Posts by tag: Low Miles

Featured Listing February 18, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1990 Honda VFR400 NC30

Correction: Price $12,750 U.S. -dc

It’s rare to find a sportbike that is both the smaller, less aggressive version of a more powerful bike, but can also stand on its own merits. In most cases, the smaller bike will get unfairly compared to its faster sibling, and always be seen as a compromise. With the 1990 Honda VFR400R, that was certainly not the case. Sure, its styling aped the legendary RC30 superbike, and it was never intended as an out and out racer the way the RC was, but the NC30 found an lovely niche as a fine-edged performance oriented mini rocket.

Where the bigger machine was prohibitively expensive for most people, and was easily capable of getting you into freedom-jeopardizing trouble, the NC was accessible, entertaining for multiple skill levels, and built to Honda’s legendary standards of quality. There’s a reason they’re valuable today. Think of a 400 made today that you can see enthusiasts drooling over in 30 years. I’ll wait.

This one resides in Vancouver, Canada, and wears Canadian collector plates. The photos here don’t do its condition justice, and it’s only covered 5,555 kilometers over its life. For those of us in the states, that is far fewer than 4,000 miles.

From the seller:

HONDA 1990 VFR 400 NC30, VERY RARE, MINT CONDITION WITH COLLECTOR PLATES!!!!

Summary
Often considered the baby brother to the RC30, the 400cc NC30 deservedly stands proud on its own right. The V-4 with ultra-precise gear driven cams delivers a powerful 60 horsepower soundtrack that is unique to this model – especially when the tach swings up toward the 14,500 RPM redline. This is partly thanks to the NC30s 360 degree crank, creating a “big bang” motor when compared to the NC21 or NC24 predecessors. With a race-bred twin spar aluminum frame, endurance-bred single sided swing arm, fourinto-one exhaust and adjustable suspension, the underpinnings of the VFR400R were anything but cheap. Drape the whole package in a glorious shape that is as iconic as any of the sport bikes we hold in high esteem (RC30, 851, 916, F4), throw in typical Honda build quality and reliability and you have the NC30 in a nutshell.

This particular bike was bought from the local Honda dealership (Vancouver Canada), it was one the bikes in his private collection. I bought this bike on an impulse and also as an investment plus I thought it would look really good (which it does) parked next to my 2009 VFR 800. This bike has to be seen in person to be truly appreciated as these pictures from a smartphone camera do not do justice. It currently has 5555 kms on it.

Price: $13,750 $12,750 US Dollars
Contact: Jeff – jeff@digitalsecurity.ca

These things have been a hot commodity for years now, but the market for grey-market Japanese collector bikes shows few signs of slowing down. These bikes will never sell for RC30 money, but their value will always punch above their horsepower class for the right collector.

Featured Listing: 1990 Honda VFR400 NC30
Featured Listing February 12, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1979 Yamaha RD400F Daytona Special

Before race bikes had to have fairings, custom suspension, and forged rearsets, they looked a lot like streetbikes with number plates, and the 1979 Yamaha RD400F Daytona was among the best. Lighter by half than most of the 750cc and 1,000cc superbikes of the time, the RD could run inside outside and around just about any of its peers. Usually, that means you sacrifice something in acceleration or top speed, but the RD’s parallel-twin 400cc two-stroke mill damn near made up for that.

With ~43 horsepower to push around just 365 pounds, the little RDs were darlings on the street, too. Their modern equivalent is probably something like the Yamaha FZ07, practical, lithe, fast enough to scare you and still accessible enough for a commuter.

This 1979 RD400F Daytona is a beautiful example of the brand, in the classic red/white/gold livery. It’s not perfect, but it isn’t that far off. It’s easily nice enough to put on a stand in your basement and stare at, but I wouldn’t be scared to take it out for a few nice weekend rides, either.

From the seller:

Canadian model 1979 RD400 F Daytona Special sold for only 1 year.
Bike is all original stock.
Low 8100 Miles.
Starts, runs and rides amazing for a 40 year old bike, no issues.
Numbers matching. Low number #403
Matching locks for all 3 – tank, ignition, and seat.
Rust free gas tank, no liner, truly in great shape inside.
Bodywork and paint in very nice shape,
Side covers in great shape very clean no brakes.
All electrical working and no cuts or repairs to wiring loom.
All chrome in great shape including the forks are clean no pits or rust, and gas cap.
Has tool OEM kit.
Things to note the Canadian model received a different crank, electronic ignition, as well as separate carbs similar to the earlier model (that doesn’t have the goofy carb tops and rubber accordion boots that came with the mechanical synchronizing system. Other changes from US model is the exhaust pipes, and have larger diameter for the header and inlet to the exhaust cigar pipes. The Canadian exhaust system also don’t have the butterfly valve.
Huge list of work done including,
Full tune up,
Carburetors just meticulously overhauled.
All work done by red seal mechanic.
140 PSI compression left and right cylinders. Can’t get better than that!!
Many fresh 0km OEM parts.
New air filter.
New spark plugs.
New neutral switch seal.
New shift shaft seal.
New clutch push rod seal.
New seat cover.
New fuel tank rear mounting rubbers.
Petcock rebuilt with new parts.
New exhaust pipe rubber joint gasket.
New black rubber fuel lines.
Fresh Motul trans oil.
Rear brake caliper rebuilt
Fresh brake pads, front and rear.
Bike roles very freely when brakes release.
1 season old battery.
Low km chain and sprockets.
Low km tires.
Probably more just can’t think of it at the moment. many months of love, sweet and work has gone into freshening up this nice original Daytona Special
I would rate this bike as a solid 8.5 out of 10.
Small deficiencies;
1 handle bar mounting bolt is not a match.
Black paint on wheels is starting to fade. comes back nice and black with a little mag product and work.
Front brake is a bit spongy from 40 year old rubber line, looks great, no cracks or splits just flexes more than I like. Yes I’m that picky.
Small marks on fuel tank.
Headlight ears have the dreaded RD400 creases.
Scratches and small weld repair on right exhaust pipe near passenger peg.
Tail fairing underside around mounting bolts has a small piece missing, can not be seen from outside.

Asking price is $7,500 US
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Contact Eric: ericheemskerk31@hotmail.com or by phone 604 837 2967

This one is a Canadian model, which means it’s a little harder edged than the versions we got in the U.S. At $7,500, it’s not exactly a bargain basement collector’s piece, but it’s definitely one you should want to own.

Featured Listing: 1979 Yamaha RD400F Daytona Special
Ducati February 5, 2020 posted by

Star-spangled Duc: 2002 Ducati 998S Ben Bostrom Edition

Ducati went all in on special editions in 2003 after Troy Bayliss took home the metal in the 2001 World Superbike Championship and American teammate Ben Bostrom followed him to third. They kicked out a special edition 2002 Ducati 998S for each man, wearing special carbon fairing pieces, Ohlins suspension, colored chromoly frames and Marchesini wheels, among other little tweaks.

2002 Ducati 998S for sale on eBay

Bayliss certainly had more to celebrate, but Ducati knew American riders would eat up a Star-Spangled Banner-adorned 998, and at the time they did not shy away from the opportunity to build a special edition. Aside from the paint and carbon bodywork, there wasn’t much to the Bostrom Edition that you couldn’t find on a 998R. The Tetrastretta v-twin kicked out close to 130 horsepower, the suspension was blue-chip stuff and the Massimo Tamburini-penned looks were in full effect.

This one has its share of knocks and bruises, especially for such a low mileage and rare bike, but overall it presents nicely. It wears what appear to be aftermarket rearsets and Termignoni cans.

From the eBay listing:

2002 998s Ducati Bostrom out of my little collection

-5726 miles
-Brand new tires
-Great condition but doesn’t have some blemishes. Please see the pictures and ask any questions you may have. The right side mirror has a rub mark, left fairing has a hairline crack, tail has slight spider webbing above “Superbike” and a little crack on the inside of the right fairing. All of these appear to be from bumps and none from the bike falling.
-Two piece side fairings, carbon belly, carbon under tray.
-This bike has several added carbon parts as well as other bits to add to the appearance.
-I am an avid fan of Ducati and added this Bostrom to my collection about three years ago. I have since found one with much lower miles and since I display my bikes, I bought the lower mileage and am now selling this one.
-The pictured bike stand IS NOT INCKUDED in the sale-it is for my other Bostrom.
-Bike has a service to include belts being done prior to my purchase. I added less than two miles during my ownership. It stayed displayed in my second story “bike cave”. The tires have 100% tread and all the little nuns are still visible. The bike does start and runs. While displayed, I started it at least once a month.

The bike is now downstairs and you are welcomed to have it inspected prior to auction ending.

Bike is located in the Dallas, Texas area. I will make myself available for inspections and to meet with a shipper for transport to you. However, inspection and shipping costs are the responsibility of the buyer. I have had numerous cars and motorcycles shipped to me so I can help answer questions.

Whether you dig the paint scheme or not, there is no denying the desirability of 998s, as they were the swansong of the awesome 916 line. Add a little rarity and scarce mileage, and you get a bike that a collector will drool over.

Star-spangled Duc: 2002 Ducati 998S Ben Bostrom Edition
Bimota February 3, 2020 posted by

Shogun in an Italian suit: 2000 Bimota SB8R

Taking Italian suspension, style and bespoke build quality know-how and shoving it full of deadnuts-reliable and prodigious power from the other side of the Atlantic, or in this case the Pacific, is a time-honored tradition. In the ’60s, the likes of Bizzarrini and Iso executed the formula to devastating effect in cars. But Bimota ported the practice over to bikes with racing success to back it up.

2000 Bimota SB8R for sale on eBay

In this case, the Italians hung a handbuilt frame and handmade carbon fiber bodywork around a Suzuki TL1000R engine, then threw Paioli springy bits at it to give it Bimota’s signature refinement. Before they were done, Bimota tweaked the big v-twin to push out just south of 140 horsepower at the crank. The result was a piece of industrial art that was made for race tracks but was almost too pretty to ride in anger.

This one, located at Speedart in Miami, Florida, has covered just 5,100 miles, and has been kept the way you’d expect for a collector’s piece of this caliber. There isn’t a surface on it that you’d be scared to eat off of. This one has a Power Commander III that was added by the second owner, which after a tune settled down some of the fueling issues these bikes can have thanks to those massive throttle bodies. It also wears a very stylish Arrow exhaust.

From the eBay listing:

Vehicle Description
Chassis No: ZESSB8R02YR000013

Odometer: 5,105 Miles

Engine: 996cc Four Stroke, V-Twin 8-valve, Liquid Cooled DOHC

Transmission: 6-Speed Gearbox

Performance: 135 bhp @ 9,750 rpm / 77 lb-ft – 0-60 mph 3.1 sec / 170 mph

Exterior: Competition Red/White

Interior: N/A

About This Motorcycle
“The first thing you notice about the SB8R is the striking exotic looks, thanks to passionate Italian design, hand-built craftsmanship, and the advanced, for its time, use of carbon fibre.”

The name Bimota is derived from the first two letters of the names of the three founders, Bianchi, Morri, and Tamburini.

Massimo Tamburini crashed his Honda 750 at the Misano race course in 1972, breaking three ribs. Finding himself with time on his hands while recovering, he designed and constructed a tubular steel frame that would eliminate the flex and handling problems that plagued the high horsepower machines of all the large Japanese manufacturers. Bimota’s first model, the HB1, was the result of his work and vision.

Only ten of them were produced, starting when the company was formed in 1973. In the early years Bimota produced mainly racing frames, then began manufacturing complete high performance machines as well as ones in “kit” form. When the now legendary KB1 was developed, the company was assured of commercial success. Bimota continued to be at the very leading edge of extremely high performance motorcycle design throughout the 80’s, 90’s and into the new millennia on both the track and the street.

Now more than forty five years after the firm’s founding, Bimotas of any era are sought after throughout the world because of their beauty, technological superiority and exclusivity.

The SB8R was the first production bike to use carbon fibre in the frame. There is plenty more additional carbon fibre elements, including the unusual but effective air intake system integrated into the front fairing, tail assembly and more. Bimota used engines from other manufacturers and constructed their own frame and body work to give it less weight and improved handling over the “donor bike”.

The Bimota SB8R uses a Suzuki TL-1000 motor, with Bimota’s own fuel and exhuast system that resulted in 135 hp. The motor and special designed rear suspension give the bike perfect balance resulting in a machine that is a joy to ride.

Even though the SB8R was designed for the track, most owners (true in the case of this motorbike), used them sparingly, riding on nice days, and the occasional bike show. This Bimota has only 5,100 miles after 16 years of ownership.

From the total of 150 hand-built examples spanning a two year period only 69 SB8Rs were exported into the US. It is questionable of how many are still in this pristine and original condition. Upon a closer examination it is easy to attest to the claims that it’s never been tipped over or any evidence of track time.

Speedart Motorsports is pleased to present this time capsule original SB8R in the configuration it left the factory in Rimini with a couple of small modifications in order to improve the ownership experience.

The light switch was modified so the headlight can be turned off, foot-pegs were replaced with European fixed position pegs, and the fueling system was modified to make it more rideable in street configuration.The fairings have original paint, carbon fiber parts have no cracks, all lights, turn-signals are original and working, tires have little wear, although they are at least 2 years old, so may want to consider replacing.Shocks don’t show signs of needing seals, engine has no leaks, runs great, once it warms up (these are cold-blooded beasts). Brakes have plenty of wear left, recommend oil change for the engine, something I intended to do, but haven’t made time.

This bike was purchased new from Ducati Bellevue on 3/2/2002. The 1st owner was a local Seattle aerospace engineer who rarely rode the bike. The last owner purchased the bike on 2015 prior to Speedart Motorsports acquiring the Bimota.

The 1st owner made only one modification to this machine. His one mod was having a custom fuel trimmer or potentiometer made to work with the existing wiring harness. These bikes were known to have fueling issues due to the massive throttle bodies and this is where the potentiometer helps out. Unfortunately the potentiometer is old technology and the adjustment range was limited. The second owner installed a PCIII that was tuned by Nels at 2 Wheel Dyno Works in Woodinville, WA.

PCIII was installed by second owner to permanently wash out some of the fueling issues that was typical of the SB8R model and its huge throttle bodies. This bike accelerates easier through the rev range than before. The fuel trimmer that had been installed by the first owner was only finite and could not adjust or reach some of these issues in the rev range. This modification alone makes it rideable even in heavy traffic.

As previously mentioned, the first owner added an out-of-production Evoluzione SB8R fuel trimmer provided by a Bimota enthusiast in Colorado. This unit is more precisely calibrated with nearly infinite settings between 0 and 999. The Bimota trimmer has 8 positions total.

The Arrow exhaust on the bike has been cored for better performance and sound. The result is outstanding in that it essentially replicates full racing pipes with much better performance and sound.

The stock tank on these SB8R’s is an Acerbis tank. The tank that’s currently installed on the bike was sealed and lined by Russ Foy in late 2014 to prevent any tank expansion. Furthermore braided steel clutch and brake lines were fitted in lieu of the stock rubber.

The sale of this race bred super bike is accompanied by owner manuals, service books and two keys.

The fortunate new owner will receive a galore of unobtainium spare parts worth thousands of dollars and who are no longer available. Such spares include, composite full fairing skins that can be painted with the desired livery suitable for racing, extra monoposto seat, additional OEM Acerbis Tank, OEM full exhaust system with silencers, lithium battery charger, rear pit stand and more, making this acquisition the ultimate SB8R package.

Disclaimer
Whilst Speedart Motorsports, LLC. (“We”) make a sincere effort to contain information that is accurate and complete, we are aware that errors and omissions may occur. We are not able therefore, to guarantee the accuracy of that information and we do not accept liability for loss or damage arising from misleading information or for any reliance on which you may place on the information contained in this website. We highly recommend that you examine the vehicle to check the accuracy of the information supplied. If you have any queries with regard to any information on our website, please contact us at . This disclaimer does not affect your statutory rights.

The buy-it-now for this beast is set at $23,000, and there are just a couple days left on the listing. With few owners in its history and one very carefully done modification, this thing is ready to make its third owner very happy.

Shogun in an Italian suit: 2000 Bimota SB8R
Ducati January 25, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 2006 Ducati PS1000LE

This Featured Listing is part of the The Edinger Ducati Collection. Thank you for supporting the site, David! -dc

Even by Ducati’s impressive standards for special editions and factory customs, the 2006 Ducati PS1000LE is a masterstroke. It is, in a way, a special edition within a special edition, as it prowled showrooms at the same time as the Ducati Sport Classic line, which kicked off a wave of retro-look machines that has yet to crest.

The PS1000LE was extra special for Duc, as it celebrated Paul Smart’s historic win at the 1972 Imola 200 aboard a 750SS. The paint scheme apes Smart’s machine, and Ducati had Pierre Terblance pen the neoclassic machine to pay exacting tribute.

The exposed trellis frame, toaster tank, bulbous rear cowl and dustbin-style bikini fairing are brilliant touches. Under all that pretty is a 992 cc L-twin that put out just south of 100 horsepower. Never designed as an out-and-out rocket, the PS is still no slouch, as the torquey mill has less than 400 pounds to shove around. It’s all kept rubberside down by adjustable Ohlins front and rear.

From the seller:

2006 Ducati PS1000LE
I have owned this rare beauty since new. The Termignoni full exhaust system sound is music and the best sounding bike in my collection. Other mods are a Ducati performance racing ECU, open clutch cover, dark shield and clear belt covers and carbon fiber hugger. Original parts will go with the bike with the exception of the original exhaust. Included are two black keys, one red key & key Code Card as well as the Ducati owner’s manual. I have every receipt since it was purchased and it has only been serviced by authorized Ducati dealers. The bike also comes with the Ducati tank cover and tank bag.
These bikes were only made one year and they were limited to 2000 units. This bike was made as a tribute to Paul Smarts win at Imola 200 in 1972 which jump started Ducatis racing successes. The popularity of the limited production bikes led to the popular Sport Classic series.
The bike is a 992cc air cooled Desmodromic 2-valve L twin with 92 HP @ 6,000 RPM and a claimed 399 pounds day with a fuel capacity of 4 gallons with a top speed of 129 MPH.
Price $19,000
Contact
David Edinger
Edinger.david@gmail.com
+1-317-908-2573

These Paul Smart bikes will only go up in value, and while this one might not have the stock exhaust, it is priced to reflect that and is a beautiful example of a timeless bike.

Featured Listing: 2006 Ducati PS1000LE
Ducati January 23, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1988 Ducati Paso 750

This Featured Listing is part of the The Edinger Ducati Collection. Thank you for supporting the site, David! -dc

That Ducati Paso 750s don’t get the pure adulation that they deserve from anyone outside dyed-in-the-wool Ducatisti is baffling. Sure, they’re looks might aptly be described as controversial and they never had world-beating power, but their place in motorcycling is as important as any mid-80’s Japanese rocket.

Most importantly, the bike saved Ducati from the scrapyard of history, pulling together the earliest versions of the brand’s modern hallmarks under new corporate ownership. Second, however controversial it might have been, their styling is uniquely Italian, uniquely 1980s and at the time was from outer space. The man who penned it, Massimo Tamburini, went on to give the world the Ducati 916 and the Ducati Monster.

So, it’s safe to say without the oddly charming Paso, with its belt-driven cam engine and fiberglass fetish, the Ducatis we drool over now might never have appeared. If we’ve piqued your interest, this 1988 Ducati Paso 750 is the pick of the litter.

With fewer than 1,500 miles on the dial since new, and wearing the rare-as-frog-hair blue bodywork, this Paso rightfully should end up in a museum. According to the seller, it’s one of just 55 sold in this color scheme worldwide.

From the seller:

This blue model Paso is very limited in numbers with only 55 sold worldwide and only has 1,486 miles which allows you to have a brand new antique. The Ducati Paso 750 was the first road going product to come out of the Cagiva-Ducati relationship, launched in 1985 when Cagiva purchased Ducati from the Italian government. Cagiva rushed to get it ready for the 1985 Milan motorcycle show. The bike has a set of Conti slip ons however the stock exhausts come with the sale of the motorcycle. This is a very comfortable bike for both the rider and the passenger.

Between 1986 and 1988, Ducati only sold 4,863 Paso 750s. It’s important because it was the first Ducati product designed by Massimo Tamburini, co-founder of Bimota, and the man who would go on to design the Ducati 916, and the MV Agusta F4, both considered to be two of the world’s most beautiful modern motorcycles.

For the Paso 750, Tamburini cloaked the entire motorcycle behind fiberglass and plastic panels, hiding all the mechanical parts. For the time, the Paso was packed with state-of-the-art features: square chromoly steel tube perimeter chassis, an aluminum rear swing arm, and aluminum Marvic 16-inch wheels wrapped in radial tires.

The Paso 750’s calling card was in the parts department. The 42mm anti-dive front forks were pretty huge for the era, and there was a stout fork brace built right into the front fender. At the rear, the rising-rate “Pro-Link”-style Ohlins monoshock was adjustable for preload, compression and rebound damping.

It is equipped with the belt-drive Pantah motor which was a strong and capable engine, and known to deliver in the Ducati 750 F1.

The bike’s instruments were nestled in a binnacle that on normal machines would be covered by a tinted plexiglass windscreen, but on the Paso was an extension of the bodywork. They were made up of equal-sized speedometer and tachometer, along with a fuel gauge.

The Paso was lauded as “the best-equipped Eurobike ever to take on the Japanese in the hotly contested 750 sports market.” Owning a Paso today is something of a labor of love. They’re also mechanically reliable. The carburetor–an automotive Weber two-barrel pressed into duty running both cylinders.

The Paso is a fun, unique, and totally ’80s ride for not a lot of cash. Riding one never fails to elicit a thumbs up, and an appreciative glance from the crowd at your local European bike night.

Top Speed is 131 MPH with 72 HP@7,000 RPM and with a dry weight of 429 pounds with a 5 speed transmission, 5.8 gallon fuel capacity and a 30.6 inch height seat

Contact: David Edinger
Edinger.david@gmail.com
+1-317-908-2573

For all that beauty and rarity, our buddy David is asking for just $5,500. That’s half what you’d pay for a grey market Japanese two stroke, and this one is twice as clean as most smokers you’ll come across.

Featured Listing: 1988 Ducati Paso 750
Kawasaki January 23, 2020 posted by

Ride and cherish: 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR

The 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR is the ultimate expression of streetbike muscle from the era when racebikes actually were just tricked out street bikes with hot engine kits, big brakes and slicks. Without someone like Pops Yoshimura in your rolodex, you still weren’t gonna get close to Eddie Lawson’s horsepower numbers, but with a couple number plates and a decent imagination you wouldn’t be far off.

1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR for sale on eBay

The 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR was the company’s marketing play on Eddie’s 1981 and 1982 AMA Superbike championships aboard a very green KZ1000. With bodywork from the previous year’s GPz, a warmed up engine and the hallmark bright green and blue bodywork over gold wheels, the look was perfect. The bikes were always meant to be a little extra special, so they sold few of them and the ones that remain are blue-chip collector bikes.

This one is a Canada-spec machine, with no smog equipment and a kilometers per hour speedo. It shows some wear and tear from its 37 years, but it feels nitpicky to mention them. With just under 11,000 kilometers on the dial, this thing has a lot of cruise nights left in it.

From the eBay listing:

1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR (Canada / Europe spec) This model does not have engine head cover US emission valve as can be seen in photo. Speedometer in Kilometers. Very rare and hard to find period FOX race shocks. Bike is in very good condition with 6822 miles or 10979 Kilometers on the bike. 150PSI plus on all cylinder compression and valves adjusted. Repacked steering head bearings, new petcock seals, rebuilt front forks with seals and 20W fork oil. Good condition and painted side covers with decals and emblems as hard side cover grommets damaged the tabs on the side covers. Bike has new side cover grommets now. Owners manual and partial tool kit as can be seen in photo. Bike runs and have video of bike running . Shifts through all gears and no clutch issues. Brakes work as they should. All lights work. New Metzeler Sportec Klassik tires front and rear. New Yuasa battery.
Clear title in hand.

This  bike is very clean and original, but not so gleaming that you’d feel bad about riding it, which we love. For someone out there, this bike is the perfect addition.

 

Ride and cherish: 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR
Aprilia January 4, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 2009 Aprilia RS125 Jorge Lorenzo Edition

Before the three MotoGP world titles made him synonymous with factory Yamaha, Jorge Lorenzo made a damn solid case that he was the next GOAT on 125cc and 250cc two-stroke Derbis and Aprilias in the big show’s feeder series. After three seasons on Derbis in 125, Lorenzo made the leap to 250s with Honda in 2005.

But in 2006, he moved from Honda to Aprilia and everything changed. He put the series on his back and ran to the next two world titles aboard the Fortuna-liveried Italian machines. This 2009 Aprilia RS125 pays tribute to those machines and those championships in the “Spain’s No. 1” livery that Fortuna used in countries that forbade tobacco sponsorship.

With just 28 horsepower, you’ll never challenge a Lorenzo lap record on one of these things, but with less than 300 pounds to push around, there’s plenty of fun to be had, especially when the road gets skinny and twisty. With just 10 miles on the dial, it’s safe to say this one hasn’t been fully enjoyed yet. It’s a US version, which means its lights are inoperable and it hasn’t got mirrors. Thanks to the EPA, this thing was never going to be legal on these shores. But as a short-track blaster or a pure collector’s item, its pedigree is hard to argue.

From the seller:

For sale is a 2009 Aprilia RS125 Jorge Lorenzo Special Edition. This bike is like new, show room quality with only 10 original miles. This is a motorcycle collectors dream! Not only are they super rare in general, but you won’t find one in this condition with this low of miles unless it’s still in the crate.

Price: $6,000
Contact Matt: matthewsumma@hotmail.com or cell/text 816-914-0516.

You can park this little ripper in your shop for $6,000, which is less than a dime-a-dozen Suzuki DR-Z.

Featured Listing: 2009 Aprilia RS125 Jorge Lorenzo Edition