Posts by tag: 750

Ducati March 24, 2019 posted by

Small Batch: 1989 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca

Behold the mighty Ducati F1 special edition “Laguna Seca.” Essentially a factory hot rod based on the F1 (a 750cc version of the Tourist Trophy), the Laguna Seca shared a special tier with the two other limited edition models, the Santamonica and the Montjuich. All of the special models were named after race tracks where a Ducati rider pulled a first place rabbit out of a hat. In this case, it was Marco “Lucky” Lucchinelli prevailing at the 1986 Battle of the Twins (BOTT) event at the famed California track. The Laguna Seca was closest to the Montjuich in spec, the differences being largely related to the intended target audience: North America. As such, changes were basically limited to emissions and noise controls. The rest is pure 1980s Ducati goodness; rough and ready, light and lean. The seller has written (or copied?) a good story of the Laguna Seca (and the F1 model in general), so I will let him pick up the tale:

1989 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for sale on eBay

From the seller:
1989 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca

Frame no. ZDM750LS*750059*
Engine no. ZDM750L1*750194

Less than 300 examples made

Only 6,500 miles from new

Considered by many enthusiasts to be the last of the ‘real’ Ducatis, the race-styled 750 F1 first appeared in 1985. Ducati had already enjoyed considerable success with its Pantah-derived F2 racers in FIM Formula 2 racing – Tony Rutter winning the championship four-times running between 1981 and 1984 – so a ‘750’ version was the logical next step.

First seen in prototype form in endurance races in 1983, the F1’s 748cc engine was the latest in a long line of stretches applied to the original 500c ‘belt drive’ Desmo unit that had first appeared in the Pantah in 1979 – a street-legal updated version of the mid-’80s TT1. A markedly over-square design of 88×61.5mm bore/stroke, the F1 engine produced around 60bhp and functioned as a stressed element within the frame, the swinging arm pivoting in the rear of the gearbox. Clearly visible above the deliberately cut away fairing sides, the aforementioned frame attracted almost as much attention as the engine: a trellis of short, straight tubes, it has formed the basis of every road-going Ducati since, as well as the first Desmosedici Moto GP racers. In the fashion of the day, the F1 came with a 16-inch front wheel, while braking power was provided by state-of-the-art triple Brembos. The stock F1 was complemented by a series of hand-built, limited edition, race replicas – Montjuich, Santamonica and Laguna Seca – the last inspired by Marco “Lucky” Lucchinelli’s famous ‘Battle of the Twins’ race victory at Daytona in 1986. Today the evocatively named F1 and its derivatives are highly prized by Ducati collectors.

Much like the Montjuich, the Laguna Seca came with bigger Dell’Orto carburetors, higher compression ratio, bigger valves, and straight-cut primary drive gears. And talk of 95bhp at 10,000rpm! But unlike the Montjuich, it came with a larger, quieter muffler.

There were some small changes between the two bikes, namely in the Laguna’s parts from the new Paso. The delta-spoked one-piece 16-inch Oscam wheels and the brake discs, but not the four-piston ‘racing’ Brembo front calipers, came from the 750 Paso, as did the wider front fender. Other changes included a ‘Lucky’ signature steel gas tank, revised foot peg bracketry and a plastic rear sub-fender attached to the swing arm. Most Laguna Secas came with a solo seat and were built in limited numbers (perhaps as few as 296.)

Not a lot of history about this particular example, although the read is a good one (reminds me of Ian Faloon). The only point of note I see on this bike is the non-standard Ohlins external shock reservoir strapped to the left side of the iconic trestle frame chassis (original shock was a Marzocchi PVS 4). Any other changes are unknown with the facts given, and with only 3 pictures to work with there are many questions left unanswered. But with only 6,500 miles, this beauty is undoubtedly clean and very rare. I’m not sure if proper etiquette deems we refer to this as the WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca, nee Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca, nee Laguna Seca Raceway, but the connection is very clear. Also clear is the asking price: a not insignificant $24,900. That is a bit higher than we usually see these bikes offered – although the seller appears open to a lesser figure – so if you’re in the market for one of these beautiful and rare model Pantahs you should act quickly. Check it out here, and then jump back to the comments and share your thoughts on the F1 model Ducatis: are you a fan? Good Luck!!

MI

Suzuki February 20, 2019 posted by

Slingshot, engage: Road-worn 1988 Suzuki GSX-R 750

Slingshot Gixxers have gained value over the last couple years on the strength of their reputation as basically the earliest available fully modern street legal sportbike. Short of an astronomically expensive RC30, a late ’80s GSX-R is about as close as you’ll get to a vintage bike that rides like something from this century. Beyond that, they carry a mystique born of their world-beating pace when new. The awe they inspired when they debuted has evolved into full-on legend status.

1988 Suzuki GSX-R 750 for sale on eBay

With the help of redesigned fairings and suspension, 17-inch rubber and a new rack of flatslide Mikunis, the ’88 Gixxer burst on the scene with technology and pace that was unheard of at the time, especially for something so light. Back then, the lack of water cooling didn’t raise any eyebrows, though Suzuki did have to get creative with oil cooling to keep the things running properly. The 750cc inline four commanded 112 horses in street trim, and the bodywork had been slickened to reduce the mill’s effort.

This 1988 Suzuki GSX-R 750 is in unrestored, original condition, except for some exhaust and airbox mods. Whereas many of these bikes are either hammered or babied, this one strikes a nice balance of looking like a bike that was well looked-after, but ridden as it should have been and stored without huge regard for the cosmetics. If you’re looking for a rider and you don’t care about looks too much, seek no more. If you’re looking for an easy restoration that doesn’t require a nut-and-bolt re-work, here’s your steed. The seller is quite proud that the bike rides on its original tires, but we’d have those suckers swapped out in a heartbeat.

From the eBay listing:

1988 GSX-R 750 Slingshot. This is a true Survivor, never been touched with the exception of the exhaust. Runs and performs perfectly. I do have the original air box also. Original tires that are in excellent condition for their age. The tires tell the story of this bike, it has been rode less than 500 miles a year. Some of the clear is peeling from decales (normal for the age of the bike). Right fairing has crack by lamp (see pic) and solo seat has small crack in rear, quick fix if you want but, I would leave it alone as bike is a survivor! Hate to see this bike go but, must make room and that is the only reason while it is going up for sale! I will listen to any reasonable offers!
Also bike comes with really nice matching Suzuki jacket cost was $550.00 when bought! Email any question you might have and also see another listing of mine on a 1989 Suzuki GSX-R 1100 that is also up for sale!

At $5,000, the asking price is right at what Hagerty says an excellent example should go for. With fairly low miles, great patina and rising interest in these machines, he might not be too far off.

Slingshot, engage: Road-worn 1988 Suzuki GSX-R 750
Kawasaki February 16, 2019 posted by

Old School Awesome: 1982 Kawasaki GPz 750

There comes a point and time when nearly everything becomes valued – nostalgically if not financially. Such just might be the case with today’s find, a cherry 1982 Kawasaki GPz750. In the early 1980s the GPz was generally a top-dog kind of sport bike. Pitted against Honda’s CB and Suzuki’s GS models, the GPz looked and acted like a sportbike. With an air cooled inline four, double overhead cams and a brace of Mikuni constant velocity carbs, the 750 could pump out 80 HP – good for nipping into the 11s in the 1/4 mile. By today’s standards this is all relatively tame – and old tech such as air cooling, carburetors and twin shocks seems laughable. But it was good enough to put a young fellow by the name of Wayne Rainey on the top step of the AMA Superbike championship on a Muzzy-prepped bike and cement the GPz as a sporting weapon with serious intent.

Old School Awesome: 1982 Kawasaki GPz 750 for sale on eBay

1982 was the first year of the 750, as both the GPz550 and GPz1100 were introduced a year earlier. 1982 was also a bit of a one year only model, based on the older architecture. Follow on years found a revised fairing setup (from quarter fairing to half), as well as the introduction to Uni-Trak, Kawasaki’s rising rate linkage, single rear shock setup. Fuel injection was also on the horizon (the 1100 introduced it to the series), but liquid cooling would have to wait for the introduction of the revolutionary Ninja model. So while one can view the GPz as a mass-produced motorcycle and therefore likely never to become truly rare, the combination of a one year only configuration and the survivor status does elevate this one into something worth considering.

From the seller:
1982 KAWASAKI GPZ 750 , I have the original stock seat and rear shocks, this bike runs like new, I Just installed Michelin Pilots front and rear, the bike has been freshly serviced and a Dyno Jet carburetor kit installed to enhance the Horse power with the period correct Bassani exhaust. The bike has been kept in doors it’s whole life and has zero cosmetic issue’s. It gets attention where ever I ride. they made this model only 1 year so these are very rare to be seen in show room condition.

I bought brand new spare brake pads, clutch kit, gaskets, spare starter motor etc . these are included in the sale. every thing electrical works perfectly, I just freshened up the battery with a Yuasa OEM original. so it’s ready to ride from California to New York.

Most GPzs have lived multiple lives. Purchased new by aggressive riders, many found their way to the racetrack in amateur and privateer formats. Those that stayed on the streets passed through a few owners, with the price likely dropping with each change. That quickly put these bikes into the financial reach of younger riders, driving up insurance rates everywhere. Not all were flogged and forgotten, but enough were to make finding a good example difficult today. And this particular example is no garage queen – with 20k on the clocks (eBay advert lists 18k) this bike has been ridden. But there is life yet in that robust motor, and all the appeal of the “arrest me red” paint still applies. It may be on the far side of 30 something, but viscerally this bike still has all its mojo.

Located in the sunny state of California (which bodes very well for issues such as rust and corrosion), this 1982 GPz750 is looking for a new home. The paint looks good despite the age, and there have been few modifications. The aftermarket exhaust is not stock, but a Bassani is not the worst pipe you could image for this application. There are a number of spares that come along with the purchase, which is a good thing from a maintenance point of view. Parts are still readily available for the mechanicals, although cosmetic trim might be getting scarce. Fortunately, all of those pieces are still attached. Check it out here. If you are of a certain age, you KNOW you wanted one of these. Maybe you had one (lucky bastard), and now miss it. Was this the bike you regretted selling all those years ago? Jump over to the Comments section and share your stories. Good Luck!!

MI

Old School Awesome: 1982 Kawasaki GPz 750
Suzuki July 10, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: Gorgeous One-of-500 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750RR

Update 7.31.2018: Price reduced to $18,000 USD or best offer. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

The formula for out-of-the box racers has ever been simple: take the street bike, throw in more air and fuel, nip, tuck and trim, and generally make everything less comfortable. Then, cut production, raise the price and call it a special edition. Yamaha is in the midst of making history with its unbelievable R1M, but before all that came the 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750RR.

It weighed less than the normal version, and went back to the original Gixxer’s longer-stroke motor. It was aimed at amateurs and club racers, but could be run as a straight-up streetbike. Not that you’d be able to stomach the agony for more than a few minutes at a stretch, but that didn’t matter, did it?

Today’s featured listing is a gorgeous example of the model, despite having covered an almost alarming 15,500 kilometers. It’s one of a very few that got imported to South Africa, which is where it resides. It’s an early bike at number 47.

From the seller:

For sale, this very rare and collectable 1989 Suzuki GSX/R750RR Limited Edition, race replica. Only 500 produced worldwide! This is number 47. Excellent original condition. Even though this is a Japanese model, it has been fully de-restricted and makes full power i.e. Carbs and Jetting, Exhaust, Ignition module.Completely original except for de-restriction. Perfectly maintained, Never raced, Never dropped, Unrestored. Recently serviced and all fluids changed

For avid collectors only. No chancers please! Call Robbie at : 082 4100787 or e-mail directly to boss@bolandbikes.com. R250 – 280K Reasonable offers considered.

The price is listed is now $18k USD obo, which is before you pay to import it, assuming you don’t live in South Africa. These things are on their way up, and the way Japanese bikes have been trending, that doesn’t seem poised to turn around any time soon.

Featured Listing: Gorgeous One-of-500 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750RR
Yamaha March 18, 2018 posted by

Wild Kingdom – 1974 Yamaha TZ750

No less a rider than Giacomo Agostini abdicated his dynasty at MV Agusta when Yamaha introduced the 4-cylinder 2-stroke 700cc racebike. He won the 1974 Daytona 200 with it, and its 750cc progeny went on to a 12-year run on the beach.  This newly restored example has matching numbers and a nicely documented race history.

1974 Yamaha TZ750 for sale on eBay

As ever, specs for a race machine are a liar’s poker affair.  The engine had a nasty tone even at idle and was good for 140hp at full song.  The frame was a twin downtube arrangement and the swingarm was all new, spread at the rear wheel but converging at the bottom pivot and top where the shock mounted, the Monocross went on to bigger and better.  Initially a pair of RD350 race engines joined at the hip, the TZ750 was more purpose-built, water cooled though the crankcase bristles with fins.  Expansion chambers mostly taking the path of least resistance – except for the left which wound around and through the frame.  Triple hydraulic disk brakes provided the retro-force.

The owner has treated this TZ750 to a rare level of restoration, both mechanically and cosmetically.  Just part of the eBay auction’s comments :

This bike has The Holy Trinity for the most discerning collectors and enthusiasts: Provenance, Rarity and Condition! What you see here is the culmination of a 10 year, no cost spared, meticulous frame-off restoration. The resto was done on a complete, running, period correct, and ‘as raced’ TZ from the 1970’s. Amazingly, during the bike’s campaign both here and abroad, it appears to have never been crashed or blown-up. The exact Factory paint scheme and colors were precisely replicated from Factory original. The Shipping Invoice (see pic, courtesy of NATS Forum) shows #159 being a genuine 1st batch racer. There were a total of 219 TZ750A’s built;  few remain today.

Rather too specialized for a hobbyist, exercising the TZ-750 will take commitment.  Maintenance hours will be more numerous than “flight” hours.  But this race veteran is sorted and shouldn’t bring too many surprises.  As the owner states:

The bike was built to run, but assembled primarily for display and ease of cleaning.

Successful to the point of domination, the TZ-750 will likely be invited back to any event it attends.  The fairing’s well-drawn lines are sure easy on the eyes.  Mechanically, it’s better than new – improvements to the exhaust system made and impossibly light brake disks, with blank livery as shipped.  Likely never to turn another hot lap, the velvet ropes beckon.  But once photographed, the years of racing history are in the books, and the soundtrack from a demonstration lap or two is all that’s missing…

-donn

Wild Kingdom – 1974 Yamaha TZ750
Laverda March 10, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SFC

The 1974 Laverda SFC is the high-water mark for 1970s Italian sportbikes, representing the pinnacle of Laverda’s race bike development and the final SFC offered in the states, as the US mandated left-side shift after September of ’74.

The Laverda’s big parallel twin made about 75 horsepower, heady grunt for an era where 100 ponies was still the stratosphere. Changes between ’73 and ’74 included new 36mm carbs and a dual-disk front brake setup.

Quite apart from the power, the Laverda was incredibly scarce, light suave. It is the antithesis of the Japanese race replicas, where weight and power hold sway over aesthetics.

This SFC has been updated tastefully and restored, and presents in near-showroom condition. Moto Borgotaro has a reputation for bringing the finest quality machines to market, and this SFC is no exception. The iconic orange paint, delicate and beautiful aluminum tank and signature bullet fairing are all without blemishes and the running gear is free of spots, stains or drips.

From the seller:

THIS BIKE’S STORY

—By Ian Falloon (Falloon Report October 2014)

Although it was always a limited edition, even after 1973 when the factory stopped racing the 750 twin, the SFC continued, incorporating many of the developments learnt from three successful years of racing.

The 750 SFC was thus a true racing machine, built to the highest standards, that could be ridden on the street and a limited edition replica of a factory racer.

Racing experience during 1973 saw the development of a new frame and this made its way to the 750 SFC in 1974, further distancing this model from the production 750 SF2

Representative of the second US specification batch (with numbers between 17110-17166), we introduce you to #17148.
One of the most significant updates for 1974 was the pair of Dell’Orto PHB 36 carburetors, without accelerator pumps. A racing two-into-one megaphone (as on this example) accentuated the lean race replica profile, and the claimed power for the 1974 750 SFC was 75 horsepower at 7,500 rpm.

A two-into-one reverse cone exhaust system was an option on the 750 SFC. This exhaust system only fits the SFC frame.

1974 LAVERDA SFC DETAILS
Frame #17148
Engine #17148
Dell’Orto PHB 36mm carburetors
Borrani aluminum wheel rims
Ceriani suspension
Electron rear hub and sprocket carrier
High quality aluminum replica gas tank
Nippon Denso instruments
Smaller European taillight
Verlicchi twin cable throttle
Completely serviced

www.motoborgotaro.com

Visit Moto Borgotaro’s site for details on how to inquire about this fantastic piece of race replica history.

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SFC
Norton February 22, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 2015 Norton 961 Commando PLUS 1967 Norton Atlas!

Update 5.21.2018: SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

When you think of the most storied marques in motorcycling history, what do you think of? The Japanese Big Four have certainly been dominant on the racing scene as of late, with Italy holding their own throughout the ages. But it was the English brands that led the way to greatness, with the great Norton conglomerate – initially launched in 1898 – standing as the iconic representation of what a performance motorcycle should be. From the cafe racer scene to the mighty TT street races to doing the ton, Nortons have been the mainstay of cool and an unmistakable status symbol for those in the know.

Surviving through the rapid changes of the 1950s and 1960s – changing hands to become Associated Motorcycles (AMC – including brands AJS, Matchless, Francis-Barnett and James) in 1953, Norton thrived through the 1960s and into the 70s and even took over BSA and Triumph in an all-British consolidation move. Unfortunately, the bottom dropped out of the UK motorcycle market shortly thereafter, driving Norton (as well as the Norton-Villers-Triumph company) under. Through the 1990s the Norton name was kept alive by enthusiasts and restoration shops, changing hands a few more times. US-based restorer Kenny Dreer created the first iteration of the 961 Commando, but the Norton name was eventually re-aquired and launched in the UK with the resources to make a difference. This Donnington-era version of Norton placed the fantastic 961 Commando into solid production, a beautiful recreation of the Norton glory days faithfully updated with current, cutting edge components. Today’s special featured listing is a 2015 Norton 961 Commando, but also includes a well-preserved 750 Atlas model from 1967.

Featured Listing:
Buy a 2015 Norton 961 Commando
and get a 1976 Norton 750 Atlas for free!

Let’s start out with the modern bike first: 2015 Norton 961 Commando. The roots of the 961 Commando starts across the pond in the US with Kenny Dreer, a famed Norton restoration expert. As the rights to Norton moved back to the UK, the 961 was evolved and redesigned (virtually every part, so they say). And lest you think this was just the offshoot of a backyard dreamer, post 2008 variants of the 961 involved serious design and development; none other than Pierre Terblanche (of Ducati fame) counted his name on the Norton employee roster.

Powering the Commando is an air-cooled parallel twin with 270-degree crank pins. Bores are Nikasil coated to improve sealing, ensuring power and longevity. The feel and sound emulate the past, but the power delivery through a modern 5-speed tranny is all of the current day. Top shelf Brembos shed velocity, while Ohlins take up suspension duty front and rear. With about 80 HP on tap, this reincarnated Commando holds its own against the Monster or Suspersport lineup from Ducati while exuding more than a little British soul.

This was a $20k machine when new; exclusivity goes hand in hand with a high price tag.

From the seller:
2015 Norton Commando SE 1 of 50, only 566 miles, just in from California, beautiful condition, Dominator pipes, recalibrated ECU, all recalls and TSBs performed.


Putting aside the new Commando, let’s step back some 50+ years; that is when the Norton Atlas first came into being. Acting as a precursor to the Commando of the late 1960s, the Atlas featured a 750cc parallel twin housed in a fabled featherbed frame. What makes the Atlas most interesting is the target market: America. Initial units were exclusively developed for export to the US. For the day, the Atlas was a significant motorcycle – all 55 HP, four-speed trans, limited suspension and drum brakes of it. Today these capabilities seem modest, but there is clear DNA in those bones.

This particular Atlas has but 8,000 miles, has been restored to what appears to be a very good standard, and has some star power as formerly being in the collection of Ewan McGregor. Not too shabby as far as a two-fer goes!

From the seller:
1967 Norton Atlas 750, restored and in very nice condition, 8K original miles, runs and rides and is well sorted. Former Ewan McGregor private collection bike.

So here is the deal: Buy the ultra rare 961 Commando, and get the Atlas for free. Offers around $25,000 USD to be considered. The seller is willing to break up the pair for the right buyer, but is offering a pretty good discount for both. Drop Corey a note if you are serious: coreyallan01@hotmail.com Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 2015 Norton 961 Commando PLUS 1967 Norton Atlas!
Honda November 19, 2017 posted by

Oval-piston wonder: 1992 Honda NR

Back in the early ’90s, Honda was still known for pushing boundaries with build quality, poise and panache unrivaled among its competitors. Throughout the decade, Big Red claimed some truly great accomplishments that dragged motorcycling further toward the coming millennium. But in ’92, Honda spat out one of its craziest street creations on record, the 750cc V4 NR.

The NR was not a homologation model as much as it was a celebration of the brand’s grand prix and endurance racers of the late 1970s and 1980s. It sported oval pistons that allowed eight valves per cylinder and required eight connecting rods, for an engine design that resembled a four-cylinder V8.

The bikes, which are heavy by today’s standards and pump out a now-modest 114 hp, rarely change hands, so any opportunity at one should be taken seriously. This 1992 Honda NR sports 5,000 miles, a lot for a bike of which just 300 examples were built. It appears to show some wear accumulated along the way.

From the eBay listing:

If you are looking at this motorcycle, you know what it is. Ready to ride or show. Outstanding condition., , The Honda NR (New Racing) is a v-four motorcycle engine series started by Honda in 1979 with the 500cc NR500 Grand Prix racer that used oval pistons. This road going NR750 uses elliptical piston with curved long sides. These bikes are rarely for sale. Great value for money., Will be sold as is off the container with all VAT and Duties paid and entered onto the NOVA system, due instock appx end feb 2018, SELLING WHAT WE ARE HAPPY TO RIDE OURSELVES,UK-WORLDWIDE DELIVERY, over 150 more bikes available on the MOTORCYCLEGIANT website.

The bike is for sale through an English dealer that is importing it from Japan. Under most circumstances, that could spell a deal breaker, as there are much easier ways to get your hands on a a bike. In the case of the NR, though, the waiting and paperwork will be well worth the struggle.