Posts by tag: Ducati

Bimota August 17, 2018 posted by

Styling Exercise: 1998 Bimota DB3 Mantra for Sale

Bimota’s stock-in-trade has always been aggressive, lightweight racebikes for the road but, every once in a while, they throw us a curveball. Or even the occasional knuckleball like this DB3 Mantra. An unapologetically road-biased machine, Bimota’s third Ducati-powered special featured upright ergonomics, an oval-section trellis frame shared with the later DB4, a roto-molded fuel tank that included a storage cubby at the back in an ill-advised nod to practicality, and styling could be called “wild” if you were feeling gracious.

It was polarizing then and now, but if you like the looks, you shouldn’t let anything discourage you from buying one: the hard parts are all easy to service, reliable, and pretty entertaining. Ducati’s air and oil-cooled two-valve v-twin has been around forever, and is relatively simple to service and parts are readily available to maintain them. Yeah, the regular belt-changes are kind of annoying, but easy to do if you know your way around an engine, and the valves generally aren’t too much of a problem either. And if the bike’s 85 claimed horses from the 904cc twin don’t adequately blow your hair back, you can build yourself a high-compression, 944cc monster that should do a pretty good job of stretching your arms.

The styling was slightly insane, but the bike handled very well, with a 43mm Paioli fork out front and an adjustable Paioli shock out back. The oval-section trellis frame was stiff and very light: just 11 pounds. Basically, it was a lighter, weirder, much more expensive Monster with better suspension. Like all Bimotas, it makes no sense from a financial perspective, as performance advantages over a Monster that cost half as much were minimal. But 454 Mantras found buyers, which makes the bike pretty much volume production for Bimota.

This example is a second-generation Mantra, with updated styling at the front, tubular handlebars instead of raised clip-ons, and Antera wheels to replace the earlier Marchesini hoops. I have a soft spot for these, as it was one of the first bikes that, as a non-rider, really caught my eye when it was new. Weird as they are, I still kind of dig the DB3 and would have one in a collection if I could afford to:

A: Have that plastic, burl-wood dash replaced with something stupid, like genuine wood or some nice carbon fiber.
B: Replace the horrible four exhaust pipes and the ludicrously-styled hangars with something much simpler.

Remove the taller screen, fit some simple bar-end mirrors and have fun.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Bimota DB3 Mantra for Sale

This is an excellent example of a DB3. 400+ made, 23 in red. Very few in the US. Very low mileage at under 9200. Ducati 900 engine just has been serviced with new belts, oil and plugs. New AGM battery. New Conti tires. Previous owner removed the complicated fuel pump system and now it is just gravity fed.

Here are the 3 issues. Without a choke cable, it is a little hard starting until fuel gets in the carbs. With a cable, I imagine it would go on the first try. Once started, restarts fine. Tach works 50% if the time, loose connection? Lastly has a slight whistle noise at an exact rpm. Ducati said it is caused by lack of the factory air box. It hurts nothing, just the flow of air… These are 3 minute things, but I go for full transparency. The bike is in great shape. Very unique Italian styling.

“Very unique Italian styling” might be the epitome of understatement in this case. But the bones are good and the DB3 should make a pretty great weekend roadster for cruising, carving up traffic, and shocking onlookers. “What is that?” is something I’d expect you’ll hear pretty often, riding the Mantra. So what’s it worth? Well the Bimota pedigree and rarity certainly makes it more valuable than an equivalent 900SS or Monster powered by the same engine, with similar performance. But by how much? Values for 90s Bimotas are currently at a bit of a low-ebb, although I doubt that can continue forever. Bidding on this one is very active and up to just about $5,000 with another day left on the auction.

-tad

Styling Exercise: 1998 Bimota DB3 Mantra for Sale
Ducati August 9, 2018 posted by

Very Special Edition: 1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca

The 1980s were a period of gestation for Ducati, hitting their sportbike stride with the move from the bevel drive motors to the now-ubiquitous rubber belt-driven desmo valve train. And while Japan focused on technology such as four valves per cylinder, liquid cooling and a constantly changing array of multi-cylinder configurations, Ducati stuck to what they knew: a robust L-twin with simple (and light) air cooling, desmodronic valve actuation, and a steel trellis frame. The F1 lacked the refinement and outright power of the Japanese competition, but the magic was in what wasn’t there; the F1 weighed less than the competition, and the narrow configuration of the twin made for a compact and very agile racer. Although time and technology left it behind, the F1 and its variants remain a significant era for the Cagiva-owned company.

1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca for sale on eBay

Sitting on the cusp of the next era (the legendary 851 was released this very same year), the F1 was becoming long in the tooth before its time. To bridge the gap to the next model and keep interest in the F1 alive, Ducati released three special editions: The Santamonica, the Montjuich and the Laguna Seca. These limited edition models consisted of unique paint schemes and minor changes (some cosmetic, some performance related). Power across the three remained identical, while some of the running gear changed based on markets and need. All of these special edition bikes run 16″ wheels front and rear, and all have special cosmetic touches to highlight the fact that they are unique. The Laguna Seca utilizes a steel gas tank (unlike the aluminum model on the Montjuich), and the wheels, brakes and fender are Paso items. Yet despite the archaic configuration and Cagiva parts bin raiding, any of the F1 specials remain collectible high-points in Ducati model history.

From the seller:
This bike is a 1987 Ducati Laguna Seca, one of 200 produced to commemorate Ducati’s victory at that California track. From ’86 to ’88 Ducati would release a trio of special edition F1’s in celebration of the machine’s various successes around the world – the Montjuich, Santa Monica, and Laguna Seca. The Laguna Seca spec commemorated Marco “Lucky” Lucchinelli winning the 1986 “Battle of the Twins” at the iconic, technical Northern-California circuit . In addition to wearing a Lucky Lucchinelli livery, the F1 Laguna Seca also boasts a decal of Lucchinelli’s signature on the tank of the limited edition Ducati. I purchased this machine in 1999 from the original owner’s estate in Southampton, NY with 614 kilometers on the odometer.

Currently this bike is in excellent condition and has travelled a mere 848 kilometers since new. It has been made more streetable by the conversion to Mikuni carbs, but the original Dell’Ortos are included in the sale price. All other parts of the bike are original except for the tires. The original Pirelli MP7S tires are included as well. It has been started regularly and taken for occasional local rides. I believe this to be the 189th Laguna Seca produced as evidenced by the VIN ZDM3GA3M0HB750189. This is a classic, rare Ducati that is difficult to find in any condition and would make a great addition to any sophisticated collection of Italian motorcycles or a great weekend ride with sympathetic Ducatisti.

In the past these F1-based specials have generated strong interest and stronger prices. There has not been too much interest in this particular example, which is strange due to the low mileage and clean, excellent condition. The opening ask is $15k; and while not exactly pocket change it is far from the highest opening for one of these models. In fact, I would consider it right on the money based on history. The paintwork looks clean and where modifications have happened (i.e. carb replacement, new tires) the originals are included in the sale. That is important for a collector, but maybe less so for someone intending to ride this beast. And who wouldn’t want to? I can practically hear the bark of the exhaust through the Conti pipe, feel the rumble of the L-twin loping just off idle, and imagine what my neighbors might think. Raw and crude in many respect, this relative relic is a riot riding on 16″ rubber.

Unfortunately, this looks to be another low mile icon destined for a comfy parking space somewhere inside. One can always hope to see and hear it run in anger, but at this price that will likely be a rare occasion. Still, it is nice to see that this Laguna Seca example did rack up some mileage up to this point. It has also survived the ravages of time and corporate changes that befell Ducati. This is a wonderful and rare survivor that deserves a good home. And despite the fact that the historic track for which it was named has itself gone through some naming changes, the Ducati F1 Laguna Seca will remain a significant model for the brand and a major collectible for those with the means and taste. If you are among that group, be sure and check it out here. And then you can jump back to the comments and share your thoughts: which F1 model do you covet – if any? Good Luck!!

MI

Very Special Edition: 1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca
Ducati July 30, 2018 posted by

Featured listing: 1988 Ducati 851 Tricolore!

Update 10.8.2018: This bike has SOLD to an RSBFS reader! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

The Ducati 851 is rare and special enough in Ducati’s classic blood red livery, but it’s worlds more special in the Italian flag tricolore paint scheme. The 851 was Ducati’s first real foray into the gem-like speedfreaks we know today. Before there were Panigales, there were these. Only there were fewer of them. Way fewer.

This example has been used as intended, which is to say: it has been ridden. It’s in show-quality condition, and wears Ferracci pipes, though the originals are included, along with a bunch of paperwork, the factory rear stand and the original windscreen.

From the seller:

I believe its a 851 Strada 1/304 from what I’ve seen online. It has 18,734 KM (11,640 miles) with Vin# ZDM851S1850158 Engine # ZDM851W4850621. I believe I am the 2nd owner of this incredible machine. 1 being the person who purchased this from Cagiva directly in Spain and who had it imported here to the states, which I have paper work from and will include the original letter from Cagiva regarding the transport to him when it was imported which can be seen in one of the pics. I got it on consignment through this gentleman out of Munroe Motorcycles in San Francisco about 8 years ago and have taken care of any bugs and gremlins it had while in my care. I mostly dealt with electrical issues from the time I bought it but thought they were all taken care of till I had swapped it over to a LiPo battery a couple years ago where the bike almost caught fire due to the battery almost blowing up. It has since had the stator and the voltage regulator replaced and I do think now everything on the bike is in great working order with no issues of any kind. I bought it with the Ferraci slip on pipes already installed, thank you Julio, and they sound amazing and are deep and throaty. Since Im a rider I had the original Marvic wheels from my SuperLight fitted to this bike from the beginning of my time with her. That way it looked stock but was on 17″ wheels and I could replace tires easily and proceed to log miles without concern. I just had the original 16” wheels put back on to sell it but am including the brake carrier/caliper set up with spacers and hardware so if the new owner wants to put 17” wheels back on it should be easy for them to do so.

So along with the hardware for 17” wheels I am also including with it the original letter and paperwork from Cagiva along with its original stand, official Ducati 851 workshop manual, original tool kit, paperwork form previous owner along with all records, original exhaust pipes which do show some slight scuffing but I got it them that way so not sure of when that occurred as I have never dropped or scratched it, original used wind screen with slight scuffing which again came that way so not sure the story there, custom Geza motorcycle cover, 3 keys and a clear California title with registration good till August of 2019. I rode it to Laguna Seca the last year Moto GP was held there and had it on Ducati Island and was even approached by Ducati and they borrowed it for an official photo shoot where they parked it under the Ducati banner and got some nice shots of it. I only say this because it was a cool little moment for me having this bike and it was quite neat to see the attention it got from the Ducati higher ups.

If the bike were mine (dream on), I’d follow the seller’s advice and stick on a set of 17s and call it good. If you keep it on two wheels, the 851 is a blue-chip collector ride and should gather value even if it isn’t a garage queen.

Featured listing: 1988 Ducati 851 Tricolore!
Ducati June 17, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: Cherry 2004 Ducati 999

Update 6.28.2018: This bike has sold to an RSBFS reader! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

It’s pretty rare that someone selling anything, whether it’s a motorcycle or a tennis ball, is totally honest about the condition it’s in. As dedicated Craigslisters, we come to accept that “no rust” really means, “stored at the bottom of the Atlantic.” It’s a fact of life.

This 2004 Ducati 999 is the exception. The seller says the only signs of use are wear on the front brake rotors, and he’s not kidding. OK, fine, if you want to nitpick, the odometer does not say zero and the tires are not the ones it left the factory on. But beyond that, the description is accurate.

The 999 followed the iconic and better-loved 916-998 series, but are deserving stars in their own right. The bikes won the World Superbike Championships in ’03, ’04 and ’06, and threw in a British Superbike Championship in ’05 to make a four-year run of championships.

The bike listed here is a base 999, which means it carries none of the expensive tchochkes of the S and R models. From the seller:

No holds barred, I cannot ride a Ducati. I am too large, too old and need a cush in the seat department to make it more than 50 miles at a whack. I am “one of those”. I guess that was same conversation about “you can’t trust anyone over thirty” forty years ago. It is just a separation of reality and perceptions with little gray areas in-between. But I am not prejudice! “Someone of my best friends ride Ducatis”. What is the world coming too?

Which leads us to this absolutely gorgeous, Ducati Red, one geriatric owner, bought new at Hansen’s, almost no miles 2004 999. We get a lot of bikes in, mostly in excellent condition, unabused with minimal signs of use. And then there is this bike.

The only signs of use you can see are the front brake rotors. Nothing else shows any signs of use. All of the factory stickers are still in place, even the ones on the mirrors. Not a single bolt was modified, nothing changed, nothing added. It still has the factory clutch cover! It is in as close to new cosmetic condition as when it was delivered as vehicle could be having been driven 7,600 miles.

The 999 was the base model of the range, but that meant in reality, $10,000 less at the dealer, 15hp less than the R version and 15#’s heavier and more than adequate suspension. I had a riding friend who received the greatest of joy riding his 999 standard and beating up the R model bikes at track events in the day owned by “checkbook” enthusiasts. It was a great bike, more than most could realistically handle and a bargain for the time.

Our selling price of the motorcycle is $6,495. VIN# ZDMIUB5T04B008511 and miles are 7,639. For other interesting bikes and collectable vehicles, visit our web site http://www.automaniagp.com , 541 479 8888 or come by and see us at 895 SE Gladiola Drive, Grants Pass, Oregon, 97526. Oregon Dealer DA1287

Short of a dealer leftover FZ-07 or an SR400 or something, there ain’t much you can find in this condition for that price. I hate to gush, but honestly. Get on it.

Featured Listing: Cherry 2004 Ducati 999
Ducati April 26, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale

Update 5.2.2018: Price reduced to $16,750! Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Update 3.16.2018: Recently serviced late last year at local Ducati specialist, including new timing belts, idler and tensioners, valve adjust,all fluids changed – including brake and forks, and carb rebuild with new accelerator pump. New price is $18,500 or best offer.
Contact Adam by email: adam_chovanak@yahoo.com

If you were looking to jump onto the Ducati 750 F1 bandwagon early with an eye towards making big money flipping one… That ship has sailed: these Pantah-powered race replicas now command some serious money. For years, these occupied the same place as the early Super Sport, in part because they straddle two generations of Ducatis, pre and post-Cagiva ownership, but don’t seem to fully belong to either. They’ve got a slightly shed-built quality from the older era, combined with the “modern” Pantah L-twin and more 80s style. When new, build quality was criticized and suspension, as delivered, was a bit crude. But the potential was there from the beginning in bikes like today’s featured 750 F1 Laguna Seca, it just needed a bit of development.

The 750 F1 used Ducati’s characteristic trellis frame, designed in this case by Verlicchi and visibly wrapped around the lightweight aluminum tank. It was powered by a 749cc version of their air/oil-cooled, two-valve twin making a claimed 76hp and styled to look like the successful TT1 race bikes of the period. Dry weight was just 385lbs and the 16″ front and 18″ wheel gave nimble handling. The Montjuich, Santa Monica, and this Laguna Seca were all limited editions of the F1 that were priced higher when new and featured improved performance and a higher top speed.

For years, the F1 languished forgotten and relatively unloved, but the fact that it was conceived before the company’s takeover by Cagiva and the perceived mass-production that followed seems to be the exact quality now driving the increase in prices. Looking closely, there’s one obvious indicator that the F1 came before Cagiva’s ownership: bikes that came later reversed the rear cylinder so that both carburetors could be fitted into the engine’s vee for much more efficient packaging. Some F1s have awkward pod filters fitted that bulge out from behind the fairing, but this example doesn’t bother with something as trivial as “air filtration” and just has mesh screens to keep out rocks, stray animals, and small children.

ZDM750LS-750139 / DM750L1-750238

Recently out of long-term collection in Japan – this Marco Lucchinelli Replica is a time capsule in beautiful shape with only ~2500km  / 1600 miles. Original paint and bodywork is excellent; red paint on the beautiful trellis frame very nice with some darkening on the upper surface of each tube. Clip-ons and muffler have visible surface corrosion. Runs great – bike starts right up, idles well and runs like it should. Original mirrors included in sale.

The F1 Laguna Seca, along with the Santa Monica and Montjuich, represented the pinnacle of the factory Pantah-based TT race-bikes. These hand-built race-replica bikes were closely based on the forks F1 racers with open-throat Dell’Orto carburetors, 10:1 compression pistons, bigger valves and less restrictive exhaust. Transmission uses straight-cut (like the works bikes) instead of helical primary drive gears. The Laguna Seca is fitted with Verlicchi aluminum swing-arm and solo seat.

Widely acclaimed when new – Cycle World stated, “They May Be Bargains. This last Ducati is a throwback in the spirit of the 750 SS of 1973, the F1’s most famous predecessor. Like the 750 SS, the F1 is the Italian sportsbike of its era.”

Mick Walker summarized in his 1989 Ducati Buyers Guide, “If you find, or already own, an F1 my advice is to hang on to it. If you are doubly lucky to have been able to afford one of the ‘limited edition’ models, then guard it with your life, for you have a real classic of the future. Any one of the Monjuich, Laguna Seca or Santamonica models is worth a full five stars, for they are both beautiful and rare.”

This gem will make a fabulous addition to your collection. Offering with low reserve and reasonable buy-it-now. Currently on it’s importation paperwork – Japanese de-registration certificate / English translation of certificate / NHTSA HS7 / EPA 3520-1 / CBP 7501 (stamped). Washington State title is available for $400 documentation fee approx. 5-week wait. WA state buyers responsible for Tax & License.

As the seller mentions, the bike isn’t cosmetically perfect, but no bike that’s thirty years old and in original condition is likely to be. Bodywork is very sharp, but some of the exposed metal parts have some surface corrosion but the paint on the bodywork looks very nice and mileage is extremely low at just 1,600. The seller is asking for $16,750

-tad

Featured Listing: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale
Sport Bikes For Sale April 23, 2018 posted by

Bonhams Spring Stafford Sale – April 21st!

Update 4.23.2018:  We’ve updated most of the listings below with their sale prices, and estimates from Bonhams were very close in most cases.  Their showcase pieces did very well also.  From Bonhams:

Bonhams Spring Stafford Sale took place this weekend (21 and 22 April) at the International Classic MotorCycle Show and saw an incredible 92% of lots sold, achieving a total of £3,376,045 (US $4,708,029).

Several world records were broken, including the 1970 Clymer Münch 1,177cc TTS ‘Mammoth’ which achieved a staggering £154,940 and the 1973 MV Agusta 750S which realized £96,700, the highest prices ever achieved for these models at auction.

Congratulations to Bonhams on a great sale and to all the new owners!

-dc


For those lucky enough to be in attendance at the Staffordshire County Showgrounds in Stratford, UK, there will be an amazing collection of motorcycles passing over the auction block courtesy of Bonhams. But fear not: you need not be in attendance in order to participate in the auction. And just so you don’t miss out on any of the key lots going up for sale, RSBFS is here to help you navigate through the drool-worthy articles on hand. Register early, and bid with confidence!

For the rest of us, let us know what you think of the sale and estimates in the comments below.

– RSBFS Team

1998 Ducati 916 SPS – This 4,000 mile machine has a Bonhams estimate of $21,000 – $27,000 USD.  SOLD – US$ 20,196 inc. premium

1990 Ducati 851 SP2 by NCR – Never been raced, but chock full of NCR parts. Bonhams estimate: US $39,000 – $49,000 USD.  SOLD – US$ 27,631 inc. premium

1989 Honda VFR750R Type RC30 – this works Honda is an Isle of Man TT and Macau Grand Prix veteran. Bonhams estimate: US$ 35,000 – 49,000.  SOLD – US$ 40,393 inc. premium

1987 Ducati 851 – Alan Cathcart’s personal machine since new, this tri colore beauty has a Bonhams estimate of $49,000 – $63,000 USD

1998 Ducati 916 Senna III – This low mileage 916 is number 281 of 300. Bonhams estimate: $14,000 – $17,000 USD.  SOLD – US$ 22,620 inc. premium

1998 Ducati 916 SPS – With a documented history (including complete engine rebuild) this SPS has a Bonhams estimate of $18,000 – $24,000 USD.

1999 Ducati 996 SPS2 – Only 150 examples of this Euro-spec model were built. Bonhams estimate: $13,000 – $17,000 USD.  SOLD – US$ 13,733 inc. premium

1986 Ducati 400 F3 – With only 327 kilometers showing, this late Cagiva-era Ducati has a Bonhams estimate of $5,600 – $8,400.  SOLD – US$ 5,655 inc. premium

2000 MV Agusta 750cc F4 S – This ‘1+1’ Biposto example of the astounding F4 lineup has a Bonhams estimate of $9,800 – 13,000.  SOLD – US$ 10,987 inc. premium

1990 Suzuki GSX-R750L ‘Slingshot’ – Presented as virtually new after an extensive restoration, this bike will be sold at No Reserve. Bonhmas estimate: $4,900 – 6,300.  SOLD – US$ 6,947 inc. premium

1988 Honda VFR400R Type NC21 – A rare oddity in the US, this baby RC30 shows approximately 23,000 miles. Bonhams estimate: $3,100 – $3,900.  SOLD US$ 4,524 inc. premium

1978 BMW 980cc R100RS ‘Krauser’ – Though rather high mileage at 80k+, this looks well looked after. Bonhams estimate: US$ 7,100 – 11,000.  SOLD – US$ 7,755 inc. premium

1971 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport ‘Telaio Rosso’ – Recently restored, previous magazine tester. Bonhams estimate: US$ 34,000 – 42,000.  SOLD US$ 43,625 inc. premium

1976 Ducati 900SS – Used in the late 70’s in amateur racing, it was later returned to road duty but includes many spares. Bonhams estimate: US$ 35,000 – 45,000.  SOLD – US$ 37,162 inc. premium

1977 Benelli 750cc Sei – odometer shows 13k KMs, includes receipts. Bonhams estimate: US$ 11,000 – 17,000.  SOLD – US$ 22,620 inc. premium

1979 Honda CBX1000Z – Imported to the UK via Canada in 1982. Includes receipts and Delkevic exhaust system. Bonhams estimate: US$ 14,000 – 20,000.   SOLD – US$ 15,349 inc. premium

1983 Suzuki GSX1100 Katana – Shows nearly 25k miles and includes some receipts. Bonhams estimate: US$ 7,100 – 11,000.  SOLD – US$ 12,926 inc. premium

1979 Suzuki GS1000 – No mention of Wes Cooley, is it a clone? Bonhams estimate: US$ 6,400 – 9,200.  SOLD – US$ 11,310 inc. premium

1970 Clymer Münch 1,177cc TTS ‘Mammoth’ – One of the featured lots of the Stafford auction. Completely restored. Bonhams estimate: US$ 110,000 – 140,000.  SOLD – US$ 217,692 inc. premium

1973 MV Agusta 750S – Another featured lot at the Stafford sale and noted as one of the most desirable of post-war motorcycles. Bonhams estimate: US$ 99,000 – 130,000.  SOLD – US$ 135,864 inc. premium

1957 F.B. Mondial 250cc DOHC Grand Prix Racing Motorcycle – World Championship and Isle of Man TT-winning motorcycle of great historical and technical interest. Offered with assorted correspondence relating to its provenance. Bonhams estimate: US$ 110,000 – 170,000.  SOLD – US$ 129,569 inc. premium

Honda 250cc RC163 Grand Prix Replica – The 250cc inline four gem was a championship winner, this replica is suitable for parades or vintage racing.  Bonham’s estimate: $20,000 – $25,000

1974 AMF Harley-Davidson 250cc Grand Prix Racing Motorcycle – This Aermacchi-designed two-stroke is unrestored and was in the stable of the Cesena Motorcycle Club before being on display at the Rimini Motorcycle museum for the past 30 years.  Bonham’s estimate – $17,000 – $21,000.  SOLD – US$ 17,773 inc. premium

Bonhams Spring Stafford Sale – April 21st!
Ducati March 16, 2018 posted by

Fresh Street Racer: 1993 Ducati 888 SP05

The Ducati 888 filled the gap between the brand-redefining 851 and the legendary 916, bumping the 851’s fuel-injected, liquid-cooled, four-valve L-twin to 888cc. The inbetweener status didn’t phase the bike much, though, as it was enough for Doug Polen to net back-to-back World Superbike championships in ’91 and ’92. Production ended in ’94 as the world geared up for the Tamburini-penned 916. Ducati sent fewer than 300 to the States.

1993 Ducati 888 SPO5 for sale on eBay

This 1993 Ducati 888 SP05 is number 270 of 500, and has covered just 125 miles since its original UK delivery. The SP versions of the 888 never made it to our roads, as they couldn’t get past American DOT laws. Now that the bike has reached the magic 25-year mark, it might be possible to bring it in and secure registration, though it probably should be ridden sparingly.

From the eBay listing:

THE BIKE SPECIALISTS,
TRADING STANDARD AWARD WINNERS.

We are pleased to present the opportunity to own a very rare collectable Ducati 888 SP5. This example is number 270 of just 500 made. A beautiful 1993 model having covered just 125 miles from new. This is the ultimate concourse example and the best we have ever seen

This bike is supplied with the original handbook, and will have a full belt service and MOT prior to the new owner taking possession.

The 888 was a motorcycle manufactured as an upgrade to the 851. The earlier 851 had introduced liquid cooling, computerised fuel injection and four-valve heads to Ducati’s two cylinder motors. After increasing the capacity of the 851 to 888 cc they then released the iconic 888 SP5 in 1993.

A small deposit will secure this Ducati and we offer finance packages to suit and can also arrange delivery both UK and worldwide.

The bike is listed with a classified ad, meaning that the price — about $55,000 USD — won’t change over the course of the listing.

Fresh Street Racer: 1993 Ducati 888 SP05
Ducati March 9, 2018 posted by

Not The End? 1998 Ducati 900SS FE #258

Touted as the end of the SuperSport era, the 900SS Final Edition of the venerable Ducati platform was both a beginning as well as an end. The last released model as designed by Massimo Tamburini, the FE was a numbered and exclusive marketing machine that represented the pinnacle of the air-cooled lineup. The next page of the new chapter of Ducati was written by a new character – the oft derided designer Pierre Terblanche – taking Ducati into new and interesting directions. The real sunset here is not the SuperSport lineup, but rather Tamburini’s influence on the design… and ultimately Tamburini’s effect on the platform. Today’s example is #258 of the purported final 300 bikes targeting North America.

1998 Ducati 900SS FE #258 for sale on eBay

The second generation of the SuperSport platform rolled into the showrooms way back in 1988. With an updated Pantah-based motor, air cooled desmodue twin was a rough gem – it contained all of the basic DNA that you would want in a sport bike, with few of the amenities or polish found in Japanese contemporaries. The SS had style with a trellis frame, basic but good suspension, and a bit of Italian flair that made it unique. Ten years on the platform had aged relatively well, although performance would never be on par with 600s from the East. Carburetors fell by the wayside as fuel injection made an appearance (likely more for EPA reasons than for power or perceived performance). And while 10 years is a lifetime for a model, the bones of the SuperSport were so good that to this day these remain well-sorted motorcycles. Not the fastest, but characteristically Ducati.

From the seller:
have a 1998 Ducati 900SS FE #258 for sale. Bike has 4180 miles on it. Had been in storage for last 11 years. New cam belts, valves checked, oil changed, new air filter, carbs completely rebuilt, new fuel filter, strainer and tank hoses, new Michelin power pilot tires, forks rebuilt with new oil and seals. New brake fluid and clutch slave cylinder rebuilt with new piston assembly. Inside of gas tank is rust free. No cracks in frame or aluminum swing arm. Bike starts and runs good up high but has a hesitation between 2000 and 4000 rpm that I can’t figure out. A couple of hours with a Ducati mechanic and it should be good to go. Nearest one to me is 5 hours away so it’s not an option otherwise it would be done. Bike did fall over in the garage on left side and has a small ding in front of tank, scuff on lower fairing and small crack in lower fairing where support bar holds it. Also has a section on bottom back of left fairing where battery leaked from the hose and removed the paint, which has been poorly touched up. I believe the fairings were repainted at some point as they appear to be a lighter shade of silver than the headlight surround.

Outside of unique silver paint and a limited edition number riveted to the headstock, there is not too much more to a FE than a one year earlier 900 SuperSport. Still, the Boys from Bologna executed well; the majority of limited edition models pull in higher dollars than standard models at auction. We have seen a few FE models past through these pages, and they always raise some interest. This particular example is not exactly a museum piece, but it looks to be an honest specimen with relatively few miles. It would appear that the owner has done a lot of work on this one, which could be a bonus if all checks out. This buyer is looking for $6,000 in a Buy It Now auction format, which could end up being fair money depending on the ultimate condition of the bike. Check it out here and relive the glory of Tamburini’s classic design. Good Luck!!

MI

Not The End? 1998 Ducati 900SS FE #258