Posts by tag: 750

Ducati March 11, 2021 posted by

Bleautiful: 1988 Ducati Paso 750

Welcome to one of the most polarizing models in Ducati history. Perhaps second to only the 749/999 series, the Paso was a little bit like the un-Ducati. With full bodywork resembling more of a a monolithic, monochromatic sport tourer, the Paso took styling in an entirely new direction. Thankfully under the covers the DNA and performance of the F1 Pantah series remained, ensuring lots of lumpy, torquey goodness.

1988 Ducati Paso 750 for sale on eBay

Strip away the Paso’s fully enclosed bodywork (purported to vent away engine heat in a controlled manner) and you would essentially be looking at a Ducati 750 F1 mill with a reversed rear (upright) cylinder head to allow for both barrels to breathe through an automotive-styled carb between the vee. This also simplified the rear exhaust routing somewhat, although the collector is a work of art. The chassis is not quite what you would expect from a company that built round-tube trellis frames for decades, but all covered up in bodywork you would never know the Paso is based on a square tubing cantilever arrangement utilizing the engine as a stressed member. And speaking of bodywork, you may note similarities between the Paso and the Bimota DB1 – after all, they were both the brain child of designer Massimo Tamburini. All in all, the package worked well, yet was a significant departure from the classic lines of pervious Ducatis. The Paso was loved fervently by some, while hated by others.

From the seller:
Excellent example of the Ducati that is credited for saving the brand from disappearing, desinged by Massimo Tamburini, the legend behind Bimota, Ducati and MV Agusta. Paso 750 is powered by 748 cc Desmodue engine, the same Pantah motor from the Ducati 750 F1. Engine starts easy, runs great without overheating or smoking. Originally powered by a Weber carburator which was often the cause of high engine temps especially in traffic, this Paso has been upgraded to a Keihin 39mm flat slide. It currently retains OEM exhaust but an upgrade to an aftermarket system will allow for much better breathing motor.

The heads have been upgraded to M750 which increase the valve adjustment intervals while offering improved valve guides as the originals had a tendency to wear out rather quickly. The cam belts were replaced approximately 3 years ago and the valves were adjusted at the same time. There is around 2600 miles on the oil and filter. All lights and signals as well as the horn work perfect. Even the clock!

The front forks with anti-dive technology were very advanced for their time. Swing arm is lightweight alloy with concentric chain adjuster. This Paso rides on factory original Marvic aluminum wheels, tires have around 3500 miles but still have plenty of thread and perform fine in the canyons.

More from the seller:
Factory blue color is a rare find for a Paso, with some sources claiming only 50 or so were painted in this color. This Paso has been completely refinished by previous owner with correct decals applied and cleared over to prevent them from fading or pealing. Bike looks like new!

Keep in mind this is a 33 year old bike and it will have few quirks and needs. The fuel gauge works but it tends to bounce a bit, especially if the fuel level is at or below half mark. There is a very minor oil leak coming from what appears to be an oil pan gasket. Due to the conversion to Keihin flat slide, the choke has been disconnected.

Sold with a clean California title. Registration is expiring on 3/10/21 and was changed to non-operational to avoid any back fees. The Paso is sold “as is, where is”. In case of shipping, it will be responsibility of the buyer. I will work with the shipper to accomodate their time schedule. Please make arrangements and ask questions before buying.

The Paso offered here is a great combination of updated pricey mechanical components and cosmetic refresh. The motor is a very desireable Pantah mill that is gaining traction with the collectors. It is rare, it is cool and its very fun bike to ride. Overall this motorcycle is an inexpensive entry into vintage Ducati world!

The Paso lineup has yet to see the light of day when it comes to collectors and appreciating values. With 35 years gone since introduction, there are signs that some of that reticence is beginning to change. To find an exceptionally clean and original anything 33 years later makes it more rare than the day it rolled off the showroom floor. And sadly many of these models – after dropping in value – fell into the hands of those who could not (or would not) give them the care and maintenance they deserved.

To be clear, this particular Paso is not strictly a bone-stock example. The seller does a good job outlining the mods made, and the switch from the stock Weber carb is a popular one (Ducati eventually introduced fuel injection in later models), although pictures of the carb throat sans filter make me nervous. The rest of the bike looks used but clean, and readers should note that it has travelled nearly 24,000 miles. Mileage is not an issue with these models provided proper maintenance has been adhered to, but if you are seeking a zero mile bike look elsewhere. There are lots of good photos provided by the seller, so check out all of the details here. On which side of the Paso debate do you fall? Unloved, or unloveable? Let us know in the comments. Good Luck!!

MI

Bleautiful: 1988 Ducati Paso 750
Ducati March 1, 2021 posted by

New-ish Old School: 1986 Ducati 750 F1

The Ducati 750 F1 is about as old school cool as you can get. Devoid of any wizardry found on more modern motorcycles, the F1 is a basic bare-knuckle brawler with fancy footwork. To call this a race bike for the street would certainly be accurate, given the underlying DNA came directly from the factory TT1 and TT2 racers. Sporting a similar trellis frame and utilizing a Pantah-era engine punched out to 748cc that were both first utilized in the TT1 racer, the F1 offers a no-nonsense riding experience that is raw and pure.

1986 Ducati 750 F1 for sale on eBay

Both the TT1 and the TT2 racers were effective weapons at such iconic places as the Isle of Man. The F1 followed in those footsteps – such that there were three “special edition” models of the bike named after famous racing circuits such as Montjuich (Spain), Stanta Monica (Italy) and Laguna Seca (United States). With about 70 HP on tap, the F1 was not so much a rocket ship as an adequately fast – but extremely nimble – racing sled. With no anti-lock brakes, no anti-wheelie control, no anti-stall device, no traction control and no quick shifter, this relic is missing everything that helps make racing motorcycles fast today. But what remains is the essence of motorcycling, distilled down to only what needs to be there. Creature comforts? Sorry, not on this bike. If it doesn’t make you faster or the bike lighter, it simply isn’t there. THAT is the beauty of the F1 series, in a nutshell.

From the seller:
Selling one of my 750 F1’s, bike got a new paint job, new belts, overall in great shape. Comes with set of original turn signals and a few more parts. Was last on the street probably 20 years ago when I bought it, see manufacturing date from tires. I had the bike for 3 years and only rode it twice, restored it to what you see and now selling it. Needs new tires and the turn signals which I installed are not connected yet, everything else works and bike starts cold and warm very well. The last 4 pictures show the bike as it looked when I got it, from the original ad when I bought the bike: “Rare 1986 Ducati F1B. Super trap tail pipe, repaired gauge mount, last ridden Donner Pass Hwy 40 hill climb 2000. Fresh oil, new battery, petcock eliminated, runs good. Liquidating collection.”.
More information can also be found at raresportbikesforsale.com when you search for Ducati 750 F1B.
Happy to answer any additional question.

The seller is correct in that we at RSBFS have seen a lot of these F1 machines (and more specialized variants) posted on these pages. In fact, this exact bike graced our pages in its earlier tricolore guise back in 2017. Comments were not kind regarding the butchered paint job, and this seller has done a great job restoring the livery to former glory. Here is a link to find other F1s on RSBFS. Researching older posts offers a great way to learn more about the model, but can also help describe the rough historical value of these models over time. Those serious about a bike such as this F1 would be well advised to do their homework.

This particular example looks pretty good in the pictures. It shows a nicely painted F1 in the standard Italian tricolore scheme. Mileage is low (4,200 claimed), however given that this bike had been raced it is possible that the speedo drive has been disconnected at some point in its life. There appear to be other minor foibles that may need to be sorted here as well. Sharp eyes will also spot some non-stock additions, including modifications to the left-side lowers as well as the tail section. But such is the nature of a 35 year old racer that aspired to be a street bike. There is no claim of “all original, zero miles” here, and the seller has been open about the efforts undertaken to bring this classic back to the status it deserves. Bidders have agreed, with decent traffic and action up to $7,300 at the time of writing. Quite a few watchers are standing by, so expect a lot more bidding once the reserve has been met. Check out all of the details and pics on this auction here. Good Luck!!

MI

New-ish Old School: 1986 Ducati 750 F1
MV Agusta February 18, 2021 posted by

Different Name Same Game: 2002 MV Agusta Senna 750

The name Ayrton Senna evokes some crazy raw F1 emotion. Arguably the greatest F1 driver of the modern era (uh, Schumacher and Hamilton excepted), Senna was in his day the highest paid driver and an international superstar. He parlayed some of that wealth and fame – not to mention his close personal relationship with motorcycle magnate Claudio Castiglioni known for the rebirth of Ducati and MV Agusta – to create a funding opportunity for his charity foundation looking after impoverished children in his native Brazil. Senna was a huge motorcycle enthusiast, and lent his name to Senna tribute models for both Ducati and MV Agusta. Today’s bike is a 2002 model MV Agusta Senna F4, based on the very successful re-launch of the MV Agusta brand.

2002 MV Agusta Senna 750 for sale on eBay

The F4 hit the press in 1998 as a 1999 model. Displacing 750cc (749.5cc to be exact) and sporting some novel engineering in the heads and intake runners (courtesy of Ferrari F1 involvement), the original engine developed 126 HP and was utilized in the Oro, the S, the 1+1 two-seater, and the Neiman Marcus Edition. It was not until 2002 that the EVO 2 spec engine was introduced – itself a product of a delayed SPR project – bumping power up to 137 HP, but at a lower redline. The Senna model was based on the EVO 2 spec, but was further blueprinted to allow for the full use of revs and then some: all the way to nearly 14,000 RPM. Festooned with the usual carbon fiber farkles, the black/gray/red Senna livery and unique number tag on the headstock, the Senna 750 was limited to 300 units worldwide.

From the seller:
2002 MV Agusta Senna in excellent condition. Number 218 of 300 made. Very rare. Clean NH title. Sold new by Fast -by- Ferrarci. Has Ferrarci risers, aftermarket LED tail light and rear fender eliminator, I have all parts removed as well as the accessories that came with the bike. (sport exhaust, sport chip, extra sprockets, factory cover) Runs and drives excellent, 3403 miles. I just have too much stuff!

In current markets Senna Editions are star-power bikes that come with exclusivity and some level of cachet. Originally conceived to be a funding vehicle for charity, today these are rare and collectible models worthy of note. We have seen several Senna models on these pages – both from Ducati and MV Agusta – and they always bring with them a stronger market than the base level bikes on which they were created. Such is the case with this model today.

Showing less than 3,500 miles and with some owner mods (original pieces reportedly come with the bike), this particular example looks clean from the photos provided. The red wheels highlight the single-sided swingarm stance, and the mods to the rear bodywork really show off the organ pipe shotgun exhaust. There are a number of watchers on this one, but nobody is piling onto the $7,000 USD opening ask. That is bargain money for a Senna Edition of any brand, however it remains to be seen where the reserve is set. There are a fair number of days remaining, so we may see some action on this one yet. Check out all of the details here. For those of you in more temperate climes, I believe that white stuff is known as snow/ice. Stay warm, stay safe, and Good Luck!!

MI

Different Name Same Game: 2002 MV Agusta Senna 750
Kawasaki August 18, 2020 posted by

Texas Tornado* – 1985 Kawasaki GPz 750 Turbo

Sorry not Colin Edwards, but a turbocharged Kawasaki from Texas – a sharp restoration of the classic 1985 model with sparkling cosmetics and performance mods.

1985 Kawasaki GPZ 750 Turbo for sale on eBay

Kawasaki came late to the gas-crisis turbo developments, but gave us the sportiest and least compromised model.  On boost the 738cc mill makes 112 hp and 73 ft.-lbs. torque, using fuel injection and just 7.8:1 compression.  The engine scoop hides the small turbocharger, which helped push the GPz through the traps at 136 mph.  GT style 18-inch wheels are fitted, along with air-adjustable suspension front and rear.  The frame is cold steel but the fairing is a hot and shapely red.

Too much time has elapsed to worry about ownership history on this Turbo, but the odo was apparently reset during the restoration.  Even with all the work done, the appearance is not far from stock.  The turbo in the exhaust system calms the normally noisy Supertrapp muffler.  Comments and a long list of updates from the eBay auction:

It has been tastefully modified, close to a resto-mod but not too much that its originality is lost. I have the original rear fender, grab rail and chain guard. Stock exhausts are being reproduced and you could make this bike factory original if desired. I also have the stock rear wheel, it is perfect with a near new tire.

Start stops and runs perfectly. This bike has won shows, it is show quality. It turns heads and always draws a crowd. This bike is no joke and it is blindingly fast and when the turbo hits you better be hanging on. It only has 3,500 miles on it since the complete rebuild.

Here is a rundown of what has been done –

810 KIT W/WISECO PISTONS

HTS10 TURBO WITH BILLET IMPELLER FROM EVERGREEN TURBO

K&N INTAKE

1.5″ BOOST PIPE

EXTERNAL BOV

RARE SUPERTRAPP EXHAUST – ADJUSTABLE TONE!

ADJUSTABLE WASTE GATE

ADJUSTABLE FUEL PUMP W/ GAUGE

NEW REWORKED INJECTORS

MRE UNDERCUT TRANSMISSION

NEW CLUTCH W/ HD SPRINGS

HYDRAULIC CLUTCH CONVERSION

NEW CLUTCH/BRAKE MASTER CYLS

BRAIDED CLUTCH/BRAKE LINES

FLOATING FRONT DISCS

NEW REAR DISC

PROGRESSIVE FORK SPRINGS

FFTP ANTI DIVE BLOCK OFF PLATES

PROGRESSIVE REAR SHOCK

5″WIDENED RR FACTORY WHEEL – NEW 160 RR TIRE

NEW MATCHING FRONT TIRE

SPEEDHUT GUAGES WITH MATCHING BOOST GAUGE

WORKING FACTORY BOOST GUAGE – LED BACKLIGHT UPGRADE

L.E.D. TURN SIGS W/L.E.D. FLASHER

L.E.D FACTORY WARNING LIGHTS

ZX7 MIRRORS

NEW ZERO GRAVITY WINDSCREEN

POLISHED SWING ARM AND WHEEL LIPS

CHROMED TURBO “WING”

CUSTOM RR FENDER DELETE (HAVE FACTORY FENDER)

2 STAGE PAINTED INNER FAIRING

RECENT FACTORY PAINT JOB w FACTORY DECALS

630 CHAIN CONVERSION

By the time all four Japanese manufacturers had their turbo models ready, OPEC ministers had peeked around the corner and calmed oil prices.  And insurers saw potential losses in all the leading-edge equipment aboard these bikes, dampening sales further with higher rates.  Still for a while the GPz 750 Turbo was the fastest bike in the showroom, and this one has been worked for even more power – while maintaining its great GPz looks.

-donn

Texas Tornado* – 1985 Kawasaki GPz 750 Turbo
Ducati February 18, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1986 Ducati 750 F1B

This Featured Listing is part of the The Edinger Ducati Collection. Thank you for supporting the site, David! -dc

The Ducati F1B is a very 1980s example of Ducati’s trademark trick — to take a race bike, stick lights on it, and see who bites. In most cases, the answer is damn near everyone, or at least everyone would, if the things were widely available. The 1986 Ducati F1B is a 76-horsepower race repilca that aped bikes Duc took to glory at Daytona, just before the takeover by Gagiva. By 1986, Cagiva had taken over, and the F1B, not to be confused with the F1A, had some cosmetic tweaks, the most obvious of which is a set of red wheels.

With its minimalist frame, gorgeous tubular swingarm and thin, simple bodywork, the F1B looks incredibly purposeful. Added to the no-frills chassis, the two jugs of the big air-cooled v-twin, fed by a pair of 36mm carbs, is on full display. While it’s not anywhere close to the power levels we have come to expect from repli-racers in 2020, there is no doubting that under most people, this thing will still feel ridiculously capable, and with no computers on board, incredibly communicative and alive.

Cosmetically, this one is very nice and original, with just a couple age marks on the seat cowl to keep it from near-perfection.

From the seller:

This is a special 1986 F1B 750, it was owned by one of the top Ducati trainers nationwide. He added an Ohlins rear shock. I added new tires, the profile is slightly taller than stock to get matching sticky street tires. The bikes runs good, carburetors are spot on. There is a bit of patina on the top of the rear seat cowling shown in the pictures. The white on the lower cowling is a different shade of white. I have a shop manual and every receipt that came with the bike and everyone since I bought it. The bike is a 34 year old Ducati Classic. The bikes has 27,165 mikes or 43,719 KM’s

I am asking $16,000 which is what I paid for it
David Edinger
Edinger.david@gmail.com317-908-2573
The bike is located in Texas

For a bike this cool and rare, $16,000 is a damn attractive ask. It’s also right in line with what these things tend to go for. With the groundhog predicting that we’re just about done with winter, it won’t be long before it’ll be time to enjoy this machine to the fullest.

Featured Listing: 1986 Ducati 750 F1B
Ducati January 23, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1988 Ducati Paso 750

This Featured Listing is part of the The Edinger Ducati Collection. Thank you for supporting the site, David! -dc

That Ducati Paso 750s don’t get the pure adulation that they deserve from anyone outside dyed-in-the-wool Ducatisti is baffling. Sure, they’re looks might aptly be described as controversial and they never had world-beating power, but their place in motorcycling is as important as any mid-80’s Japanese rocket.

Most importantly, the bike saved Ducati from the scrapyard of history, pulling together the earliest versions of the brand’s modern hallmarks under new corporate ownership. Second, however controversial it might have been, their styling is uniquely Italian, uniquely 1980s and at the time was from outer space. The man who penned it, Massimo Tamburini, went on to give the world the Ducati 916 and the Ducati Monster.

So, it’s safe to say without the oddly charming Paso, with its belt-driven cam engine and fiberglass fetish, the Ducatis we drool over now might never have appeared. If we’ve piqued your interest, this 1988 Ducati Paso 750 is the pick of the litter.

With fewer than 1,500 miles on the dial since new, and wearing the rare-as-frog-hair blue bodywork, this Paso rightfully should end up in a museum. According to the seller, it’s one of just 55 sold in this color scheme worldwide.

From the seller:

This blue model Paso is very limited in numbers with only 55 sold worldwide and only has 1,486 miles which allows you to have a brand new antique. The Ducati Paso 750 was the first road going product to come out of the Cagiva-Ducati relationship, launched in 1985 when Cagiva purchased Ducati from the Italian government. Cagiva rushed to get it ready for the 1985 Milan motorcycle show. The bike has a set of Conti slip ons however the stock exhausts come with the sale of the motorcycle. This is a very comfortable bike for both the rider and the passenger.

Between 1986 and 1988, Ducati only sold 4,863 Paso 750s. It’s important because it was the first Ducati product designed by Massimo Tamburini, co-founder of Bimota, and the man who would go on to design the Ducati 916, and the MV Agusta F4, both considered to be two of the world’s most beautiful modern motorcycles.

For the Paso 750, Tamburini cloaked the entire motorcycle behind fiberglass and plastic panels, hiding all the mechanical parts. For the time, the Paso was packed with state-of-the-art features: square chromoly steel tube perimeter chassis, an aluminum rear swing arm, and aluminum Marvic 16-inch wheels wrapped in radial tires.

The Paso 750’s calling card was in the parts department. The 42mm anti-dive front forks were pretty huge for the era, and there was a stout fork brace built right into the front fender. At the rear, the rising-rate “Pro-Link”-style Ohlins monoshock was adjustable for preload, compression and rebound damping.

It is equipped with the belt-drive Pantah motor which was a strong and capable engine, and known to deliver in the Ducati 750 F1.

The bike’s instruments were nestled in a binnacle that on normal machines would be covered by a tinted plexiglass windscreen, but on the Paso was an extension of the bodywork. They were made up of equal-sized speedometer and tachometer, along with a fuel gauge.

The Paso was lauded as “the best-equipped Eurobike ever to take on the Japanese in the hotly contested 750 sports market.” Owning a Paso today is something of a labor of love. They’re also mechanically reliable. The carburetor–an automotive Weber two-barrel pressed into duty running both cylinders.

The Paso is a fun, unique, and totally ’80s ride for not a lot of cash. Riding one never fails to elicit a thumbs up, and an appreciative glance from the crowd at your local European bike night.

Top Speed is 131 MPH with 72 HP@7,000 RPM and with a dry weight of 429 pounds with a 5 speed transmission, 5.8 gallon fuel capacity and a 30.6 inch height seat

Contact: David Edinger
Edinger.david@gmail.com
+1-317-908-2573

For all that beauty and rarity, our buddy David is asking for just $5,500. That’s half what you’d pay for a grey market Japanese two stroke, and this one is twice as clean as most smokers you’ll come across.

Featured Listing: 1988 Ducati Paso 750
MV Agusta January 9, 2020 posted by

Down but not out: 2004 MV Agusta F4 750 SPR

When MV Agusta dropped the F4 to an adoring public, they made a significant splash. This was important, as the F4 was the rebirth of the legendary brand. Penned by designer Massimo Tamburini, the F4 was a spiritual successor to the Ducati 916 line. Featuring a timeless silhouette coupled with an all-new inline four cylinder 750cc power plant, the MV Agusta simply oozed quality and exclusivity. Eventually the 750 grew into a 1,000cc variant, and each of the two capacity lines spawned numerous special editions. In total there were nine different 750 variants offered, along with a dozen different 1,000cc limited offerings. Today’s F4 SPR was the pinnacle of the 750 line and intended for racetrack use. Both the SPR and the later SR (intended as a reimagined ORO edition) utilized a power unit derived from the Senna edition, itself a more powerful engine derived from the 750 Evo 2 (which was originally intended as a SPR model), which itself was an upgraded motor based on the standard 750 S unit. All clear?

To build an SPR required new engine internals to improve power and engine characteristics befitting a race bike. More power (146 HP @ 13,000 RPM) improved straight line performance when fitted with the race exhaust and eprom. The transmission was altered to a close ratio gearbox with a new clutch assembly. The chassis remained standard across the full 750 family, but suspension was upgraded for racetrack use. The SPR utilizes a larger fork with nitride treatment to reduce stiction. A race-spec rear shock sourced from Sachs was a step up from previous models. Weight was reduced through the use of carbon fiber body panels. As with all special F4s, a limited edition numbering scheme was created and a plate was attached to the headstock. The seller has included some great information about the F4 SPR, so I will let him pick up the story:

From the seller:
This is a very limited production MV Agusta F4 750 SPR #268 out of total 300 SPR production. At 146 hp the F4 SPR is the most powerful F4 750 produced. It was built only for 6 short months (June-December of 2003) to culminate the end of the F4 750 series production. There was only one color availabe, the flat black.

This is not a gussied up F4 but a distinct model within the series, produced by MV primarily for track use. SPR engine was equiped with a new cylinder head with re-designed combustion chambers, improved intake and exhaust manifolds, hotter cams, Mahle pistons with oil jet cooling, lightweight crankshaft. This resulted in 146 hp at 13,000 rpm. To improve performance on the track, SPR is equipped with a close ration gearbox. Depending on the final drive used, SPR’s top speed ranged from 170 mph to 183 mph – not bad for a 750cc motorcycle!

Suspension upfront are massive 49 mm Marzocchi forks with titanium nitride treatment. Sachs Racing damper is in the rear and has a dual compression adjustment for high and low speed. Front brakes are dual 6 piston calipers with a single 4 piston caliper in the rear.

More from the seller:
#268 is a strong runner. It does not overheat, leak or smoke. It comes with a full service history with most work done at Pro Italia. It just had a $650 service performed which included new battery, fuel pump, starter solenoid and chain lube. The stand switch was intermittent and was disconnected which results in the N green light to remain on constant. Tires are ok but would recommend replacing if you will be riding this SPR in anger.

It comes with an Ohlins steering damper, factory tool kit, owner manual, service records and one key. It has a clean California title and registration that is good until 12.18.2020

This SPR is not a garage queen. It was down earlier in its life and with the exception of the the slight damage to the rear brake pedal and a cosmetic (no punctures or leaks) dent in the radiator (see pics for both). The rest is cosmetic, primarily the right side fairings are scratched and the front fairing has two small cracks – one just above the headlight and the other below the mirror which I found only after cleaning the bike. The windscreen has a small crack on the top. I have included pictures with the fairings off for better inspection as well as the pictures of the damages. Please feel free to ask any questions.

MV Agusta F4 SPR models are rare. 300 unit count rare. They are some of the most capable 750s on the planet, exclusive as all get out, and expensive on the used market. Expect to part with $15K+ for an impeccable example of the breed. Which brings us to the downside of this particular example: it has been down. Purists will tell you to run – not walk – away from this one. But purists may have the cash a spic-n-span example will bring (even a lovingly used SPR is over $10k these days) And purists are more likely to collect than ride. If you are seeking an awesome bike that you want to use – possibly even on track days – do you really want a museum piece? The pictures show some bodywork damage, but some deeper inspection might be warranted to ensure the rest of the components are straight and serviceable. If they are, this could be a cheaper way to ease yourself into a rare and coveted SPR.

Today’s bike has a Buy It Now asking price of $6,600, with the seller open to offers. While that is not a bad deal for a rare SPR model, potential buyers will have to trade off between cost and value. Part of the bargain here is the in the unknown – damage which is beyond cosmetic. The seller has done a good job of describing and showing the effects of the impact, so that should help. If there are no hidden issues lurking, then all the better. But don’t discount the cosmetic either; those carbon skins do not come cheaply, if they can still be had at all (I don’t know about SPR parts availability – knowledgeable readers feel free to chime in). At the end of the day, you could have a rare rocket for fun, but not likely to be on the same level as a collector bike. Check it out here and then make your choice: are you willing to trade sweat equity for status, or do you buy only the best? Good Luck!!

MI

Down but not out: 2004 MV Agusta F4 750 SPR
Harley Davidson December 6, 2019 posted by

Dr. Evel – 1972 Harley-Davidson XR-750

Harley-Davidson introduced the XR-750 in 1969 in response to an AMA rule change that made their flat head racers finally obsolete.  The 1972 revision had an updated engine design and went on to an unmatched series of flat track wins and stadium jumps.  This example is fitted with the optional rear brake and a tuneable SuperTrapp exhaust.

1972 Harley-Davidson XR-750 for sale on eBay

After the quick initial conversion of their Sportster race engine, Harley took more time with Rev. 2.0 and commissioned a different layout with a wider bore and shorter stroke, and alloy heads.  In an interesting redux of the sidevalve KR engine, each pushrod has its own cam, uncomplicating cam profile and timing changes.  Power was 80 hp or better, spinning pretty well for a pushrod mill at nearly 8,000 rpm.  The 19-inch front wheel is right at the end of the Ceriani forks, so handling should be true to the 26-degree rake.  Number plates and mufflers conceal the twin-shock rear, and the tank/seat combo is fiberglass.

Offered by a Florida dealer, no history or past ownership is offered, but the eBay classified does hold promise.  Gotta love racebike details like both brake and shifter on the right peg.  XR fans will have to comment in their thoughts, however it would be unreasonable to expect anything on a dirt track racer to be original or unmodified ( or even un-damaged ! ).  From the eBay listing:

Blast from the past and a beautiful example! Inquire and we will answer ALL and ANY questions and we will try hard to get the answers. Hagerty values this at $50,000!

A redesign in 1972 resulted in a motorcycle that would be the most successful in the history of American Motorcyclist Association Racing.
Evel Knievel made the bike famous outside the fairly narrow lane of flat track racing, jumping his 1972 XR to a string of then-world records.

The right collector could take this XR in any number of directions – as raced by Roger Jr., an AMA champion tribute, or Evel Knievel lookalike.  Or home to the dirt as an amateur ?  Nothing as sensible or practical as a sportbike, but a could be a great project.

-donn

Dr. Evel – 1972 Harley-Davidson XR-750