Posts by tag: Liquid Cooled

Honda April 11, 2017 posted by

Hot Air: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo

Imagine the scene in Honda dealerships back in 1982: Buck Rogers – your bike is ready. One can only imagine what the buying public thought of a futuristic, turbocharged rocket ship that offered liter-bike power in a 500cc format. Unfortunately, the reaction from the general public was not to immediately rip open their wallets and buy one. Complicated, heavy, expensive and more compromising than riders (and buyers) wanted, the Honda CX Turbo lineup survived only a few, short years before being closed down completely. Produced in very low numbers, these Turbos have half of the “supply/demand” equation on their side. Unfortunately, even fewer buyers seem to want these bikes today, making them an interesting investment conundrum. Relative scarcity does not automatically equate to “desired” – or valuable.

1982 Honda CX500 Turbo for sale on eBay

Public opinion be damned. These bikes are some of the finest produced by Honda during this era. These are cutting-edge bikes – including turbocharging, liquid cooling, computerized fuel injection – all during an era where the archaic, air-cooled GPz still hunted in the canyons. This was the promise of the future, delivered on a neon orange & pearlescent canvas, plenty of gold accents, yards of ABS plastic bodywork, and enough “TURBO” badges to make people think you went nuts with a J.C. Whitney catalog. It is different – very different. And that is both the glory as well as the failing of the Honda Turbo lineup. People want the same, only better. Honda delivered a sport touring bike (likely because it was impossible to package all of the tech in a sport bike sized machine) that was neither really sporty, nor really touring. It was an in-between bike that screamed loudly, but never really said anything that people wanted to hear. It was a monumental advancement, and an utter flop. And you will have to pry mine (a 650 model) out of my cold, dead hands.

From the seller:
Beautiful 8000 mile example of this cool turbocharged touring bike. I got his from the original owners estate sitting in the back of the garage. It had been sitting for years. I resurrected it and drove it several hundred miles and love it! but i’m a harley and triumph guy and although I like all bikes it really is not my type of bike. But more about the bike, it runs great and drives great has the original owners manual with the tire gauge and the only thing I did to get it going was replace the fuel pump and rebuild the petcock and it runs beautifully. All the gauges work great. It has a few scratches here and there but nothing too noticeable. Original paint!!

Today, everything said about the CX500 Turbo back in 1982 applies. It is big, heavy, complex and different. It’s still expensive, although time has not been supportive of the overall value. Prices on these models appeared to peak around 2010. It’s hard to believe that they will not still appreciate due to novelty and rarity, but one will likely need to another round of 1980s nostalgia to return before that happens.

This pretty (in the eyes of this beholder, at least) CX500 Turbo one is listed for $5,000 in a Buy It Now classified, with the seller open to offers. That is fair money for a 8,000 mile example of a rare bike, and far below the top dollar we have seen asked in the past. There is some damage noted to the hard to replace bodywork, so make sure you do your homework first. Check it out here, and then share your thoughts. Investment opportunity or just something different to own and ride around? Good Luck!!

MI

Hot Air: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo
Ducati March 29, 2017 posted by

Museum Piece: Low-Mileage, One-Owner 1991 Ducati 851 for Sale

For connoisseurs, the Ducati 851 is the Bolognese superbike to have: it’s not as obvious or uncomfortable as a 916, and it was the first of the four-valve breed, the speartip of Ducati’s new push to be relevant to the modern sportbike world. The air-cooled, two-valve Pantah may be a classic, charismatic engine, but it couldn’t possibly hope to compete against liquid-cooled, sixteen-valve inline fours in the brand-new World Superbike series that was meant to showcase the very best production-based motorcycles in wheel-to-wheel competition. So Ducati added four-valve heads and liquid-cooling to their venerable L-Twin and quickly found success: a displacement advantage helped to offset the outright power gap compared to the four-cylinder bikes, and handling was excellent.

Styling is more “functionally elegant” than “dripping with sex,” but that means humane ergonomics and less flash for Ducati fans more interested in performance than posing. And although the bike’s 93hp isn’t huge by today’s standards, it has the famous Ducati torque that’s gone missing from bikes like the 1199 as they’ve chased revs and horsepower to compete with the fours. The low-mount dual exhausts seem to sound much better than the 916’s undertail system, for some reason, and they’re also obviously much less likely to roast sensitive parts of your anatomy.

Early four-valve bikes like the 851 and 888 can get expensive to maintain if you don’t do some of the work yourself: frequent regular belt changes and valve-adjustments don’t require pricey parts, but are labor-intensive at standard shop rates. They can be fickle, but the slow evolution of these bikes’ hard parts mean spares shouldn’t be too difficult to track down. In general, the rule with Ducatis is: buy wisely or pay the price, as a “cheap” example can quickly become a very expensive proposition. Luckily, today’s bike avoids that by being fastidiously maintained and enthusiast-owned.

From the original eBay listing: Low-Mileage, One-Owner 1991 Ducati 851 for Sale

I purchased this bike in June of 1991 and have been the only owner since the bike was new.  I purchased the bike from Dunbar Motorsports in Brockton, Massachusetts.  The bike is currently located in Atlanta, Georgia.

The bike is in near-pristine condition, and is a desirable bike for a collection, or as a concours bike, or just as a daily rider.

Here is literally every flaw I could find, no matter how minor.  All of these minor bumps and bruises are shown in the photographs:

  • There is a very small chip in the fiberglass on the removable pillion cover that covers the passenger’s seat (see photo #8)
  • There is a very small area on the right muffler where it is rough (see photo #9).  I lent the bike to my brother soon after I got it, and he managed to drop the bike while just sitting on it (!).  The only things damaged were the right side fairing and right side mirror, a small area on the muffler and, of course, my brother’s pride.  He replaced the fairing and mirror with factory new parts (this was quite some time ago when it was still possible to get factory new parts), but the damage to the muffler was so minor that I couldn’t ask him to replace it.  Note that this was the only time in its life that the bike was dropped.
  • There is a VERY minor stress crack in the fiberglass on the front fairing (see photo #10).
  • There are 3 small parallel cracks in the paint on the frame near the right foot peg (see photo #11).
  • The rubber cover for the brake light switch is dry and starting to crack (see photo #12).

As I said, all very minor.  Other than these minor flaws, the bike is in pristine condition, and is exactly as it rolled off the showroom floor in 1991 — down to the original Michelin Hi-Sport tires which are still in good shape (though I might recommend changing them out if you plan to take many tight corners, as they are 26 years old!).  There have been no aftermarket modifications whatsoever.

The bike was completely serviced last fall by Ducshop in Marietta, Georgia (http://ducshop.com), including belts, fluids, battery, etc.  The bike has a clear Georgia title, is registered and insured, and ridden periodically to keep its legs stretched.  The bike runs perfectly, and is a real thrill to ride.

The bike comes with all of its paperwork, including the service records, original Owner’s Identification Card, original Purchase and Warranty Registration, original Bill of Sale from the dealer (the bike cost $12,350 in 1991), and the original Owner’s Manual.  The bike also comes with a race stand that the dealer originally included with the sale of the bike (the bike has never been raced or has even been on a track).

The bike is the Strada (street) model of the 851 Superbike.  Like all Superbikes, it has the 8-valve (4 per cylinder), fuel injected “desmodromic” engine (the valves are both opened and closed by a cam to eliminate any possibility of valve float at high RPM).

The 851 Superbike model was first launched in 1987.  With its powerful liquid-cooled, fuel injected, 8-valve V-twin desmo engine, its signature steel tube trellis frame, Brembo brakes and Marzocchi suspension, it heralded the start of the modern era for Ducati.  Built for the fledgling World SuperBike series, Ducati quickly won three World SuperBike crowns in a row 1990-1992, with Frenchman Raymond Roche aboard the 1990 851, and Doug Polen riding an 851 bored out to 888cc.

The unfortunate thing about a bike like this is that part of the value is derived from the low miles and originality, a shame since these are great riders’ bikes. In addition, that functional styling means a riding position that won’t outright murder your spine, so the low mileage is doubly tragic. In such sharp condition, I have no doubt this one will find a very happy buyer: bidding is already up to $8,950 with several days left on the auction.

-tad

Museum Piece: Low-Mileage, One-Owner 1991 Ducati 851 for Sale
Ducati March 4, 2017 posted by

Rare Homologation Special: 1988 Ducati 851 Tricolore for Sale

If you’re looking to get close to your racing heroes, style yourself a Very Serious Motorcyclist™, or just like the idea of riding something with genuine links to legitimate race bikes, homologation specials offer their owners a taste of the trick parts and lightweight performance available to professional racers, all in a streetable package. This 851 Tricolore wears its Italian heritage proudly, and takes things a bit beyond what you’d normally expect in terms of road-legal performance: its about as close to a road-legal race bike as you’re likely to find.

The 916 gets most of the fame and is more instantly recognizable, but it’s really the earlier 851, introduced in 1987, that paved the way for Ducati’s World Superbike success and the company’s return to racing glory. The older Pantah-derived air-cooled L-twin engines were certainly high-performance motors in their day, but had been long-since eclipsed by the inline fours from Japan, and Ducati needed something new if they wanted to compete on relatively equal footing with 750cc inline fours in the brand-new World Superbike Championship.

Ducati kept the proven foundation of their v-twin, but added liquid cooling and brand new four-valve heads to create their “Desmoquattro” that pumped out 93hp along with plenty of fat midrange torque and gave the newly introduced 851 the performance to compete, factoring in a bit of a displacement bump that allowed the twins approximate parity with the smaller, revvier inline fours. Wrapped around that heavily updated engine was Ducati’s distinctive trellis frame and chunky bodywork, along with ergonomics that were considered extreme at the time, but seem positively luxurious compared to the masochistic 916 that came later… For a while there, the 851 and the 888 that followed were less desirable than the gorgeous 916. But as they say, “familiarity breeds contempt” and with so many of Tamburini’s masterpiece running around, it’s hard not to be a bit blasé about them now. But the 916 would never have existed without the success of the 851 and that functional bodywork has a style all its own.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Ducati 851 Tricolore for Sale

One of 207 homologation “kit bikes”!
Frame Number: ZDM3HB6T6JB850034
Engine Number: HB6J850032

It was the Ducati 851 that first served notice that high-performance sportbikes and World Superbike racing would no longer be Japanese-only affairs. Where before Ducatis made do with simple air-cooled motors, the 851 had liquid-cooling, four-valve desmodromic cylinder heads and electronic fuel-injection. In 1990 Raymond Roche rode a factory 851 to the World Superbike championship, the first of 13 titles to date for Ducati.

World Superbike racers were required to be based on production streetbikes. One way to get the highest-specification base model possible was to build homologation specials – expensive, limited-edition versions that needed relatively minor modification to be track-ready. Ducati took this so-called “kit bike” approach with the 851 Superbike. Just 207 of these nominally street-legal machines were hand-built, enough to satisfy World Superbike rules, with an estimated 20 examples coming to the U.S.

 Differences from showroom stock include a braced swingarm, close-ratio gearbox, ventilated dry clutch and lightweight magnesium Marvic wheels. No speedometer, just a tachometer and temperature gauge. The motor was upgraded with race-grind camshafts, a hot-rodded electronic control unit, ram-air duct and free-breathing reverse-cone mufflers. It was good for about 120 horsepower.

One of the other differences is a round ring on the seat, which is explained by an amusing folk tale: the claim is that some Ducati employee placed a hot espresso maker on the mold before production, causing a slight deformation in the seat.

The Tri-Colore 851 kit bike on offer has been made fully street-legal, and is titled and registered. Globe-type turn signals mounted in the handlebar ends satisfy the DMV. The original owner was a local Southern California collector of some very interesting and important bikes, particularly Italian, low production machines. He mounted a bicycle speedometer with magnet on the front hub to further satisfy the DMV and clocked 2600 miles. The second owner kept the bike in his private museum of very exclusive Italian machinery and removed the speedo for display.

Mechanically, the bike is in excellent condition. The engine starts easily, idles smoothly and runs well. The bike shifts easily though all gears with a nice clutch action. Brakes, suspension and all electrical systems work perfectly. The new owner should be mindful of tire-pressure as the scuff-free magnesium wheels are notoriously porous. And it sounds fantastic!

Cosmetically, the bike is exquisite, showing light patina conducive with age and mileage. This is truly a Superbike for the street, with impeccable ownership history and is accompanied by a substantial document file, keys, and a clean, clear California title. A great opportunity to own a truly rare and exotic Italian icon.

So what does this piece of Ducati history cost? Well the asking price is $31,900 which is obviously very steep for an 851, but a bit of a bargain compared to the last one of these that was up for sale. This appears to be a different bike, considering that one had never had gas in it or been started, whereas this one has had a bit of use and a couple of concessions to road use added. The small bar-end mirrors are a modern addition, but aren’t obtrusive and suit the bike’s minimal-road-equipment style compared to the big, chunky, fairing-mounted original road-equipment parts or a more 80s set of “Napoleon” bar-end mirrors. The seller claims that just 207 of these homologation 851s were built in 1988 to meet World Superbike requirements and it looks to be in excellent shape, with just enough wear to suggest that it’s in original, well-preserved condition. This is, as the seller says, literally a superbike for the street, with just enough road equipment to keep things legal-ish but not distract from your World Superbike fantasies. Hopefully, anyone that buys this will continue to put a few weekend miles on it from time-to-time!

-tad

Rare Homologation Special: 1988 Ducati 851 Tricolore for Sale
Yamaha January 31, 2017 posted by

Top of the Heap: 1996 Yamaha FZR400RR SP

Another “direct from Japan” offering available on ebay this week is a FZR400RR SP model. RSBFS has only seen one of these bikes come through our pages, way back in 2011, and I urge you to read Ian’s excellent coverage on the model in question. The last bike we saw was a UK spec machine, while this one resides in its home country of Japan. What you need to know: When it comes to Yamaha 400cc machines, this was the top spec, ultra rare edition of the FZR set. Everything else is simply from the stone age.

1996 Yamaha FZR400RR SP for sale on eBay

The march of progress is inexorable; yesterday’s breakthrough is tomorrow’s antiquity. That is especially true in the cutting edge world of performance motorcycles. What was spectacular 21 years ago is still enchanting today, but not likely as mind-blowing as it was then. Still, starting with the basic Fizzer 400 – widely regarded as a handling gem even today – and going whole-hog “price is no object” mad in the R&D facility produced what was essentially a Fizzer on crack. Meant for the track, the RR SP model featured some tasty carbon, solo saddle, fully adjustable suspension, bigger binders, modified intake, flat slide carbs, special exhaust and more. Nothing was left on the R&D table when Yamaha called it done.

From the seller:
YAMAHA FZR400RR SP

VIN: HK31A-102176
Year: 1996
Mileage: 40,385km (Meter is changed to Aftermarket. Real mileage is unknown)
Condition: Running well. Body work has scratches, cracks and touch up paint.

MODIFY
Front fork,Triple clamp and Top bridge TZR250R 3XV of up side down forks
Carbs FCR32
Meter Aftermarket
Front brake caliper Brembo 40mm
Ignition coil UOTANI SP
Front wheel 17*3.00 Rear wheel 17*4.50
Winkers, Tail light LED

Shipping : We’ll put it into the wooden crate and ship by surface.
We’ll enclose Japanese original title, and also Sales Certificate and Bill of Sales issued by us in English. Shipping cost: The bid price includes shipping cost to overseas, and it’s charged from our office in Japan to the nearest port to your address. We expect you’d pick it up at the port and arrange the land transport to your address by yourself. The other cost, such as the handling cost, duty fee, tax, etc. which will be charged in your country, they’re not included there.

My research indicated that 1994 was the last of the 400s from Yamaha, yet this is listed as a 1996. Maybe one of our super-sharp readers can help fill that gap for us. Regardless, numbers are very low for the RR SP model, and limited to the few countries in which they were released (hint: the US was not one of them).

The seller is offering to crate the bike and ship it world wide, and will include some importation paperwork. The rest will be up to you, which may be difficult depending upon where you live. Those in the US should consider this carefully, as nothing is more tragic than purchasing a bike that cannot be used legally. However this would make for a very potent track-day weapon, so there is that angle to consider. Check it out here and remember: we may not see another one of these for another six years! Good luck!

MI

Top of the Heap: 1996 Yamaha FZR400RR SP
Kawasaki January 25, 2017 posted by

Bantamweight Sportbike: 1990 Kawasaki ZXR400 for Sale

While we see the occasional CBR400RR here on the site, and FZR400s aren’t too hard to find if you go looking, it’s been quite a while since we’ve been able to feature one of Kawasaki’s bantamweight superbikes, the ZXR400. With a liquid-cooled 398cc inline four and a six-speed gearbox to make the most of the high-strung powerband, the ZXR packs serious sportbike credentials into a very compact package. It was introduced in 1989 and produced through 1999. Claimed power for the earlier “H” bikes was slightly higher at 64hp versus the later “L” version at 61hp, and they made that peak figure further up the rev-range by a few hundred rpm. But torque was a bit lower, as you might expect, since the engine is mechanically nearly identical in both versions. The earlier model was also naturally a bit lighter, with a claimed dry weight of just 350lbs, which meant the bike was good for a top speed of over 140mph.

As has been stated in the past, there’s a reason that all this sophisticated technology was included in a bike with such limited displacement. Simply: it wasn’t aimed at new motorcyclists. Here in the USA, bikes under 600cc are generally cheap commuters with decades-old technology, and new riders are often steered towards 600cc sportbikes since there are no limitations for newer riders, insurance is cheap, and the market is saturated with 1000 sportbikes and 2300cc cruisers. But overseas, tiered licenses mean limited access to bigger bikes for many riders, and international racing series didn’t really have a 600cc class at the time, so these 400s were really just a step down from World Superbike displacement 750s.

From the original eBay listing: 1990 Kawasaki ZXR400 for Sale

This is the full power Japanese home market version not the usual detuned US market model.
The bike has just been imported in December 2016 and registered on a Florida Title in my name.
These superb looking bikes with ram air induction are now at classic status
This beauty has only covered 35,871 miles in 27 years
Tires are brand new front and rear.
The bike does stert up and run fine and clutch gears and brakes are all good the Carb’s could do with tuning and possibly rejetting for the low grade US fuel.

The bike looks good in the photos, but that’s not saying much, considering their low quality…  Certainly, the price is right: the Buy It Now is listed as just $3,000 which, although the mileage is on the high side, seems to make this a pretty good deal if you’re looking for something sporty, unusual, and are working with a limited budget. The seller mentions “the usual detuned US market model” although I’m not sure these were ever officially imported to the States. Either way, if you’re interested in picking this up, be sure to verify that you can legally register it in your home state and request some better images to verify the bike’s condition.

-tad

Bantamweight Sportbike: 1990 Kawasaki ZXR400 for Sale
Honda January 4, 2017 posted by

Third Generation: 1990 Honda NSR250R for Sale

The MC21 was the third generation of Honda’s lithe NSR250R, their entry into the quarter-liter two-stroke class that had been hotly contested by the major Japanese manufacturers since the mid 1980s. Power was modest, at least in stock form, but handling was cutting-edge, and the bike was packed with the usual wealth of Honda tech: PGM-III electronic ignition that used a three-dimensional ignition map for each cylinder and RC “Revolution Control” powervalve technology.

The NSR250R was motivated by a 90° liquid-cooled 249cc v-twin backed up with a six-speed cassette gearbox for bench-racing bragging rights and quick gearing changes at the track. From the factory, these were limited to 45hp by Japanese regulations, but more power is available from de-restricted bikes and today’s machine is claimed to have a full compliment of horses. Triple disc brakes quickly brought the 300lb machine to a stop and both front and rear wheels were now 17″ [earlier MC16 and MC18s had 18″ rears] for modern looks and a slightly wider selection of modern rubber.

From the original eBay listing: 1990 Honda NSR250R for Sale

Up for auction is a beautiful 1990 Honda NSR 250 “R” model with only 8610 miles. The bike was legally imported into the United States.The bike has a clear US title with the proper 11 digit VIN number (title and frame number match). The bike has been de-restricted for full power. Bike starts first kick every time and idols perfect with no oil leaks. The bike is all original minus stainless steel brake lines, gas cap, rear set, and clutch and brake levers. Please view all the images as there are few scratches and scuff’s throughout the bike. Also please keep in mind that this is all OEM factory Honda fairings and not the cheaper aftermarket stuff. All the electronics including horn, turn signals,high and low beam, and killswitch all work as they should. The carbs were recently cleaned as well as brand-new spark plugs and all fresh fluids. The bike also has a new battery and tires with less than 150 miles on them.  This bike is being sold locally and I encourage all bidders to come down and view the bike in person or send a local mechanic on your behalf to view for you. Rare vintage Japanese bikes don’t come up often and this is a beautiful example with no disappointment.  I’d also like to note that the bike can be titled in any state other than California. I do know that some NSR’s are titled in the state but do not know the loopholes to get the bike titled in California. All other states are fine to be titled for street use.

The seller also includes a nice startup/walkaround video so you can feel a bit better about taking a chance on this particular two-stroke. Bidding is up just over $6,100 with the Reserve Not Yet Met and several days left on the auction. It’s not in perfect shape, with a few scrapes, scratches, and missing fasteners, but there is very little corrosion or discoloration on the aluminum parts, and the seller claims those are the original fairings.

-tad

Third Generation: 1990 Honda NSR250R for Sale
Ducati December 1, 2016 posted by

Nearly New: 1998 Ducati 916 With Just 245 Miles for Sale

1998-ducati-916-r-front

Much ink has been spilled waxing poetic about Massimo Tamburini’s masterpiece, the Ducati 916. The bike was such a common sight throughout the 90s as the two-wheeled incarnation of lust, it’s become a bit… familiar, and it’s easy to forget just how shockingly sexy this bike was when it was introduced: the incredibly slim waist, the single-sided swingarm, the undertail exhausts, and those huge side-panels, bare of graphics except for simple Ducati logos.

1998-ducati-916-l-side

Under the curvy new skin, the mechanicals were an evolution of Ducati’s 888: a liquid-cooled, four-valve 90° v-twin displacing 916cc and producing 114hp, backed by a six-speed gearbox and a traditional, rattly dry clutch. That powerplant was housed in a stiff, lightweight steel trellis frame that helped define Ducati superbikes until the nearly frameless Panigale came along.

1998-ducati-916-r-rear

The 916 was impractical, uncomfortable, and expensive both to buy and to maintain. But it was also impossibly desirable and undeniably fast. If you’re looking for one now, prices have become very reasonable, at least in terms of the initial purchase: they’re still expensive to maintain and require regular attention. And that combination of “uncomfortable” and “expensive to buy and maintain” means that there are plenty running around in excellent condition and with very low miles. But ones with just a couple hundred miles on the odometer like this one are few and far between.

1998-ducati-916-clocks

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Ducati 916 for Sale

Yes this beautiful Superbike has 245 miles on it.  It would have had less but I had to drive it to see Frankie Chili the Superbike star to sign the tank.  I bought from a guy who owned a huge plumbing company who bought it at Sotheby’s charity auction in 2002 brand new in Vegas after being signed by Ben Bostrom. Several other amazing guys signed tank but unfortunately while sitting in my office got cleaned by a cleaning person and ruined the signatures.   Bike is in my storage next to Jet Tunning, one of the Premier Motorcycle tuners in all of CA.  Bike has not been started since 2006.  Battery disconnected and fuel drained.  Bike is 100% original, never dropped or scratched. Clean Title as expected.  I bought this bike as art.  It was enjoyed by 1000s of folks who loved the fact that this was the body style that put Ducati back on the map in the 1990s.  Office building sold and now in warehouse covered.  Needs a good home where someone can hang it over a bar, or put in a collection, or maybe just rode hard for the first time in its life.  Thanks for looking.

1998-ducati-916-r-side

The $7,500 asking price is high for a bog-standard 916, or it would be, if it wasn’t virtually brand-new. As it is, that seems like a decent price for such a pristine machine, although I’d be tempted to just clean the badly-smudged signatures off the tank for a dead-stock look. It’s a shame, since they’d be a very cool addition for a display bike if they were in good condition… And honestly, “display” is probably what will happen to this bike: there are plenty of nice, well-maintained bikes around if you’re looking for one to ride, and this bike would probably need a comprehensive service if you wanted to actually ride it.

You’d also probably want to remove those “916” decals from the side panels: earlier 916s with the older graphics had the displacement displayed but, when Ducati switched to their new corporate logo, it was dropped until the introduction of the updated 996. Not a good aesthetic choice, but very easy to fix.

-tad

1998-ducati-916-tank

Nearly New: 1998 Ducati 916 With Just 245 Miles for Sale
Ducati November 18, 2016 posted by

Monster Mash: 2007 Ducati Monster S4RS for Sale

2007-ducati-monster-s4rs-r-side

This Monster S4RS was the ultimate incarnation of Ducati’s first-generation naked bike. The very first air-cooled Monsters were sporty and fun, but quickly outpaced by bikes like Triumph’s updated, bug-eyed Speed Triple, Aprilia’s Tuono, and the wild naked bikes from KTM. Luckily, Ducati already had the right engine for the job, and fitted their four-valve, liquid-cooled 998cc Testastretta engine into the bike for a huge jump in power that catapulted the bike back into class contention.

2007-ducati-monster-s4rs-l-side

Unfortunately, although the bike had the parts and the pedigree, the resulting bike didn’t really gel. In terms of pure numbers, it put Ducati back in the hunt, but it worked better in theory than in practice: the engine is stunning, but overpowers the bike a bit, handling isn’t quite as good as it should be given the quality suspension components, and the uncomfortable riding position and limited tank range make this more of a toy than a daily rider. Basically, it was more hairy than fast, and was cursed with Ducati’s frequent servicing requirements.

2007-ducati-monster-s4rs-clocks

Styling too is a bit compromised, with Miguel Galluzi’s elemental design burdened by several bulky radiators stuck to the front of the engine, with hoses and tubes running this way and that. Modern liquid-cooled Monsters have more thoughtfully-routed coolant systems, but the earlier bikes look a bit like a lash-up if you look closely. If posing and wheelies are your thing and the standard Monster’s power just doesn’t cut it, these make very fun and very fast point-and-squirt motorcycles with tons of sex appeal.

2007-ducati-monster-s4rs-exhausts

From the original eBay listing: 2007 Ducati Monster S4RS for Sale

This is my  2007 Ducati Monster S4Rs Testastretta. I bought this bike brand new in 2007. It currently has 7,400 miles, with brand new tires, a new Shorai lithium-ion battery, and is up to date on all services. Service work has all been performed at Hall’s Ducati in Springfield Illinois. It has well over $13,000 in extras and performance upgrades. I’m not sure I can list everything it has, but I’ll try.

  • Full Termignoni exhaust system
  • Ducati Performance ECU
  • Ducati Performance airbox and high flow air filter
  • Nichol’s light weight fly wheel
  • Ducati Performance silicone coolant hoses
  • Oberon clutch slave cylinder
  • Fast By Ferracci clutch pressure plate
  • Speedy Moto clutch springs/caps
  • PSR clutch cover
  • PSR inspection plate cover
  • MPL tuning billet frame plugs
  • Rizoma bar ends
  • Rizoma bar end mirrors
  • Rizoma Graffio LED front turn signals
  • LED taillight with integrated, sequential turn signals
  • Rear tail chop/license plate relocation
  • Oberon billet gas cap
  • Ducati Performance rear sprocket carrier
  • RK Racing gold X-ring chain
  • Rizoma clip-on handle bars and triple clamp
  • Custom Ducati fluid reservoir caps
  • ASV control clamps
  • Pazzo Racing adjustable levers
  • Zero Gravity smoke windscreen
  • Custom fairing stabilizers
  • Dunlop Q3 tires-less than 500 miles on them
  • Stainless steel oil filter housing w/reusable filter
  • Shorai lithium-ion battery

The starting bid is $8,900 with no takers as yet and plenty of time left on the auction. For some people, a “custom bike” involves an Indianapolis Colts paintjob and chrome spikes. Seriously, you guys have no idea what sort of horrors we have to wade through to bring you these bikes featured on the site… Luckily, for Ducati owners, “custom” means a veritable smorgasbord of lightweight carbon, titanium bits, and booming exhausts, expensive updates to their already expensive machines. Honestly, you can pretty much buy a decent early carbureted Monster for what that full Termignoni exhaust costs…

-tad

2007-ducati-monster-s4rs-l-side-front

Monster Mash: 2007 Ducati Monster S4RS for Sale