Posts by tag: Ducati

Ducati April 11, 2019 posted by

On Form: 2008 Ducati 1098 R

When Pierre Terblanche took over the Ducati styling reins from Massimo Tamburini he had very big shoes to fill. For years the 916 / 996 / 998 series captured the hearts, minds and wallets of riders everywhere. In retrospect, the reception of the 999 (pronounced “ugly”) and the short span of three years availability was a pretty big clue to the powers that be that the new design language wasn’t cutting the showroom mustard. Enter Giandrea Fabbro, chosen to pen the successor Ducati Superbike – the 1098. Evoking elements from the 916 line – including the glorious single-sided swing arm – yet in a modern day form, Fabbro created an update to the iconic silhouette and evolved the Ducati Superbike for the next series of models.

2008 Ducati 1098 R for sale on eBay

But the 1098 didn’t just turn heads in the magazines and dealership showrooms. You see, part of the reason for the 1098 was WSBK racing. Ducati was already at the limit of their performance technology in World Superbike with the 999cc limit for twins. The next step to get on par with the might of the Japanese was more displacement. Ducati decided to buck the rules and evolved the 999 mill to just under 1100cc, thereby petitioning the sanctioning body to change the rules. A standoff ensued, and no side wanted to give. Ducati – a key mainstay of WSBK – threatened to boycott the series. Eventually, the sanctioning body came to an understanding with all of the players in the series: the maximum displacement for twins was raised to 1200cc, but concessions were introduced to maintain parity among the manufacturers. Thus, the Ducati 1098 was allowed to enter the 2007 WSBK series.

From the seller:
2008 Ducati 1098R ,mileage 3353 ,number 99 of 450 like models in the United States, carbon
rear shock guard,key and F/Sprocket, full termi system,dyno tuned with power commander installed

Despite the return of classic good looks, the Ducati 1098 introduction was not all smooth sailing. Initial tests indicated that the 999 was actually the easier bike to ride fast; the 1098 was more sensitive to setup. But the 1098 was definitely successful at the racetrack, winning the 2008 WSBK series championship. The 1098R model, as we see here, follows the unique formula that makes Ducati “R” bikes so special. Sure, it has more carbon fiber and better, more adjustable suspension. But the real trick with Ducati R bikes is in the engine, where there is more. More engine, that is. You see, the Ducati 1098 R actually displaces 1198cc, built right up to the (new) limits for Superbike racing. With 180 HP on tap in stock form, the 1098 R was the most potent twin cylinder sport bike available at the time, and had an equally impressive price tag.

Today’s example is a 2008 model, and appears to be very well cared for. From the pictures it is obvious the owner is a Duc fan, as there is also a 999R in some of the photos. Ducatis are lonely machines, so it is nice that this one had some company. With only 3,353 miles there is not much that should be wrong here. The Power Commander is a popular fueling mod that can help throttle response and gain back some HP that was donated to those evil folks from the EPA. The clutch cover is practically a mandated aftermarket necessity. Otherwise all looks to be in order. No mention of a service, belts or valve adjustment, so interested buyers might want to ask some questions. Check it out here. When it comes to Ducati R models, you could certainly do worse than a 1098. Good Luck!!

MI

On Form:  2008 Ducati 1098 R
Ducati April 4, 2019 posted by

Godfather: 1998 Ducati 916

In 1994 Ducati unleashed the equivalent of a nuclear weapon in the face of a sport bike field full of conventional weaponry. That year Ducati introduced the legendary 916 – and commenced an enviable run of WSBK world titles (four within a five-year span). Simultaneously offering a quantum leap in twin-cylinder performance (horsepower, rev limits, packaging), the 916 was also stunningly beautiful. Even today the lines on a 916 are distinctive and striking. From the twin narrow headlights, to the high mounted exhaust cans, to the single sided swing arm with endurance-styled quick-change rear wheel, to the straight-sectioned chrome-moly chassis, nearly everything on the 916 forced us to rethink what we knew about how motorcycles were designed and how they performed.

1998 Ducati 916 for sale on eBay

The original 916 spanned from 1994 through 1998 – eventually making way for the 996, and ultimately the 998. But even in the first generation of this model, Ducati spared little expense on components. The 916 was a fair sight more expensive than contemporary Japanese machines, making it more exclusive. But far from a glittering farkle with no real purpose, the glory of the 916 was that it worked. It worked for all of the moto magazine editors and testers. It worked at the racetrack. And thanks to its good looks, it worked on the showroom as well. Ducati created a massive following with the 916 as designer Massimo Tamburini played off speed and style like his own personal yin and yang. To say it was a winner is stating the obvious… after it already happened.

From the seller:
I have a nice 1998 ducati 916 that has been part of my collection for about 4 years
bike is nice and near mint shape has about 7732 miles .bike always starts and rides nice
valves have been adjusted in this machine. comes with a clear title. bike does have some add ons as you see in the pics
vin#zdm1sb8s6wb013367
asking 8500

Today the 916 is not quite the performance explosion it was 25 years ago; time, after all, will catch up with all of us. But there is no denying that it stands strong and proud despite the time that has passed. There is no embarrassment when showing up on a 916 – whether it is a local bike nite event, a weekend canyon ride, or even a track day with your buddies. The 916 looks great, pulls strong and handles well. You just need to remember that this WAS cutting edge during its time – but technology inexorably creeps forward. Take the brakes, for example. The 916 shipped with top-shelf Brembo calipers clamping down on huge disks. But modern riders won’t confuse them for monoblock calipers and radial master cylinders. Nor will the 114 horsepower astound a modern liter bike rider. Again, it was more than adequate in the day, but by today’s numbers is not truly remarkable. But even today few motorcycles have represented the total package of looks, performance and commercial success.

Today’s example is a clean 1998 model (last year of the original 916 run). It has but 7,700 miles on the clock, which equates to fewer than 400 miles a year. There are a few add ons that I can see – the Termis and ubiquitous open clutch cover are but two – but nothing appears to have been hacked or unconditionally changed. I could do without the stickers, but those can be non-destructively removed. The seller even refers to a recent maintenance (a four-valve desmo adjustment is not an insignificant task when replacing shims), although there is no mention of when the belts were last changed. Still, this is a good looking specimen of a fantastic motorcycle. The 916 is a collectible motorcycle, and prices are on the rise. The earliest, cleanest and rarest examples of the 916 have risen most quickly, but even the base model is growing in value. This one has an opening ask of $7,999, with reserve in place. The ad text states an $8,500 asking price, so it looks like the reserve might be set close to the opening ask. Check it out here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Godfather: 1998 Ducati 916
Ducati March 24, 2019 posted by

Small Batch: 1989 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca

Behold the mighty Ducati F1 special edition “Laguna Seca.” Essentially a factory hot rod based on the F1 (a 750cc version of the Tourist Trophy), the Laguna Seca shared a special tier with the two other limited edition models, the Santamonica and the Montjuich. All of the special models were named after race tracks where a Ducati rider pulled a first place rabbit out of a hat. In this case, it was Marco “Lucky” Lucchinelli prevailing at the 1986 Battle of the Twins (BOTT) event at the famed California track. The Laguna Seca was closest to the Montjuich in spec, the differences being largely related to the intended target audience: North America. As such, changes were basically limited to emissions and noise controls. The rest is pure 1980s Ducati goodness; rough and ready, light and lean. The seller has written (or copied?) a good story of the Laguna Seca (and the F1 model in general), so I will let him pick up the tale:

1989 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for sale on eBay

From the seller:
1989 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca

Frame no. ZDM750LS*750059*
Engine no. ZDM750L1*750194

Less than 300 examples made

Only 6,500 miles from new

Considered by many enthusiasts to be the last of the ‘real’ Ducatis, the race-styled 750 F1 first appeared in 1985. Ducati had already enjoyed considerable success with its Pantah-derived F2 racers in FIM Formula 2 racing – Tony Rutter winning the championship four-times running between 1981 and 1984 – so a ‘750’ version was the logical next step.

First seen in prototype form in endurance races in 1983, the F1’s 748cc engine was the latest in a long line of stretches applied to the original 500c ‘belt drive’ Desmo unit that had first appeared in the Pantah in 1979 – a street-legal updated version of the mid-’80s TT1. A markedly over-square design of 88×61.5mm bore/stroke, the F1 engine produced around 60bhp and functioned as a stressed element within the frame, the swinging arm pivoting in the rear of the gearbox. Clearly visible above the deliberately cut away fairing sides, the aforementioned frame attracted almost as much attention as the engine: a trellis of short, straight tubes, it has formed the basis of every road-going Ducati since, as well as the first Desmosedici Moto GP racers. In the fashion of the day, the F1 came with a 16-inch front wheel, while braking power was provided by state-of-the-art triple Brembos. The stock F1 was complemented by a series of hand-built, limited edition, race replicas – Montjuich, Santamonica and Laguna Seca – the last inspired by Marco “Lucky” Lucchinelli’s famous ‘Battle of the Twins’ race victory at Daytona in 1986. Today the evocatively named F1 and its derivatives are highly prized by Ducati collectors.

Much like the Montjuich, the Laguna Seca came with bigger Dell’Orto carburetors, higher compression ratio, bigger valves, and straight-cut primary drive gears. And talk of 95bhp at 10,000rpm! But unlike the Montjuich, it came with a larger, quieter muffler.

There were some small changes between the two bikes, namely in the Laguna’s parts from the new Paso. The delta-spoked one-piece 16-inch Oscam wheels and the brake discs, but not the four-piston ‘racing’ Brembo front calipers, came from the 750 Paso, as did the wider front fender. Other changes included a ‘Lucky’ signature steel gas tank, revised foot peg bracketry and a plastic rear sub-fender attached to the swing arm. Most Laguna Secas came with a solo seat and were built in limited numbers (perhaps as few as 296.)

Not a lot of history about this particular example, although the read is a good one (reminds me of Ian Faloon). The only point of note I see on this bike is the non-standard Ohlins external shock reservoir strapped to the left side of the iconic trestle frame chassis (original shock was a Marzocchi PVS 4). Any other changes are unknown with the facts given, and with only 3 pictures to work with there are many questions left unanswered. But with only 6,500 miles, this beauty is undoubtedly clean and very rare. I’m not sure if proper etiquette deems we refer to this as the WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca, nee Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca, nee Laguna Seca Raceway, but the connection is very clear. Also clear is the asking price: a not insignificant $24,900. That is a bit higher than we usually see these bikes offered – although the seller appears open to a lesser figure – so if you’re in the market for one of these beautiful and rare model Pantahs you should act quickly. Check it out here, and then jump back to the comments and share your thoughts on the F1 model Ducatis: are you a fan? Good Luck!!

MI

Ducati March 20, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2004 Ducati 998 Matrix Edition

If you feel like snagging a patent-leather set of, um, leathers and flying around the Oakland freeways like Trinity did in The Matrix Reloaded, may we present your ride. The bike from the original Hollywood scene was a 2001 Ducati 996, but by the time the movie came out, Ducati’s 998 had reached dealers. So sci fi fans were treated to a 2004 Ducati 998 wearing a beautiful metallic green paintjob and some stickers bearing the title of the movie.

Under the skin, the bike was a standard 998, sporting an Ohlins fully-adjustable rear shock and adjustable Showa forks. The Tetrastretta twin pushed out somewhere around 120 horsepower in the final iteration of the iconic 916 body shape. As Ducati special editions from the mid-aughties go, this one is pretty light on special details, but its lineage is enough to make collectors drool.

Production numbers are hard to pin down. The seller says around 200 were built, while various Internet sources claim between 150 and 200, or just flat out admit they have no idea. Suffice to say, there aren’t a ton of these things kicking around.

Aside from a tear in the seat, as noted in the Craigslist posting, and aftermarket rearsets, this 2004 Ducati 998 Matrix Edition is as it left the dealer. The seller notes that the bike has been displayed for the last few years on slicks and a non-op title. Before it was put to rest, it reportedly ran well, though it was apparently a lemon law buyback.

From the Craigslist post:

Rare Matrix edition, only about 200 units built. Collector’s bike.
This bike is prepped for display. Fluids and battery removed, slicks installed. It has been like that in my living room for the last 5 years. It was running well before.
Non operable, title in hand, says “lemon law buyback”.
No scratches, great condition. Small tear in rear seat as depicted. Everything original except for rear sets.
Rear stand included. Dog not included.

With 12,000 miles on the dial, we have to guess that whatever issues this bike had from the factory have been handled. And, at $7,000, it’s a semi-affordable way to own a rare Ducati in an iconic body style.

Featured Listing: 2004 Ducati 998 Matrix Edition
Ducati February 27, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2005 Ducati 999R

I’m going to go on record here, and tell you that I was wrong. In fact, I think many people were wrong. We just didn’t notice. You see, when the Ducati 916 was released it blew the world away with what a motorcycle should look like, sound like, and how one should move. Massimo Tamburini penned an instant legend; a svelte scalpel with a booming, throbbing heart. We fell in love. The world fell in love. And copy cats followed with the ensuing years – the 996, and the 998 just to name two. More of the same was good when it looked this good. And ultimately, we fell into a rut. Everything had to have the same narrow slit twin headlights, single sided swing arm, and exhaust cans hanging way up high. It was a look, and we liked it that way. Enter 2003, and the Pierre Terblanche-designed 999. Gone was the familiar face, the coke bottle side view, and that rear wheel hanging out with no visible means of support. The Ducati 999 climbed out of the rut in such a fantastic manner that people had a hard time following. History will show that the 999 failed to capture loyal Ducati buyers due to the polarizing looks. It was a love it or hate it sort of thing. But everybody who rode it loved it.

Featured Listing: 2005 Ducati 999R

Today the 999 is starting to get recognized for the amazing machine that it is. In person the lines and details on the bike make the 916 look like a Jr High School crush. And while pictures do not do it justice, the real thing draws your eye in to see more. This is a motorcycle that has presence with a capital P in a way the 916/996/998 simply cannot compare. And speaking of comparisons, let’s talk performance. With a power plant based on the 998R unit (itself a major revision of the Testastretta engine), the 999R promised 150 HP pushing a sub-400 pound machine. That is both more powerful and lighter than the R bike that preceded it, and it shows on the road and on the racetrack. Stopping this missile is easy, thanks to the race-spec radial mount Brembos. And unlike the trio of bikes that came before, the triple nine has yet another crazy trick up its sleeve: comfort. With revised ergonomics that include a range of adjustments, the 999 is actually a platform you can ride without planning a trip to the chiropractor. The seller has good detail about this bike, so I will let him pick up the tale on this one:

From the seller:
The Ducati 999R was one of the most expensive to manufacture motorcycles Ducati created other then the Desmosedici. It had an invoice of $29,995 when new, $7000 higher then the S model which was the next lower upgrade over the standard 999 offered. The R had the same Ohlins Suspension, but the engine was treated to all sort of exotic changes including being a true 999cc in size from the 104mm bore, having Sand- Cast Crankcases, revised Ports with larger Valves, more aggressive Cams, higher Compression ratio, Titanium Connecting Rods, Knife Edged Crankshaft and 12-Hole Injectors feeding 54mm Throttle Bodies that added up to almost 15 HP more then the S model.

The end result was one of the most amazing refined motorcycles produced. It combined an incredibly smooth engine with insane amounts of torque along with an incredible chassis delivering unbelievable handling and astonishing brakes. It then wrapped all of this engineering and handling in Carbon Fiber Body Work finished in Ducati Red with fit and finish that has not been seen since.

More from the seller:
Living the Ducati dream, the owner (dealer) then installed all sorts of what have become “normal” Ducati ad on’s. The Leo Vince Titanium Exhaust System sitting in a box new was close to $4,000. The Speedy Moto vented Clutch Cover and Pressure Plate was a foregone conclusion. The AMS Triple Clamps create a beautiful sight from the rider’s seat along with the Pmoto Master Brake and Clutch Reservoir billet covers. After Market Front Brake Rotors were dramatically lighter and replaced the stock Ducati items. The infinitely adjustable Rear Seats may take an engineer to adjust there are so many variables allowed. Also installed was Ducati’s Factory Shift Assist which can be seen to the left of the instrument cluster. There so much more as you can see in the images. What is great about this bike is that all of the stock parts (except the front brake rotors) are included with the sale.

A full service has been completed including Belts, Tires and Fluid changes. The motorcycle was inspected, the gas replaced with clear treated fluid and test ridden by a Ducati trained Tech.

The selling price: $16,495
Mileage: 3,642
VIN# ZDM1UB5W85B013323

For more information please contact: ted@automaniagp.com
You can also visit the Automania website

This is one very beautiful 999R, and it is sporting a wealth of upgrades and very few miles. It has had a recent service. If you dream of a Ducati R bike, this should be your wake up call. The 999 series were superior in every way to the previous generation. These are also the bikes that are next up on the value-appreciation escalator. As people realize how capable these machines really are AND begin to understand how good these bikes really look you will see a run on them. They have come of age. There is subtlety in this beauty; the 999 just needed a few years for us to mature – and admit we were wrong. But I’m not wrong about this – there is a whole lot of bike for $10,000+ less than a heavier, slower 998R will fetch. That is a bargain in the making, and a future standout for collectors. Look closely. Then admit it. You were wrong too. Give Ted a ping when you are ready to ‘fess up. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 2005 Ducati 999R
Ducati February 26, 2019 posted by

Doing the math: 2002 Ducati 998R

Sold before we could post it! This immaculate 998R is going to a new home after someone committed to the $26k BIN. -MI

In the game of “there’s no substitute for cubic inches” the Ducati 998 was a step above that which came before. The last of the 916 lineage, the 998R model was everything that a 916 enthusiast could hope for. More engine, with more torque and power. More suspension and more adjustment. More championships, and unfortunately, more price. Visually, the 998 (as well as the 996 that preceded it) resemble the fabled 916. But the 998 was everything that the 916 strove to be in the initial version. And the 998R? It was even more.

2002 Ducati 998R for sale on eBay

As is Ducati custom, the “R” bikes are something just a bit more special. Ignoring the limited edition numbered plaque on the headstock for a moment, the R bikes have always been equipped with the best of the best – from suspension to brakes. But even more so, the power plant of the R model has been one step ahead of current year Ducatis. The 996R model foreshadowed the 998 in displacement. And the 998R, with a revised bore/stroke combo, a model-specific oil pan, cams, and more, really displaced 999cc. That’s right folks – this is really a 999R in Tamburini clothing (for those that prefer it to the Terblance design that followed). From an engine perspective, it is mechanically closer to the 999 than the 996 (and not just numerically). Easily the most recognizable form in the motorcycling world, the 998 utilized the general bodywork, single sided swing arm and high exhaust of the 916 to create a beautiful – and terrifically potent – road missile.

From the seller:
For Sale is my 2002 Ducati 998R, #461 of 700. I have owned the bike since August, 2006. It currently has less than 6600 miles and is in excellent shape. It has always been titled and licensed in California, since new and the current registration (in my name) is good through Jan 2020. It has been stored in a climate controlled garage since I bought it 12 years ago. There is no evidence that it was ever abused or raced. I have many receipts from the previous owners dating back to early 2003.

This bike is in very original condition as a street legal model. The paint is beautiful with one noticeable scratch on the lower portion of the fairing. Everything works properly (gauges, lights, controls, horn, etc). It has Marchesini Magnesium wheels with older Pirelli tires. Ohlins suspension front and rear with an Ohlins steering damper. I have added the wiring mod to allow the bike to idle in neutral while on the side stand. Also, a new Yuasa battery (May 2018). It comes with all the additional goodies. I will include the front and rear stands, a factory 998R shop manual, a complete factory tool kit, the 998R owner’s manual, and the factory Plaque of Authenticity.

More from the seller:
The most current service to the bike (June/July, 2018) was performed by Scott Watters, owner of Motoservizio in Signal Hill, Ca. Prior to starting his business in 2002, Scott worked at Ducati dealerships as a factory trained mechanic. He also was a Fast by Ferracci mechanic for Doug Polen (AMA 1994), Vance and Hines mechanic for Thomas Stevens and Anthony Gobert (AMA 1997-98), Doug Polen (FUSA 2000), Dean Mizdal AMA 2001. All were racing Ducati MCs.

The recent servicing included:
4 valve service
New cam belts
All fluids fully changed (oil/filter, coolant, fork oil/seals/bushings, and brake fluid)
New air filters
R&R fuel pump, new filter, new hoses, and cleaned tank interior
Clean the headlight shells inside and out

Again, the bike is in excellent condition and is ready to be ridden hard or put on display.

The final model in the original 916-based line, the 998R stands out as the pinnacle example of that model. It shares all of its good looks and characteristics with the legend, yet boasts more power and better *erverything* across the line. If you are in it for the collection, this is a must-have bike. If you are in it to ride like Troy Bayliss (but undercover, without the polarizing graphics of the Bayliss Edition), this is still a must-have bike. This is a bike you can ride today and it will still be appreciated by the people you pass. Not bad for a design that reaches so far back; it is really that timeless. Check it out here, and don’t wait long. It is not cheap, but we do not see 998Rs of this caliber often. Two more than a 996, 82 more than a 916, and one less than a 999 – you do the math. Good Luck!!

MI

Doing the math: 2002 Ducati 998R
Ducati February 22, 2019 posted by

Dirty Duc: 2005 Ducati 999R

What you’re looking at here is certainly not the nicest 2005 Ducati 999R that I have ever seen, but it is still a 2005 Ducati 999R, and that gives it a couple free passes and a trump card or two. Knicked though parts of it may be, it is still every bit the 135-horsepower carbon-clad repliracer that it was 14 years ago. Built to be the barrel-chested alpha male of superbike racing, the 999 series was quick to prove its mettle. It carried off three World Superbike Titles and a British Superbike title between 2004 and 2006, spawning a raft of special editions in the process. The wins also helped make up for its, uh, controversial visage.

2005 Ducati 999R for sale on eBay

The 999R separated itself from the base bike and the 999S with an engine that not only had sexier internals — titanium connecting rods and a knife-edged crankshaft among them — it had a different bore and stroke in sandcast cases. Wear items and big-ticket repairs on this bike will be a real thing when the time comes, but will be worth it.

As I said earlier, this one has some blemishes and its fair share of dirt, but does appear to be a real-deal 2005 Ducati 999R. It looks like it has aftermarket footpegs, and there is a weird rub mark on the stamped VIN. Despite the dirt, the seller says it has only covered 1,324 miles, and it appears to be in ready-to-ride shape.

From the eBay listing:

You are purchasing a

DUCATI 2005 999R MOTORCYCLE

SOME SCRATCHES AND BLEMISHES GREAT CONDITION. ONLY HAS 1324 MILES. BUY AS IS.

ALSO HAVE MATCHING BIKE 2005 DUCATI 749

VIN# ZDM1UB5W15B013308

WE CAN HELP YOU ARRANGE FREIGHT TO ANY WHERE IN THE WORLD. (MUST ADHERE TO AND COMPLY WITH E BAY RULES)

WE HAVE HUNDREDS OF SHIPPING CONTACTS, SHIPPING CRATES AND PACKAGING MATERIALS TO PROPERLY PACK YOUR MOTORCYCLE FOR SAFE DELIVERY

BIKE IS BEING SOLD WITH RESPONSIBILITY FOR CUSTOMER TO PICK-UP. BUT FOR EXTRA CHARGE WE CAN HELP YOU SHIP IT ANYWHERE.

WE DO HAVE CRATES IN STOCK, CALL US TO GET A QUOTE. WE SHIP ALL OVER THE WORLD.

M. VANN’S COLLECTION

At $28,000, the price is tied for the highest ask I have seen for one of these with a zero-mile FILA Edition bike from  a few weeks back. Low-mileage non-special-editions have recently been changing hands in the high teens, but there’s always exceptions.

Dirty Duc: 2005 Ducati 999R
Ducati February 19, 2019 posted by

Top Gun: 1991 Ducati 851

I’m not sure you can overstate the importance of the Ducati 851 to the Italian brand’s position at the top of motorcycling’s desirability food chain. Get past the literally and figuratively square headlight — the steel-framed 1983 dad glasses of illumination — and everything else is focused, lithe Italic sin. The 851 took a pokey, dated bottom end, stuck big pistons, four-valve heads and water cooling on and paved the way for the next 20 years of Ducati twins. Bologna shoved the resulting 100-horse mill into a chassis that only just nudged past 460 pounds wet and set about gathering up the 1990 World Superbike Championship.

1991 Ducati 851 for sale on eBay

Though the family resemblance is under the skin, there would be no Ducati 916 if it weren’t for the 851. As you might expect, the Ducati 851 is known for laser-precise handling, and the prodigious and immediate shove that big L-twins are known for. The beast makes its peak horsepower shy of 10,000 rpm, but that doesn’t mean it’s a lazy or ponderous engine. It’s every bit as racy as the chassis and suspension that support it.

The 1991 Ducati 851 you see here appears to be in near-perfect shape, with just a small hole in the seat marring an otherwise flawless preservation. In the grand scheme of things, 1991 wasn’t that long ago, yet the 851 is simple in a way that no modern machine can match. The dashboard is three dials. The body work is a thin carbon fiber skirt around a steel trellis. The paint on the front fender is so thin the weave is threatening to break through. It’s perfect.

From the eBay listing:

Very nice condition 1991 Ducati 851, runs fine, had new belts a year ago, mostly stock except exhaust and rear fender hugger. Excellent paint, no damage. Tires new. All over very good +
condition. I bought it to ride but I’m 60 and cant take the riding position..otherwise I’d never sell.
Please E mail or call w questions..6193158428 Stu Thanks Have title ( clean ) in hand.

The bike has definitely seen some miles, with the clock showing 33,000 racked up in 28 years, but who can fault a guy for riding his Ducati? It does not appear to be too much worse for wear, and at $6,900 buy-it-now, it’s a damn-near no-brainer.

Top Gun: 1991 Ducati 851