Posts by tag: Liquid Cooled

Kawasaki July 21, 2021 posted by

Moto Madness: Mike Baldwin’s 1979 Kawasaki Factory Works Race Bike

Star power. It is what sells. Be it the star power of a famous race bike, a famous team, a famous rider, a famous win, or all of the above. This is what sets certain bikes above the rest. And today’s find is a wonderful reminder that the lime green team was once a very dominant force in racing other than WSBK. This bike is a claimed works Kawasaki factory KR750 racer, piloted by none other than Mike Baldwin.

1979 Kawasaki KR750 Factory Race Bike for sale on eBay

In the early to mid 1970s, there was a flurry of activity on the racing scene. Yamaha had brought out their TZ750 – which looked to dominate all and sundry on both the factory and privateer levels – and Kawasaki wanted a piece of that action. Having a successful two stroke in the form of the H1 triple style, Team Green acted quickly to assemble a factory racer that could bring home the gold. With lower restrictions regarding homologation, Kawasaki was able to make use of existing tech, massage it heavily into GP-level machinery, and unleash it upon the world. Utilizing a 750cc triple, Kawasaki offset and skewed both the intake and exhaust ports to narrow the now liquid-cooled motor significantly. A one piece crank simplified the overall engine arrangement (as opposed to the Yamaha, which utilized a series of intermediary shafts to drive the primary and ancillaries), resulting in a powerful, but lightweight package. Coupled with a six speed transmission, triple disk brakes, and what appears to be ancient dual-shock rear suspension, the KR750 nearly won the world championship with Gary Nixon aboard. But runaway success was not to be for Kawasaki, even though the KR750 showed immense potential.

From the seller:
Mike Baldwin was a record-setting five-time AMA Road Racing Champion and the all-time wins leader in AMA Formula 1/Formula 750 history. In all, Baldwin won 27 AMA national races – 17 in AMA F1/750 and 10 in AMA Superbike – and he is considered one of the top road racers America has ever produced.

More from the seller:
At Daytona in ’79, Baldwin appeared to be a real threat to win the Daytona Triple Crown (the Daytona 200, the Daytona Lightweight and the Daytona Superbike races). He was easily the fastest in Superbike and battled for top billing in the Daytona 200 and Lightweight qualifying. Unfortunately, Baldwin high-sided in practice on Thursday and broke his collarbone. Without racing in the qualifying race, Baldwin had to start from the back of the grid in the 200. The leaders had completed nearly three-quarters of a lap by the time the third wave of riders, of which Baldwin was in the back, was given the green flag. In spite of his huge disadvantage and riding in pain with the broken shoulder, Baldwin tore through the field on the factory Kawasaki KR750 and finished a strong fourth, giving him at least a moral victory. In addition to racing for Kawasaki in 1979, he also raced in Europe during the gap in the AMA schedule after Daytona.

More from the seller:
The bike was restored in 1993 by author Stephen Wright with help from Norm Bigelow at the Kawasaki Racing Dept. It has been shown at Del Mar in 1997 and at the Bedford Museum in “The Wild Ones” exhibit in 2003. Also, first place at the Wheelcraft Motorcycle show at Sears Point raceway in 2001. Current owner purchased the bike from Stephen Wright in 1999. Sold on bill of sale. Race notes and history come with the bike.

Race bikes are very difficult to judge when it comes to value. To be certain, factory racers are built and campaigned in limited supply, making them rare to begin with. Couple that with the numerous mods that occur organically over the course of several seasons (due to rules, additional performance, etc), plus the very real potential for crash damage and it is not too surprising to realize that not many of these bikes survive to be restored to this particular level. That is especially true with a well-known and respected rider, such as Mike Baldwin.

The Buy It Now ask for this green monster is a very cool $125k. There is no doubt the bike is historically significant. Sadly we cannot comp this to other sales given the scarcity of pristine Mike Baldwin KR750s on the market. The seller is open to offers and it looks like there are a fair number of watchers on this one, so we may yet see a sale. Let’s all hope it finds a good home, as bikes this rich in history deserve a spot of honor. Check out all of the details here, then start shopping for some green leathers and gear. Good Luck!!

MI

Moto Madness: Mike Baldwin’s 1979 Kawasaki Factory Works Race Bike
Featured Listing July 20, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing – 1989 Honda CBR600 Hurricane

Update 7.20.21: Price reduced to $3,300. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

From the classics section of milestone motorcycles comes the wonderful Honda 600 Hurricane. Officially known as the CBR600F when introduced in 1987, the Hurricane was Honda’s wash and wear tuxedo for the ultra-competitive middleweight class; this was a bike that could do everything well. With a raspy liquid cooled inline four that was completely enclosed by bodywork, the Hurricane made a statement that set it apart from the rest of the crowd. During this time, full bodywork was an actual thing, with Bimota (DB1) and Ducati (Paso) leading the trend. Honda’s entry was vastly different than the other Japanese Big Four offerings and resulted in a runaway showroom success that spawned many variants. Up through 1990 these became known as the first series bikes (CBR-F1, if you will), and what followed were the F2, F3 and F4 models.

Featured Listing – 1989 Honda CBR600 Hurricane

As the magazine adverts at the time stated, even the Ninja fears the Hurricane. And that was not too far from the truth. The CBR pumped out 85 ponies at the crank – plenty of motive force to push what was described as the lightest and quickest middleweight of the time to the top of the timing sheets. With air-adjustable anti-dive forks and a rising rate rear linkage with preload settings, the Honda could handle with the best of them. Our seller Jim is an obvious fan of the model. He has provided a ton of detail on this bike, and I will let him pick up the story here:

From the seller:
Lordy, I hate selling my motorcycles. This 1989 Honda CBR 600 “Hurricane” caught my eye the minute I saw it on Ebay a few years back. All I’ve done in my ownership is to ride it, enjoy it, and maintain it (like my other bikes). I’m a collector but everything must be ridden! I’ve put a thousand miles on it (odo is now 26,517) and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it. As far as I’m concerned the custom red/white/blue seat puts it over the top. It’s been stored properly and tendered during the entire time I’ve owned it. The bikes starts and runs smoothly and everything works! It’s also been freshly serviced.

When the “jelly mould” styling came out in 1987 everyone was a fan of the styling but I just simply loved that full enclosure bodywork back then. That full enclosure bodywork hides a steel frame, an inline four cylinder engine of 598cc with twin cam, 16 valves and 85Bhp. Did I mention it runs great? In 1989 this bike was the quickest and most powerful middleweight ever built, but it was it’s the complete user-friendly nature of the bike that make the bike what it is—-super, all day comfortable yet still la great handler.

More from the seller:
CBR stands for “City Bike Racing” and Honda’s idea was to create a bike that could take you to work and back five days a week and then win races on at the weekend. I get it—-30+ years later it still performs its mission well.

For the 1989 model year the hugely successful CBR600 got upgraded with minor tweeks. It looked the same jelly mould bike but underneath it got higher compression (11.3:1, up from 11:1), the cam timing was revised, bigger carbs fitted, new ignition and a beefed up clutch. It also got adjustable rebound damping. Power was increased from 85Bhp to 93Bhp and, apparently was a noticeable difference.

Performance
0-60mph 3.5 secs
0-100mph 7.7 secs
Top Speed 137mph
Fuel consumption 45mpg

More from the seller:
The CBR600F1 had a nice set of clocks that I still think look great today with their red details and markers. These clocks always looked great at night with their orange/red glow. There is just something about a set of needles, gently illuminated from below as you ride into the twilight. OK, maybe that’s a bit too poetic but you get the picture. This is a great vintage bike in very good condition.

Nit-pick items? One of the mirrors is a little faded so it’s a slight creamy white. It looks like one of the red decals is peeling up just a hair on the tank. The bike is not perfect but it’s in damn good condition and is surrounded by admirers wherever I ride. You won’t be disappointed. Be prepared to ride all day!

Price: $3,600 $3,300 USD
Contact: Jim (jimbrown.sales@gmail.com)

While never particularly rare in the day (this was a very popular model for Honda dealers), we do not often see these wonderful machines in such fantastic condition. Quite simply, most have been abused, dropped, stunted, raced, crashed and resold for scrap. This bike looks great, comes from a RSBFS enthusiast who has taken care of the beast, and is now offering up this example of a legendary model for a mere $3,600 $3,300. With typical Honda engineering and build quality, this is a bike that will last a lifetime of use when properly maintained. You are not likely to find anything that will turn heads – or put a bigger smile on your face – for that small of an outlay. It even has period correct F1 slip ons! Give Jim a shout and snag this one before it’s gone!

MI

Featured Listing – 1989 Honda CBR600 Hurricane
Honda July 8, 2021 posted by

Rare & Rarely Used: 2003 Honda RC51

We often like to claim milestone motorcycles were designed to “break all the rules” but in the case of the RC51, the bike was designed to the extent of the rules – quite literally. Known formally as the Honda RVT1000R, the RC51 was a significant departure from the earlier (and successful) RC30 and RC45 formats.

Whereas Honda homologation superbikes of the past were v-4 configurations, the RC51 genesis was a change in WSBK rules allowing twins a greater displacement. This had been exploited by Ducati to the tune of several world championships, so Honda figured if you couldn’t beat them you might as well join them. Enter the 90 degree V-twin displacing 999cc and pumping out a reported 133 HP. With an aluminum twin spar chassis that capitalized on the narrow format engine, nifty aerodynamic tricks such as the side mounted radiators, technologically advanced fuel injection and race ready components such as the close-ratio gearbox the RC51 was ready to hit the track.

It turns out the old adage was right – the bike won right out of the box with Colin Edwards in 2000, and again in 2002. Nicky Hayden won the AMA Superbike championship in 2002 as well, providing Honda with a trio of impressive trophies for their efforts. And while Honda pulled out of WSBK before the 2003 season, the RC51 continued to be offered as a street bike until 2006.

Today’s example has traveled but 795 miles in all its years. This is also a non-California bike, which means it is devoid of the complexities of additional emissions-related equipment festooned on Golden State models – yet it IS located in California. The pictures show a very clean, very original specimen. And with that pristine and awesome presentation comes a price tag: a Buy It Now of $19,500. That is big money. Fortunately the seller is open to offers. So check out all of the details here (including a lot more high res pictures), and Good Luck!!

MI

Rare & Rarely Used: 2003 Honda RC51
Kawasaki July 7, 2021 posted by

Home Market Hero: 1995 Kawasaki ZXR400R

There are so many cool things about today’s listing. For starters, it is an ultra-rare (in the US) 400cc Ninja that was only available in Japan. As we know, the small-bore market in Japan is serious business which means that they get serious hardware. Think of this as a bike just as potent as any of the 600 hyper-sport or 750cc Superbike set, in a smaller size. What else is cool? How about a California title? For a grey market import, that is mecca (and usually very, very difficult to obtain). Dig deeper and you will see that this bike has been listed on RSBFS before way back in 2017. Even better? This came out of the indoor man cave(s) of Utah collector Gary, who listed a significant number of bikes on the site. All signs point to something wonderful.

1995 Kawasaki ZXR400R for sale on eBay

The little 398cc inline four featured 16 valves and screamed to an unheard of 14,500 RPM. Today those revs seem expected, or even tame for a four stroke, but 26 years ago that was a pretty big deal. Those revs paved the way for the 62 HP worth of very angry bees – and shows you just how serious the Japanese home market was compared to what was released into the US. The 350 pound package is reportedly scalpel-sharp in the braking and handling department, while similar to a two stroke in terms of powerband; if you are in the lower half of the rev range, better click down a few gears in order to find motivation.

From the seller:
1995 Kawasaki ZXR400R.
This is the single seat R model. Very rare, never sold in the states. California titled with correct vin and year. Should easily transfer to any state. Bone stock, never molested. Still has original Japanese stickers on windscreen and tank. All original paint that’s in amazing shape. It is unrestored and doesn’t need it, so it’s not perfect. 16k kilometers. Runs like new. Bike screams with a 15k redline. Basically a baby zx7R. One of the most gorgeous bikes you will ever see. I’m 6’1 and fit perfectly on it. Surprisingly roomy. Has fresh motul fluids. The petcock and fuel system has been gone through recently. New chain.

Writeup on rarest sport bikes in 2017 of this bike. Lots of info and pics. I’ve put 300 miles on it since then.

The seller has included a startup video of the bike in question. If it is in similar condition to when it sold from the Utah collection, one could expect a very well sorted and well loved machine. By all counts, the pictures and video show that to be true.

The value equation on these rabid 400s is skewed – there is no doubt about that. If you are looking for cheap fun, look elsewhere. Any number of larger capacity bikes could be had for much less money, while offering better real world performance. However if you are looking for something rare, something that expects more from you as a rider than simply twisting your wrist, something that challenges you to be your best at every corner entry, every apex, and every exit – your next ride is waiting for you. Located in sunny California and titled and plated in same, this gorgeous and rare 1995 ZXR400R is on the market and looking for a good home (preferably inside – we know it is housebroken, after all)! Check out all of the details here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Home Market Hero: 1995 Kawasaki ZXR400R
Ducati June 30, 2021 posted by

Year of the Duc: 1991 Ducati 851

The year of 2021 needs to officially be renamed as the Year of the 851. I cannot recall ever seeing such an inventory of these milestone machines (check out a search of the RSBFS archives here). So what is so special about the 851? In a nutshell, the 851 contains 3 separate technologies that were a first for the Bologna manufacturer: 4-valve heads, fuel injection and liquid cooling. This combo kicked off a winning spree in WSBK and solidified Ducati’s approach of being a race team that occasionally builds street bikes. Today’s find is an exceptional 1991 model, which includes the popular white frame and wheel combination. I won’t go into the gory details of the model – check out the link above for that – but will simply remark that this is a well-represented version of this model and year.

1991 Ducati 851 for sale on eBay

From the seller:
Beautiful and well-maintained 1991 Ducati 851 Superbike for sale by owner. Have all of the original paperwork and maintenance records, as well as 2 original keys. Iconic and classic motorcycle in mint condition. The bike is all original parts and works flawlessly. Timing belt replacement and valve adjustment have both been done in the past few months. New tires were also fitted 6 months. Always kept indoors in a temperature controlled space. It hurts me to let go of this beautiful piece, but it is time to sell to someone who has the time to care for this motorcycle.

Today’s bike shows a few more miles than some of the museum want to be machines that we have seen previously, but it is obvious it has enjoyed some care and feeding deserving of the breed. Belts and valves are critical for this model, and both have been addressed recently. That means that this beauty is ready to ride off into the sunset right now. Both seat and windscreen look to be aftermarket, but neither should be considered deal killers. The rest looks to be completely stock, right down to the stock cans and stock clutch cover. The asking price on this one is a seemingly high $17,000, but the seller is open to offers. Check out all of the details here, and let us know what you think: Is 2021 the Year of the 851? Good Luck!!

MI

Year of the Duc: 1991 Ducati 851
Honda June 29, 2021 posted by

Southern Belle – 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo

Hot on the heels of this 1985 Honda VFR1000R (eBay shows that it sold for $7,652), the same seller has just listed a 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo in a similar, no reserve auction. And this is the way that we like to see bikes represented – decent pictures showing a neat, clean, indoor storage facility. The bikes are clean and presentable, and not still dripping wet from a quick hose-down like some other auctions. Given, the bikes themselves might not be of the uber-rarity set (I haven’t spied a NR750 or Supermono in the pictures yet, but I’m still looking) – but they are relatively rare and special machines worthy of collecting. Which brings us to the world’s first full factory turbo offering, the 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo.

1982 Honda CX500 Turbo for sale on eBay

Built around the basis of the CX platform, the CX500 Turbo was a sort of Moto Guzzi replica in that the engine configuration was a vee mounted across the bike, but the crankshaft rotation was inline with the wheels. The vee angle was 80 degrees, and the cylinder head intake and exhaust tracts were rotated slightly to allow for better legroom for the rider. If you’ve ever barked your shins on a BMW airhead intake or banged your knees on Guzzi carbs you know the value of this subtle piece of engineering. The Turbo used larger main bearings in the strengthened cases, and Honda bolted up an IHI turbo capable of 200,000 RPM and 19 PSI and topped the whole thing off with their first incarnation of programmable fuel injection. A stronger crank, clutch and connecting rods held the rest of the bottom end together, along with a pair of forged pistons. Suspension, electronics and bodywork were all bespoke Turbo fittings, making for a fast, powerful and unique offering.

From the seller:
1982 Honda CX500 Turbo SELLING @ NO RESERVE

This is an amazing all original and very rare bike that is coming out of a private collection that is perfect for anyones collection or for anyone to enjoy. The bike runs and drives just like it should and needs nothing to my knowledge. The bike has been very well maintained and shows great for an original bike, the only thing that I can see on the entire bike is that their is a small chip/nick on one side, and I have a picture of that to show you. The only thing to my knowledge that has been changed on the bike is a aftermarket windshield has been added which is a little larger then stock. Still a great bike for anyones collection or for anyone to enjoy that is just beautiful to look at in person. And remember this is SELLING @ NO RESERVE so high bidder takes it home.

Make no mistake, the Turbo is a big bike. Ready to ride this is a nearly 600 pound motorcycle, and not for the inseam challenged. Much of the weight is carried up high, thanks to the longitudinal nature of the vee configuration, the large radiator to cool of the turbocharged madness, and a 5.2 gallon fuel tank perched way up on top of everything. Far from a lithe sport bike, the Turbo revels in sport touring, where the strong midrange rush can be used at will. The 280mm front disks are decent, and the air-assist anti dive fork does a reasonable job of keeping everything in line. But those 600 pounds are hard to hide when the road gets narrow and twisty.

As referenced earlier, we have seen this seller before. There are a lot of bikes in the background shots for his auctions, so we know this is quite the collector. This bike appears to be mostly stock, with the noted exception of the windscreen. For a rider, that may not be a bad thing as the stock windscreen tends to create significant noise and buffeting at highway speed (different shapes of helmets can offer some help). Like the previous auction, this one has started low and there is no reserve. There are a good number of bids, and a much larger number of watchers which is the way these auctions should run. Check out all of the details here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Southern Belle – 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo
Honda June 26, 2021 posted by

Going the Distance: 1985 Honda VF1000R

The Honda VF1000R is one of those interesting bikes that always evokes emotion and usually is well received here on the pages of Rare. Originally conceived as a homologation bike for racing, the VF1000R did inspire homologation race bikes and contribute to race efforts, even though the plans to homologate it fell through. Best known for endurance racing in Europe and the gear-driven cam arrangement that found its way into the vaunted RC30, the VFR1000R stands tall with livery reminiscent of Freddy Spencer, and a raft of clever features that speak to Honda’s “engineering-first” philosophy.

1985 Honda VF1000R for sale on eBay

While the basics of the VFR1000R motor come from the lower-spec “F” DNA, the R was developed specifically for the gear driven cam arrangement. The idea here is that geared cams can be indexed more accurately than the belt driven type, and this plays into the hands of highly-stressed, high RPM race motors. The cams themselves were nestled into an all new four-valve head, intended to increase air flow and raise compression over the F model. The result was an approximate 10 HP gain, and the potential for future development with an eye to building all-out race motors. The downside was that the added complexity added weight. The VFR1000R outweighs the commensurate 1000F by a figure similar to the HP gain, which for a race bike is not ideal.

From the seller:
1985 Honda VF1000R

Very Clean bike coming out of a private collection. The bike is just how you see it in the pictures, needing nothing other then a new battery to make it ready to go.

From the bulbous, all encompassing bodywork with the solo seat cowl, to the large, single headlight (only the 1986 year bikes received the Euro dual-headlamp look in the US), from the GP-inspired 16″ front wheel with quick change hardware to the adjustable Pro-link rear suspension, the modular ComStar wheels, the VF1000R was a quality piece of kit. That helped explain the nearly 50% price increase over the F model, ensuring exclusivity and dooming the R to relatively poor sales by comparison. Today these factors make this a rare model for a non-homologated, mass produced sport bike.

Today’s example is claimed to be a museum bike, and the pictures show a clean VFR1000R surrounded by Honda siblings (and a lone Suzuki XN85 Turbo). The odometer shows a low 11,0000-ish miles, and the seller claims that the bike needs nothing except a battery. The doubter in me wonders how one knows until a battery is actually installed and the bike started, but the pictures show a well-cared for example, and this era Honda has a rather bulletproof reputation overall – so I will overlook that. It might be just shadows, but I also detect possible scratches/rash on one of the fairing panels. There have been a fair number of bidders and a significant number of watchers on this one, however the auction is below $5k which is a good deal for someone if it closes like this. Check out all of the details here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Going the Distance: 1985 Honda VF1000R
Featured Listing June 24, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing – 1992 Honda VFR750F

When you look back at the bikes you could have owned – or maybe did own, but let slip away – many will dream of the unobtainable collector machines built in small numbers and high prices. But when you look back on the bikes you could have owned to *ride*, then the list changes significantly. Gone are the torture racks, the rolling stock full of NOS parts never to be found again, or the odd and unique (but not very practical) imports. Instead you would look back at the best all around bikes in history – and come to a singular conclusion: the Honda VFR750F. Here is a bike that can do it ALL – from canyon riding and track days to touring, exploring and commuting. The VFR has long been a do everything exceptionally well type of mount. And while we can nostalgically look at some of the examples floating around the internet, the thought of somebody’s used up bike is not the stuff of dreams. Enter RSBFS reader Brian and this stunning 1992 model VFR750F in the more rare darker VFR livery. What you are looking at is what Cycle World called “…the best all-around motorcycle in the business…” that has been refurbished to a very high specification.

Featured Listing: 1992 Honda VFR750F

The VFR series was a home run for Honda, and spawned many generations and a couple of truly interesting models. Based around a 90 degree V-4 with four valve heads, the VFR has been a constant winner in reviews, in showrooms, and at the racetrack. Even the mighty RC30 and RC45 models were derivatives of this family line, if that gives you any indication of the performance potential that was engineered into the basic bones. The 1992 model is an ideal representation of the second generation bikes, with aluminum frame and classic single sided swingarm. Expect an even 100 horsepower in stock configuration, enabling the VFR to go as well as it looks. There is enough there to keep up with all but the most berserker sport bikes in the canyons, and the best part is the cushy ride to-fro the happy sporting grounds. Pound for pound, it is difficult to imagine a bike better suited to everything we tend to do with a two wheeled device in our stables. If you could only have one bike for the rest of your riding days….

From the seller:
Since this is an unusual color for a VFR, I’ve started calling this one “Darth Viffer” 😊 Seems most VFR’s are red.

Up for sale is a 1992 Honda VFR750F with just over 25k miles on the clock. It is almost 100% stock and original, and includes two rare OEM accessories – the matching solo seat cowl and center stand. The bike has just undergone a thorough mechanical and cosmetic refresh, including the following that were completed before I bought it:
Fork seals/oil
Michelin Pilot Road 4 tires
New battery
New voltage regulator/rectifier

Brian considers this a complete OCD mechanical/cosmetic restoration – and I will let his words and pictures tell the story further. Obviously there is much, much more here than your average wash and wax!

More from the seller:
Over the winter, the following maintenance was performed:
Complete carburetor overhaul – ultrasonic cleaning, new float valves, and new viton o-rings/gaskets.
Carb synch performed with Vacuummate electronic synchronizer.
New carb intake boots.
Valve clearances were checked, all within tolerance.
Compression checked – 1) 188 2) 192 3) 198 4) 202.
New NGK spark plugs.
OEM Honda oil filter, Rotella T6 5W-40 synthetic oil.
OEM Honda Type 2 coolant.
Air filter cleaned (Uni filter replacement)
New OEM thermostat. Radiator and reserve tank completely cleaned and flushed.
Cleaned commutator and brushes on the radiator fan.
Verified output of charging system, cleaned and dielectric grease applied to critical connections.
Replaced two plug caps due to higher than spec resistance readings.
Steering head bearings replaced with tapered roller kit.
Rear suspension completely disassembled and cleaned, all bearings cleaned and greased.
Rear axle and bearings thoroughly cleaned and greased, replaced the double row ball bearing.
Replaced the chain and sprockets with OEM gearing. RK GXW chain and JT sprockets.
Complete disassembly and ultrasonic cleaning of all brake and clutch parts. Front and rear calipers, clutch slave cylinder and both brake and clutch master cylinders.
Replaced the fuel pump with a Facet electric pump (OEM pumps are obsolete). The replacement pump incorporates a check valve and shuts of fuel flow when not powered.
Rebuilt fuel petcock with a kit from NRP carbs in the UK.
All bodywork removed, cleaned and paint polished. Touched up where needed (mostly some nicks on the wheels and some scratches on the front fender).
All plastic and rubber parts treated with 303 aerospace protectant.
All fasteners removed were ultrasonically cleaned, and some polished.

More from the seller:
This is a true “no stone unturned” mechanical and cosmetic refresh, I was originally planning on keeping this one. Due to recent events and acquiring yet another VFR project I now have three 3rd gen VFR’s so I’ve decided to let this one go. I really want to find a decent home for this one, it’s taken a lot of work to get it up to its current mechanical state. There are still a few very minor imperfections on the bike and it’s not 100% original and OEM, but I guarantee you will not find a cleaner or more mechanically sorted VFR outside of the Barber Museum.

Some of the pictures show the bike with a Vance & Hines SS2R slip-on. Others have the stock exhaust can. The buyer will have the choice between the two, but both are not included (I need one for the other VFR I have in the works).

Price: Asking $5,500
Contact: Brian (v4hrc@telstar-online.net)

Nobody here at RSBFS is going to tell you that a 1992 Honda VFR750F is the collector’s bucket list bike in terms of long term monetary value. But if you ride what you own – and ride a lot – you could scarcely do better than some of the under-appreciated models in the motorcycling spectrum. The VFR is definitely one of them, and I challenge you to find a better example of the breed than this beautiful specimen. It is completely stock, has all the OEM bits and is mechanically nearly new – making it an exceptional find in today’s market. If you’ve never had one – or if you did and miss what you had, give Brian a shout and make yourself a deal. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing – 1992 Honda VFR750F