Posts by tag: Liquid Cooled

Featured Listing April 18, 2019 posted by

Sponsored Listing: 1990 Kawasaki Ninja 750R

This listing is for our friends and Primary Sponsor: Iconic Motorbikes. Thanks as always for supporting the site guys! -dc

This is not the bright-green, dual headlight monster most people call to mind when you say, "750cc Kawasaki Ninja." Instead of the truly featherweight lairiness of the Kawasaki ZX-7R, the 1990 Kawasaki Ninja 750R delivers a still-potent punch with much better manners than its race replica stablemate.

The Ninja 750R originally was designed to compete with the likes of the Honda Interceptor and the Suzuki GSX-R 750, but from the get-go it had higher bars and a slightly less spine-eroding seating position. It was fast enough to keep yourself entertained, but cushy enough to go two-up. It also bears the distinction of being the last fully-faired Japanese sportbike to rock a steel frame.

This one, offered by our friends and site sponsor Iconic Motorbikes, is in close to immaculate condition, with just north of 9,000 miles on it. It has apparently been sitting for some time, but was put away and stored properly, so new tires and perhaps a new chain should be all it needs to fall right back into duty as a big mileage puller. The red-black-silver livery is much less noisy than the racebike's, and is a nice nod to the GPz 900 that graced Top Gun.

From the seller:

1990 Kawasaki Ninja 750R – Excellent Condition – Only 9032 Miles
Here we have one of the cleanest Ninja 750R’s we’re yet to come across.

This 1990 750R is a solid 9.5 out of 10 and 100% stock! Harder and harder to find in this condition and even more difficult to find unmolested!

Perfect for a collector or a rider however if you’re planning to ride, plan on tires and some recommissioning costs as she’s been sitting for quite some time. Thankfully the bike was put away dry and stored properly so costs will not be excessive and we’d be happy to help!

At $6,050, the bike is priced according to its condition and scarcity when compared to the faster ZX-7R. For that, you're getting a great, classic sport tourer with tons of years left.

Sponsored Listing: 1990 Kawasaki Ninja 750R
Featured Listing April 17, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR1000

For as plentiful as bikes like this 1987 Yamaha FZR1000 were in their day, it's becoming increasingly rare to see them pop up on the local Craigslist, as time and the squiddly behavior they enable take their toll. But nice ones are still out there, and more often than not you'll see them for sale here.

When the 1987 Yamaha FZR1000 dropped, it was one of a few bikes with mind-bending numbers that signalled the dawn of the superbike age. Honda had their VFRs, Suzuki their GSXRs and Yamaha had the FZR1000, which carried the most modern looks and eye-watering power numbers. By today's standards, where the price of a nicely-equipped Civic will get you a 210-horsepower Aprilia RSV4, the FZR's 135 horsepower doesn't seem that crazy. But back in '87, it might as well have been a Saturn IV rocket.

That grunt let the big FZR hit 60 in less than three seconds and run to a 160 mph top speed, which is fast by any standard, and far and away enough for any mortal.

This 1987 Yamaha FZR1000 is in beautiful condition, especially considering its age and the 46,000 miles on the odometer. There are age-associated blemishes here and there and a couple stress cracks, but it is otherwise flawless. The only deviations from stock are an aftermarket windscreen and a manual switch for the cooling fan.

From the seller:

Bike is extremely rare and in immaculate condition.

* Brand new tires and brakes front and rear, battery and fork seals all have less that 25 miles
* All fluids just changed
* Near perfect paint and bodywork - only a small stress crack around one of the fairing fasteners and a couple very small fairing scratches
* Unmolested, spotlessly clean and completely stock except for aftermarket windscreen and a hard-wired switch to operate cooling fan manually
* Solo seat is present
* 75,000 kms (46000 miles)
* Starts, runs and shifts perfectly and everything works as it should with the exception of the high/low beam switch which is a bit temperamental at times on low beam, but I always ride with high beam so it's not an issue for me and should be an easy fix
* Bike is located in Vancouver, BC and is open to reasonable offers, as I'm not in a rush or need to sell it
* Buyer will be responsible for shipping, but will provide buyer assistance

Price $3,900. Contact Ken by email: kennethemsley@gmail.com

For a rider or a collector, there is little to dislike about this one. With Yamaha's reputation for durability, even the relatively high mileage should not be a concern. To chat with the seller, reach out to kennethemsley@gmail.com.

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR1000
Yamaha April 9, 2019 posted by

Small Bites: 1990 Yamaha FZR 400

Always a gem in original guise, the Yamaha FZR400 stands alone as the smaller-than-middleweight that was officially imported into the United States. Unlike the current crop of small-bore US bikes, these 400cc scoots were often reserved for European countries only; power-hungry America was not seen as a viable market by most manufacturers. This was partially borne out by the FZR400 - it was drastically out-sold by the FZR600 and FZR1000 here in the US. Because of that, the FZR400 is relatively rare. But more than just rare, the FZR400 is a fantastic performer...provided you bring reasonable expectations to the table. Today's example is a 1990 model and looks great.

1990 Yamaha FZR 400 for sale on eBay

When compared to some of the other 400cc set (especially the Honda NC24/27/30 series), the FZR400 is often seen as less technologically advanced. The engine is somewhat conventional and resembles a slimmed down 600cc mill: a liquid cooled, inline four cylinder with four valves per cylinder and a brace of four CV carbs. But with a made-to-fit aluminum frame and (in the case of the later generation '90 model) a larger aluminum box-section swing arm and larger brakes, the FZR400 is a made to order canyon carver right from the showroom floor.

From the seller:
1990 Yamaha FZR-400 ~ 100% original and unmolested, with only 5022 miles. This is straight out of Mr. Kitty's personal collection. NEVER raced or modified. Only year in this color combination and Deltabox swingarm. New Pirellis front and rear, just did a head-to-toe service! Carbs, NGK plugs, air filter, anti-freeze flush, brake system flush, and oil change using Bel-Ray semi-synthetic. No rattle can or touch-up paint has ever touched this bike! This little Fizzer is not only rare but ready to ride! Clean Clear NY title ~ $6000

Shipping at buyers expense, NYS residents pay sales tax.

It looks like we have seen this bike before. Back in 2017 Aaron wrote this post on what looks to be this exact bike. It had about 10 fewer miles back then, and finds its way back on the open market with the same pictures. The seller's eBay account has changed, so it is possible that the bike changed hands somewhere along the way. Either way, the bike looks fantastic in the pictures, and with the rare blue/black livery should really stand out in person. With a recent service and new tires, this is a low mileage Fizzer that is ready to shred. We KNOW that RSBFS readers love these machines - they are sweet handling, unique and tremendous fun! There appears to be some slight marks on the pipe, but nothing that looks like rash. Check it out here, and then jump back to the comment and share your thoughts on the "more common" of the 400cc sub-middleweights. Good Luck!!

MI

Small Bites:  1990 Yamaha FZR 400
Ducati April 4, 2019 posted by

Godfather: 1998 Ducati 916

In 1994 Ducati unleashed the equivalent of a nuclear weapon in the face of a sport bike field full of conventional weaponry. That year Ducati introduced the legendary 916 - and commenced an enviable run of WSBK world titles (four within a five-year span). Simultaneously offering a quantum leap in twin-cylinder performance (horsepower, rev limits, packaging), the 916 was also stunningly beautiful. Even today the lines on a 916 are distinctive and striking. From the twin narrow headlights, to the high mounted exhaust cans, to the single sided swing arm with endurance-styled quick-change rear wheel, to the straight-sectioned chrome-moly chassis, nearly everything on the 916 forced us to rethink what we knew about how motorcycles were designed and how they performed.

1998 Ducati 916 for sale on eBay

The original 916 spanned from 1994 through 1998 - eventually making way for the 996, and ultimately the 998. But even in the first generation of this model, Ducati spared little expense on components. The 916 was a fair sight more expensive than contemporary Japanese machines, making it more exclusive. But far from a glittering farkle with no real purpose, the glory of the 916 was that it worked. It worked for all of the moto magazine editors and testers. It worked at the racetrack. And thanks to its good looks, it worked on the showroom as well. Ducati created a massive following with the 916 as designer Massimo Tamburini played off speed and style like his own personal yin and yang. To say it was a winner is stating the obvious... after it already happened.

From the seller:
I have a nice 1998 ducati 916 that has been part of my collection for about 4 years
bike is nice and near mint shape has about 7732 miles .bike always starts and rides nice
valves have been adjusted in this machine. comes with a clear title. bike does have some add ons as you see in the pics
vin#zdm1sb8s6wb013367
asking 8500

Today the 916 is not quite the performance explosion it was 25 years ago; time, after all, will catch up with all of us. But there is no denying that it stands strong and proud despite the time that has passed. There is no embarrassment when showing up on a 916 - whether it is a local bike nite event, a weekend canyon ride, or even a track day with your buddies. The 916 looks great, pulls strong and handles well. You just need to remember that this WAS cutting edge during its time - but technology inexorably creeps forward. Take the brakes, for example. The 916 shipped with top-shelf Brembo calipers clamping down on huge disks. But modern riders won't confuse them for monoblock calipers and radial master cylinders. Nor will the 114 horsepower astound a modern liter bike rider. Again, it was more than adequate in the day, but by today's numbers is not truly remarkable. But even today few motorcycles have represented the total package of looks, performance and commercial success.

Today's example is a clean 1998 model (last year of the original 916 run). It has but 7,700 miles on the clock, which equates to fewer than 400 miles a year. There are a few add ons that I can see - the Termis and ubiquitous open clutch cover are but two - but nothing appears to have been hacked or unconditionally changed. I could do without the stickers, but those can be non-destructively removed. The seller even refers to a recent maintenance (a four-valve desmo adjustment is not an insignificant task when replacing shims), although there is no mention of when the belts were last changed. Still, this is a good looking specimen of a fantastic motorcycle. The 916 is a collectible motorcycle, and prices are on the rise. The earliest, cleanest and rarest examples of the 916 have risen most quickly, but even the base model is growing in value. This one has an opening ask of $7,999, with reserve in place. The ad text states an $8,500 asking price, so it looks like the reserve might be set close to the opening ask. Check it out here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Godfather: 1998 Ducati 916
Honda April 2, 2019 posted by

Tropical Depression: 1988 Honda CBR250R

Deep in the vaults of exotic hardware purposely kept from the shores of America include examples such as this magnificent 1988 Honda CBR250R. There were extremely rare in the US during the late 1980s and 1990s - which is amusing since the venerable 250 Ninja was imported during the same period of time. But the CBR250R was the far sharper of the two, and was destined for the small-cube crazy home market of Japan where quarter liter racers dominate. The US had to make due with a relatively tame parallel twin that practically shrieked "entry-level-economy." But in the collector market today, the CBR250R has become easier to find, as evidenced by the number listed on these pages over the years. Still, they should be considered to be quite rare and finding one in good condition is the same thrill as with any other unique bike.

1988 Honda CBR250R for sale on eBay

The CBR250R does some shrieking of its own, but that is largely due to the sheer number of revs this bike requires in order to produce forward movement. A liquid cooled inline four cylinder with four valves per pot and a 11.5:1 compression ratio, the CBR250R relies on a 18,000(!) redline to achieve a respectable 40 - 45 horsepower. With full sport bodywork, twin headlamps and a single, beefy front disk (certainly enough to stop this 330 pounds dry machine), the CBR250R was marketed as part of the Hurricane lineup in some European markets. Given that the Hurricane model range scaled up to the mighty 1000F, you might think of this as more of a squall.

From the seller:
This very rare MC19 CBR250R is the 963rd bike produced for the 1988 production run. It was purchased about a year ago with 318km on the speedometer (about 190 original miles). It was imported by a dealer in UT and purchased in running condition. It still had the original 1987 date code tires on it, which were badly cracked, so a new set of Avon tires were installed. The carburetors were removed, re-jetted and installed on new OEM intake manifolds. The rear sprocket was changed from 54 to 52 and finally to 50 teeth, in order to reduce highway cruising rpms by about 1,000.

These bikes weigh 350lbs wet and are rated at 45 horsepower at 14,500rpms. The redline is at 18k rpms and the engine will run up to redline quite willingly. With stock gearing the bikes were rated at 110 mph top speeds.

This bike sat in Japan for 30 years, perhaps at a dealership or in a personal collection. It has a fair amount of patina on alloy parts and in little nooks and crannies in the engine bay area. If you love to polish aluminum, you can make this bike really shine again. The frame is aluminum.

These bikes were never imported/sold in the US and only after they are 25 years old can they be brought into the country and legally registered in CA and elsewhere. Yes, the bike IS registered with its 11 digit serial number!

I do have PDF files of the service manual in English and there are a few spare parts, including the rear sprockets. The oil filter is a common Honda part. The thermostat was replaced with a 180 degree unit, which keeps the little engine cooler than when they have the stock 190 degree unit installed.

A new choke cable was installed. These bikes have electric fuel pumps and inline filters.

A few paint scratches are evident here and there. The original OEM factory windscreen is checked but not cracked. One of the forward fairing tabs is broken, but held in place with the original modified nut-plate.

Riding these bikes is an unreal experience, especially when you rev it up past 14k rpms. You can easily imagine yourself as being Mike Hailwood at the IOM races, with the little four screaming out unimaginable rpms through the gears.

Due to recent ankle surgery, I am no longer able to ride the bike as before, so sadly must let it go to an appreciative new owner. Current miles are about 2,995 km, which is about 1,800 miles. This is one of my favorite bikes of all times... and I have owned hundreds of Hondas of all types and sizes. I will miss it dearly and will enjoy the memories that it gave me over the past year.

This particular CBR250R has an interesting history and shows how rare these bikes are... and how small our collecting community really is. This bike was sold on the pages of RSBFS a few years back, as highlighted in this post by Tad. And while the VIN number remains the same, the mileage has grown from 192 up to 1,800. What has not grown is the price - the Buy It Now figure is right at the $6k mark, just like the earlier sale. I've grabbed one of the photos from that post (above), as the current seller has not included very many. There are a few more sharp, high-res photos available via the older post - although please note they do not necessarily represent the bike as it sits today. Check out the current advert here, and then imagine what 18,000 RPM sounds like as you strafe the apexes of your favorite canyon. Good Luck!!

MI

Tropical Depression: 1988 Honda CBR250R
Honda March 25, 2019 posted by

Late-century modern: 1999 Honda CBR 900RR

This is what a sportbike should still look like, if you ask me. Loud, high-contrast, aggressive graphics wrapped around a stubby, purposeful chassis carrying more engine than makes sense. There are, of course, a ton of newer bikes that hit the right aesthetic notes, but none have the same Air Jordan vibe of the mid-late '90s bikes. This 1999 Honda CBR900RR hits all those perfect notes, and is in excellent condition so the madness can be fully appreciated.

1999 Honda CBR900RR for sale on eBay

It has clearly been garaged and well cared for, and the seller says he recently checked the valves and made sure the carbs are clean. It has also apparently been lowered. It's not a flawless bike after 20 years and 14,000 miles, but it's an excellent rider that stands above most other CBR900RRs you'll run across.

From the eBay listing:

This bike is probably the cleanest CBR900 you will see in awhile ,it is all stock except Yoshimura bolt on and braided steel brake lines...it has been lowered about an inch or two...it has a threaded adjuster bikes has a spot or two on fairings...small blemish....all who see it say its like new. Runs perfect as it should, valves were checked by me as were carburetors...I have over 30 years exp....has Yoshimura bolt on exhaust, braided steel brake lines ....any questions call 407-791-3584

By the time this bike was built, the model's star had faded somewhat, as the Yamaha R1 had bowed the year before and managed to scare the pants off anyone with the brass to go near its limit. When the Honda CBR900RR debuted in 1992, it had landed with a similar seismic impact. It had the stature of a 600 but an engine that very closely approached the power of its rivals' 1,000cc offerings. With less weight to pull around and snappy handling thanks in part to a 16-inch front wheel, the 900 made everything else seem a little flabby and out of touch.

The later CBR900s had a very slightly punched out engine, a stiffened chassis and bigger brakes than the original. An angular single headlight had replaced the original's iconic round-eyed visage.

If you're looking for a really nice now-classic sportbike to liven up your weekends, this thing looks like the ticket. Since it's a later model, it might not approach the collectibilty of the originals, but it'll stand out anywhere you take it.