Posts by Category: Honda

Honda February 13, 2017 posted by

X-Rated! 1979 Honda CBX

In the world of bike porn, there are many shapes and sizes. And while most lust-worthy machines are built from the ground up to become a whole - frame, suspension, motor, bodywork - the outrageous, plus sized Honda CBX seems to be a machine totally built around the motor. The first gen CBX made no bones about what made it special - it was a naked bike showing off its wares to the world. Born from the engineering might of Honda during a time of great experimentation, this inline six-cylinder with DOHC and four valves per cylinder pumped out an impressive 105 brake horsepower. And while the motor looks impossibly wide when viewed from the front, Honda spent considerable effort to reduce the flare at the bottom end, stacking ancillaries such as the alternator behind the block.

1979 Honda CBX for sale on eBay

The CBX debuted in the latter part of 1978 and were badged as 1979 models. The first generation bikes actually developed more outright HP than the follow on models, although the later years did have overall improvements in torque and general responsiveness. Sold alongside the CB900F, the CBX was a bigger, badder and far more expensive machine. And while CBX sales were far better than other "experimental" bikes of the time (think the CX-series Turbos), it was handily outsold by the cheaper 900F.

The seller's text goes a long way to describing the CBX history, variances and qualities:

From the seller:
Introduced in 1978 as a 1979 model, the Honda CBX topped its competitors with a 6-cylinder dual overhead camshaft engine; however, it was not the first inline 6-cylinder from the Japanese-motorcycle titan. Honda developed a series of sophisticated multi-piston 4-stroke Grand Prix-racing entries culminating in the RC165 and RC166 250cc inline 6-cylinder machines. The engine was successful in 1966 and 1967, and was the precursor to the CBX. The fact the CBX engine has its roots in Grand Prix racing is not coincidental. Engineer Shoichiro Irimajiri developed the 6-cylinder Grand Prix engine and led the team behind the CBX powerplant. Six cylinders, 24 valves and chain-driven dual overhead camshafts help the 1,000cc Honda engine crank out 105 horsepower. Six Mikuni carburetors with an integral accelerator pump deliver the right combination of fuel and air into the cylinders. The CBX engine is integrated into the frame as a stressed member, and the absence of conventional downtubes makes for a clear display of all six cylinders and the exhaust. Honda pushed into the future with bold styling and innovative features on the Super Sport CBX. The sculpted tank blended into CBX-logo side covers and the kicked-up winged tail section looked fast at rest. Lightweight Comstar 5-spoke alloy wheels were equipped with dual front and single rear disc brakes to slow the CBX from velocity. In an effort to improve lagging sales Honda pushed the CBX away from pure sport into a sports touring direction in 1981-82. Full fairings and hard saddlebags position the earlier and more powerful CBX1000 Super Sport into a unique spot in collectible Honda history. This 1979 Honda CBX first and most powerful year of what was then the fastest production motorcycle in the world. This bike will thrill you with its smooth idle and fantastic power and the sound is unmistakable, go for a ride or just add to your collection.

While Honda did race six-cylinder machines in the 1960s, this was their first jump into sixes for the street. However they were not alone: Benelli had already come (and gone) with the Sei models, and Kawasaki was soon to follow with their excellent KZ1300 liquid cooled example. And while Kawasaki transitioned their naked bike into a full-blown touring bike, Honda elected to evolve the CBX into a sport tourer. They would re-enter the six-cylinder world with the dominating Gold Wing touring RV, but chose to drop the inline arrangement in favor of a boxer layout. Most recently BMW introduced the K1600, an inline six more narrow than some fours.

The CBX line has always been a visceral affair. These bikes have serious presence, amazing sound, and actually function as a terrific day-to-day rider. Being a Honda, they are well built and surprisingly reliable. Parts are still available for the model, making it an excellent collector choice. Prices have been on the rise with these machines - especially the earliest models - but nothing compared to an RC30, RG500 Gamma or D16RR. Interest in this particular bike is solid, with bidding up to $7,700 with reserve still in place. I, for one, will be watching this one. This bike is clean and looks very, very original. Check it out here, and then share your six-cylinder thoughts in our Comments section. Is a CBX on your bike porn bucket list? Good Luck!

MI

X-Rated!  1979 Honda CBX
Honda February 9, 2017 posted by

Featured Hot Rod: 1993 Honda CBR900RR / 954RR Hybrid!

Since the dawn of internal combustion there have always been those independent spirits with a vision of speed. The recipe is age old and time worn; take a small vehicle and stuff a big motor into it. The engine swap shuffle has been played many, many times, to vehicles too countless to note. The quest is always the same: start with something good, add more power, and make it better. Manufacturers are not ignorant of this magic spell either - the original Honda CBR900RR is the perfect example of what happens when you take a CBR600 and stuff a 900 into it. Bingo! A factory hot rod is born. What happens when someone takes that hot rod and ups the ante? You get an even hotter hot rod, such as this CBR900RR with motivation from a 954RR mill.

Featured Listing: 1993 Honda 900RR/954RR Hybrid!

Countless engine swap projects end in a pile of parts. Fewer actually make it to running status, despite looking rather Frankenstein. Fewer still manage to pull off the swap with good looking results. Chris Perkins - the man with the vision and the 900RR - wanted to reach this rare level and beyond. Chris wanted it to look factory - a true sleeper. Look closely at the photos, as "sleeper" is exactly what this builder pulled off. Integrating the best of the 1993 900RR qualities while taking advantage of the performance and electronic enhancements of the 2003 954RR model, this hybrid spans ten years of engine development without changing the overall stance of the original 900RR.

From the seller:
1993 Honda CBR900RR Chassis with a 2003 CBR954RR Fuel injected engine and electronics.
Custom built, one off bike featured on Superstreetbike.com
The bike was built with the intent to make a "Pro-Touring" style bike that sheds old technology and be ridden like a modern sport bike, sans the carburetors and jetting issues usually associated with older bikes.

Top quality products were used in the build, such as:

Ohlins rear shock
Two Brothers Carbon canister on a stock CBR954RR exhaust header
Dunlop D208 Qualifiers front and rear
RK chain
Supersprox Chain wheels
EBC HH brake pads
Servo Buddy to eliminate the exhaust valve
NGK plugs
K&N filter
PPG DCU 2 stage paint buried with liberal amounts of PPG 2021 clear
Ballistic lithium battery

Bike presents as new, and has been started then drained of all fuel.
Fresh oil and filter. Thermostat and coolant have been changed..

Asking $9800

Leafing through the swap info reads like a never-ending set of challenges and innovative solutions (you can read the article at SuperStreetBike.com). The 900RR frame needed to be modified due to the changes in how the 954RR motor was mounted. Solution: A CBR1000 front mount fabricated onto the chassis, with older tabs and mounts removed. The 954RR motor is fuel injected, requiring a change to the fuel tank. Solution: Graft the bottom a 954RR tank into a 900RR tank. Similar challenges were presented with the electrics (a lithium battery makes room for the 954RR ECU), gauges (custom mount to make the 954RR cluster fit in the stock location) and exhaust (modified 954RR pieces). What sounds so simple - stuff a big motor in a small bike chassis - can be tremendously complicated. Chris methodically worked his way through each of these issues with ingenuity and innovation. The resultant machine looks absolutely stock, yet is unique unto itself.

This fantastic melding of old performance into a new hot rod is available directly from the builder. With stock looks and a healthy bump in power, it is sure to be a screamer. So roll with the old-school cool that is the original double R, knowing that beneath the skin you have what it takes to hang with much newer machinery. Your sleeper awaits you - just contact Chris for details!

MI

Featured Hot Rod: 1993 Honda CBR900RR / 954RR Hybrid!
Honda February 9, 2017 posted by

Frosh – 1987 Honda NSR-250R MC16

Honda had tested the market with the NS250F/R in 1984, and sampled in the MotoGP waters.  On the heels of Freddie Spencer's 1985 championship in the 500 and 250cc classes ( ! ), the factory introduced the NSR-250R in late 1986 as a 1987 model.  This early example of the winning two-stroke twin is almost a blank canvas - ready for a quick once over for the road or a big restoration.

1987 Honda NSR-250R for sale on eBay

Just square with 54 mm bore and 54.5 mm stroke, the 249cc MC16 engine used hard coating on the cylinder walls to help the 45 hp last, and computer controlled exhaust port to extend the torque band.  The alloy frame was lifted from the GP bikes, as was the cassette transmission and Pro-Link rear.  Just over 300 lbs. fueled, the NSR-250R came with dual front disks and three spoke alloy wheels.  Tires are 17" front and 18" rear which will require some attention when buying new rubber.

This  NYC-based example has more miles than most but doesn't look to have been abused.  The current registration is a help at the very least.  Cosmetics and mechanicals might be freshened up, or you could explore the edge of the slippery slope.  The owner doesn't divulge much history but says this in the eBay auction:

1987 HONDA NSR 250 (MC16) WITH 25118 KM (15607 MILES).  THE BIKE IS ALL ORIGINAL AND COMPLETE.  STARTS ON THE FIRST KICK AND RUNS AND DRIVES EXCELLENT.  THE ORIGINAL PLASTICS ARE PERFECT.  NO CRACKS EXCEPT FOR THE WINDSHIELD.  THE ORIGINAL PAINT IS GOOD, BUT NOT PERFECT.  THE BIKE IS TITLED IN THE UNITED STATES AND IS CURRENTLY REGISTERED AND INSURED IN MY NAME.

This was a brutally competitive market segment and time, and Honda won the 250cc championship 11 times from 1985-2009.  As the MotoGP 250cc class fed improvements into the showroom, the later bikes have more and higher tech, but the first year machine has its appeal.  This one has a rather realistic cost of admission, and the early year might ease the pain once renovations get under way.  From a time when championship-winning innovations quickly found their way into the street machines, the NSR-250R is purely speedy and lightweight, no room for anything artificial...

-donn

Frosh – 1987 Honda NSR-250R MC16
Honda January 29, 2017 posted by

Hello Beastie: 1991 Honda CBR1000F

1991 Honda CBR1000F on eBay

In the late 1980's/early 1990's the major Japanese motorcycle manufactures all seemed to follow the same 3-level market segment philosophy.  At the bottom end were the learner bikes of 125cc or 250cc,  in the middle were the 750cc machines including Limited Edition repli-racers that could go to the track with a few modifications.  Finally in the top segment were 1000cc machines, big bikes that could do both big speed and big distances in comfort.   In this 1000cc (and up!) segment the results included machines such as the Kawasaki ZZR1100/ZX11 and our featured bike, a CBR1000F.

The CBR1000F actually launched in 1987 and originally followed the Honda "Hurricane" naming convention.   A redesign came in 1989 with improved bodywork including a much improved front fairing.   At the same time the Hurricane moniker was was dropped and the big beastie became known simply as the CBR1000F.

For anyone interested in the details of the changes, click here.

The big Honda wasn't designed to win any awards for feather touch handling, and at nearly 500 pounds wet you weren't going to pick it up by yourself if it tipped over.  But it would track straight and true against crosswinds that would blow smaller bikes around.   Basically it was exactly as advertised; a big bike that could do big miles smoothly via big speed.

This particular CBR1000F looks to be in excellent shape.   The OEM seat, already quite comfortable, has been upgraded to a Corbin unit and the front windscreen looks to be non-OEM but otherwise everything looks to be stock and in good condition.   The seller indicates the bike has recently come out of storage and has been refreshed but does have a few light scratches and is in need of fresh rubber.  The only issue I can see i some damage t0 the riders left exhaust which might mean the bike has gone down once but no damage is apparent in the bodywork.

Here is what the seller has to say:

  • Only 16,500 miles
  • New fork seals
  • New battery
  • Been in storage for over a decade, just taken out and reconditioned by Honda technician.
  • Carbs taken apart cleaned and adjusted to factory specs
  • Tires are in decent shape but would replace 
  • Bike does have numerous scratches/scuffs...all small scratches/scuffs and might be able to buff out but wanted to disclose all flaws.

So what is this bike beastie worth?   Is it worth more than its current no-reserve Ebay price of $1,326 USD?  Before you do a double take on that price, based on ebay recent sales history, this does seem to be about the current asking price for the early 1990's CBR1000F.  But those bikes don't look as good as this one, so I would expect this price to move up a bit.

While the Honda CBR1000F probably won't ever appreciate in value, its still a very good bike with the bulletproof Honda reliability that was common of the early 1990's.  The condition and low price of this one seems like a great opportunity for anyone who is looking to keep their main bike for the track but add something a bit more "grown up" to their garage and at a very, very good price.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Post Script - the same seller is also offering a 1986 Kawasaki 1000R in that's more appealing, click here for details.

Hello Beastie:  1991 Honda CBR1000F
Honda January 28, 2017 posted by

Endurance: 1979 Honda CB900F DHOLDA Edition

Among the modifiers, tuners and hot rodders of the motorcycle world, the lines can be drawn between the majors and the minors. The majors contain those that made the jump beyond tuner - be it kit producer or full-fledged manufacturer. I'm thinking the likes of Rickman, Bimota, Spondon, Harris, NCR and the like. The minors are full of extremely talented - but smaller scale output - organizations that often specialize in one type of make or model or focus on racing classes. Think Kalex & Speedup (concentrating around Moto2 racing), or any of the individuals that started careers improving race bikes (e.g. Tony Foale). This group also includes boutique builders such as Lance Gamma (who, incidentally offer services beyond RGs) and Nico Bakker (who is capable of designing/building anything). This list is potentially endless, and I'm sure readers can rattle off a dozen potentials. One such entry that must be included in this group is the D’Hollander family out of Belgium.

1979 DHOLDA Honda CB900 for sale on eBay

Focusing on Honda specifically for racing - and specializing in Endurance events - D’Hollander combined his own name with that of Honda to create the DHOLDA brand. While the beginnings were small (the grandfather originally made bicycle frames, before moving to mopeds), DHOLDA can be credited for winning at least one major Endurance event every year throughout the 1970s. We are not talking club-level racing either: 24 hours of Francorchamps (Spa), 24 hours of Barcelona, 1000 km at Mugello, and of course, the Bol D'Or. Into the 1980s and beyond, DHOLDA migrated into SuperBike, SuperSport, SuperMotard, as well as stock classes (i.e. 600), always with Honda. Alongside the business of racing DHOLDA created a business catered to street riders with go-fast parts and tuning services. It is from that side of the DHOLDA organization that this wonderful period CB emerged.

From the seller:
Welcome to a great opportunity. This is a very rare DHOLDA CB900F European Spec CB900F tuned by famous DHOLDA of Belgium race tuner Jean D'Hollander. Please feel free to google "DHOLDA Honda". This bike is Honda Racing History heritage, not sure if ever actually used in competition. I believe it is one of a handful of tuned bikes much like AMG is for Mercedes. The bike engine has been bored to 1000cc and the head has been reworked as is the custom exhaust and carbs. I have been in touch with Mike D'Hollander who is Jeans son and now runs the famous tuning company along with his sister. He indicated that his father, before he passed away in 1995 was big on building these king of incredible bikes. I have the emails and willing to forward them to you. The history of the bike as far as I know is it came to the USA in 1980-81 from Europe. It has all European gauges (look at speedo KPH) so it shows 13219 kilometers which is just over 8,000 miles. This is very low mileage! It sat in an air conditioned warehouse until recently. I have gone through the bike and cleaned most of the grime and dust off it and got it looking pretty decent.

More from the seller:
Everything works on this bike. The tank is coated and clean. The carbs could probably use a cleaning but work fine. The engine is a high compression, all four cylinders about 200psi(very nice) and it burns no oil,no smoke at all. Engine is tight and has no leaks at all, not a drop of oil. It revs like the devil, with plenty of power. I estimate over 100hp, maybe 110-120hp. It has a custom fairing-fiberglass and Euro headlight with switches for parking,head lights and high beam, each position controlled by rider. The brakes are good but tires are probably 30 years old with tread but should be replaced. I rebuild the rear brake master cylinder with fresh fluid both front/rear brakes and new oil/filter. Hope I didn't miss anything but please ASK QUESTIONS! 718-551-4451. I would like whomever gets this bike to be able to appreciate the provenance and history. Maybe it belongs in a Museum but I am a regular guy who loves to find these kind of rare bikes and passes them on to the right person that has the ability to display and store them. Currently I have a clear Florida title.

It is not exactly clear what tuner services and modifications were bestowed upon this bike. It wears the Endurance-style fairing made popular during the era, replete with dual headlights necessary to light corners through the long nights of 24-hour races. It also sports a significant bump in capacity with a big-bore kit and who knows what other engine wizardry DHOLDA was capable of during this time. Any way you look at it, this bike looks serious; dated, perhaps, but serious.

DHOLDA is not only still around, as an organization DHOLDA is thriving with both racing and street tuning sides of the business. As long as it's a Honda, they have solutions that can improve your ride or race. And if the old-school Endurance stance is your look, check out this very cool DHOLDA Honda CB. The BIN price is $11,900, with the auction near $5k with reserve still in place. As always, let us know what you think!

MI

Endurance: 1979 Honda CB900F DHOLDA Edition
Honda January 27, 2017 posted by

Odd Import: 1983 Honda MVX250F

In the world of import two strokes, you may be intimately familiar with RGs, NSRs, RZs and the like. What you don't hear much about is the MVX. One of the oddities of the popcorn set, the MVX represents Honda's engineering might coupled with a healthy dose of experimentalism. Unlike the RD/RZ/RG set with parallel twins (or later, the RG V-twins), Honda pulled a page from their GP racing manual and created a V-3 triple cylinder machine. With a configuration similar to the Ducati L-twin layout - but with two front cylinders - the MVX was no wider than a parallel twin while showcasing an extra cylinder. Balancing the odd number of reciprocating parts was accomplished via a slightly heavier connecting rod on the 3rd, upright cylinder. The result was 49 horsepower at 9,000 RPM, with redline starting at 10,500 RPM.

1983 Honda MVX250F for sale on eBay

You would be forgiven to pass this off as a glorified moped - with flashy graphics but no street creds. After all, is that a drum brake up front?? In reality, what appears to be a drum brake is actually a clever inboard single disk. The centralized location eliminates the torque created by traditionally-situated single disk implementations, although heat buildup during extreme use would continue to plague the setup. Honda eventually adopted a conventional twin disk arrangement for the NS-series of bikes that were to follow.

From the seller:
The bike is imported from Japan.
Not registered yet in the U.S.
This bike is sold without title.
Low miles (2884km)
Engine number MC09E-1014852

The engine running to half a year ago, I stayed for a while. So, Cleaning of cab & spark plug. The color of the tank is slightly peeling off. Coating inside the tank

Part of the engine & frame that has been simple painted . A little cracked of single seat. The end of the stand is broken. Battery replacement required.

The seller has done a good job providing photos and video of the bike in question. Like the last bike from this seller, this MVX lacks any title. Given that the MVX never came near US shores (Japan and Pacific Rim countries were the sole recipients), getting this one licensed for road use might be a bit dicey. For its age and origination, this bike looks to be in great shape (which is not always the case with overseas imports). As always, RSBFS recommends that you do your homework and plan ahead if you have a hankering to act.

If you decide to act, better bring your wallet - the opening ask for this one is $5,800. We have not had enough history with these bikes to really derive a value, so it will be interesting to watch this one and see where it goes. The MVX is very rare in the US, but how much value does that add? What do you think? Does this 1983 Honda MVX250F tickle your fancy? Would you prefer this over a similar year two stroke from Suzuki or Yamaha? Check it out, then share you thoughts in the comments. Good Luck to the seller and all potential buyers!

MI

Odd Import: 1983 Honda MVX250F