Posts by tag: Two Stroke

Suzuki December 1, 2019 posted by

Chi Slamma Gamma – 1986 Suzuki RG500

Fully ten years after Barry Sheene won the GP world championship on his RG500, Suzuki had tamed the beast for the showroom.  Though the delay missed the window of opportunity in the U.S., many examples have been imported, and this looks like one of the finest.

1986 Suzuki RG500 Gamma for sale on eBay

Unthinkably complex in this day of 400cc singles, the RG was actually two 250cc twins geared to a common lay shaft, which was protected by a shock damper on the road machine.  The low-profile 28mm Mikuni carburettors and their air shared filter are wedged against the sides of the fairing, with disc induction valves underneath.  Suzuki’s Automatic Exhaust Control power valve system and expansion chambers made their way aft closer to the centerline.  Alloy chassis and cast frame connectors  are seemingly more modern than the earlier race bike, the seat fairing covering the upper exhausts and stretching all the way to the footpegs.

With just over 6,000 miles, this Chicago resident is even better looking than the odometer would suggest, with no evident runs, hits, or errors.  The owner says this in the eBay auction:

As you can see from the photos in the photo section as well as the body of the description, the machine has had absolutely no restoration performed to any part of it.  The condition is exactly what it looks like in the photos.  I looked at a quite a few of these bikes before I finally bought this one, and I’ve never seen a better original one before or since.

The paint on all of the fairings, tail section and tank is original, and have never had any type of paintwork or touchup.  The fairings have never had any type of cracks or damage.  The bike has never been in any type of accident or been dropped at any time.

The RG500 runs and rides the way you expect a machine with this type of mileage to run.  All of the mechanical components have been checked over to ensure they work properly including the clutch and brakes.  The fuel delivery system was also completely gone through this season and functions perfectly. 

Suzuki began the square four saga with two 125’s making 250cc, and offered a 400cc variant alongside the 500 in appropriate markets.  But the RG500 was the race winner, and the great powertrain was in a 340 lbs. ( dry ) package, a power-to-weight ratio that was years ahead of its time.  Bidding is quite active but hasn’t met the reserve, and we’ll be keeping an eye on this one.

-donn

 

Chi Slamma Gamma – 1986 Suzuki RG500
Yamaha November 27, 2019 posted by

Wild Wolf: 1986 Suzuki RG500 Walter Wolf

If you’re not into oil drilling and late-1970s Formula 1, you might be nonplussed at the handsome red and purple livery that graces this otherwise-standard 1986 Suzuki RG500 Gamma. But, under the alliterative name and the cool-if-dated graphics lies a story of early business success followed by a longshot investment in a passion project that just so happened to pay off.

1986 Suzuki RG500 Walter Wolf for sale on eBay

After making his money selling oil drilling parts, Austrian-via-Canada businessman Walter Wolf  in 1975 bought most of the Williams Racing Team and all of Hesketh Racing and made a go at Formula 1 ownership. Soon after, he rebranded the team with his name, hired Jody Scheckter and won the first race his team entered with the new branding. Not bad. After another couple seasons, Wolf got bored and sold the team, but the cool graphics and handsome livery needed somewhere to land.

Enter, the 1986 Suzuki RG500 Gamma. With Wolf’s colors painted on, Suzuki had a defacto special edition of the already potent twin-crank parallel four two-stroke GP hero. This one is a Japanese market model that landed in South Africa in 2013, where it received a mechanical refresh less than 120 miles ago. Throw some new tires at it, and the 95-horsepower knife’s edge animal will be ready to be a backroads thrill seeker or garage display artifact.

From the eBay listing:

Thanks for taking the time to view my listing on this extremely rare Suzuki RG500 Walter Wolf.
She was imported from Japan in 2013 and formed part of a private collection until recently.
Cosmetically and mechanical the vehicle is an superb condition. She starts on the first kick every time, even from cold with the help of the choke.
The RG has been serviced less than 200 Km ago which included steering neck and wheel bearing replacement as well as complete carburettor refurbishments.
The period correct tyres that’s currently fitted are fine for display purpose however I would recommend that they be replaced if the Gamma is going to be ridden with some proper enthusiasm as Suzuki intended.
Here’s a link to the 360 degree view and engine sound: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wSlSKVJnTEQ&feature=youtu.be

Worldwide shipping cost to:
Europe: $850
U.S.A, Canada :$950
Asia and Australia: $970
Shipping cost includes crating, insurance and handling.
The shipping will be taken care of by a trustworthy reliable agency that specialize in transporting motorcycles across the globe.

Please contact me should you require any additional info.

As you can hear and see, this thing idles like a champ and is in truly immaculate cosmetic condition. At $18,500, this special edition of a rare bike is priced as what it is, but there’s no doubting that some lucky collector will roll home with an absolute gem.

Wild Wolf: 1986 Suzuki RG500 Walter Wolf
Featured Listing November 22, 2019 posted by

Featured Listings: Pair of 1994 Suzuki RGV250R VJ22 Lucky Strikes

It shouldn’t need to be explained how deliciously apt the Lucky Strike livery was for the Suzuki RGV250R, a competition terrorizing, rule-bending hooligan of a lightweight sportbike that smoked like a chimney and is as un-PC as grandad at an open bar. These little Suzukis are the stuff of my mid-1990s bedroom wall, and our friend Gary in Utah has not one, but two of the little curs. For the price of a new Hyundai, you can have a brace of the finest oil-burning track machines Japan ever spat out.

Built around a 90-degree v-twin that was good for around 70 horsepower uncorked, the 1994 Suzuki RGV250R VJ22 made its name shirking tiered licensing rules and treating roadracers to quick, precise handling that you just couldn’t match on a bike with loads of horsepower and a big waistline. On these bikes, the heritage as a racetrack terror is carried to the bodywork, where the big Lucky Strike logos ape Kevin Schwantz’s 500cc GP World Championship machine. We could think of few people to better personify the RGV250R than the waifish, aggressive Texan.

The pair here, in true Gary fashion, are immaculate, though one is ever so slightly nicer than the other. The bike with the Arrow pipes and black passenger seat is a little straighter, and has newly powdercoated wheels wearing a new set of Dunlop Sportmaxes. It comes with a standard exhaust should you want to take it back to stock. The bike with stock cans and a red seat needs a powdercoat and comes with an aftermarket exhaust if the stocker is too tame.

As with anything Gary touches, they have recently had all mechanical systems checked and refreshed.

From the seller:

Both bikes are 1994 models. Vin numbers confirmed genuine lucky strike models. L.S. With Arrow exhaust system has newly powder coated wheels and new Dunlop sport max tires. New drive chain. All fairings are 100% genuine OEM Suzuki factory. Genuine OEM new black passenger seat. Bike comes with OEM stock exhaust system. Customized with gold anodized bar ends. 7,427 kilometers.

L.S. with stock pipes and red passenger seat has 4,903 kilometers. Aftermarket exhaust comes with the bike. All stock condition. All fairings and components are 100% genuine OEM factory Suzuki. Bike could use the wheels powder coated but still looks very nice. Tiny ding in the front right side gas tank. Both bikes are minty low mileage examples. Both come with Utah state titles and are titled as street bikes for road use.

Both L.S.’s run like new. Both have had carb cleans….They both have new engine fluids, new brake fluid and both have had fork seals replaced and new fork fluid. Electrical components are 100% operational as new.

Askng $11,900 each.

Contact: rmurangemasters@aol.com (Gary)

Maybe you and a friend are in search of the next track day thrill, or maybe you want a buddy bike for weekend canyon carving, or, hell, maybe you just want one to ride and one to polish. Whatever floats your boat, these things have you covered.

Featured Listings: Pair of 1994 Suzuki RGV250R VJ22 Lucky Strikes
Aprilia November 8, 2019 posted by

For Offroad Use Only: 2001 Aprilia RS250 Cup for Sale

By 2001, the entire quarter-liter sportbike class was basically dead, leaving the Aprilia RS250 Cup a bit of an orphan. Yamaha TZR250 production ended in 1995, Honda’s NSR250R in 1996, and the Suzuki RGV250Γ held out until 1998. But I guess Aprilia still had some of the older 90° RGV250 engines lying around, so they kept churning out bikes for a few more years. The bigger issue was their viability as road bikes: one of the biggest reasons for the classes’ demise was the increasingly stringent emissions regulations that favored cleaner-burning four-stroke engines, instead of the light weight, but very dirty two-strokes that powered these bikes. They don’t call them “smokers” for nothing…

So the 249cc powerplant was from Suzuki, with a few Aprilia-branded bits to make the claim that they’d tuned it extensively somewhat believable. The frame was an aluminum twin-spar unit like the donor bike, but what a frame: unlike the industrial units seen on the Gamma and NSR, Aprilia’s was gorgeously sculptural, as was the swingarm. Brakes were more than up to the task, since the very same triple-Brembo setup was used on much heavier bikes like the Ducati 916 and Moto Guzzi Sport 1100…

By 2001, new two-strokes weren’t legal for road use in many markets, including the US. The RS250 Cup got around this by not bothering to be a road bike. It was intended for a single-make racing series, although an awful lot of them turn up here on eBay with very few miles, suggesting folks bought them to collect and not to race. It’s not too difficult to source bits from the road-legal version if you’re looking to convert one, although that doesn’t appear to have been done in this case.

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Aprilia RS250 Cup for Sale

This is an Aprilia RS250 imported into the US for the Aprilia Cup club road racing series. It was sold as a race bike only so bill of sale only. This example was never raced and spent most of its life in a private motorcycle collection. The original owner added lighting, turn signals, horn, and other equipment typically found on a street bike. I have only ridden it 6 or 8 times in the years I have owned it but I recently went over it from nose to tail and made sure everything is in good working order. Other than the added street equipment the bike is as originally delivered by Aprilia. Having owned and road raced one of these for many years I am very familiar with them and this motor is quiet and tight. Factory shop manual is included with the bike.  Also includes a new Shorai lithium/iron battery.

The Aprilia RS250 Cup was originally a track-only machine, although the seller indicates that it’s been made nominally road-legal and that it has managed to accumulate 3,000k miles so far, and bidding is up to just $5,250 with a few days left on the auction. The projector-beam headlight isn’t stock, but actually works pretty well, although I’d replace those red-anodized fasteners with black as soon as I got the bike home. Obviously, any potential buyers should be wary if they intend to register this machine for road use, unless they just plan on converting it back to track-only configuration.

-tad

For Offroad Use Only: 2001 Aprilia RS250 Cup for Sale
Suzuki October 29, 2019 posted by

Tastefully Modified Smoker: 1993 Suzuki RGV250Γ VJ22 for Sale

Two-stroke sportbikes of the late 1980s and early 1990s followed a very similar format: aluminum beam frame, full fairing, racy ergonomics, and a small two-stroke powerplants packing cutting-edge technology and serious power per cubic inch. But the formula wasn’t really the result of a lack of imagination, it was convergent evolution: the class was ruthlessly competitive, and every component of bikes like the Suzuki RGV250Γ was maximized for performance and minimal weight.

Early on, the quarter-liter two-stroke class saw a variety of configurations: longitudinal and transverse parallel-twins, v-twins… But as time went on, Honda, Yamaha, and Suzuki all moved to a v-twin. The original RG250 used a parallel-twin, but by the time of the RGV, the engine was a liquid-cooled, 90° two-stroke v-twin that displaced 249cc, along with a six-speed gearbox, a package that was also used to motivate Aprilia’s RS250.

Naturally, all of the bikes in the class used some form of expansion chamber to help increase the peaky little two-stroke’s flexibility. In the case of the Suzuki, it was their SAPC or “Suzuki Advanced Power Control,” an electronically-controlled power valve and ignition-timing system. An asymmetrical swingarm with a pronounced curve on the right side allowed for the bulging expansion chambers on that side, and the second generation VJ22 version of the RGV250 used 17″ wheels at both ends, meaning you should be able to find good, modern rubber to shoe your whippy little sportbike.

The SAPC graphics and bodywork are very 90s, but upper fairing on this example isn’t stock: normally, the VJ22 has a large, trapezoidal unit in the center of the bike, as opposed to the more cat-eyed style, asymmetrical design seen here. It’s probably meant to evoke an endurance-racing machine of the era, since they often swapped the stock twin-lamp setups for single lights.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Suzuki RGV250 VJ22 for Sale

1993 Suzuki RGV250 custom with only 10,816 kilometers (6,720 miles). This RGV is gorgeous! Bike is in excellent condition with just a few scratches and blemishes you would expect to find on a used bike. There is a small rub mark on the left side frame down by the foot shift lever and scratches on the right side lower fairing towards the bottom. However there are no cracks in the fairings and no dents in the tank. Bike is really clean and has great curb appeal. All fairings are 100% genuine Suzuki factory OEM except for the custom upper cowling. I don’t normally buy custom bikes but this one is special. The custom single headlight look with the wide front fairing looks awesome! The previous owner changed the rear sprocket 4 teeth down for a higher top speed and added a Sugaya full exhaust system for a few more ponies and awesome racing sound. Original OEM sprocket and OEM exhaust chambers and silencers come with the bike so you can go back to stock if you like. The color looks black indoors but the true color comes out when you take the bike out into the sunlight. It is actually blue metallic and the paint really comes alive outside in the sun. Pictures don’t do it justice. Bike runs excellent and will arrive with new fluids. Bike comes with a Utah state title and is titled as a street bike for road use. $200 deposit due immediately after sale ends thru PayPal. Remaining balance due within 5 business days by bank wire, cash or check. Please text 801-358-6537 for more pictures or questions. 

We’ve featured bikes from this seller’s collection in the past and, as a group, they’ve been very nicely preserved examples of various rare Japanese sportbikes, and there’s no reason to expect this would be an exception. Purists might give the aftermarket headlight setup and exhaust the side-eye, but they’re pretty cool updates to what is, in most markets, a pretty commonly available machine. And the bike is priced well, with a $6,750 Buy It Now price!

-tad

Tastefully Modified Smoker: 1993 Suzuki RGV250Γ VJ22 for Sale
Kawasaki October 25, 2019 posted by

Red, white and smoky: 1985 Kawasaki KR250S

The 1985 Kawasaki KR250S was a street-going version of a two-stroke road racer that took home four championships in the 1970s. They weighed less than 300 pounds, made 45 horsepower and packaging was kept tight with a weird “tandem twin” engine design. The mill was essentially two singles in a line with a unified crank. Before the KR-1, this bike carried the two-stroke banner for Kawasaki.

1985 Kawasaki KR250S for sale on eBay

This 1985 Kawasaki KR250S is in excellent shape and was just imported to the U.S. from Japan. It wears the marks and blemishes of its years and has not been treated to U.S. paperwork. In California, you won’t have any luck with documentation, but it might be worth trying in other states. Even so, as a vintage ride, limited trackday mount or museum piece, there is real value to the collectors among you.

From the eBay listing:

1985 Kawasaki KR250S located at our shop in Santa Ana, California. The pictures in this auction were taken at our shop in Japan. This bike is in excellent condition for it’s age. Bike only has 2691 KM = 1614 Miles. Engine runs very good. KR250S in this condition are very hard to find in Japan now. More info is available on our website. Bike is sold with a bill of sale only. I don’t have a title for the bike and can’t get one here in California. If your living outside the USA, you will have to arrange your own shipping. I can recommend a good shipping company. USA buyers will also have to arrange there own shipping. Bike is sold as is, no returns. So, ask questions and look at the pictures carefully before you bid. Payment must be received no later than 3 business days after auction close. Sorry, no Paypal

With a starting bid at $6,200, this thing is prepped for the collector or the well-heeled two-stroke connoisseur, but we dare you to find another one.

Red, white and smoky: 1985 Kawasaki KR250S
Suzuki October 2, 2019 posted by

Lucky Strike Replica: 1996 Suzuki RGV250 VJ23A for Sale

The 1996 Suzuki RGV250 VJ23 was basically the last gasp for road-legal two-stroke sport bikes, and one of the most technologically advanced. Sure, Aprilia made the RS250 for a few years beyond that, but it was actually powered by the previous generation of Suzuki’s RGV250 engine, and the final examples weren’t even road legal in many markets. Earlier versions of the RGV250 were powered by the expected 90° v-twin, but the VJ23 was pretty much new from the ground-up, and was powered by a more compact 70° unit with slightly undersquare internal dimensions and a dry clutch for the six-speed transmission. Interestingly the new engine’s bore and stroke of 54 x 54.5mm match the Honda NSR250R’s specs exactly, and I’m assuming the increased torque contributed to the new RGV’s improved rideability.

Bodywork was completely new for the bike as well, and resembles the SRAD GSX-R of the period, all curves and bulges, with a functional ram-air duct in the fairing. The new VJ23 also featured an electric starter, a very unusual feature for a flyweight two-stroke, but very civilized and refined. Other revisions meant weight stayed basically the same as the outgoing VJ22, in spite of the starter. Frame was the expected twin-spar aluminum unit, along with the usual asymmetrical banana swingarm.

The biggest concern buying one of these desirable Lucky Strike race-replicas is… whether or not it’s a replica replica. It’s obviously pretty easy to buy new, pre-painted bodywork of varying degrees of quality from overseas, or even have a good-quality paint-job applied to standard bodywork yourself. How can you tell if it’s the real thing? As always, caveat emptor. Consult with an expert before parting with your money to avoid disappointments, especially at the $14,500 asking price.

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Suzuki RGV250 VJ23A Lucky Strike Replica for Sale

Up for sale is a genuine 1996 Suzuki RGV250SP VJ23A Lucky Strike with only 1,444 kilometers (897 miles). Just imported from Japan. Bike is in mint condition showing very little patina. Tank is perfect, upper and lowers are mint no scratches, no dings, no dents, no handling marks. Rear fairing has a few very light surface scratches or boot marks that don’t show up in pictures. All fairings are 100% genuine OEM Suzuki factory. Frame number confirms genuine factory Lucky Strike model. (Number 133 of 200 manufactured) Bike is completely stock. It’s in gorgeous collector quality condition. Runs like new. Comes with new fluids, carb cleaning and new Dunlop Sportmax tires. Comes with two keys and Utah state title. It is titled as a street bike for road use. This Lucky Strike will be the Crown Jewel of any collection! Please text 801-358-6537 for questions and pictures.

Keep in mind also that, if you plan to keep your collectible GP-replica bone stock, that these were intended for the Japanese home market and limited to just 40hp from the factory. This example was imported directly from Japan, according to to the seller, so I’d assume it is the limited power version of the bike. A few “export models” were made, just 360 or so of the 2218 VJ23s that were built. Either way, this was one of the most highly-developed two-stroke sportbikes ever made for use on public roads, and represents the very end of development for the breed.

-tad

Lucky Strike Replica: 1996 Suzuki RGV250 VJ23A for Sale
Kawasaki September 23, 2019 posted by

Before Kris – 1988 Kawasaki KR-1

Kawasaki had a tiger by the tale in 1988, and for a season or two the KR-1 bested every RGV, TZR and NSR.  Coming out of a collection, this KR-1 looks to have missed the scrapes most 250cc two-strokes got caught up in.

1988 Kawasaki KR-1 for sale on eBay

Kawasaki’s 249cc two-stroke might have been furthest from a real race bike, as there wasn’t a factory presence in the 250 category.  Still the snappy parallel twin, with balance shaft, was eminently tuneable and the package very light.  The 55 hp produced by the Integrated Power Valve System worked beautifully with just 271 lbs. of dry weight.  The frame looked overbuilt but was a light alloy, and 41mm forks were up front with dual discs.  Out back there was the Uni-Trak monoshock and an 18-inch rear wheel.  Pillion accommodations put the lie to racey looking bodywork.

This Seattle owner has a few classic sportbike auctions going, and goes into detail about their KR-1:

Recently completely serviced and detailed with clear Washington state title. The KR-1 is considered to be the fastest and more lively two stroke 250 sports bike compared to all the other models in its class. The model was never imported in to the USA and is probably the rarest model in the 250cc two stroke sports bike category around the world. This particular Kawasaki KR-1 has just 8,298 miles, the bike is mostly all original and in exceptional preserved condition.

The body work is all original and is in very good condition, there are absolutely no cracks on any of the body panels but there are some minor nicks and scrapes. The wheels are perfect with no rock chips or scratches anywhere. The frame and engine have no major corrosion and are nice and clean. Overall cosmetically this bike is in very nice condition.

The bike runs and rides great, and shifts smoothly through all 6 gears. The carburetors were recently ultrasonically cleaned and adjusted, and a full service tune-up was performed which included new spark plugs, chain, air filter, brake pads, oil change, new tires, and fluids flushed. All of the lighting, switches, and electrical components work as they should.

These bikes were never imported into the USA, and very few were exported outside of Japan to any other countries so this is a very rare  Kawasaki model. 

Kawi and Suzuki traded the “fastest 250” back and forth a few times, with the KR-1S snatching it back before the factory decided to focus on their four stroke offerings.  Though Suzuki had staying power, the KR-1 stole the moment in the very late -80’s.  Early interest in the auction says the hammer might fall at a high price, but the new owner will have a sparkling and rare example.

-donn

Before Kris – 1988 Kawasaki KR-1