Posts by tag: RS

Yamaha September 7, 2018 posted by

Street-Legal Stroker: 1992 Yamaha TZR250RS for Sale

Yamaha’s TZR250 doesn’t seem to command the same prices or attention as Honda’s NSR. Which is interesting, considering it’s similar in terms of weight and performance, and the TZR is generally even rarer in every market outside Japan: both the 3MA and 3XV versions were officially sold in the Japanese market only, although plenty found their way to the UK, Europe, and Canada via “parallel import” laws.

Certainly, the TZR isn’t lacking in technology: the 3XV packs an electronic engine-management system to rival Honda’s PGM-IV that controls the ignition advance, the powervalve, and the carburetors’ fuel mixture. Yamaha’s Deltabox frame is light and stiff, and the RS version seen here adds a dry clutch, close-ratio box, and later models even included fully-adjustable forks. This example goes a step further and has been upgraded with Öhlins forks and a Nitron rear shock.

Ultimately, the package closely mirrored the rest of the class: 90° liquid-cooled two-stroke v-twin displacing 249cc, an aluminum frame, a six-speed gearbox, and the de rigueur powervalve to boost the two-stroke’s limited midrange. The seller is asking $11,500 for this updated, well cared-for example.

From the original eBay listing: 1992 Yamaha TZR250RS for Sale

You are looking at a super clean, well maintained and a hard to find TZR 250RS. The RS model comes with close ratio gear box, RS paint scheme, fully adjustable suspension and dry clutch. I upgraded the front forks with Ohlins components, Nitron R1 rear shock, Brembo calipers, Brembo pads, braided brake lines and full floating rotors. Maintenance was done which includes fresh Motul fluids (coolant, brake fluid and transmission oil), carbs been cleaned/synced. Bike is street legal, titled, registered and insured in NJ. Everything on the bike is OEM all original with the exception of the upgrades mentioned. You will never find another one in this condition. 

This one has been up for sale more than once in a couple different places, but appears to be very clean and comes with a New Jersey title, which is a nice bonus for anyone looking to ride their stinky little sportbike. The biggest question here is: has the bike been de-restricted? Collectors may not be too worried, but anyone looking to ride this anywhere outside a very tight, technical racetrack or a very twisty back road will want more than the government-mandated 45hp. The Japanese government, obviously: the US government regulates many, many things, but horsepower is not one of them.

-tad

Street-Legal Stroker: 1992 Yamaha TZR250RS for Sale
Moto Guzzi March 19, 2018 posted by

Alternate Italian: 1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS

If asked to picture a red, Italian vee twin sportbike, the majority of the world would come up with a single marque: Ducati. But in truth the Italians have been rather prolific with their sporty scoots across dozens of manufacturers, even though some brands may not be household names here in the United States. And some, while once well known, have fallen to the march of progress and the downfall of insolvency. One of those surviving iconic Italian brands is Moto Guzzi – holding the title of the oldest motorcycle manufacturer in Europe still in continuous production. Now owned by Piaggio but allowed to operate quasi-independently, Moto Guzzi soldiers on with a handful of cruisers and V7 nostalgia bikes. However Guzzi once was known for sport bikes, and none highlight the brand better than today’s Daytona RS.

1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS for sale on eBay

Based on the very (for Moto Guzzi) successful 1100 Sport model, the RS contained a few extra goodies in the horsepower and handling department. Like many other successful brands, Moto Guzzi marketed the RS as a premium model, selling the extra performance. Unlike the 1100 Sport, the RS featured new 4-valve cylinder heads and a bigger cam to help with higher RPM breathing. Modern EFI provided the fueling. Down below, a new lightened crankshaft was connected to a lighter flywheel, carillo rods and forged (rather than cast) pistons. Moto Guzzis have always been known to be robust motorcycles, and the venerable transverse vee arrangement readily accepted these updates without complaint. On the chassis side, the RS received uprated WP dampers front and rear along with 17″ rubber front and rear. Tipping the scales at the same rate as the 1100 Sport (approx 488 lbs), the RS offered 12 HP and nearly 1,000 RPM more motive power along with handling refinements and a 240 KM/h top speed.

From the seller:
Daytona RS, very rare, only 34 to North America. I have had the bike for ~3 yrs in southern Arizona. Runs very strong, great looking with everything working. Mileage ~9000 as I continue to ride it on occasions. New cam belts, forks rebuilt, valves checked, tires good (Pirelli angel gt). Aftermarket exhaust, handlebars and Creedon chip.

From a performance standpoint, the big Guzzis were largely outclassed by Japanese precision. From a local perspective, Moto Guzzi found itself losing ground to the group from Bologna – to the point where Ducati dominated the Italian vee twin sporting scene. Ultimately grouped into the Battle of the Twins class against Beemers and Harleys, Moto Guzzi never quite made the transition to the modern sportbike era. But to damn the brand because it refused to enter the hyperactive world of “win on Sunday, sell on Monday” would be missing the point of this Dayton beast. With long legs, great sounds and fantastic looks, this Daytona RS is timeless and offers so much more than a fleeting performance benchmark. This is a classic steed that performs well enough to hold its head up high while enveloping the rider in a cloak of quality and mystique. This is a bike that riders look at knowingly and longingly; this is ultimate cool, personified.

This particular Daytona RS looks to be in pretty good shape. There is some wear evident in the rash on the triple clamps – it is minor and does not affect functionality, but somehow marks in this area always aggrivate me – and some slight damage to the left side rear tail section. Otherwise this appears to be an honest bike, and presents well. The mileage is sub 9,000, and from the seller’s text maintenance and care was performed as one would expect. There are some extras in the form of upgraded Termi exhaust as well as a tuner chip controlling the EFI, enhancing power delivery as well as rideability. These RS models are rare and in demand in the small circle of Guzzi fans, so this one may not last long. The opening bid started out at a rock-bottom $1,000 (with reserve), and the BIN is a reasonable $11,500. Check it out here, and revel in the artistry of Italian chic. Good Luck!!

MI

Alternate Italian: 1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS
Yamaha December 22, 2017 posted by

Racing Sport: 1993 Yamaha TZR250RS for Sale

Update: A reader reached out to note that, “The forks are missing the compression and rebound clickers, those are R forks.” Seller replied back to us, “I pulled out the books and it looks like the first year for the RS model was a 3XV8 which had the same forks as the standard R model. The next year, 3XV9 and 3XVA came with adjusters.” Thanks to SmokinJoe B for the note and Gary for the response. -dc

Yamaha’s two-stroke TZR250 was always a bit of an odd duck in the quarter-liter sportbike class. The first-generation TZR was the much more sophisticated follow up to the RD series of bikes and was pretty widely available everywhere but in the US, while later examples like the 3MA and 3XV seen here were only available outside Japan as grey-market or parallel imports and are considered exotic, even in markets where two-stroke sportbikes were common.

Early 1KT and 3MA TZRs used parallel twins, but the final 3XV version finally adopted an “if you can’t beat them” philosophy and changed to a small 90° v-twin to match the competition from Honda and Suzuki. The new v-twin displaced 249cc and was backed by a six-speed gearbox. Like the NSR, it featured computer-controlled ignition and Yamaha’s YPVS power valve system. In spite of all the trickery, it produced the usual 45hp, limited by the expected Japanese governmental regulations.

The rest of the specification was pretty similar to the rest of the class as well: a 278lbs dry weight with a stiff aluminum beam frame like other bikes in the class, in this case an evolution of Yamaha’s Deltabox, with a banana swingarm to allow the bike’s distinctive asymmetrical exhaust to tuck in close to the bike’s centerline.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Yamaha TZR250RS Racing Sport for Sale

Up for auction to the highest bidder with NO RESERVE is a 1993 Yamaha TZR250RS with 16,709 kilometers (10,382 miles). This is the dry clutch Racing Sport model that everybody wants. Bike is in beautiful condition with a few scrapes and scratches. Tank is in perfect condition. All fairings are 100% genuine Yamaha OEM. Upper fairing appears to have been professionally re-sprayed. Bike has a tremendous amount of curb appeal. This RS is a solid rider and is ready to go. Full service just performed with new battery and fluids. Bike runs flawless. Bike comes with Utah state title and is titled as a streetbike for road use.

Merry Christmas!

Bidding is up to just $6,100 with a couple days left and the reserve has been met! As rare as all of these two strokes have been up until recently, I’ve seen quite a few Hondas and even a few Suzukis, but the various iterations of the Yamaha TZR are still uncommon here in the US, especially in clean condition with OEM bodywork. I’m not clear what “beautiful condition with scratches and scrapes throughout” means exactly, but I’m assuming it means it’s been well cared-for and the paint looks good, but has the usual minor blemishes a bike picks up through normal use: a scratch on the tank from a belt buckle, a scuff on the tail from a boot while swinging a leg over, a scrape where another bike parked too close at a bike meetup.

-tad

Racing Sport: 1993 Yamaha TZR250RS for Sale
Ducati March 11, 2017 posted by

Rebuilt Racer: 1999 Ducati 748RS for Sale

The Ducati 916/748 was the poster child for performance motorcycles throughout its production, with the same sort of ubiquity the Lamborghini Countach enjoyed in its heyday. With so many of them made over such a long timeframe, it’s easy to forget how huge an impact the bike had when it was new: Tamburini’s creation may have been uncomfortable, temperamental, and expensive, but Ducati sold streetbikes so they could go racing, not the other way around. Which makes today’s 748RS one of the purest Ducatis you can buy, aside from a used World Superbike machine.

The 748 was the baby-brother to the 916 and came in standard, S, R, and RS flavors. Naturally, the RS was the trickest of the bunch, a pure factory racebike with plenty of trick parts and a highly-strung engine with maintenance requirements to match. The 748cc v-twin was pitched against 600cc inline fours and the displacement bump allowed by World Supersport rules helped the Ducati compete, but heavily-revised internals were also required to keep them on relatively equal footing. Wild cams opened RS-specific valves to make the 124hp needed, while a 54mm Termignoni exhaust ferried exhaust gasses to the undertail “mufflers.”

As you’d expect, the bike features a close-ratio gearbox, high-end suspension, and extensive use of lightweight materials, including bodywork and a simplified wiring loom, as this was never intended to be used on the road and obviously didn’t need connections for lights and other legal requirements.

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Ducati 748RS for Sale

A motorcycle like this only comes up for sale once in a blue moon. This is a completely rebuilt 1999 Ducati 748RS (Corsa) factory race bike. This particular machine was used in the AMA Pro Thunder Championship which was won by Shawn Conrad. The machine as it sits, is effectively new. It has been rebuilt from the ground up and any part not 100% has been replaced. The engine was rebuilt by Chris Boy’s team at Motocorse Ducati in Fort Lauderdale and has zero miles, zero time on it. Everything has been refurbished except the side panels which are original and “as raced”. This is again, a factory race bike and ready for your living room or to take racing or for track days. There is no title as this is a factory race bike.  The Ducati factory can confirm it is as stated. I can assist with shipping but the costs are all to the buyers account.

Those of you without deep pockets, beware: this is no tarted-up roadbike converted to track duty, and parts can be very expensive, even if you’re used to Ducati’s regular belt changes and valve-adjustment: rumor has it, you’ll be swapping out those valves [and rockers!] out every 750 km or so. The bike is listed with a $13,499 starting bid, no takers and several days left on the auction. That’s big money for a 748 but seems pretty reasonable for an RS, especially one with legitimate race history, a complete rebuild, and a bit of as-raced patina. From the seller’s description, this one’s basically ready to race or display!

-tad

Rebuilt Racer: 1999 Ducati 748RS for Sale
Ducati January 17, 2017 posted by

1998 Ducati 996 Factory Superbike!

This is the sort of bike that sets the offices of RSBFS buzzing. Feast your eyes on an actual *factory* race bike. Not an RS version of a street bike. An actual “we are the Ducati factory and we are going racing…” sort of race bike. And not just any factory bike, but one piloted by the redoubtable Troy Corser. In fact, this is likely one of the machines that he rode in the ’98 season (back to WSBK after an unsuccessful stint in 500cc class) – in a year where he narrowly missed the title. A crash in warm-up during the last round of the season resulted in broken ribs and a missed opportunity, relegating Corser to 3rd in the overall standings behind Carl Fogarty and Aaron Slight.

1998 Ducati 996 Factory Racer for sale on eBay!

When it comes to race bikes, rare is not enough. You need details, authenticity, and – where possible – proof. Since factory racers are not governed by motor vehicle registration bureaucracy in the same manner as a street machine, there is always the challenge of originality. It doesn’t help that racers are constantly being modified during a season (and this one continued to race), further muddling the trail. With a signed letter purportedly outlining the provenance of this historic machine, a matching chassis number complete with NCR markings, and enough carbon fiber and electronics to make mere mortals weak in the knees, this bike certainly looks the business.

From the seller:
Frame#ZDMH100AAXB002311MF3#
engine 004945

Bike sell directly throught DUCATI SPA to DUCATI CORSE in November 1999
we have got documentation and use for Troy Corser
After Ducati rent to team R&D BF racing team with Aoki and Romboni for the season 2001 and finish De Cecco bought through ds Ducati Mr.
Ciabatti to make run Blora Paolo in the italian CIV
It has been kept in dry and ready to race condition.
And,this is not 996RS,It is real factory bike.(Totally different to RS,specially computer device,fork,brakes,engine..etc..)

bike is in italy, more picture avaitable

For most of us, this is an unusual bike that almost never surfaces. It is, in many ways, a holy grail of bike spotting. But unlike many of the collectables that we show on this site, this is not exactly something you can throw a leg over on a ride to 7-11 for a Slurpee. This is a purposeful track machine. But who would really risk this bike for a basic track day? Would you dare try to race it? The lack of spares is concerning, but the inability to replace the bike itself would scare me silly. All of which – more or less – makes this a wonderful piece of indoor artwork.

This is one of those “better bring your wallet” sort of situations. The ask for this rolling, booming, rib-breaking time-slice of WSBK is a cool $65k USD. That is actually not as sky-high as some race bikes we have seen in the past, but certainly a goodly chunk of change. Prices do not include transportation fees either. Located in Italy (where else?), this bike will need to be shipped assuming the buyer is not local. A very sweet reminder of WSBK dominance, this Ducati 996 factory racer is waiting for your call!

MI

1998 Ducati 996 Factory Superbike!
Aprilia December 16, 2015 posted by

Under the Tree – 2001 Aprilia RS50

Stylin’ as a pit bike or unlicensed starter, the RS50 looks for all the world like the turn-of-the-century RS125, or if you squint, an RS250.  Not really built for serious fun, though it does have an aluminum frame and 17 inch wheels.

20151215 2001 aprilia rs50 right front

2001 Aprilia RS50 for sale on eBay

20151215 2001 aprilia rs50 left

Running an engine 0.3 cc less than the limit, the RS50 stays in the moped category.  Though generally restricted to 30 mph, unrestricted versions are capable of a little over 60 mph, better fun.  The Dell-Orto carburetor and disk brakes are hopeful for a larger machine in the future, but this one is perfect for the neighb or the pits.

20151215 2001 aprilia rs50 binnacle

20151215 2001 aprilia rs50 right fairing

Likely owned by a racer or an Aprilia fan, this RS50 is in nice shape with just a hint of hangar rash here and there.  Showing a low 1,700 miles, it’s just hard to rack up the miles hugging the shoulder.  From the eBay auction:

2001 Aprilia RS-50 with only 1767 miles.

Completely stock and in mint condition. Oil injection.

New Pirelli’s, tuned, and serviced.

No work needed: This is a turn-key bike with clean, clear, street-legal title.

Collector quality!

 

20151215 2001 aprilia rs50 left front

20151215 2001 aprilia rs50 right seat

Still warm enough for a test ride, only a couple of hours northwest of NYC.  Just the thing for the ( future ) sportbike nut on your Christmas list…

-donn

Under the Tree – 2001 Aprilia RS50
Moto Guzzi December 14, 2014 posted by

Gentleman’s Express: 1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS

1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS L side

Moto Guzzi is famous for manufacturing quirky, long-legged sports machines like this Daytona RS. The Daytona featured Guzzi’s 992cc four-valve, SOHC engine that was also found in the bizarrely-styled Centauro. Fans fast Moto Guzzi’s from the 1990’s are probably most familiar with the Sport 1100, the lower-spec, lower-cost version of this machine that was fitted with the bigger two-valve pushrod motor. The fuel-injected engine had a higher, 9,000rpm rev-limit as shown on the white-faced tach but the powerband reportedly featured a frustrating flat-spot at 5,000rpm, right where you’d expect to find yourself on the road. This flat-spot was exacerbated by the standard, not-particularly-slick Guzzi five-speed gearbox that made it difficult to simply ride around the problem.

1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS Dash

While the frame and chassis were big improvements compared to earlier Moto Guzzis, by the late 90’s, the rapid pace of sportbike evolution had left them in the dust and the Daytona was too heavy, too clunky, and too slow to keep up with the new kids on the block. Ducati’s sadomasochistic sex appeal and cornering poise allowed it to compete against the Japanese but, compared to its direct rivals, the Daytona RS was really a “slow, old bus.”

With stable handling, good brakes, high-end suspension components, and a generally epic engine, it wasn’t a total loss though. Dripping with character and blessed with a booming exhaust, the Daytona RS was more of a GT and less of a raw sportbike. A flawed masterpiece for sunny morning rides through the canyons while you hold the bike a gear low to keep the revs ahead of that annoying flat-spot, riding a bike that makes you feel special.

1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS R side Engine

This Daytona isn’t perfect, but looks to be well cared-for example and includes some interesting features, and the fact that it needs a bit of cosmetic attention wouldn’t bother me, as it’d be a chance to go back to a more traditional eagle logo on the tank. While the bike originally was available with a passenger pad and pillion pegs, this bike’s solo tail is possibly for the best: passenger accommodations were supposedly very poor…

The bike features head-guards, although I’ve never seen this particular, abbreviated style before. On two-valve Guzzis, these actually do more to protect the spark plug leads than the heads themselves, allowing victims of low-speed crashes to get back on the road running on both cylinders. The four-valve engine’s plugs are more recessed, but the guards should still protect the heads themselves in a crash.

1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS L Termi

The sound of any uncorked Guzzi twin is truly epic, and the genuine Termignoni pipes fitted should give this Daytona the ability to shatter windows from blocks away.

I’m curious about those front brakes: they look like six-piston calipers. The bike was originally equipped with the standard package of Goldline four-piston Brembos common to many Italian bikes of the era, although the Italians are notorious for fitting non-standard bits partway through a production run, so perhaps these are original?

1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS FI Detail

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS

1536 original miles, clean title with paper work, I was told by a collector that only 308 were made. The bike is in very nice condition, runs extremely strong, but will need to be repainted due to the fact it was dropped over in the back of a truck and has some scratches and 2 indentations in the tank. The turn signal are tucked under the tail fairing, but are still there. This is the solo seat version with a dual Termignoni carbon fiber exhaust system. The motorcycle has just been serviced and will be getting new fork seals before this auction is over.

There are two days left on the auction with no takers yet at the $6,000 starting bid. While the $12,000 Buy It Now price might seem steep for a 90’s Guzzi, this bike shouldn’t be confused with its more common two-valve sibling: the Daytona RS is really the ultimate incarnation of the spine-framed Guzzis. Although this example has a few minor cosmetic issues, the low miles and general quality of the bike make it a tempting place to start if you’re looking to complete your collection with one of the best-looking Guzzis of the era.

-tad

1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS R side

Yamaha November 2, 2014 posted by

Get it before it freezes: 1992 Yamaha TZR250RS in Minnesota

TZR250RS_2

Let’s face it: in many parts of the country, summer is long over. Unless you live in Phoenix or LA, you might have already winterized your ride. Fall probably doesn’t offer too many fine riding days in several states, and winter is on the way. I view Minnesota in that group. Meaning no offense the the denizens of the 10,000 lakes variety, but that particular state will soon be one big block of ice. Therefore, if you are lusting after a TZR250RS, now is the time to act. Wait too long and this one might be locked in a glacier until spring thaw.

TZR250RS_13

1992 Yamaha TZR250RS for sale on eBay

TZR250RS_15

The TZR250RS – also known as the 3XV model in Yamaha parlance – consists of a 90 degree v-twin, fed with reed valve induction and twin Mikuni flatslide carbs. Throw in a close-ratio gearbox with a dry clutch, add triple disks all around, hold the beast up with decent, modern suspension and you are left with a sub 280 lb (dry) rocket that will corner with the best. As this example is a Japanese spec bike intended for the home market, expect a restricted output of approximately 45 HP. Performance increases between 30% and 50% are possible through de-restriction and classic two stroke mods and add-ons.

TZR250RS_12

From the seller:
Bid to buy this legendary 1992 Yamaha TZR250RS!
Only made for 2 years, and only 500 produced each year
Japanese non-export RS model
Hand-ported flatside carbs, factory dry clutch, stock airbox, stock pipes
This is the closest 2-stroke to a true GP bike- like a TZ, but manageable for the street

TZR250RS_3

The seller claims this to be a 8.5 out of 10 – however the detailed pictures do show evidence of a tip over. Both left and right bar ends show some rash, as do pegs, brake lever and possibly the tail section. None of that appears to be anything more than cosmetic, however. We do not see a lot of TZR250RS models in the US, so this is a bit of a rarity. I cannot confirm the exact numbers produced (perhaps TZR aficionados can help out), but we do not see these nearly as often as NSRs, RGs or RGVs. Check out the auction here (still below $3k at the time of this writing), and be sure and let us know what you think. Good Luck!

MI

Get it before it freezes: 1992 Yamaha TZR250RS in Minnesota