Posts by tag: 750

Featured Listing June 10, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1989 GSX-R750 Slingshot

Update 6.10.2019: Back on eBay. Good luck to buyers and seller! Links updated. -dc

Presented in their alternate red and white livery, this K-variant GSX-R750 is ready to do battle at the next street cred concours. It has a careful 12,000 miles which is low, but more of a survivor than babied collector. Suzuki designed it with a laser focus on light weight and usable power, which made the GSX-R750 instantly popular.

1989 Suzuki GSX-R750 Slingshot for sale on eBay

Suzuki went seriously oversquare in the comprehensive 1988 revision, the 73mm bore and 44.7mm stroke allowing 13,000 rpm and 112 hp. Still air/oil cooled though, which eliminated weight and complexity. 36mm Mikuni carbs featured the asymmetrical slide hence the “Slingshot” name, beside the way it took off from the starting line. The alloy frame was updated, but continued with its lightweight and braced theme, carrying the engine lower than before. Cartridge forks were still right side up, and the Full Floater swingarm controlled the rear. Brakes were a more modern size with 310mm front disks. Without a spec sheet or caliper you can see the wheels are wider and noise is contained by a 4-into-1 exhaust.

The owner Scott’s comments:

If you’ve always wanted a really nice Slingshot here’s your chance. Red with white just under 12,000 original miles. This is a true survivor which is mostly stock other than the airbox and Supertrapp silencer. New battery just serviced all new fluids and carburetor cleaning/rebuild, new rear brake line, petcock, and cush drive. Everything including dash lights are in perfect working order, its ready to go for the new owner. It comes with a hard to find unpainted rear seat cowl along with a back of the gas tank bra. It’s a lot of fun to ride for a thirty-year-old bike. Rides very close to a modern bike and makes great sounds. It’s never been down to the best of my knowledge.

Here’s the back story, I bought it with the thought of turning it into a vintage race bike. When my friends saw it, particularly one that’s a GSXR nut, they convinced me it was too nice the convert. They were not willing to buy it but would not let me race it! So I found a Slab-side that was a better candidate. As I’m more of a track guy my street riding in next to zero nowadays so this has been sitting in my climate-controlled Man Town.

I like to sell bikes with no stories hence the recent service. I would rate this an 8 out of 10. It’s not a museum piece but a really nice original survivor that you will be proud to ride and turns heads wherever you go. There are a few stress cracks in the bodywork which is normal. There’s also a crack in the top right side of the fairing right underneath the throttle.

I’m a fifty plus year old you guy that collects bikes so I am quite picky and tend to understate a bikes condition. It’s registered in New Hampshire which does not title anything over fifteen years old, but I do have the previous owner’s title. I do not need to sell this bike so please don’t waste either of our times. I have a more pictures and happy to answer any questions. Thanks for looking!

1989 was the second year of the 2.0 GSX-R750, and small changes were made, mostly to increase available lean angle ! Otherwise it was a fitting second generation of a middleweight bred for the track, and a great value for the ante. Rather than a sheltered collector, this unrestored survivor could be enjoyed inside and out. You can email Scott – here – for more information.

-donn

Featured Listing – 1989 GSX-R750 Slingshot
MV Agusta May 25, 2019 posted by

Beautiful Boy: 2000 MV Agusta F4 750

There are fast motorcycles, there are unique motorcycles, there are iconic motorcycles and there are truly beautiful motorcycles. The re-introduction of the fabled MV Agusta brand in 1999 seemingly achieved all those goals thanks to the vision of Massimo Tamburini and the might and wealth of the Cagiva Research Center.

2000 MV Agusta F4 750 for sale on eBay

Following the well-trodden path to sport bike glory, the MV Agusta F4 utilizes an in-line four cylinder engine with four-valve heads, fuel injection, and novel variable length intake runners to help control engine power across the rev range. Dubbed Torque Shift System (or TSS for short), that intake wizardry is one of two Formula 1 technologies utilized by the F4. The second is the oft-hyped hemispherical head chamber with 4-valves per cylinder. And while the hemi head and radially splayed four valves definitely maximize the airflow and flame front during combustion, neither are particularly new in terms of technology. All told the 750cc power plant was good for a stout 126 HP.

From the seller:
This motorcycle looks like is brand new…..it’s a model year 2000. 750 cc engine. sounds fantastic… bought it from the original owner who use to keep it in his own room…..always garaged and covered. it only has 3,900 original miles on it, it has good tires and all the fluids have been exchange recently. runs beautifully. it has quite a few carbon fiber pieces and the previous owner did some polishing on the engine cover, chain cover and foot pegs along with the rims… . too many things to list here. Look at the pictures and give me your thoughts about it. This one of a kind has to go to a good home. If you are looking for a unique, head-turner, clean bike, blast to ride, this is it….check what is available in the market!

In addition to the F1 technology, the F4 borrowed heavily from the fertile past of designer Tamburini. Both the single sided swing arm and the under seat exhaust are derivations of the Ducati 916 (which Tamburini also designed). The exhaust pokes out of the underside of the seat in a not-so-subtle fan out of four separate pipes, and sounds glorious. The rest of the bike relies upon yards of aluminum for the frame, beefy front forks (Showa), and a fair bit of carbon fiber flair.

The introduction of the F4 was a massive investment into technology, and the resultant bikes were as beautiful as they were fast. Limited production and high prices kept them to the exclusive territory of well-heeled riders or even better heeled collectors. Today they are available on the used bike market at more realistic prices – but still not cheap. This particular example is an early model with few miles (<4,000) and what appears to be a great deal of care bestowed upon it. With a Buy It Now price of $7,500, this bike is asking strong, but not outrageous money. The seller is open to offers, so there may be an opportunity to pull this down somewhat. With bikes of this caliber, prospective buyers would do well to find the cleanest, best example possible. I could do with less of the polished bits, but this 2000 MV Agusta F4 750 looks to be better than most we have seen in some time and is worth checking out. The full details are here. Good luck!!

MI

Beautiful Boy: 2000 MV Agusta F4 750
Benelli April 20, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1976 Benelli Sei 750

Check out all of Joe’s bikes for sale on RSBFS! Many thanks for choosing us to help move your collection! -dc

Benelli and Honda exchanged flattery in the 1970’s, which began with Benelli creating a six cylinder look-alike of Honda’s CB500 Four in 1972.  Their flagship Sei began as a 750 and progressed to a 900 by 1979.  Honda returned the compliment in 1978 with their CBX.  Restored by a previous owner, this Sei is a magnificent labor of love.

Benelli made a careful study of the air-cooled Honda and made a few changes – the gear-driven alternator, located behind the cylinders, keeps the engine’s width manageable.  With three Dell’Orto carburettors, 76 hp was almost effortless and the Sei created usable torque from 2,000 rpm.  The chassis is a hefty downtube with right-side-up Marzocchi forks, and twin Sebac shocks.  Dual front disks make up for the tried-and-true rear drum.  Styling is dominated by the six-way calliope, with a few angular details on the instrument cluster, side covers, and cylinders.

A bottle of chrome polish might be on the new owner’s shopping list, since the Sei is all metal, with not even the side covers executed in plastic.  On display since shortly after the restoration was completed, it shows almost as a new machine, with sparkling finishes and new rubber parts, like the carburetor boots.  The owner shares these notes:

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari.

The 1976 Benelli SEI 750 six-cylinder is another one of those iconic Italian motorcycles. It was the first six-cylinder production motorcycle, and, yes, those six exhaust pipes not only sound great but look phenomenal. The bike was restored by a gentleman that spent what looks like half a lifetime to get it to such perfection. This bike starts and runs as it should and I don’t personally know of one important criticism that I could make on the bike for show or riding.

The Benelli winding through the gears sound like a Gran Prix rarer and the slick handling is something has to be experienced. These six cylinder Benelli bikes have a long way to go in terms of collector appreciation. When you buy a first series Benelli six cylinder you will find a crowd wherever you stop.

Then just wind up through the gears and it seems that the roar of those six exhaust pipes can be heard a mile away.

Check out the pictures of this Benelli it has to be one of the best, if not The Best, restored 1976 Benelli SEI 750’s ever!

All my bikes are kept in climate controlled storage and on trickle chargers when not in use so they are always ready to take a day’s ride at a moment’s notice.


Prefer phone calls 847-774-4857

Check out the pictures and be a little amazed – you are seeing the best!

As the 1970’s opened, industrialist Alejandro DeTomaso had high hopes for his new acquisition, and funded the development of the magnetic Sei.  The big-band sound of six individual 125cc cylinders is more like a fleet of motorcycles than just one.  Never destined to be in every garage, the bright light in the Benelli showroom was reflecting off the Sei’s six chrome mufflers.  The owner has curated and preserved this example to a high standard, and not insignificantly, kept it ready to ride.  Please contact Joe with offers at 847-774-4857.

-donn

Featured Listing – 1976 Benelli Sei 750
Featured Listing April 19, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 MV Agusta 750 S America

Check out all of Joe’s bikes for sale on RSBFS! Many thanks for choosing us to help move your collection! -dc

Back in 1974, there was no other bike to have, really. Regardless of what you were able to shop for, the MV Agusta 750S America was the bike you wanted. First of all, it was Italian, and red, which meant it had that little something extra that nobody else had. Temperamental, yes, and expensive to be sure, and perhaps not even the fastest thing on two wheels, but none of that mattered. It would more or less keep pace with the cruder, brawnier two strokes, and it would go around corners without killing you. Then there was the noise.

Whether you’re listening to a Colombo V-12 at full song, or the rorty throb of a Lancia Fulvia’s V4, or the percussive pop and rattle of a Ducati 900 SS/SP, the Italians long ago mastered the art of the proper internal combustion sound. The 750 S America may have them all beat, with a rhythmic, tachycardic and slightly uneven throbbing at idle cracking into a full-chested wail at higher revs. It’s quite the song and dance for 90 horsepower, but in its day the MV’s voice was the siren song of speed.

This 1974 MV Agusta 750S America is in magnificent shape, and appears to be all or almost all-original. The classic red-and-gold livery is without blemishes, and the bike’s numerous nooks and crannies appear to be clean enough to eat off of. The condition is thanks in large part to a fastidious seller, who has kept the bike stored in a heated facility and made sure that it remains ready to run.

From the seller:

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection.  I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection.  These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles ‘70s, ‘80s, and ‘90s.  Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one.  These motorcycles were targeted for by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best was available and that is what I purchased.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the ‘70s and ‘80s are the future Ferrari’s of motorcycle collecting.   We all know what has happened to Ferraris.

For many people the MV Augusta American is like the Ferrari of motorcycles.  It is a typically great Italian design that when new cost an unthinkable amount of money and has been held in the highest esteem since it was produced.

In the world of motorcycle collecting it is one of the most prestigious Italian bikes that you can have in your collection.   This bike, as far as we know, is entirely original.  It runs perfectly, and, is, without question, one of the best sounding motorcycle that were ever made and yes, it is kept in fully heated storage when not in use.   It is always kept on a trickle charger. It is ready to travel 500 miles on the first day.

If you ever heard of Ferrari GTO run through the gears you will know that the 1974 Augusta MV 750 S America has a very similar melodic sound of authority which is just music to the ears.

This is a very expensive bike for serious collectors.  It is a very limited production bike.  By searching the Internet, you can read all the accolades that have accumulated over time for this particular breed, this is for serious future collectors.

They are only original once.

I would suggest that you check out the other rare cycles that I am offering for sale by clicking on “other items for sale” in the upper right corner to see the other bikes being offered from my collection.

Prefer phone calls 847-774-4857

Thanks for looking at one of the best!

Back in ’74, these things were the most expensive bikes on the street, with a raft of super-expensive parts keeping them out of the hands of you average grocery bagger. With just 550 or so MV Agusta 750S Americas built, the story is more or less the same today. If you have the means …

Featured Listing: 1974 MV Agusta 750 S America
Featured Listing April 18, 2019 posted by

Sponsored Listing: 1990 Kawasaki Ninja 750R

This listing is for our friends and Primary Sponsor: Iconic Motorbikes. Thanks as always for supporting the site guys! -dc

This is not the bright-green, dual headlight monster most people call to mind when you say, “750cc Kawasaki Ninja.” Instead of the truly featherweight lairiness of the Kawasaki ZX-7R, the 1990 Kawasaki Ninja 750R delivers a still-potent punch with much better manners than its race replica stablemate.

The Ninja 750R originally was designed to compete with the likes of the Honda Interceptor and the Suzuki GSX-R 750, but from the get-go it had higher bars and a slightly less spine-eroding seating position. It was fast enough to keep yourself entertained, but cushy enough to go two-up. It also bears the distinction of being the last fully-faired Japanese sportbike to rock a steel frame.

This one, offered by our friends and site sponsor Iconic Motorbikes, is in close to immaculate condition, with just north of 9,000 miles on it. It has apparently been sitting for some time, but was put away and stored properly, so new tires and perhaps a new chain should be all it needs to fall right back into duty as a big mileage puller. The red-black-silver livery is much less noisy than the racebike’s, and is a nice nod to the GPz 900 that graced Top Gun.

From the seller:

1990 Kawasaki Ninja 750R – Excellent Condition – Only 9032 Miles
Here we have one of the cleanest Ninja 750R’s we’re yet to come across.

This 1990 750R is a solid 9.5 out of 10 and 100% stock! Harder and harder to find in this condition and even more difficult to find unmolested!

Perfect for a collector or a rider however if you’re planning to ride, plan on tires and some recommissioning costs as she’s been sitting for quite some time. Thankfully the bike was put away dry and stored properly so costs will not be excessive and we’d be happy to help!

At $6,050, the bike is priced according to its condition and scarcity when compared to the faster ZX-7R. For that, you’re getting a great, classic sport tourer with tons of years left.

Sponsored Listing: 1990 Kawasaki Ninja 750R
Featured Listing April 18, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1972 Harley-Davidson XR750

It’s hard to think of a racing bike more uniquely American than the Harley-Davidson XR750. The bike combines all of the qualities that make us who we are as a nation, and carries a long history of victories through grit, determination and dedication to the art of plying your trade better than anyone else. For riders and racers in the 1970s and 1980s, the XR is as hallowed as Richard Petty’s sacred 43 or McQueen’s trademark smirk.

1972 Harley-Davidson XR750 for sale on eBay

The XR750, which is variously quoted as having anywhere from 80 to 100 horsepower is the winningest motorcycle in AMA history, thanks in large part to the fact that, 50 years after it bowed, flat trackers are still finding success aboard updated versions. Evel Knievel made the bike famous outside the fairly narrow lane of flat track racing, jumping his 1972 XR to a string of then-world records.

This 1972 Harley-Davidson XR750 was raced by Mike Boyes in the 1970s and 1980s. It sits in unrestored, as-raced condition, and has not started since Boyes last rolled it into the pits. It is a time capsule in the purest sense of the word. It is the first year of the alloy-head XR750 engine, and carries nearly 50 years of race patina on its simple orange bodywork. The fiberglass tank is uncoated and unlined, and therefore is likely unfit for use. The seller says that, despite its long slumber, the bike shows every sign that it would fire and run with minimal work.

From the eBay listing:

1972 Harley-Davidson XR-750 flat track racing motorcycle
Engine no. 1C101XH0
Unrestored. As raced.
• First year of the alloy head XR
• Raced throughout California in the 1970’s and 1980’s
• Delivered in as-raced, unrestored condition
This 1972 alloy XR-750 was purchased by Mike Boyes from renowned Harley tuner Michigander Tex Peel. Boyes then raced it mainly in California in the mid-to-late 1970s and early 1980s. He lives near Seattle, Washington today. Boyes sold the bike to Yoshi Kosaka of the Garage Company, now of Inglewood, California, who kept the bike for many years before selling it to Mike Cheiky, a California-based inventor. Mike died last year and so his wife Charity enlisted a family friend to find it a new home. The XR-750 found its way to New York City Motorcycles. Its appearance – the patina, that is – has been ‘undisturbed’ since it was last raced at Ascot, San Jose, Sacramento, and others. The motor gives every indication of firing up with a minimum of proper servicing and safety checks although it is recommended that fuel not be poured inside of the XR750’s original, un-lined, uncoated tank. To run it, a substitute tank or external fuel feed should be used.
Ran when parked 🙂
This is my third vintage XR750 and the purest racer of them all. The motorcycle looks exactly as it did when it exited the racetrack the last time.
Recent marriage and move to Japan makes keeping, shipping and/or storing impractical. My move is your gain 🙂
See other motorcycles offered for sale along with the XR.
*missing left footpeg
*Sold with a BILL OF SALE ONLY. XR750’s do not have titles and are not legal for road use!*
***optional Harley Racing factory stand available to the winning bidder only. $500 value***

The motorcycle is sold as is, where is, and there are no warranties expressed nor implied. Judge the photos and make your own assessment of the bike’s condition, rather than rely on my opinion and/or description. Questions and clarifications are encouraged. These are my personal opin Bidders must be certain of their commitment before bidding, as once its submitted. If you win it, you bought it. No time for nonsense please. Bidders with less than 10 or any negative feedback must contact me prior to bidding or else expect your bid to be cancelled and removed.

This motorcycle requires thorough inspection and recommissioning before running or riding. Know what you are buying before you bid. If you don’t have the expertise and/or the budget, with all due respect, this is not the bike for you.

New York City Motorcycles ( nycmc dot com) is reasonably well known in the vintage motorcycle community and this is not the only platform for offering the bike. Therefore please consider not waiting until the final seconds of the auction to bid. Because while you’re waiting to pull the trigger, if a fair offer arrives from elsewhere and there is not a comparable bid here, the auction will instantly disappear from your watched items.

Motorcycle is located in Venice, CA. I will work with your shipper but its your responsibility.

I’ve had several questions regarding the engine number.  Firstly, thank you for pointing out the number being incorrect, incomplete or possibly the engine number of the prior series, 1970 Ironhead.  I’ve just added addtional photos of the engine case, which shows the full number: 1C1013(followed by 2 with a slash over the number) H8

The slash through the two is consistent with a 1975 model I owned previously – in that instance the number 6 followed by the number 5 slashed out.  The unanimous opinion from experienced XR owners and collectors was 6 referring to 1976, the bikes completion date; the 5 slashed out refers to the 1975 model.  In that case labor disruptions at Youngstown were responsible for some 1975 bikes being carried over and released the following year. 

The number first shown was indeed incorrect.  I used the text from the Bonhams auction catalog from the Barber Motorsports, sale in October of last year, where the XR was listed.  Bonhams conducted their own independent review of the bike’s provenance.  I should have proofread their reference then, as well as now before I put the bike up for auction now.  Apologies for my oversight and hope this clears up any confusion caused.  Feel free to ask additional questions if my hypothesis appears incorrect!

Thanks again.

Running original XRs command silly money, and this one is a true museum piece with race provenance to back it up. Hurry over to eBay if it tickles your fancy, the auction is about to wind down!

Featured Listing: 1972 Harley-Davidson XR750
Sport Bikes For Sale April 18, 2019 posted by

Restored and preserved: 1986 Suzuki GSXR750 LE

The seller of this 1986 Suzuki GSXR750 LE claims he’s got the nicest one around, and he might be right. According to the eBay auction, his dad, a former AMA mechanic, bought it in the mid-1990s from the original owner, bought a raft of NOS factory parts during a cosmetic restoration, and then mothballed it. It hasn’t been ridden since a brief trip in 1998, and still wears a set of 1996 Michelins that still have their whiskers.

1986 Suzuki GSXR750 LE for sale on eBay

The seller says his dad decided the bike was too valuable to ride after a quick trip down the block, which for him is a shame, but is to the modern collector’s benefit. With dry clutches, lighter wheels, stouter suspension and healthier engines, the 1986 Suzuki GSXR750 LE was meant to have the plate and signals removed and ridden in anger at the track. They were a race kit and some expertise away from an AMA grid.

Suzuki built a few hundred of the LEs and stopped, so they’re scarce as hen’s teeth in any condition, let alone near perfect, as this one is.

From the eBay listing:

Significance

The 1986 Suzuki GSXR750R was a unique, limited-production homologation sportbike which featured many race-oriented options. Among them were a Yoshimura dry clutch, GSXR1100 forks and wheels, proprietary magnesium parts, a solo-occupant seat, remote reservoir shock and quick-release DZUS fasteners. The colors and graphic scheme were unique to the model, and ~200 examples were said to be released. My example is the most accurate, stock representation of the ’86 Limited offered on the market today.

History
This motorcycle was acquired by my father in March of 1995. He purchased it locally from its first owner, who was recalled to Active Military status to participate in the Bosnia peacekeeping operations. The motorcycle had cosmetic damage associated with its first owner. This consisted of scratches in the tank and bodywork.

My father, an AMA Superbike mechanic from 1980-1988 was very familiar with this generation GSXR, and its significance. He wanted a showroom-perfect example. Through our connections with a local Suzuki dealership, he ordered every piece possible for the bike: Tank, tailsection, chin fairing, turn signals, headlights, warning stickers, fairing, windscreen, fuel lines (anything that would dry-rot), etc. Anything that has been replaced on the GSXR was done so in 1996 with factory Suzuki parts. The replacement bodywork is NOS Suzuki. The sidepanels came from Suzuki unpainted, but were painted to exact replica specifications. The front fairing, lower fairing, tank and tail-section were painted from the factory as-is. Windscreen is a period-correct Lockhart Philips brand. Everything on the bike is the real deal, and it is entirely discontinued now. We were unable to secure a NOS set of original tires. Brand new (from ’96) Michelins are fitted.

We have done nothing but protect it and care for it since. It was registered in 1998 for road use, but my father drove it down our street, turned around, and rode back in. It was too valuable to ride.

Overall Condition

My bike in the enclosed pictures is arguably the best example of a US domestic market ’86 GSXR750R Limited Edition. Most examples have an aftermarket pipe, no airbox, non-standard turn signals, stickers, etc. This does not. It is OEM down to its vent hoses and grips. You’ll find all mechanical properties to be impressive, as in very low/no corrosion, and completely functioning.

Why Sell?

It’s no secret that this Limited stands to appreciate. In a decade it could easily be worth $40k. Unfortunately, our children’s education costs are increasing.

Please inquire with any questions!

At $21,500 buy-it-now, the seller has some idea what he’s got, and isn’t letting it go for a bargain. That said, it’s a beautiful example of an insanely rare and important bike, and will be a must-have for the right collector.

Restored and preserved: 1986 Suzuki GSXR750 LE
Ducati March 24, 2019 posted by

Small Batch: 1989 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca

Behold the mighty Ducati F1 special edition “Laguna Seca.” Essentially a factory hot rod based on the F1 (a 750cc version of the Tourist Trophy), the Laguna Seca shared a special tier with the two other limited edition models, the Santamonica and the Montjuich. All of the special models were named after race tracks where a Ducati rider pulled a first place rabbit out of a hat. In this case, it was Marco “Lucky” Lucchinelli prevailing at the 1986 Battle of the Twins (BOTT) event at the famed California track. The Laguna Seca was closest to the Montjuich in spec, the differences being largely related to the intended target audience: North America. As such, changes were basically limited to emissions and noise controls. The rest is pure 1980s Ducati goodness; rough and ready, light and lean. The seller has written (or copied?) a good story of the Laguna Seca (and the F1 model in general), so I will let him pick up the tale:

1989 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for sale on eBay

From the seller:
1989 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca

Frame no. ZDM750LS*750059*
Engine no. ZDM750L1*750194

Less than 300 examples made

Only 6,500 miles from new

Considered by many enthusiasts to be the last of the ‘real’ Ducatis, the race-styled 750 F1 first appeared in 1985. Ducati had already enjoyed considerable success with its Pantah-derived F2 racers in FIM Formula 2 racing – Tony Rutter winning the championship four-times running between 1981 and 1984 – so a ‘750’ version was the logical next step.

First seen in prototype form in endurance races in 1983, the F1’s 748cc engine was the latest in a long line of stretches applied to the original 500c ‘belt drive’ Desmo unit that had first appeared in the Pantah in 1979 – a street-legal updated version of the mid-’80s TT1. A markedly over-square design of 88×61.5mm bore/stroke, the F1 engine produced around 60bhp and functioned as a stressed element within the frame, the swinging arm pivoting in the rear of the gearbox. Clearly visible above the deliberately cut away fairing sides, the aforementioned frame attracted almost as much attention as the engine: a trellis of short, straight tubes, it has formed the basis of every road-going Ducati since, as well as the first Desmosedici Moto GP racers. In the fashion of the day, the F1 came with a 16-inch front wheel, while braking power was provided by state-of-the-art triple Brembos. The stock F1 was complemented by a series of hand-built, limited edition, race replicas – Montjuich, Santamonica and Laguna Seca – the last inspired by Marco “Lucky” Lucchinelli’s famous ‘Battle of the Twins’ race victory at Daytona in 1986. Today the evocatively named F1 and its derivatives are highly prized by Ducati collectors.

Much like the Montjuich, the Laguna Seca came with bigger Dell’Orto carburetors, higher compression ratio, bigger valves, and straight-cut primary drive gears. And talk of 95bhp at 10,000rpm! But unlike the Montjuich, it came with a larger, quieter muffler.

There were some small changes between the two bikes, namely in the Laguna’s parts from the new Paso. The delta-spoked one-piece 16-inch Oscam wheels and the brake discs, but not the four-piston ‘racing’ Brembo front calipers, came from the 750 Paso, as did the wider front fender. Other changes included a ‘Lucky’ signature steel gas tank, revised foot peg bracketry and a plastic rear sub-fender attached to the swing arm. Most Laguna Secas came with a solo seat and were built in limited numbers (perhaps as few as 296.)

Not a lot of history about this particular example, although the read is a good one (reminds me of Ian Faloon). The only point of note I see on this bike is the non-standard Ohlins external shock reservoir strapped to the left side of the iconic trestle frame chassis (original shock was a Marzocchi PVS 4). Any other changes are unknown with the facts given, and with only 3 pictures to work with there are many questions left unanswered. But with only 6,500 miles, this beauty is undoubtedly clean and very rare. I’m not sure if proper etiquette deems we refer to this as the WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca, nee Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca, nee Laguna Seca Raceway, but the connection is very clear. Also clear is the asking price: a not insignificant $24,900. That is a bit higher than we usually see these bikes offered – although the seller appears open to a lesser figure – so if you’re in the market for one of these beautiful and rare model Pantahs you should act quickly. Check it out here, and then jump back to the comments and share your thoughts on the F1 model Ducatis: are you a fan? Good Luck!!

MI

Suzuki February 20, 2019 posted by

Slingshot, engage: Road-worn 1988 Suzuki GSX-R 750

Slingshot Gixxers have gained value over the last couple years on the strength of their reputation as basically the earliest available fully modern street legal sportbike. Short of an astronomically expensive RC30, a late ’80s GSX-R is about as close as you’ll get to a vintage bike that rides like something from this century. Beyond that, they carry a mystique born of their world-beating pace when new. The awe they inspired when they debuted has evolved into full-on legend status.

1988 Suzuki GSX-R 750 for sale on eBay

With the help of redesigned fairings and suspension, 17-inch rubber and a new rack of flatslide Mikunis, the ’88 Gixxer burst on the scene with technology and pace that was unheard of at the time, especially for something so light. Back then, the lack of water cooling didn’t raise any eyebrows, though Suzuki did have to get creative with oil cooling to keep the things running properly. The 750cc inline four commanded 112 horses in street trim, and the bodywork had been slickened to reduce the mill’s effort.

This 1988 Suzuki GSX-R 750 is in unrestored, original condition, except for some exhaust and airbox mods. Whereas many of these bikes are either hammered or babied, this one strikes a nice balance of looking like a bike that was well looked-after, but ridden as it should have been and stored without huge regard for the cosmetics. If you’re looking for a rider and you don’t care about looks too much, seek no more. If you’re looking for an easy restoration that doesn’t require a nut-and-bolt re-work, here’s your steed. The seller is quite proud that the bike rides on its original tires, but we’d have those suckers swapped out in a heartbeat.

From the eBay listing:

1988 GSX-R 750 Slingshot. This is a true Survivor, never been touched with the exception of the exhaust. Runs and performs perfectly. I do have the original air box also. Original tires that are in excellent condition for their age. The tires tell the story of this bike, it has been rode less than 500 miles a year. Some of the clear is peeling from decales (normal for the age of the bike). Right fairing has crack by lamp (see pic) and solo seat has small crack in rear, quick fix if you want but, I would leave it alone as bike is a survivor! Hate to see this bike go but, must make room and that is the only reason while it is going up for sale! I will listen to any reasonable offers!
Also bike comes with really nice matching Suzuki jacket cost was $550.00 when bought! Email any question you might have and also see another listing of mine on a 1989 Suzuki GSX-R 1100 that is also up for sale!

At $5,000, the asking price is right at what Hagerty says an excellent example should go for. With fairly low miles, great patina and rising interest in these machines, he might not be too far off.

Slingshot, engage: Road-worn 1988 Suzuki GSX-R 750