were not engineered for the upgrade. The complete lack of engine controls that we take for granted (computer controlled fuel injection, programmable ignition modules, rev limiters) made for a very fragile existence. There was actually recommendations in the manual that new owners upgrade to stronger valve springs, weld the crank and upgrade the clutch if the bike were to be used aggressively. When was the last time your owners manual made those types of modification suggestions? But given that there was no factory warranty, there was apparently little to lose.

These are mean, aggressive yet beautiful motorcycles. They chronicle an era where experimentation and entrepreneurship could coexist with a larger factory effort. And the epic bikes that resulted from these strange bedfellows strike awe and wonder in the hearts and minds of viewers – and riders. To find a totally stock Z1-R TC is an amazingly rare sight. This bike is very, very close to perfectly original, and has a very limited list of owners. It looks absolutely pristine and clean enough to eat off of – should you dare to commit such sacrilege. For those in the market for something unique and special, few bikes can compete with this beautiful 1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC. If previous listings of this model are any example, this one will go quickly. Boost on, and good luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC
Ducati November 20, 2019 posted by Mike

Featured Listing: 1985 Ducati Mike Hailwood Replica

Update 11.20.2019: Joe’s bikes are being sold at Bonhams 2020 Las Vegas Auction. The auction is scheduled to take place on Thursday, January 23rd 2020 at Caesar’s Entertainment Studios, beginning at 12 noon. For information about the bikes and the auction itself, please visit – https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25835/ You can also contact Michael Caimano directly at 929-666-2243 or Michael.Caimano@Bonhams.com

Check out all Joe’s bikes that are being offered at Bonhams. Good luck to bidders and seller! -dc

In 1978 Mike Hailwood won the Isle of Man TT riding a Ducati. This was 11 years after his last motorcycle race, the previous period during which he was firmly on the Honda payroll. Everything about the event spelled disaster – an old timer long past his glory years on a make of bike nobody really associated him with – and nobody believed he would be competitive. But this was the stuff of heroes; and heroes always win. Hailwood went on to win what can only be considered the comeback of the century. This cemented the legend of Mike “the Bike” Hailwood’s connection with Ducati, and provided for some wonderful bikes. Today’s Featured Listing – a 1985 Ducati MHR – is one such factory offering that celebrated the success of Mike Hailwood.

The Ducati MHR is a bike built in the tradition of homage; it was built to celebrate the famous TT win. But given that the TT was for street-based machinery, the factory replica was not simply a graphics package. Yes, Hailwood won in 1978. Yes, the Pantah (which introduced the next generation belt-driven cams vs. bevel-driven) was introduced way back in 1980. Then why, you might ask, was a MHR being built in 1985 and based on the older hardware? The answer is that Ducati, still a relatively small company, focused on bevel drive for the big bikes (750 – 1000cc), while the Pantah was initially offered in 600cc and below variants. The bevel-drive motors were still very much in the forefront during this time, even though they may seem slightly archaic today. So the MHR is based on the “square case” 900SS of the day – which was a capable machine in its own right. But why still offer a homage bike in 1985 when Hailwood won the TT back in 1978? Simple: the public demanded it. While the MHR was a very limited edition, it was a tremendously successful marketing effort and a strong model for Ducati. Today’s seller has some good details about this bike, so I will let him take it over from here:

From the seller:
1985 Ducati Hailwood Replica

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. These motorcycles were targeted by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best were available and that is what I purchased.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari.

More from the seller:
The Ducati Hailwood Millie shown here was made in two series. The first one being a short fairing and only 900 cc with a kick starter and this model, the Hailwood Millie (1000 cc) with the electric starter and the large fairing; one is one of the most beautifully designed fairings ever. It is a big bike not meant for the meek. Of course, it has the electric starter and exhaust note that will thrill any motorcycle enthusiast. It is in absolutely near perfect condition. It is always on a trickle charger and ready to give you a thrill of a lifetime as you wind through the gears and open it up on an open road. This is another Italian bike that, in our opinion, can be classified as the Ferrari of bikes of the future.

This is certainly a bike for the serious collectors. For those that don’t know all the details, the internet is just loaded with information. I can only suggest that you scrutinize the pictures and decide for yourself if this is another rare Italian collector bike that will eventually become as iconic as a Ferrari. Ten years ago, I spent a long time looking for the best Hailwood Millie and believe me this was the beat of the best, hands down.

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

These second generation MHR machines are truly beautiful motorcycles. Whereas the original offering utilizes a fiberglass cover over a stock SS tank, the latter bikes use a tank that is unique to the model. The rest of the bodywork is all MHE, evoking the spirit (and the livery) of the racer. And while the underpinnings are SS items, some performance items such as the Conti exhausts are model specific. The solo seat is a non-race item; in reality it is a rear pillion cover, making this a two-seater and enhancing the usefulness of the bike. But people who lust after a MHR are not concerned with practicality – they want the booming V-twin soundtrack and the waves of torque that have made Ducati victorious and famous. You may not be able to ride with the effortless agility of Mike Hailwood, but you can still rock the livery and the sound while paying homage to the great man with this stunning 1985 Ducati Mike Hailwood Replica. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1985 Ducati Mike Hailwood Replica
Yamaha November 18, 2019 posted by Mike

Buck Rogers: 1982 Yamaha XJ650LJ Seca Turbo

The Turbo years were the wild west for technology mavens in the motorcycling world. For only a few short years did this persist, but while it did the space race was on! Every one of the Big Four came up with at least one turbocharged model, and each had its unique position in the market. Each had its own unique strength. And all had a common weakness. The 1982 Yamaha Seca Turbo was no different. Not the first of the factory turbo bikes – and definitely not the last – the Seca Turbo was the typical middle child. In many ways Yamaha jumped onto the turbo bandwagon with a #MeToo bike, but their interpretation of the breed did produce an interesting motorcycle. As far as factory turbos go, the Yamaha Seca 650 Turbo was a low-tech, low-buck affair. The whole Yamaha approach was a check-box effort, allowing them to play in this important space while presenting the least amount of risk. As such, the Yamaha Turbo is perhaps the least collected of the Big Four factory bikes. But that does not mean it is not worth a look.

1982 Yamaha XJ650LJ Seca Turbo for sale on eBay

While Honda flexed their technological muscles (and deep cash reserves) in the creation of the liquid-cooled, computer-controlled CX500 Turbo, Yamaha warmed over the existing Seca with relatively little fanfare. Air cooling was the order of the day, as was the brace of carburetors. The turbo itself – a teeny-tiny 39mm unit from Mitsubishi – produced a meager 7-ish pounds of boost and was arranged in a “blow through” scheme to avoid the cost and complexity of fuel injection. The heads were new to provide for better airflow, although the bottom end was a modified version of the existing 650. Internals were strengthened, additional oil galleys were added for lubrication and cooling, and forged pistons were utilized. All told, the Seca was rated for approximately 90 horsepower (good for a quarter mile in the mid to high 12s).

From the seller:
Hi I’m selling my 1982 XJ650LJ Seca Turbo. Its in great shape. Replaced left front linker Lens with New OEM. The windshield has a small crack but does not affect function. Rebuilt Turbo, been sitting to long. Low miles.
Complete Service done. Oil Change, Spark Plugs, Carbs Rebuilt ETC ETC.

The real effort on the Seca Turbo was expended on the styling aspect. This bike practically screamed “futuristic missle,” even if the performance didn’t quite back it up. It did look the part, at least in 1982. Today it appears a bit dated, much like a Seca with a funky fairing on it. The underlying chassis was straight from the normally aspirated 650 Seca, although the Turbo did benefit from air assist forks up front, and an air shock in the back. That was relatively high tech for the times. At over 500 pounds dry, nobody would mistake the Seca for a sport bike, but testers in the day indicated that the Yamaha had minimal turbo lag and managed the twisty bits as well as its contemporary peers.

If all this sounds like I’m panning the Seca Turbo, let me set you straight: While the bike did not live up to the performance of the latter factory turbos such as the XN85, the CX650T or the mighty GPz750 Turbo, the Seca is still a good motorcycle and a great example of the experimentation that took place during this phase of motorcycle development. These are unique and fun motorcycles to ride, and certainly something you won’t see very often at your local bike night. The Seca Turbo – like all turbos – are relatively rare due to the fact that they were not big sellers. Time passed them over quickly, and by 1984-85 that party was over. This particular Seca Turbo looks to be in extremely decent condition for a rider, sports relatively low miles, and has been under the care of a turbo fan. The price is downright C.H.E.A.P. for such a unique bike, with a Buy It Now price of only $3,750. Check it out here, and get your boost on. Good Luck!!

MI

Buck Rogers: 1982 Yamaha XJ650LJ Seca Turbo
Ducati November 15, 2019 posted by Mike

Who’s Next? 1995 Ducati 900 SS SP

The Ducati 900 Supersport series is one of those bikes that is just so solid that it persists in company that is far more exotic, expensive, and technologically advanced. Even in the day the 900 SS was a bit of a dinosaur – an air-cooled, 2-valved, carburetted throwback to the 1970s – while the competition was spending wildly on technology such as fuel injection, liquid cooling, multi-valve per cylinder, variable valve timing, turbocharging and more. But you can’t hide greatness – and the bones of the Supersport were truly great. Comparing the 900 Supersport to the same year 916 is a bit like comparing a basic cheeseburger to a dry-aged ribeye steak. But you know what? That cheeseburger can be a mighty satisfying meal in the end. And so too is it with the 900 Supersport – especially the SP model such as today’s example – it has all the basics to be a truly great bike. And continues to be to this day. If you are looking for a fantastic ride without the flash, farkles and other nonsense, you’ve come to the right place. Today’s seller is clearly an enthusiast and it is worth reading a few of his own words about this bike:

1995 Ducati 900 SS SP for sale on eBay

From the seller:
Ducati 900 Super Sport
1995
Sports Production (SP) Model with Fully-Faired Chassis Production Run #412
Desmodromic 90 Degree Twin-Cylinder Engine Six-Speed Transmission

Model Specific Details Per Owner
This motorcycle has been preserved exactly as one would want. Period. I have gone to great lengths to minimize any unnecessary changes that would otherwise compromise what Ducati intended this bike to be. Obviously a blood-red Italian work of art needs nothing in the way of cosmetics, so let well enough alone.

I felt the best use of any improvements would be more of personal expressions such as un- restricting the exhaust to allow the bike to actually sound like a Ducati should with a set of Remus canisters. These match the factory equipped carbon fiber components much better than any others in my opinion. To facilitate the most from the exhaust, I perfectly jetted the carburetors. No flat spots, nor burning eyes, and of course the results are impressive for the torque curve of an already excellent engine.

To welcome more fresh air into the carburetors, I added the Genuine Ducati air-box cover. I’m sure others with hole saws and hack-saw blades get the same results, but i chose OEM whenever possible. As far as the Slave Cylinder, the stock one seemed to lack feel and a clean return. Off it went and was promptly replaced by the excellent unit from Pro Italia. Regarding the braking system, it is what it is. Nobody was impressed when new, the same remains today. I added Ferodo pads at both ends and have felt these are aggressive enough for a spirited run through the curves. The brake lines are shockingly original. I’ll leave YOU to replace them with fresh, likely stainless-steel braided models. They will certainly be an amazing upgrade.

More from the seller:
The dry clutch is holding its own in the fully enclosed carbon cover and has been gently used. The tires are fresh, new Metzler’s, of the sport touring variety. The chain has plenty of life in it, and the sprockets are newly replaced. All good stuff to head out with confidence.

In 2013, I decided to have the fine factory trained mechanics at The Motor Cafe in Sunnyvale, California pull the top end off the Duc and take a look around to see what it needed to keep on living. Not surprising to me, because of my impeccable maintenance schedule, and my gentle albeit, frequent abuse of the mountain roads, three out four of the valves, and their many clearances were just at, but not over recommended tolerances. One valve was now due for adjustment. I decided to go the full service treatment and get a bit more done.

This is what was performed: cylinder heads stripped and cleaned. Checked for cracks. New copper/beryllium seats. New Del West valve guides. New OEM Ducati valves and hardware such as keepers and rings to hold it together. The pistons were cleaned up and received new rings and the cylinder bore was prepped appropriately. It was all buttoned back up leak free for the next go round.

More from the seller:
Following this, the carburetors were checked for synchronization. The fuel filter was replaced in the tank and the gasket around the filler as well. A new front odometer drive unit was installed which I purchased back in 1998 when still available along with a fresh set of wheel bearings to smooth things out. Out back, the linkages were greased too.

A few additional things too mention about this machine. I have replaced the original clear windscreen which is still in excellent shape, with an OEM Ducati “smoke” model to help preserve the appearance of the instrument cluster. With that in mind, please take note in the accompanying photos the genuine Ducati carbon fiber gauge enclosure. This is not a common item as far as I’ve come to notice. Also, the front fender is BRAND NEW. I still have the original, which also is in good shape. All the carbon on this bike is better than most for the amount of actual miles enjoyed in real sunlight. Anyone could certainly sand and clear coat the existing carbon if they would like too as a restoration option.

There is a LOT more text from the seller in the advert (I recommend you go check it out), but from what has been shared it is obvious that this was a well loved machine. And what is not to love? The basic bike feels like it has been hewed from solid rock. The big L-twin lumps a bit at idle, and thrashes in the upper RPM ranges. But in between the two is a wave of throbbing torque that grabs you out of one corner and launches you towards the next. And when you get to the next the excellent Brembos and the stiff, chrome molly trellis frame chassis do a great job of making the corner a no-brainer. Every bike should make you feel this good – but few do. This is a bike to be ridden… and by the looks of it, this one has. There are no fewer than 32,000+ miles on this bike, and it still looks new and ready for the next go around. And did I mention it is an SP? In the case of a 1990s Supersport, that means adjustable suspension (a great improvement, especially up front), floating front disks, remote reservoir brake and clutch masters, carbon fiber mudguard, and a wider rear tire thanks to a special aluminum swing arm. And let’s not forget the most important bit: a SP-specific serial number plate on the triple clamp. Some folks go so far as to call the SP model a Superlight with a passenger pillion.

Despite the low tech and the basic nature, 900 SS SP models continue to be desired by riders. That is no surprise as the basic SS platform is extremely forgiving and very capable. It is also very reliable. This particular example has a lot of miles, but it has obviously been lavished on as well. It has some upgrades, and some very serious maintenance. That is all very positive, as these are bulletproof bikes if kept up, as this one appears to be. This one just hit eBay with a Buy It Now price of $5,500. That is strong money for a CR model, but probably well in the ballpark for an SP that shows like this one. And did I mention the spares? There appears to be quite a lot. Check it out and let us know what you think. I believe someone will pick it up relatively quickly, as this is the kind of bike worth holding on to. So who is the next owner? Good Luck!!

MI

Who’s Next? 1995 Ducati 900 SS SP
Yamaha November 8, 2019 posted by Mike

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT

Update 11.27.2019: SOLD in less than three weeks! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Say you’re a Yamaha fan and you want to collect something significant. Where do you start? Well, rare homologation machines are always a great place to look. Think you want an OW-01? You might find that mighty machine to be very, very expensive, and not as rare as you think. If you really want to buy the right bike at the right time, the homologation machine to check out is the 1980s FZR750R variants. Built to go AMA Superbike racing, the FZR750R line was fast and trick, and continues to be an affordable collector option today. Take for example today’s Featured Listing: a 1987 Yamaha FZR750R “T” model.

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT

To build the FZR750R, Yamaha invested in new technology. To build the DeltaBox frame, for instance, Yamaha adopted robotic procedures for folding and welding the thin aluminum components. This stiff but light frame housed the all-important, 106 horsepower “Genesis” engine. Sporting a unique valve train consisting of 5 valves per cylinder (3 intake, 2 exhaust), the Genesis engine family also maximized weight bias by canting the cylinder bank forward to place more weight lower and closer to the front tire. Between the high RPM capability offered by the airflow through the head (and straight-shot downdraft carbs) and the handling afforded by the chassis and ideal weight distribution, the FZR750R was a potent competitor on the racetrack.

From the seller:
Original 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT, #2** of 500 Homologation specials for 1987 , this is a Canadian market bike with 26290kms

This bike is a unrestored survivor in excellent overall condition and does not appear to have been raced (no drilled brake caliper bolts, axles etc etc) the exhaust has never been painted from new. There are some scratches to the protruding air intakes on both sides of the fairing as shown, the fairing is not cracked or split in any way in these areas.

This bike is in very original condition, with all the original reflectors, grips, handlebar ends leavers footrests, windshield and trim. The bike has been fully serviced: valve clearances done, carbs serviced and balanced, it has brand new Bridgestone Battleax tires front and rear, everything works as the should.

Comes with the original owners manual in English / French as it is a Canadian.

Asking Price: $5,950 USD

The anecdotal stories suggest that Yamaha dealers were discouraged to offering these homologation machines to buyers intent on utilizing them on the street; after all, Yamaha built these bikes to go racing. And while many FZR750Rs were raced, we have (thankfully) seen a number of these bikes show up on the street. Some have been reconverted from the race bike status. This particular example appears to have been saved the hard life of the race track, and has instead lived its life as a pampered street bike. That is a plus for collectors. That is not to say that this bike has not been used – with 16,000 miles on the all-metric clocks this is not a garage queen, but looks to be in complete and original form.

Yamaha produced but 200 of these particular bikes for the US market, and only 500 world wide. Those are some pretty low numbers by “Limited Edition” standards, and you are looking at the #2 bike in the production series. But before you think “that will cost me an arm and a leg,” the seller is only asking $5,950. That is right in the sweet spot of where these amazing machines are today, and an amazing deal when you consider that this was destined for AMA Superbike competition. The bike is located in Osaka, Japan, and the owner is willing to talk about crating, domestic shipping or (I hear vacation!) local pick up. Check out the picks and then drop Trev a line. Homologation bikes are hot, and the FZR750R has been the underappreciated step child of the genre. These are bound to go up, so we recommend picking up a great example before the market discovers them. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT
BMW November 7, 2019 posted by Mike

Featured Listing: 1992 BMW K1

This is the fourth motorcycle being offered from the Stuart Parr Collection. Thank you for supporting the site and good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

In the annals of modern motorcycle history, the Japanese have the technological might, the Italians have the performance artwork, and the Germans… well, the Germans had a more conservative approach. Much of that has changed in recent years (witness the HP2 Sport, the S1000RR), but it was with the iconic K1 that BMW proved it had the technological chops AND an artistic feel without abandoning the company soul or ethics. You see, BMW wanted (needed) younger riders to join the brand. But their staid approach of “the gentleman’s transport” didn’t cut it with the youth. They wanted speed. But BMW was constrained by the 100 bhp limit imposed on bikes sold in Germany. So how to get maximum speed within the imposed power listing? Technology. Namely, aerodynamics. Thus the design and style of the K1 was born of function, and has gone on to become a bit of a legend.

Featured Listing: 1992 BMW K1

The life of the K1 started with a standard K bike – in this case a K100. This was the “new” architecture for BMW; the inline four cylinder motor flopped on it’s side and mounted crosswise on the bike. This allowed for a low center of gravity; the crankshaft runs parallel with the bike on the right side and made for easy power takeoff for the shaft drive. From those bones, the K1 started ingesting technology. The standard K100 engine was upgraded with 16 valve heads, higher compression and lighter connecting rods for extended high RPM running. ABS was a standard feature for US-bound bikes, but optional in other markets. Wanting to achieve speeds in the range of 150 mph, the K1 entered the wind tunnel and was shaped with a vengeance. The wheelbase was extended for greater stability. Check out the streamlines of the front fender, and the aerodynamic – yet protective – main fairing. The integrated tail section even contained saddlebags, which provided function AND airflow resolution. In all, there are seven pieces to the main fairing to harness and define the aero elements. Colors offered were Teutonic interpretations of yin and yang: either fire engine red with yellow accents, or a turquoise blue with yellow accents. Love it or hate it, either color combination stands out.

From the seller:
41,000km’s / 25k mi. This is a fantastic example of the timeless “ketchup & mustard” 1990’s BMW design icon.

Fully restored to new condition in Europe in 2014, this K1 is absolutely beautiful in every respect, and runs/operates perfectly. Heated grips, ABS, 100hp 16v, Marzocchi forks, Brembo brakes – 6,900 examples ever produced. Included with the sale is a hard bound folio detailing the ownership (U.K. and Germany) and restoration details.

Probably the best non-original K1 on earth: $15,000

Despite the techno wizardry, the end result was a 520+ pound, long wheelbase motorcycle that excelled at what BMWs always excelled at: eating up the miles. And with a price tag higher than most available motorcycles (MSRP of over $13,000), this hardly targeted the youth. Instead, BMW created a showroom magnet that pulled interested viewers in – and then sold them a different K or R bike instead. Sales of the K1 were slow, and the bike was under appreciated during it’s stay on the dealer floor. Time has been kinder to the model, and cannot erase the sensationalism built up around this pivotal motorcycle – even if it did not set the world on fire. Today these are rare machines that still represent the change of attitude in BMW management, and finding one that does not exhibit the ravages of time (think large expanses of thin bodywork and the possibility for damage) or abuse should be celebrated.

Today’s 19991 BMW K1 comes to us courtesy of the Stuart Parr Collection, and shows as beautifully as a new bike. Drool over the high resolution photography, and tell me this isn’t the cleanest K1 you have seen in the wild. I mean, it just looks *perfect*. And this is no zero mile “never gonna be ridden” garage queen either; this wonderful example has 25,000 on the clocks. We all know the legendary longevity of a BMW, and to find a rare K1 in the cosmetic condition such as this should make you sit up and take notice. Asking price is $15,000 and inquiries can be directed to Gregory Johnston on (631) 537-1486 or via email – here. Good Luck!

MI

Featured Listing: 1992 BMW K1