Posts by tag: Liquid Cooled

Honda October 26, 2016 posted by

Flyweight Racer Redux: 1996 Honda RS125R for Sale

1996-honda-rs125r-r-front2As I’ve mentioned before, it’s weird how some bikes seem to show up in waves, and this is the third Honda RS125R I’ve seen this week. The previous example I posted was in very good condition and came with a nice stash of spares, but was more functional than this particular bike, which also has “TONS” of spare parts along with a very slick paint job.

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Hiding behind those red, white, and blue fairings and nestled in between those beautiful aluminum frame rails is the compact, slightly undersquare 54mm x 54.5mm two-stroke single and a six-speed gearbox. It can be tuned to produce over 40hp and, with a dry weight of under 160 pounds, it’s very possible that the new owner will weigh more than the bike itself. The single Brembo caliper and disc up front should be plenty to haul the bike down from speed, given the bike’s incredibly low weight.

1996-honda-rs125r-dash

The only downside to this bike? It’d be a shame to abuse that nice paint rubbing fenders with other racebikes on tracks, but it’d be a shame to let a machine this focused sit as a static display piece…

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Honda RS125R for Sale

Super rare and unique. I restored this bike from the ground up 6 years ago when I purchased it in 2010. Custom designed paint and graphics, it looks insane. Pearlescent clear coat over the paint – spent way too much money and many many hours to create. It is a piece of art. Riders like Loris Capirossi, Dani Pedrosa and Nicky Hayden got their starts racing RS125Rs… here’s your chance to own one. 

Carbon fiber pipe and paint matched carbon fiber rear tire hugger, color matched rear stand. It has rare Hjelm Motorsports rear sets, carbon fiber handlebars, working tach and temp gauge. New slicks (from 2010). Price includes TONS of spare parts, extra cylinder head, rebuild kit parts, carb jets for altitude adjustment, many sprockets… way too much to list.

Bike has been on display in my foyer and detailed with plexus monthly. Tank is dry (no corrosion) Everything on the bike has been restored, rebuilt or replaced. Should start right up with some fresh premix. Will need a brake fluid flush from sitting as well. 

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With the seller asking $5,700 this RS125R seems to far more reasonably priced than last week’s example, and also includes a wide range of spare parts to keep it running. I’m not sure if the graphics correspond with any race team’s colors, but I’m pretty sure these all came with bare white fairings originally anyway, ready for sponsor decals and whatever wild look your up-and-coming racer wanted.

-tad

1996-honda-rs125r-l-side

Flyweight Racer Redux: 1996 Honda RS125R for Sale
Suzuki October 19, 2016 posted by

Good As New: 1986 Suzuki RG500Γ for Sale

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“It’s only new once” is pretty axiomatic in the collector car and bike worlds. Meaning that a slightly imperfect, but time-capsule machine with a bit of wear and tear is generally more desirable than a perfectly restored, better-than-new example to many collectors. Original machines have flaws: they’re often mass-produced, or have little cosmetic flaws from the factory, but they accurately reflect the bike as it would have been at the time it was running around, terrorizing the backroads. This 1986 Suzuki RG500Γ “Gamma” is claimed to have been restored to “as-new” condition. Personally, I’d actually prefer a bike that improves a bit upon the original, adds in a few modern parts for the sake of reliability and performance at the cost of some period-correctness. But then I’m not a well-heeled motorcycle enthusiast.

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If you’re not familiar with Suzuki’s Gamma, hello and welcome to RareSportBikesforSale! The bike was Suzuki’s very trick race-replica, competing in a class of two against Yamaha’s RZ500. Both used four-cylinder, two-stroke powerplants exclusive to their respective models and shared with no other bikes. In the Suzuki’s case, it was a water-cooled 500cc square-four with a pair of cranks versus the Yamaha’s V4, also with two crankshafts. The RG500 made in the neighborhood of 100hp and weighed in at around 400lbs dry.

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Not very impressive today but it was considered pretty quick in 1986. But the numbers don’t tell the whole story, and straight-line performance wasn’t really the point of this race-replica: that highly-strung engine provided an addictive hit when it came “on the pipe,” while cutting-edge handling rewarded skilled riders. Of the two, the Suzuki was considered far more “hard core” and is the more desirable choice today, although both are very collectible motorcycles that evoke a lost era of two-stroke performance.

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From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki RG500Γ for Sale

Totally restored to new machine it is a great bike
I have all the bills and documents for what was done for this rebuild
Bike comes with a service manual and a very rare microfiche of all parts for the Gamma
This bike has 2 seats a mono and double, original keys
New tires and bearings and many more original parts from Suzuki
Bike has been totally re-calibrated to factory Suzuki spec by Pulsion Suzuki call ask for Mike on this bike
Location is in Drummonville Quebec Canada
Will miss it reason for sale moving to Africa

1986-suzuki-rg500-engine-detail

The Starting Bid and the Buy It Now on this bike are both $12,500 with no takers yet. I’d prefer some higher-resolution photos that show the bike off in all its glory, but from what I can tell, it looks pretty clean, so I’m not sure what’s causing bidders to be gun-shy. Maybe it’s the lack of detail in the listing? The bike’s inherent Canadian-ness? I’m sure our readers will have some ideas… “Restored” can have a few different meanings in eBay Land so it might be worth it to email the seller for a few more details before plunking down your cash, but for those of us just dreaming this should serve as inspiration.

-tad

1986-suzuki-rg500-r-front

Good As New: 1986 Suzuki RG500Γ for Sale
Yamaha September 2, 2016 posted by

Featured Listing: CA-Titled 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale

Update 9.4.2016: I’ve received word that this bike is now sold. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

This Featured Listing is part of a set from the sellers for a VFR400, TZR250, and an NSR250. They are available for purchase as a group or individually. The sellers are available this labor day weekend for personal inspections in Southern California. -dc

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1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA L Front

Here in the USA, the 80s and 90s saw intense competition between the Japanese Big Four in the 600cc and 750cc classes, with the bikes seeing almost yearly updates to the roadbikes and fierce rivalries on track. Oveseas, the same sort of knife-fight-in-a-phone-booth competition was happening in the quarter-liter sportbike class, with little two-strokes like this TZR250 looking for any performance advantage to edge out its rivals.

1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA R Rear

Earlier bikes in the class were mostly parallel-twins, although Honda, Suzuki, and Yamaha were all running v-twins by the late 90s, all in an effort to maximize the slim performance benefits available. All featured cutting-edge technology, with lightweight aluminum beam frames, top-spec brakes, power valves, “banana” swingarms designed to maximize cornering clearance, and bulging expansion chambers. Later bikes even featured some seriously cutting-edge electronics, with Honda’s PGM-III creating a three-dimensional ignition map for each cylinder, based on throttle-position, revs, and gear. The bikes all made similar power and weighed in at around 300lbs, with narrow powerbands and razor-sharp handling.

1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA L Tank

Before moving to a v-twin with the 3XV, Yamaha experimented with the 3MA version of their TZR250 that used a parallel-twin configuration with the cylinders reversed so the carburetors were up front and the exhausts faced to the rear. This mainly seems to have been a way to efficiently package the bike’s exhausts: two-strokes rely on bulbous expansion chambers to make competitive power, and routing them under and around the engine and past the swingarm was challenging. Aside from some slightly bulging side-panels, the reverse-cylinder 3MA solved that problem, and the stinger tips poking through the tail look very trick.

1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA R Fairing

The 3MA is a pretty exotic little bike and pretty rare outside Japan. Reliability is claimed to be no worse than any other 250cc two-stroke, but parts availability for this Japanese-market-only bike can be tricky. Looking for performance parts for your NSR250? Tyga’s got a whole website worth of exhausts, engine kits, rearsets, and bodywork. The 3MA? Better brush up on your Japanese and get ready for long waits as parts ship from the other side of the world.

1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA L Rear

From the seller: 1989 TZR250 3MA for Sale

7,614km Original owner, purchased new from EMI, CA titled & registration (currently on non-op), this TZR is basically stock except for custom ceramic coated expansion chambers with jetting to match, braided steel brake lines, rear fender eliminated, and has full tread Bridgestone Battlax BT014 tires. Oil injection intact. Rear lower corner of left side fairing damaged, not too visible, but needs repair. Has not been started in a while, but fuel system is dry, petcock recently rebuilt.

Spares & extras: Gearbox cassette, steering damper, & a few bits.

Comes with Pit Bull rear stand, fresh Yuasa battery and trickle charger, parts catalog, service manual, and more documentation. Pit Bull front stand is available.

$5900

In case you don’t feel like doing math this morning, 7,614km works out to just 4,731 miles. The price is on the high side for a 3MA, but not by very much, and the bike’s legal status and very low miles more than make up for it: I hear that it’s possible to register these in California, but it can be expensive and difficult. This one saves you the trouble, and includes some spares to boot. It’s not absolutely perfect cosmetically, but unless you’re looking for a museum piece, this looks like a great example. I don’t have the money or the space for another bike right now, but this one’s making me wish I did.

-tad

1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA R Seat

Featured Listing: CA-Titled 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale
Yamaha August 31, 2016 posted by

Starting Small: 1985 Yamaha TZR250 1KT for Sale

1985 Yamaha TZR250 R Side Front

Designed as a natural evolution of Yamaha’s RD two-stroke sportbikes, the TZR250 helped set the tone for the entire class, and the bike featured a lightweight aluminum beam frame, full bodywork, and liquid-cooling for the twin-cylinder powerplant that produced a claimed 50hp with the help of Yamahas YPVS power-valve. Until the introduction of the 3XV version of the bike in 1991, Yamaha used a parallel-twin configuration although rivals from Honda and Suzuki quickly moved to v-twin engines. The TZR was cutting-edge when introduced but was quickly eclipsed by the sportier offerings from Suzuki, Kawasaki, and Honda until the 3MA reverse-cylinder version was introduced, although that bike was never officially available outside Japan.

1985 Yamaha TZR250 L Side

Unlike some other small sportbikes of the 80s and 90s, including Yamaha’s own 3MA, the TZR250 came with 17” wheels front and rear. This could, in theory, could help with tire selection: there are lots of smaller “sportbike lite” Ninja 300s and CBR300s running around and certainly bikes like KTM’s RC390 cry out for sporty rubber in skinnier sizes. The single front disc and caliper probably won’t offer cutting-edge stopping power but, with good pads fitted, should pull the sub-300lb machine up well enough.

1985 Yamaha TZR250 Clocks

This example is fresh off the boat from one of the regular eBay importers, and looks very striking in this unfamiliar color scheme. If you’re comfortable with DMV shenanigans in your home state, keep an eye on this one. It’s a little rough around the edges, with some scuffs and surface corrosion, but is complete and appears to run well.

1985 Yamaha TZR250 R Side

From the original eBay listing: 1985 Yamaha TZR250 1KT for Sale

The bike is just imported from Japan. Not registered yet in the U.S. Very good running condition sharp response of 2-stroke engine is still well. Can shift all gears very smooth. Brakes are work fine. Electricals are all working. Has YAMAHA genuine fairings, but has hairline cracks and chips and scratches on fairings. Fuel tank has some scratches. Will needs new tires and fork seals too. Speedometer looks YAMAHA genuine parts and shows 11,900 km = about 7,400 mi, but actual mileage is unknown. Has an original key.

This is an over 30 years old used bike. Sold as is with NO warranty NO refunds NO return.

1985 Yamaha TZR250 Engine

The seller also includes a video of the bike starting and running. The last TZR250 1KT we featured sold for $6,000 on the nose, so this one should probably fall somewhat lower given the recently imported status: the aforementioned bike actually had a NJ title. I happen to like the graphics on this one, although traditionalists may prefer the period’s seemingly more common red/white speedblock pattern, so I’m not sure how the color will affect interest in the bike.

Keep in mind that this is a no-reserve auction, so keep an eye on this little TZR as it might go for cheap.

-tad

1985 Yamaha TZR250 L Side Rear

Starting Small: 1985 Yamaha TZR250 1KT for Sale
Triumph August 26, 2016 posted by

Four Cylinder Brit: 1995 Triumph Daytona 1200 for Sale

1995 Triumph Daytona 1200 L Side

The sagas of some of the most well-known European manufacturers can read like film scripts, full of action and intrigue. But if Ducati’s story is a bit like an Indiana Jones movie, with death-defying thrills and narrow escapes from doom, Triumph’s history is a bit like a zombie movie, since they were basically dead and buried when John Bloor came along to resurrect the company. So how does a shambling, undead motorcycle manufacturer with limited resources and a less-than-stellar reputation for quality create a successful range of motorcycles from scratch? With interesting niche machines like today’s Daytona 1200.

1995 Triumph Daytona 1200 Tank

Triumph’s bikes of the period were designed around a modular concept that allowed Triumph to develop a wide variety of motorcycles for different riders with a minimal cost. It also allowed them to quickly introduce new models and capitalize on market trends. Introduced in 1993, the Daytona was virtually identical to the touring Trophy, with new bodywork, suspension, and tires. But those small changes resulted in a bike that was much more than the sum of its parts.

1995 Triumph Daytona 1200 Front Brake

The Daytona 1200 is much like the 900 in terms of character, only more so: the big 1180cc inline four isn’t so much a lightweight sportbike as it is an alternative to something like the ZX-11, a fast, big-bore GT. And while the other bikes in the class battled it out for top-speed honors, the Daytona wisely demurred and stuck with road-biased gearing that emphasized the beastly midrange stomp of the big four and gave the bike seriously rapid acceleration up to 100mph. The engine produced a claimed 147hp and 85lb-ft of torque, pulling around 550lbs wet. That horsepower number may not scream “high performance” but take a look at that torque figure: right on par with modern literbikes, although the Daytona obviously has more weight to lug around. Handling was very good, but limited by the bike’s 550lb wet weight, a downside of Triumph’s modular construction. Comfort was excellent as well, almost as if Triumph expected their customers to actually ride their machines…

1995 Triumph Daytona 1200 Clocks

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Triumph Daytona 1200 for Sale

This is a one owner bike purchased from new. It has 5,093 100% original miles. This bike is 100% original except for the D&D exhaust system. It has never been in an accident of any kind. We have the original clean title, everything is authentic.

Very few miles have rolled under the wheels of today’s example. It appears to be in excellent condition, and includes an aftermarket exhaust that should reduce the weight slightly and increase the volume and quality of the noise, although D&D exhausts can be a little on the loud side. That $6,588.00 Buy It Now price is pricey for an old Daytona, but I bet you won’t see one nicer anytime soon. The seller also includes a very nice, high-resolution video of the bike to give you a good idea of what you’ll be buying.

1995 Triumph Daytona 1200 Engine Detail

Triumph knew that their modular design was never going to compete directly with specialized bikes from the Japanese manufacturers, so they simply went their own way, and focused on maximizing the performance of their platform, improving the quality, and styled their products to appeal to a more sophisticated, mature rider who didn’t need to pretend they were going to win races on their machines. That may not have led to bragging rights at the time, but it made for a very well-rounded machine that’s aged very well: styling is classic and the bike offers very real performance. All of the Daytonas, and even the later 595 and 955 versions are starting to increase in value of late. If you’re looking for a handsome bike with character and the ability to munch miles, a Daytona like this one might make an excellent addition to your stable.

-tad

1995 Triumph Daytona 1200 R Side Rear

Four Cylinder Brit: 1995 Triumph Daytona 1200 for Sale
Ducati August 16, 2016 posted by

Featured Listing: 1992 Ducati 851 for Sale

Update 8.26.2016: Sold! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

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Far less common and cliché than the 916, the Ducati 851 represents the connoisseur’s choice for Ducati fans looking for a classic superbike. Although it’s hard to argue with the significance of the 916, it’s almost a victim of its own success. I mean, nearly the same bodywork for twenty years, in two different sizes, for three generations… there’s just too dang many of them. So while the SPS and R models certainly qualify as “rare” and low-mileage examples are quickly increasing in value, it’s not too hard to pick up decent 916s and especially 748s for under $5,000 if you look around.

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But the 851 and 888 were made in much smaller numbers for a much shorter period of time. The 916 may have perfected the formula, but the 851 is the founder of Ducati’s superbike feast. It was the first roadgoing Ducati to feature the four-valve, liquid-cooled Desmoquattro. The bike came about because of the company’s need for a more powerful engine to compete in World Superbike racing. Their air/oil-cooled engines were certainly competitive in smaller classes in the early 1980s but Ducati needed something far more potent to compete against the 750cc four-cylinder machines from Japan.

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Introduced in 1987, the bike was a success both on track and in the showroom, and helped establish Ducati as the sportbike player it is today. The heavily-revised engine kept the fat midrange of a twin, but coupled it with more revs and a 93hp top end that helped it keep up with the screaming four-cylinder competition. Styling is chunky and less sexual than a 916, but it looks purposeful and distinctive, with a pair of traditionally-mounted exhausts announcing the bike’s v-twin-ness.

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Today’s example appears to be very clean and well-maintained, with a number of tasteful and functional updates, and that very reasonable $6,400 asking price just sweetens the deal.
From the seller: 1992 Ducati 851 for Sale

This is a great bike that has had a few appreciative owners. Don’t worry this girl has been well cared for. In the last 2 weeks and 50 miles the oil, brake/clutch fluid, and belts have been changed. When the Tech changed the belts he went over the bike and feels it needs nothing. I’ve had it for the last 18 months and I’ve ridden it about 1500 care free miles. This girl is ready to ride, needs nothing. 
I bought this bike about 18 months ago, I planned to keep it for a while but I recently lost my storage so I should sell a few bikes.

Metzler Sportec tires, less than 2500 miles
Shiny Carbon Fiber – Front Fender, Belt covers, Clutch cover, Countershaft Sprocket cover, Rear “Hugger”
Stainless front brake lines
Barnett Clutch – installed 1500 miles ago
Lightweight aluminum clutch Hub
Evoluzione clutch slave
Nichols Motorsports Engine Bolts
Classic Carbon Ferraci High pipes, these are the good ones with badge not the cheesy sticker. Ferraci Chip, K&N AirFilter (Don’t have Airbox lid)
520 racing Chain conversion — DID O-ring chain, hardened sprockets – Installed 1500 miles ago
Forks were re-built with stock internals, 1500 miles ago.
23,300 miles
$6400

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Miles on this particular bike are higher than on some of the top-dollar collectibles and it’s not one of the rarer versions of the 851, but maintenance appears to have been pretty meticulous and the bike has obviously been owned by enthusiasts. “Low miles” is an appealing quality in theory but, when you’re looking at a 24-year-old motorcycle, “high-mileage with regular use and careful maintenance” is a far better prospect than “low-mileage and has been sitting in my living room for the past fifteen years.” Motorcycles, particularly Ducatis, do not do well with extended periods of inactivity but the basic mechanicals are, in fact, pretty robust and this example is just what you want if you intend to ride your collectible. Certainly, a 916 has the more iconic looks, but an 851 is rarer, has humane ergonomics, and offers up similar performance, making it the less-obvious choice.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1992 Ducati 851 for Sale
Yamaha August 15, 2016 posted by

East Coast Smoker: 1986 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale

1986 Yamaha TZR250 R Side Front

Introduced in 1986, the Yamaha TZR250 was the follow up to their RD family of sportbikes. Yamaha’s first go at a quarter-liter TZR had middling success: it wasn’t especially competitive next to more focused rivals from Kawasaki and Suzuki on track, but it was a far better roadbike. The TZR followed the standard two-fiddy two-stroke formula of the period, with a lightweight aluminum frame and fully-faired bodywork surrounding a 249cc liquid-cooled parallel twin, and midrange courtesy of Yamaha’s YPVS power valve. They claimed 50hp from the motor, which made the 282lb dry machine capable of a top speed north of 120mph.

1986 Yamaha TZR250 L Fairing

17” wheels could be found at both ends, although tire sizes fall somewhere near bicycle width in the front and front tire at the rear… The single disc brake up front was adequate and pretty standard for lightweight sportbikes of the period, although twin front discs quickly became the norm for the 250cc class. Apparently a “blue spot” caliper from an R1 or R6 will bolt directly onto the stock front forks if you feel you need a bit more stopping power, a little restomod touch, or a splash of color.

1986 Yamaha TZR250 R Side

The first TZRs were known as the 2MA or 1KT bikes, depending on the market in which they were sold. Later, the parallel twin saw its cylinders reversed in an effort to improve cornering clearance in the 3MA, before Yamaha switched to a v-twin for the final, 3XV version.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale

86 TZR250, 9362 Kilometers.
Imported from Japan one year ago.
Super rare. Runs well.
Will ship at your expense.

Well that’s not exactly a ton of information, almost an eBay haiku, but at least the seller includes a number of nice pictures. Even with the recent influx of grey-market two-strokes, the Yamaha TZR is pretty rare, although at that $6,000 Buy It Now price seems on the high side. They’re claimed to be relatively easy to maintain which is appealing, considering parts will have to ship from overseas most likely.

Interestingly, this particular little smoker is hiding in New Jersey. See: some good things do come from Jersey! Besides me of course: I grew up there. Actually, I’ve never really understood all the hate heaped on Jersey. It’s like people fly into Newark International Airport and decide that the whole place must just be more of the same. Or they get their information from uppity New York residents… Anyway, the state may be best known for its Jersey Shore bro-culture and really good tomatoes, but it is most definitely not known for having a permissive DMV, so I’m wondering about the status of this TZR. Is it registered and titled? The listing doesn’t say. Maybe that’s why it’s being sold after only a year? Considering that these early 2MA bikes are supposed to be most at home on the road, it’d be a shame if this was for collectors and track-riders only.

-tad

1986 Yamaha TZR250 L Side

East Coast Smoker: 1986 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale
Yamaha August 12, 2016 posted by

Pint-Sized Racer: 2006 Yamaha TZ125 for Sale

2006 Yamaha TZ125 R Side

Unlike the roadgoing, but still-sporty TZR series, Yamaha’s TZ bikes were track-only motorcycles with performance far exceeding what road riders might expect from their diminutive displacements and dimensions: technically, the Yamaha TZ125 isn’t even pint-sized as this post title implies, since Google reliably informs me that a pint is actually 473cc, and even a cup is 236cc, which is an interesting coincidence for bikes like the Aprilia RS250 Cup… The TZ125 featured a liquid-cooled two stroke with slightly oversquare 56mm x 50.7mm bore and stroke that produced an impressive 44hp from those 124cc, helped by Yamaha’s YPVS power-valve. Pushing just 160lbs “semi-dry,” the featherweight sportbike could see speeds north of 125mph, depending on tuning, gearing, and what the rider had for breakfast.

2006 Yamaha TZ125 L Side Bare

A cassette-style six-speed gearbox allows for quick trackside repairs and changes, and there’s no starter of any kind, so rollers or bump-starting are the order of the day. Keep in mind that this is a true MotoGP machine in miniature, so you should be prepared to spend plenty of time between race or track weekends tweaking and maintaining this highly-strung little beast. But even just sitting still, this is such a cool machine: the details and welds on the frame, that huge intake snorkel, the dry clutch jutting from the side of the bike, and the airbox nestled between the frame spars.

2006 Yamaha TZ125 Dash

These probably work better for younger or smaller riders, owing to the fact that even last night’s heavy meal could make a difference in top-speed and acceleration. Those 20 pounds of ballast you’ve put on since college? Yeah, that’s more than 10% of the bike’s total weight. But several commenters in the past have claimed that taller folks can actually ride them, something I hope to put to the test at one point or another.

2006 Yamaha TZ125 R Side Bare

From the original eBay listing: 2006 Yamaha TZ125 for Sale

Yamaha TZ125 Roadracer 2006 year model, all must go! Same owner since bought new in Nov 2005, original crankcases as new, KLS shifter, Ohlins rear shock, Marchesini wheels, Galfer brakes, PVL programmable ignition, MCE Racing/airtech airbox and fairing, thumb Choke, Storz steering damper, MCE Racing ported and flowed Cylinder, MCE Racing crankshaft, MCE Racing tuned engine. Additional spare parts, new crank cases, 2 new cylinders, 3 new cylinder heads, new front forks, 2 new windscreens, front and rear stands, tools with toolbox, crankshaft fixtures, foldable steel worktable, misc new gaskets, leathers, gloves, helmet, Accumix jug. Dent in top of fuel tank from something falling while in storage, can be removed by dent specialist.

The listing is pretty simple, but includes plenty of information about performance modification and spares included. The bike has a starting bid of $6,995 with no takers yet, which seems fair for a pure racing machine that includes some trick updates and a bunch of parts to keep the bike running for a long time to come.

-tad

2006 Yamaha TZ125 L Side

Pint-Sized Racer: 2006 Yamaha TZ125 for Sale