Posts by tag: collector

Kawasaki June 6, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1982 Kawasaki KZ1000 S1

6.26.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Last seen on RSBFS in 2013 under the byline Kawgasm, the 1982 Kawasaki KZ1000 S1 is off the rarity scales.  This S1 was found in a storage container, cleaned and assembled but not restored, then taken to the Quail Motorcycle Gathering in May, this might be the silk purse from a sow’s ear story for spring 2019.

Unrestored 1982 Kawasaki KZ1000 S1 For Sale on eBay

The Kawi S1 is pictured in Webster’s next to the word unobtanium, and you would’ve had to know somebody in the motorcycle business then, and perhaps finance now to procure one. The race engine was quite different from an ELR with dual plugs, magneto drive on the right end of the crank, a bank of Keihin CR carburetors and a mammoth oil cooler under the steering head. The fabricated swingarm is supported by remote reservoir Works Performance shocks. Lockheed racing brakes made the solid 330mm disks, looking downright oversized even these days.

Evidently the original owner was a machinist and cooked up some beautiful light alloy parts for his new machine. The oil cooler brackets are bombproof but the brake rotor and caliper mounts have a serious look. Comments accompanying the before pictures:

n October, 2014, a friend of mine told me about a guy that was interested in selling his 1982 Kawasaki 1000. He said he bought it new in 1983. His wife said that he was getting on in age and if he passed away, she wouldn’t know what to do with it. He asked me to come by and see it. When he opened the storage container door, stuffed in the back was a green bike. I assumed it was a 1983 ELR. There was no lighting in the container and you could hardly move inside. I was able to get some pictures and realized it was truly an S1. I told him I was interested and he said he’d get back to me. It took him 5 years to get back to me. It took us 6 hours to move a machine and many boxes in order to get to it. But finally, it was extracted. Here’s a chance to own the Holy Grail of 80’s sport bikes.

A careful inventory and cleaning was in order, but you can’t call it a restoration. The original CR carbs were in a box and re-fitted. They still have yet to experience dino juice. The condition and documentation defies belief, and the owners’ restraint in the presence of a “new” S1 indicates this isn’t their first barn find.

1 of 29 produced. Frame #0080 Motor#030330. Arizona Titled. This bike was sold new in Tucson,Az.
Bike was originally shipped to Hill Kawasaki in Orlando, Florida

Then Transferred to Kawasaki of Tucson on 10/21/1983

Sold on 10/31/1983 by Kawasaki of Tucson

Never any track time. This one owner bike was played with on the street for less than 3 months and then stored away until January 2019. It was removed from storage and is now for sale. Unrestored and like new. A true “barn find”. Documentation includes the Predelivery (PDI) Form. The dealer information sheet from Kawasaki Motor Company regarding these bikes. The Dealer transfer form with pricing and serial numbers. The warranty forms filled out, even though there was no warranty. The Factory Chassis and Engine manuals. The Chassis and Engine parts pricing books. The Factory race stand . The original carbs were never run on the bike. The owner opted for 33mm smooth bore Mikunis. The original Keihin CR carbs were reinstalled at the time the bike was removed from storage. They are new and have never had fuel run through them. The owner was a machinist and made billet oil cooler mounts, billet caliper hangers and billet front brake rotor carriers. The original steel kerker muffler was replaced with an aluminum one. The slicks were replaced with street Dunlop’s in 1983. The condition of this bike is unbelievable. Unrestored !

Around thirty S1’s are reputed to exist, along with a substantial number of replicas in various states of correctness.  As the real deal, the fuel tank and carbs of this one will likely remain dry, some old slicks sourced, and some velvet ropes strung to keep it out of arm’s reach.  .

-donn

Featured Listing – 1982 Kawasaki KZ1000 S1
MV Agusta May 21, 2019 posted by

Fulsome – 1977 MV Agusta 750S / 850SS America

The mid-seventies saw MV Agusta floundering after the founder’s death, and about to accept an offer they couldn’t refuse from the Italian government.  U.S. importers persuaded the company to try and revive their fortunes with a special 750, a monoposto bristling with premium parts.  This rare example returned to Italy for a mid-stream model upgrade before sale.

1977 MV Agusta 750S / 850SS America for sale on eBay

Before almost every big bike was an inline four, MV Agusta had a history of air-cooled DOHC Grand Prix machines.  For the 750S, displacement was increased to 788cc’s, heads re-designed and 26mm Dell’Orto carburetors were specified.  Though the cams are driven by a gear train between cylinders two and three, the alternator is behind, resulting in a trim crankcase.  Shaft drive indicating its more GT purpose, most MV 750’s came with front discs and a drum rear brake.

Not enough to be one of 500 or so, this MV was upgraded by the factory to an 850SS, which the factory did to just a few dozen leftover machines to make them more enticing.  A little history from the eBay auction:

750S to 850SS conversion: Factory records during this period in MV history can be inconsistent. 1977 was the final year of factory-produced MV Agusta motorcycles, and the factory was fast and loose with some things, including specifications from bike to bike. They were also having a hard time selling new 750S Americas in a crowded field of ever larger and more powerful Japanese machines, which could be had for a fraction of the MV’s $6500 sticker price. So, an uprated variant of the 750S, the 850SS, was cooked up as a way to move leftover or unsold 750S machines. In late 1976, MV recalled 19 unsold new 750S machines (including this bike) for conversion from distributor stock.

They also instructed dealers/distributors in how to convert other 750S machines to 850SS spec. Fortunately, this bike’s journey is well-described in both factory and distributor documents. The bike is first described in documents from 1975 and early 1976, as a “1976 model 750cc ‘S’ America”. Later documents from 1977 list it (by serial number) among 19 bikes that were recalled in late-1976 to the MV factory in Italy for conversion to “850S” specification. Additional documents from 1977 pertain to the re-importation of the bike by the US distributor, Garville, now as an “850S” with “86hp” (vs 75hp in standard 750S trim), and allocation to Champion Motorcycles in Costa Mesa, California.

The bike has 750S sidecover emblems; these may have been left on the bike at the factory or re-installed later. It has the factory optional and 850SS-correct EPM cast alloy wheels with triple Brembo calipers. 850SSs typically used 27mm carbs unless bound for the US, like this one, which then used the standard 26mm Dellorto carbs of the 750S America. All original documents relating to this bike are included in the sale, both when it was a “1976 750S” and after conversion to 1977 850SS (see pix), with the exception of the document listing this bike among the 19 recalled to the factory for 850SS conversion. That particular document belongs to the records of another of my MVs, but I will provide a copy/scan of that original document to the new owner as well. 

42 years on, the 850SS shows no particular wear, but chips and aging paint and plating of a real classic.  Despite the outstanding components from Ceriani, Tomaselli, and Brembo, the factory thought having the LaFranconi mufflers black would be sporty.

Already playing catch-up to the new Japanese imports, Agusta didn’t have the time or resources to engineer a new lightweight model.  At over 500 lbs. dry, the 750 and 850S reviewed as a better ride for moderate speeds but did so in style.  The factory wound down shortly and was offline for ten years before being revived by Cagiva.  Seeming more appropriate for a white glove auction than online, this 850S is a history lesson in 1970’s design and manufacturing.

-donn

Fulsome – 1977 MV Agusta 750S / 850SS America
Ducati May 5, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1990 Ducati 851 SP3

Our luck that Ducati was compelled to prove that their WSBK race machines weren’t too special, and a few hundred were made as homologation specials and offered to the cogniscenti.  This 1990 851 SP3 can be displayed immediately, and shows just over 2,500 miles.

New owners Cagiva opened their checkbook wide for development of a 4-valve desmo engine, nicely oversquare with 11:1 compression, it claimed 111 hp from 888cc’s.  Weber injection sprayed down 50mm intakes, and the fairing hides an oil cooler and water radiator.  The classic white trellis frame shows Öhlins front and rear, and black wheels are a departure, but go well with the carbon mudguards.

Owned by a collector, this rare bird has been on the dais from early on.  A previous owner selected a more vintage-looking exhaust, but otherwise it appears as delivered.  It has been selected by RSBFS contributors as early as 2011, and sold at a Bonham’s auction in 2014, looking museum ready whenever it’s seen.  With only 500 made, demand from insiders with connections to the brand makes one wonder if this might be the only stateside example.

From the seller:

1990 Ducati 851 SP3

Up for sale from my collection is a rare 1991 Ducati 851/888 SP3 #467 of 534!

The 851 is an iconic bike not only for Ducati, but World Superbike! The 851 helped to start the modern history of Ducati in World Superbike!

The 851 SP3 appeared in 1991. In addition to an increased motor capacity to 888cc and close ratio gearbox, it featured higher compression pistons, a forced air intake, which contributed to a slight power increase, Desmo 4 valve cylinder heads, fuel injection and water cooled, which amounted to 111hp at 10,500 rpm. The 1991 SP3 also featured stronger crankcases and updated clutch.

The Brembo wheels were painted black and the brake and clutch master cylinders included remotely mounted fluid reservoirs. Front and rear suspension feature Ohlins race proven technology.

Upgrades are minimal, brake lines, aluminum sub frame (around front by instruments by Jimmy Adamo), spaghetti exhaust with RARE Verlicchi megaphones and updated cylinder head studs.

This SP3 has been ridden very little with just 3823km (2375 miles) on the odometer. This is a rare low mileage investment piece!

Overall cosmetic condition is excellent, with work performed by Advanced Motorsports before I purchased it.

If this bike looks familiar, it was featured with a number of rare Ducati’s and sold at the 2014 Bonhams Las Vegas auction for $25,300.
Values continue to climb!

https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/21389/lot/377/
The bike was previously part of the Silverman Museum Collection.

Although a video was taken after delivery of the SP3 after I purchased it, it has been sitting in my collection. If interested in riding the bike, I would recommend preventative service before riding.

Bike is complete with original owners manual and clear Colorado title!

If looking for a desirable, investment quality Ducati SP3, this is one to consider!

Please contact Lee for more information at (425) 830-4300 or lee@hotlasers.com

Lee offers two videos of number 467, a walk around and a one with the engine running:

The 851 was the beginning of Ducati’s long-running appreciation for the proving ground and advertising venue that the Superbike World Championship provides.  Two series wins with 888 power followed the 851, and then the 916 entered the picture.  This SP3 is testimony to that great era, and though it likely won’t get the chance, could provide proof on the tarmac.  Lee welcomes offers and questions on 425-830-4300 or by email – here –.

-donn

Featured Listing – 1990 Ducati 851 SP3
Yamaha April 29, 2019 posted by

Fiat Currency – 2008 Yamaha YZF-R1

Having presented an all-new R1 in 2007, Yamaha changed very little for 2008.  Hopeful for Rossi, they presented a Moto GP liveried body kit.  This owner has barely ridden the bike, kept it perfectly, and even improved a few of the minor decals.

2008 Yamaha YZF-R1 for sale on eBay

After many years with the 5-valve Genesis, Yamaha’s ’07 re-design used just four valves per cylinder, but still managed 180 hp from the liter.  Intake runner length is computer controlled, optimizing the low and high rpm running.  The throttle is electronic rather than mechanical, and there’s a factory slipper clutch.  The rider is warmed by air evacuating the fairing and the underseat exhaust.  Kayaba suspension is multi-adjustable and triple-puck calipers over 310mm rotors are outstanding.

The original owner has protected this R1 from a sportbike’s usual reality, installed the Fiat fairing kit, and made a few minor improvements.  For a fan, it’s a collectible combination, plus there’s a Rossi-signed tailpiece.  Pre-owned but not really used.  Comments from the eBay auction:

What’s unique about this particular scooter is the Limited Edition MotoGP Yamaha/Fiat Livery Kit which was presented by the Yamaha Factory Race Team back in 2007. Only 380 were made and distributed worldwide and my number is 144.  Every piece was meticulously installed and the results were and remain flawless.
The sponsorship decals that came with the kit were used at the time of installation but were of inferior quality so I had a professional printer make die cut decals copying what was on the factory race bikes at the time and the result is night and day difference. The decals you see on the swing arm and rear tire hugger show the better application. The original kit decals were smaller in dimension and were not proportionate to the areas of their intended placement. I did not keep the originals, some of them were damaged when removing them but in all seriousness, no big loss in that department. 

There have been no engine or exhaust modifications. Electronics have not been tampered with whatsoever. The bike is primarily stock with only a few aftermarket accessories. The stock brake and clutch levers were removed (for you purists, I still have them) and replaced with a machined set in anodized black. They’re not a brand name, I purchased them from a Chinese vendor on a whim but was pleasantly surprised by the exceptional quality and I thought they met my aesthetic and quality standard so that’s why they’re on the bike. 

The other decals you see on the bike which were not part of the Livery Kit are the number 46 on the windscreen and other assorted decals on the white bodywork towards the rear of the bike, the rear seat cowl and under the seat area. (No, that’s not a genuine OHLINS shock. Only the decal is genuine) All are high quality die-cut and replicate with accuracy of what was plastered all over Valentino Rossi’s bikes during the 2007/2008 MotoGP seasons. 
When Indianapolis Motor Speedway hosted the MotoGP races, I had the good fortune of first meeting Valentino Rossi in 2010 (and three times after) and he personally signed the seat cowl. I don’t have it installed on the bike. I’ve always kept it off. Safely protected of course.

Ten years on from the original R1, the oughties update had a host of improvements, and the bike got good reviews for it’s roadability.  The compact cockpit pleases smaller riders and the suspension isn’t too brutal.  Power delivery is slow starting but comes on strong above 8,000 rpm.  Number 46 went on to dominate the 2008 season, clinching the championship three races before the end of the season.  Collectible as it is, a ride would be hard to resist.

-donn

Fiat Currency – 2008 Yamaha YZF-R1
Featured Listing April 23, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1990 Honda VFR750R / RC30

Check out all of Joe’s bikes for sale on RSBFS! Many thanks for choosing us to help move your collection! -dc

Even if not fans, RSBFS readers will acknowledge Honda’s long history of success in motorcycle production and racing.  These days, Honda seems to have the engineering chops ( and resources ) to do almost whatever they put their minds to – witness their Formula 1 winning V6’s for Williams and McLaren, several years as CART’s engine of choice, and more recently the HondaJet aircraft ( with turbofans developed by Honda and GE ).

The VFR750R/RC30 from 1987-1990 is just one more example, where engineers and designers pulled a winning concept together, and the manufacturing side of the company executed beautifully, about 3,000 times.  As testament, the factory team won the inaugural WSBK season in 1988.  This rare example has been in a collector’s display since new, and occasionally exercised, turning under 1,200 miles.

As their homologation special for the Superbike World Championship, the RC30 really was the mythical race bike with lights.  From the sharp-steering alloy chassis to the 296mm front disks to the single-sided Pro-Link swingarm, the RC30 provided the racers what they needed.  Shocks and forks on the single seater were only adjustable for preload, since the race teams would be putting their own special parts.  The compact V-4 looked similar to the preceding VFR750F, but shared almost no internal parts.  Even the exhaust note with the new 360-degree crank was specific to the RC30.

Resting in the motorcycle wing of a large auto collection, this RC30 has received excellent care and not even break-in miles.  The pictures show an apparently new machine, even though a generation has passed since it was built.  The owner tells of a mid-life cosmetic refurbishment:

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari.

An exception would have to be my super low (under 1,200) miles, almost perfectly like-new 1990 Honda RC30.

Yes, there are a few exceptions to what I call my Italian collecting rule and one of those would be the 1990 Honda RC30. This 1990 Honda RC30 needs no introduction or explanation by me as it is such a famous Honda, that the only thing you need to know about an RC30 is if you are getting a good one or a really great one or one of the very best.

The RC30 in this listing was purchased for the collection several years ago and is an extremely low mileage bike. It was absolutely 99% perfect, however, some of the detail parts that were white rubber or painted white had become slightly discolored. At that time, almost ten years ago, Honda was still had these parts in stock and we purchased each and every part to bring the cosmetic looks of the bike back to 99%. This 1990 Honda RC30 has not been raced or abused or messed with in any way. It currently looks like new, runs just as it should and is kept on a trickle charger and is exercised thoroughly during the spring, summer, and fall; and again it has never been raced or abused (most have been!).

As you may already know, there is nothing more exciting nor handles better than the Honda RC30. The looks, graphics, and colors of the bike need no apology either. They are absolutely a stand-out in any crowd of motorcycles. Most RC30s were extensively raced and it is very hard to find one that has not been modified or raced. You are looking at one that has not been abused in that way shape or form. This bike is always kept on a trickle charge and ready take a trip to any bike show at a moment’s notice. This is truly a bike for a serious collection and it would be a shame to abuse it. Oh yes, it comes with a new Honda rear wheel stand still in the box.

All my bikes are kept in climate controlled storage and on trickle chargers when not in use so they are always ready to take a day’s ride at a moment’s notice.

Honda might be accused of an obsession with the V-4, which brought it multiple WSBK titles along with TT and endurance racing wins.  After Superbike rulesmakers made a short dalliance with the V-twin an offer they couldn’t refuse, Honda returned to the four with the RC212V.  But for road riders, the RC30 was a moment when you could buy something very special from the local dealer, even though it cost twice as much as the nearest competitor.  That moment is reflected in recent asking prices even for fairly well-used examples.  But in this case, we have an RC30 that has been in a collector’s hands from day one, without damage history and in impeccable shape.  Please contact Joe for more information at 847-774-4857.

-donn

Featured Listing – 1990 Honda VFR750R / RC30
Benelli April 20, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1976 Benelli Sei 750

Check out all of Joe’s bikes for sale on RSBFS! Many thanks for choosing us to help move your collection! -dc

Benelli and Honda exchanged flattery in the 1970’s, which began with Benelli creating a six cylinder look-alike of Honda’s CB500 Four in 1972.  Their flagship Sei began as a 750 and progressed to a 900 by 1979.  Honda returned the compliment in 1978 with their CBX.  Restored by a previous owner, this Sei is a magnificent labor of love.

Benelli made a careful study of the air-cooled Honda and made a few changes – the gear-driven alternator, located behind the cylinders, keeps the engine’s width manageable.  With three Dell’Orto carburettors, 76 hp was almost effortless and the Sei created usable torque from 2,000 rpm.  The chassis is a hefty downtube with right-side-up Marzocchi forks, and twin Sebac shocks.  Dual front disks make up for the tried-and-true rear drum.  Styling is dominated by the six-way calliope, with a few angular details on the instrument cluster, side covers, and cylinders.

A bottle of chrome polish might be on the new owner’s shopping list, since the Sei is all metal, with not even the side covers executed in plastic.  On display since shortly after the restoration was completed, it shows almost as a new machine, with sparkling finishes and new rubber parts, like the carburetor boots.  The owner shares these notes:

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari.

The 1976 Benelli SEI 750 six-cylinder is another one of those iconic Italian motorcycles. It was the first six-cylinder production motorcycle, and, yes, those six exhaust pipes not only sound great but look phenomenal. The bike was restored by a gentleman that spent what looks like half a lifetime to get it to such perfection. This bike starts and runs as it should and I don’t personally know of one important criticism that I could make on the bike for show or riding.

The Benelli winding through the gears sound like a Gran Prix rarer and the slick handling is something has to be experienced. These six cylinder Benelli bikes have a long way to go in terms of collector appreciation. When you buy a first series Benelli six cylinder you will find a crowd wherever you stop.

Then just wind up through the gears and it seems that the roar of those six exhaust pipes can be heard a mile away.

Check out the pictures of this Benelli it has to be one of the best, if not The Best, restored 1976 Benelli SEI 750’s ever!

All my bikes are kept in climate controlled storage and on trickle chargers when not in use so they are always ready to take a day’s ride at a moment’s notice.


Prefer phone calls 847-774-4857

Check out the pictures and be a little amazed – you are seeing the best!

As the 1970’s opened, industrialist Alejandro DeTomaso had high hopes for his new acquisition, and funded the development of the magnetic Sei.  The big-band sound of six individual 125cc cylinders is more like a fleet of motorcycles than just one.  Never destined to be in every garage, the bright light in the Benelli showroom was reflecting off the Sei’s six chrome mufflers.  The owner has curated and preserved this example to a high standard, and not insignificantly, kept it ready to ride.  Please contact Joe with offers at 847-774-4857.

-donn

Featured Listing – 1976 Benelli Sei 750
Suzuki February 15, 2019 posted by

Early Adopter – 1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo

Though each of the big four produced an -80’s turbocharged middleweight, Suzuki’s was focused on sport and is still the rarest.  This example has been on display in Sweden since 1987 and is ready for a marquis spot.

1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo ( Sweden ) for sale on eBay

Each of the turbos were a technology showcase and showroom failure, but as ever, Suzuki jammed a helping of sportbike technique into their design.  In spite of the excess heat brought by a turbo system, Suzuki stuck with air-oil cooling and used an early version of their SACS piston squirters to keep temps under control.  The 673cc four used 12 pounds of boost to make 85 hp, helped by electronic fuel injection which was tuneable and didn’t require carburetor float bowls next to a hot turbocharger.

The chassis got a healthy dose of attention, with the first road application of a smaller 16″ front wheel and anti-dive forks.  The Full Floater alloy monoshock made for a sweet handling powerhouse.  Fans will see references to the 1981 Katana in the supersport fairing which flows right to the tailcone.  Brakes are big for the time at 290mm, an acknowledgement of the 550 lbs. wet weight.

I was thinking this Suzuki might be related to the Christensson MC Collection we saw at the Mecum auction in January, but it must be another collector from that mad hotbed of sportbikes, Sweden.  Though not perfect, the condition is close to museum quality, with just 2,300 miles.  There are nick here and there, and some peculiar almost-scratches on the right engine case.  Unlikely though it is, a quick look and lubrication of any rotating part would be in order before a ride.  From the eBay auction:

SUPER RARE ONLY MADE 1 YEAR (1983)
Bike has only 3697 km / 2297 miles on it and has been parked away since 1987.
Minor scratches as per documentation.
Bike is located in central Sweden (Västerås)

With just rudimentary electronics, this Suzuki turbo could be diverted from the collection back to rideability with just some seals and oils.  More likely it will get a thorough buffing and resume its spot in a collection, but RSBFS readers and writers would love to hear if anyone inspects or bids on this XN85 !

-donn

Early Adopter – 1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo
Honda November 6, 2018 posted by

Spitting Image – 1987 Honda NSR250R

Honda’s early NSR-250’s were nicely templated on the winning RS250R race machine, in race livery almost hard to tell apart.  This one went from road to private collection and has been made ready for the new owner’s choice.

1987 Honda NSR250R for sale on eBay

Honda’s MC16 used a 249cc V-twin, with cylinders slightly turned to ease intake and exhaust routing.  Exhaust port sizes are adjusted, and torque band extended, by Honda’s RC Valve.  Almost any frame could cope with the legislated 45 hp, but Honda built a twin spar from alloy extrusions welded to cast connectors and headstock.  In-house suspension used air adjustable forks and Pro-link monoshock, with the straight swingarm that pre-dates the banana.

Evidently this collector is more than proverbially thinning the herd, and has auctioned several over the past few months.  Not a virgin with over 15K miles, but still looks excellent.  Beside one cracked corner on the right fairing and a couple of paint chips, it appears complete and original.  A lot of new wear parts were installed when the NSR was taken off the road, though we don’t know when that was, cables and pads should be ok to sit.  Here is the list of freshenings that were done to make it ready for sale, from the eBay auction:

New Battery & amp; Battery Tender Hookup – which can also be used to run Electric gear

New front and rear brake fluids flushed and replaced with Honda Pro DOT 4

Carbs were Digitally Synchronized

New Spark Plugs Installed

Perfect Mechanical and Great Cosmetic condition and needs nothing

Replaced the fork oil with 15W

New transmission oil

Oil Injection Tank filled up

Coolant flushed and replaced

New set of tires have 250+/- miles on them in 3 rides this last summer

Honda continued with the NSR250R for another ten years, so the early model is less collectible, but also doesn’t have the harder to defeat PGM ignition controller.  Not the lightest small sport, but Honda build quality took sales away from Yamaha, who had been ruling the two-stroke market.  Not exactly museum quality, this NSR looks like it could be a great rider.  Interest in the auction is high with 5 days to run…

-donn

Spitting Image – 1987 Honda NSR250R
Sport Bikes For Sale May 13, 2018 posted by

Quail Motorcycle gathering 2018: Munro Racer, Flying Merkel and more

Another year and another good time at the Quail Motorcycling gathering in Carmel California last weekend.   This year was a bit warmer and was the 10th anniversary event.  Almost all the prior year winners were present and highlights included an actual race Yamaha, the Burt Munro racer and some amazing one off customs including my personal favorite a 1985 Yamaha 500cc two stroke melded to a modern day R1 chasis.   Enjoy the photos!

Rainey Yamaha, windscreen and seat were replacements but everything else looked like it had come off the track.

Here is the one I mentioned in the header.  The sign on the front is a bit hard to read due to glare but it says 1985 Yamaha RZV500.  Bodywork looks like a 2nd gen R1.  Sadly I didnt get to hear it fire.

Is that the Burt Munro Indian special?  yup..super cool

Note:  for anyone who hasn’t seen the Burt Munro movie with Anthony Hopkins, definitely worth a watch.

How about some rotary engine goodness?  there was actually a whole selection of these, this was the cleanest and had a super cool rotational dash unit that sadly I didn’t get a photo of in operation.

A fair selection of mid 1980’s and 1990’s sportbikes:

Classics including this years best in show, a Flying Merkel:

Many of the winners from the last 10 years were present too:

Some super cool customs were on hand too, including this Yamaha GTS that looked like something master chief would be on:

Some old and new electric bikes showed how far these machines have come. The past:

The present:

Last but not least, a bit of fun – the bat cycle…admit it, you heard the classic theme in your head:

There were also lots of good bikes out in the parking lot but my memory was running low so I didnt take any shots.   There were also vendors on hand including Bonhams and Aprilia and Moto Guzzi were offering test rides.  All in all, a truly great way to spend a spring day.

Note:  Price for a ticket was $75 via advance purchase and included parking and a really nice lunch, crowd was about 3000 over the course of the day.  I got there early and was able to get up close and personal with a lot of these machines.   While the next trip I have on my motorcycling bucket list is to the Barber Museum, I plan on returning again in the future.

-Marty/dallaslavowner

Quail Motorcycle gathering 2018:  Munro Racer, Flying Merkel and more