Posts by tag: 750

Ducati February 18, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1986 Ducati 750 F1B

This Featured Listing is part of the The Edinger Ducati Collection. Thank you for supporting the site, David! -dc

The Ducati F1B is a very 1980s example of Ducati’s trademark trick — to take a race bike, stick lights on it, and see who bites. In most cases, the answer is damn near everyone, or at least everyone would, if the things were widely available. The 1986 Ducati F1B is a 76-horsepower race repilca that aped bikes Duc took to glory at Daytona, just before the takeover by Gagiva. By 1986, Cagiva had taken over, and the F1B, not to be confused with the F1A, had some cosmetic tweaks, the most obvious of which is a set of red wheels.

With its minimalist frame, gorgeous tubular swingarm and thin, simple bodywork, the F1B looks incredibly purposeful. Added to the no-frills chassis, the two jugs of the big air-cooled v-twin, fed by a pair of 36mm carbs, is on full display. While it’s not anywhere close to the power levels we have come to expect from repli-racers in 2020, there is no doubting that under most people, this thing will still feel ridiculously capable, and with no computers on board, incredibly communicative and alive.

Cosmetically, this one is very nice and original, with just a couple age marks on the seat cowl to keep it from near-perfection.

From the seller:

This is a special 1986 F1B 750, it was owned by one of the top Ducati trainers nationwide. He added an Ohlins rear shock. I added new tires, the profile is slightly taller than stock to get matching sticky street tires. The bikes runs good, carburetors are spot on. There is a bit of patina on the top of the rear seat cowling shown in the pictures. The white on the lower cowling is a different shade of white. I have a shop manual and every receipt that came with the bike and everyone since I bought it. The bike is a 34 year old Ducati Classic. The bikes has 27,165 mikes or 43,719 KM’s

I am asking $16,000 which is what I paid for it
David Edinger
Edinger.david@gmail.com317-908-2573
The bike is located in Texas

For a bike this cool and rare, $16,000 is a damn attractive ask. It’s also right in line with what these things tend to go for. With the groundhog predicting that we’re just about done with winter, it won’t be long before it’ll be time to enjoy this machine to the fullest.

Featured Listing: 1986 Ducati 750 F1B
Ducati January 23, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1988 Ducati Paso 750

This Featured Listing is part of the The Edinger Ducati Collection. Thank you for supporting the site, David! -dc

That Ducati Paso 750s don’t get the pure adulation that they deserve from anyone outside dyed-in-the-wool Ducatisti is baffling. Sure, they’re looks might aptly be described as controversial and they never had world-beating power, but their place in motorcycling is as important as any mid-80’s Japanese rocket.

Most importantly, the bike saved Ducati from the scrapyard of history, pulling together the earliest versions of the brand’s modern hallmarks under new corporate ownership. Second, however controversial it might have been, their styling is uniquely Italian, uniquely 1980s and at the time was from outer space. The man who penned it, Massimo Tamburini, went on to give the world the Ducati 916 and the Ducati Monster.

So, it’s safe to say without the oddly charming Paso, with its belt-driven cam engine and fiberglass fetish, the Ducatis we drool over now might never have appeared. If we’ve piqued your interest, this 1988 Ducati Paso 750 is the pick of the litter.

With fewer than 1,500 miles on the dial since new, and wearing the rare-as-frog-hair blue bodywork, this Paso rightfully should end up in a museum. According to the seller, it’s one of just 55 sold in this color scheme worldwide.

From the seller:

This blue model Paso is very limited in numbers with only 55 sold worldwide and only has 1,486 miles which allows you to have a brand new antique. The Ducati Paso 750 was the first road going product to come out of the Cagiva-Ducati relationship, launched in 1985 when Cagiva purchased Ducati from the Italian government. Cagiva rushed to get it ready for the 1985 Milan motorcycle show. The bike has a set of Conti slip ons however the stock exhausts come with the sale of the motorcycle. This is a very comfortable bike for both the rider and the passenger.

Between 1986 and 1988, Ducati only sold 4,863 Paso 750s. It’s important because it was the first Ducati product designed by Massimo Tamburini, co-founder of Bimota, and the man who would go on to design the Ducati 916, and the MV Agusta F4, both considered to be two of the world’s most beautiful modern motorcycles.

For the Paso 750, Tamburini cloaked the entire motorcycle behind fiberglass and plastic panels, hiding all the mechanical parts. For the time, the Paso was packed with state-of-the-art features: square chromoly steel tube perimeter chassis, an aluminum rear swing arm, and aluminum Marvic 16-inch wheels wrapped in radial tires.

The Paso 750’s calling card was in the parts department. The 42mm anti-dive front forks were pretty huge for the era, and there was a stout fork brace built right into the front fender. At the rear, the rising-rate “Pro-Link”-style Ohlins monoshock was adjustable for preload, compression and rebound damping.

It is equipped with the belt-drive Pantah motor which was a strong and capable engine, and known to deliver in the Ducati 750 F1.

The bike’s instruments were nestled in a binnacle that on normal machines would be covered by a tinted plexiglass windscreen, but on the Paso was an extension of the bodywork. They were made up of equal-sized speedometer and tachometer, along with a fuel gauge.

The Paso was lauded as “the best-equipped Eurobike ever to take on the Japanese in the hotly contested 750 sports market.” Owning a Paso today is something of a labor of love. They’re also mechanically reliable. The carburetor–an automotive Weber two-barrel pressed into duty running both cylinders.

The Paso is a fun, unique, and totally ’80s ride for not a lot of cash. Riding one never fails to elicit a thumbs up, and an appreciative glance from the crowd at your local European bike night.

Top Speed is 131 MPH with 72 HP@7,000 RPM and with a dry weight of 429 pounds with a 5 speed transmission, 5.8 gallon fuel capacity and a 30.6 inch height seat

Contact: David Edinger
Edinger.david@gmail.com
+1-317-908-2573

For all that beauty and rarity, our buddy David is asking for just $5,500. That’s half what you’d pay for a grey market Japanese two stroke, and this one is twice as clean as most smokers you’ll come across.

Featured Listing: 1988 Ducati Paso 750
MV Agusta January 9, 2020 posted by

Down but not out: 2004 MV Agusta F4 750 SPR

When MV Agusta dropped the F4 to an adoring public, they made a significant splash. This was important, as the F4 was the rebirth of the legendary brand. Penned by designer Massimo Tamburini, the F4 was a spiritual successor to the Ducati 916 line. Featuring a timeless silhouette coupled with an all-new inline four cylinder 750cc power plant, the MV Agusta simply oozed quality and exclusivity. Eventually the 750 grew into a 1,000cc variant, and each of the two capacity lines spawned numerous special editions. In total there were nine different 750 variants offered, along with a dozen different 1,000cc limited offerings. Today’s F4 SPR was the pinnacle of the 750 line and intended for racetrack use. Both the SPR and the later SR (intended as a reimagined ORO edition) utilized a power unit derived from the Senna edition, itself a more powerful engine derived from the 750 Evo 2 (which was originally intended as a SPR model), which itself was an upgraded motor based on the standard 750 S unit. All clear?

To build an SPR required new engine internals to improve power and engine characteristics befitting a race bike. More power (146 HP @ 13,000 RPM) improved straight line performance when fitted with the race exhaust and eprom. The transmission was altered to a close ratio gearbox with a new clutch assembly. The chassis remained standard across the full 750 family, but suspension was upgraded for racetrack use. The SPR utilizes a larger fork with nitride treatment to reduce stiction. A race-spec rear shock sourced from Sachs was a step up from previous models. Weight was reduced through the use of carbon fiber body panels. As with all special F4s, a limited edition numbering scheme was created and a plate was attached to the headstock. The seller has included some great information about the F4 SPR, so I will let him pick up the story:

From the seller:
This is a very limited production MV Agusta F4 750 SPR #268 out of total 300 SPR production. At 146 hp the F4 SPR is the most powerful F4 750 produced. It was built only for 6 short months (June-December of 2003) to culminate the end of the F4 750 series production. There was only one color availabe, the flat black.

This is not a gussied up F4 but a distinct model within the series, produced by MV primarily for track use. SPR engine was equiped with a new cylinder head with re-designed combustion chambers, improved intake and exhaust manifolds, hotter cams, Mahle pistons with oil jet cooling, lightweight crankshaft. This resulted in 146 hp at 13,000 rpm. To improve performance on the track, SPR is equipped with a close ration gearbox. Depending on the final drive used, SPR’s top speed ranged from 170 mph to 183 mph – not bad for a 750cc motorcycle!

Suspension upfront are massive 49 mm Marzocchi forks with titanium nitride treatment. Sachs Racing damper is in the rear and has a dual compression adjustment for high and low speed. Front brakes are dual 6 piston calipers with a single 4 piston caliper in the rear.

More from the seller:
#268 is a strong runner. It does not overheat, leak or smoke. It comes with a full service history with most work done at Pro Italia. It just had a $650 service performed which included new battery, fuel pump, starter solenoid and chain lube. The stand switch was intermittent and was disconnected which results in the N green light to remain on constant. Tires are ok but would recommend replacing if you will be riding this SPR in anger.

It comes with an Ohlins steering damper, factory tool kit, owner manual, service records and one key. It has a clean California title and registration that is good until 12.18.2020

This SPR is not a garage queen. It was down earlier in its life and with the exception of the the slight damage to the rear brake pedal and a cosmetic (no punctures or leaks) dent in the radiator (see pics for both). The rest is cosmetic, primarily the right side fairings are scratched and the front fairing has two small cracks – one just above the headlight and the other below the mirror which I found only after cleaning the bike. The windscreen has a small crack on the top. I have included pictures with the fairings off for better inspection as well as the pictures of the damages. Please feel free to ask any questions.

MV Agusta F4 SPR models are rare. 300 unit count rare. They are some of the most capable 750s on the planet, exclusive as all get out, and expensive on the used market. Expect to part with $15K+ for an impeccable example of the breed. Which brings us to the downside of this particular example: it has been down. Purists will tell you to run – not walk – away from this one. But purists may have the cash a spic-n-span example will bring (even a lovingly used SPR is over $10k these days) And purists are more likely to collect than ride. If you are seeking an awesome bike that you want to use – possibly even on track days – do you really want a museum piece? The pictures show some bodywork damage, but some deeper inspection might be warranted to ensure the rest of the components are straight and serviceable. If they are, this could be a cheaper way to ease yourself into a rare and coveted SPR.

Today’s bike has a Buy It Now asking price of $6,600, with the seller open to offers. While that is not a bad deal for a rare SPR model, potential buyers will have to trade off between cost and value. Part of the bargain here is the in the unknown – damage which is beyond cosmetic. The seller has done a good job of describing and showing the effects of the impact, so that should help. If there are no hidden issues lurking, then all the better. But don’t discount the cosmetic either; those carbon skins do not come cheaply, if they can still be had at all (I don’t know about SPR parts availability – knowledgeable readers feel free to chime in). At the end of the day, you could have a rare rocket for fun, but not likely to be on the same level as a collector bike. Check it out here and then make your choice: are you willing to trade sweat equity for status, or do you buy only the best? Good Luck!!

MI

Down but not out: 2004 MV Agusta F4 750 SPR
Harley Davidson December 6, 2019 posted by

Dr. Evel – 1972 Harley-Davidson XR-750

Harley-Davidson introduced the XR-750 in 1969 in response to an AMA rule change that made their flat head racers finally obsolete.  The 1972 revision had an updated engine design and went on to an unmatched series of flat track wins and stadium jumps.  This example is fitted with the optional rear brake and a tuneable SuperTrapp exhaust.

1972 Harley-Davidson XR-750 for sale on eBay

After the quick initial conversion of their Sportster race engine, Harley took more time with Rev. 2.0 and commissioned a different layout with a wider bore and shorter stroke, and alloy heads.  In an interesting redux of the sidevalve KR engine, each pushrod has its own cam, uncomplicating cam profile and timing changes.  Power was 80 hp or better, spinning pretty well for a pushrod mill at nearly 8,000 rpm.  The 19-inch front wheel is right at the end of the Ceriani forks, so handling should be true to the 26-degree rake.  Number plates and mufflers conceal the twin-shock rear, and the tank/seat combo is fiberglass.

Offered by a Florida dealer, no history or past ownership is offered, but the eBay classified does hold promise.  Gotta love racebike details like both brake and shifter on the right peg.  XR fans will have to comment in their thoughts, however it would be unreasonable to expect anything on a dirt track racer to be original or unmodified ( or even un-damaged ! ).  From the eBay listing:

Blast from the past and a beautiful example! Inquire and we will answer ALL and ANY questions and we will try hard to get the answers. Hagerty values this at $50,000!

A redesign in 1972 resulted in a motorcycle that would be the most successful in the history of American Motorcyclist Association Racing.
Evel Knievel made the bike famous outside the fairly narrow lane of flat track racing, jumping his 1972 XR to a string of then-world records.

The right collector could take this XR in any number of directions – as raced by Roger Jr., an AMA champion tribute, or Evel Knievel lookalike.  Or home to the dirt as an amateur ?  Nothing as sensible or practical as a sportbike, but a could be a great project.

-donn

Dr. Evel – 1972 Harley-Davidson XR-750
MV Agusta October 7, 2019 posted by

For the children: 2002 MV Agusta F4 Senna

The Senna branded Ducati and MV Agusta special editions are all about friendship. Claudio Castiglioni is the principal figure in this equation; close, personal friend of F1 legend Ayrton Senna, and the captain of the ship for both Ducati and MV Agusta when the commemorative editions were released. In total Ducati offered 3 Senna editions of the 916, while MV Agusta created a tribute edition for both the F4 750 as well as the F4 1000. All net proceeds from Senna-branded bikes profited the Instituto Ayrton Senna, Ayrton’s personal foundation to care for poor and needy children in his native Brazil. Today’s example of the rare Senna breed is a 2002 MV Agusta F4, the 750cc variant limited to just 300 units world wide.

2002 MV Augusta F4 Senna for sale on eBay

The base MV Agusta F4 750 was no slouch when introduced. As is often noted, the F4 engine was partially developed by the Ferrari Formula 1 engineering team, and featured an inline four with 16 radially splayed valves. The intake trumpets were computer controlled and adjustable for length, allowing for better control of the torque curve depending upon RPM and throttle settings. Good for 126 horsepower in base form, the Senna model utilized the EVO 2 spec motor (which was blueprinted), providing an additional 10 HP and a slightly higher redline. Other bits from the EVO 2 were utilized, including parts for the never released SPR model (note the tach). Bodywork was carbon (instead of ABS), the wheels were model specific and a number plaque was fitted to prove authenticity and exclusivity.

From the seller:
are 2002 MV Augusta F4 Senna 173/300 with 7600 miles. 1 of only 50 imported to the US and the most beautiful IMHO. Always garaged and dealer serviced. I am the second owner having purchased in 2004 and owned for 15 years. I put on 7k of those miles.

Has Senna RG3 exhaust and chip installed. Includes Senna package wheel stand, cover, extra sprockets, and owners documents. Clean history and title. Never wrecked. The bike has been enjoyed and has had a few rock dings I have treated with touch up paint.

Recently came from dealer service with new battery and all new fluids. The bike is running great and ready to be enjoyed. Tires have plenty of tread but are older, (recommend replacement) otherwise, no other flaws to report.

Senna models are rare and tick all of the right boxes: exclusivity, carbon fiber, star power, stunning looks and great go-fast parts. New these would retail at a substantial premium over the standard S model F4. Hit the fast forward selector some 17 years, and prices have dropped to a point where mere mortals can afford – but still significantly higher than base model F4s will pull in. This particular bike looks to be well cared for across the span of two owners, with service records and some great extras. The BIN on this on is $12,500, with an opening auction ask of $11,500. So that should make the price expectations pretty clear. Check it out here, as we all know the MV Agusta F4 was the design Ducati should have used for the 999. With rare Senna livery this will be a stand out bike for years to come. Good Luck!!

MI

For the children: 2002 MV Agusta F4 Senna
Kawasaki July 27, 2019 posted by

Peer Pressure: 1985 Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo

The 1980s were wild time of experimentation. There was a technology explosion as liquid cooling, computerized fuel injection and other performance enhancers hit the scene. The sport bike battleground became a dizzying array of different configurations, each manufacturer vying for top honors on the racetrack and the showroom. Nowhere was this more evident than the brief window of the Turbo craze; the promise of liter bike power in a mid-sized sport bike never materialized, but the Big Four made seemingly every effort to make it so. Today what remains are the carcasses of the aftermath; an antiquated reminder of how quickly technology moves forward.

1985 Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo for sale on eBay

Honda Turbos followed the route of the 500 & 650 cc CX twins, Suzuki went with a 650cc Katana rip-off that originated the air-oil cooling later made famous by the GSX-R series, Yamaha phoned in a warmed over Seca with a unique blow-through, carbureted 650 cc configuration, and Kawasaki built the Top Dog of the bunch with the GPz750 Turbo. Rated by motorcycle magazines as the fasted bike in 1985, the Kawi Turbo did deliver on the 1/4 mile promise of turbocharging. However the drawbacks of forced induction – weight, cost, complexity, turbo lag, lack of power predictability, etc – quickly sunk the ship. Buyers weren’t interested in paying the premium for the Turbo, and riders preferred the real world performance of the less expensive liter bikes. The year of the Turbo was over.

From the seller:
1985 KAWASAKI GPz750 TURBO (ZX750E), RARE and ORIGINAL
Manufacture Date – 08/84. One of 1,500 1985 GPz750 Turbos produced!!

An ALL ORIGINAL example of the fastest production motorcycle made in 1985, per Kawasaki. OEM motor, bars, seat, pipes, turbo, levers, mirrors, signals, brakes, fairing, wheels, etc. The ONE exception is an after-market uni-shock (single shock) the previous owner installed. I have the OEM uni-shock for it too and it still works great.

CLEAN and CLEAR TITLE!

Runs great! Looks great! Collector quality! This rare bike has already surpassed collector and vintage status. And, dependent on who you ask or where you look, has reached Antique status at 35 years old. Does NOT run like an old, decrepit bike….no way. ONLY 10,846 original miles on the odometer (see pic). There may be a few more miles on it when it sells. A RARE TURBO ANTIQUE YOU CAN RIDE! And ride fast…if you’re into that sort of thing. How cool is that? Fresh gas. Fresh battery. Newer front and rear brakes. Turbo works like it should. All electrics work like they should. Good compression. Good tires. All those little OEM Kawa stickers and decals are still in place; see RPM gauge, chain guard, base of tank, etc. Dual helmet locks! Original, original, original. If you are tired of looking at GPz 750 Turbo’s that are not original and in great condition, you can now stop looking. You have found The One.

This Turbo was last ridden in 2012 – see pic of temp tag – with annual fuel and oil changes. Basically long-term storage. New battery installed and starts right up. Currently has 92 octane in it (premium). There is very, very light surface rust around the base of the tank neck filler hole – see pic. Tank is very, very clean.

This bike isn’t new (obviously) but in very, very, very excellent condition with SUPER LOW miles on it and the starting bid reflects that condition.

More from the seller:
Many OEM Kawi parts and accessories go with this antique GPz750 TURBO motorcycle. Items such as (see pics):
OEM Kawa Uni-shock absorber
OEM Kawa GPz750 Turbo tool kit!
OEM Kawa Ignition keys, 2 each
OEM Kawa SERVICE MANUAL (1984)
OEM Kawa WORKSHOP MANUAL; SERVICE MANUAL SUPPLEMENT (1985), TWO EACH
OEM Kawa GPz750 TECHNICAL TRAINING MANUAL, TWO EACH
OEM Kawa 20-page “PRESS KIT”. This is cool. An OEM (copy) of a 1985 Press Kit, authored and published in Japan but written in English. Used for the roll-out introduction of the 1985 GPz750 Turbo for the Press
OEM Kawa “750 Turbo” sticker (bumper sticker)
OEM Kawa Fuel filter, NEW, 1 each
OEM Kawa Air filter, NEW, 1 each
OEM Kawa Clutch Cable, NEW, 1 each
OEM Kawa Horns, dual set, 1 each

Kawasaki-branded key fob; color matched to bike
Mini-turbo key ring ornaments, color matched to bike, 2 each – Super Cool!
Bike cover with custom Kawasaki patch
Master Lock wheel disc lock; color matched to bike, 2 keys
OEM equivalent NEW battery, 14L-A2 (replaces 12N14-3A); just installed
Deltran “Battery Tender Automatic” (full size) WITH pigtail connection already installed on bike
K & N oil filters, NEW, 2 each
Canyon Carver handlebar tie-down set, 1 each
Custom aluminum license plate bracket
Some extra high-pressure fuel line hose

As stated previously on these pages, Factory Turbos are rare. But they are rare for some of the wrong reasons; nobody wanted them. The big Four quickly realized the poor ROI this direction was offering, and pivoted back to more mainstream sport bikes. Nearly 35 years later the song remains the same. Yes, prime examples of the XN, CX, XJ and ZX have slowly gained in value in recent years, but certainly not any faster than a super-clean example of any other 80’s era sport bike. It seems completely unfair, given the rarity, uniqueness and performance of these puffer bikes – but the public votes by wallet share, and these machines have proven to have a narrow focus of interested buyers. This particular GPz750 Turbo looks awesome and has some cool stuff that comes with it. But is it worth the opening ask of $9,999? Historic values would say probably not, but the market is constantly changing and conspires to make fools of us all. Check it out here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Peer Pressure: 1985 Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo
Suzuki June 10, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1989 GSX-R750 Slingshot

Update 7.23.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Presented in their alternate red and white livery, this K-variant GSX-R750 is ready to do battle at the next street cred concours. It has a careful 12,000 miles which is low, but more of a survivor than babied collector. Suzuki designed it with a laser focus on light weight and usable power, which made the GSX-R750 instantly popular.

1989 Suzuki GSX-R750 Slingshot for sale on eBay

Suzuki went seriously oversquare in the comprehensive 1988 revision, the 73mm bore and 44.7mm stroke allowing 13,000 rpm and 112 hp. Still air/oil cooled though, which eliminated weight and complexity. 36mm Mikuni carbs featured the asymmetrical slide hence the “Slingshot” name, beside the way it took off from the starting line. The alloy frame was updated, but continued with its lightweight and braced theme, carrying the engine lower than before. Cartridge forks were still right side up, and the Full Floater swingarm controlled the rear. Brakes were a more modern size with 310mm front disks. Without a spec sheet or caliper you can see the wheels are wider and noise is contained by a 4-into-1 exhaust.

The owner Scott’s comments:

If you’ve always wanted a really nice Slingshot here’s your chance. Red with white just under 12,000 original miles. This is a true survivor which is mostly stock other than the airbox and Supertrapp silencer. New battery just serviced all new fluids and carburetor cleaning/rebuild, new rear brake line, petcock, and cush drive. Everything including dash lights are in perfect working order, its ready to go for the new owner. It comes with a hard to find unpainted rear seat cowl along with a back of the gas tank bra. It’s a lot of fun to ride for a thirty-year-old bike. Rides very close to a modern bike and makes great sounds. It’s never been down to the best of my knowledge.

Here’s the back story, I bought it with the thought of turning it into a vintage race bike. When my friends saw it, particularly one that’s a GSXR nut, they convinced me it was too nice the convert. They were not willing to buy it but would not let me race it! So I found a Slab-side that was a better candidate. As I’m more of a track guy my street riding in next to zero nowadays so this has been sitting in my climate-controlled Man Town.

I like to sell bikes with no stories hence the recent service. I would rate this an 8 out of 10. It’s not a museum piece but a really nice original survivor that you will be proud to ride and turns heads wherever you go. There are a few stress cracks in the bodywork which is normal. There’s also a crack in the top right side of the fairing right underneath the throttle.

I’m a fifty plus year old you guy that collects bikes so I am quite picky and tend to understate a bikes condition. It’s registered in New Hampshire which does not title anything over fifteen years old, but I do have the previous owner’s title. I do not need to sell this bike so please don’t waste either of our times. I have a more pictures and happy to answer any questions. Thanks for looking!

1989 was the second year of the 2.0 GSX-R750, and small changes were made, mostly to increase available lean angle ! Otherwise it was a fitting second generation of a middleweight bred for the track, and a great value for the ante. Rather than a sheltered collector, this unrestored survivor could be enjoyed inside and out.

-donn

Featured Listing – 1989 GSX-R750 Slingshot
MV Agusta May 25, 2019 posted by

Beautiful Boy: 2000 MV Agusta F4 750

There are fast motorcycles, there are unique motorcycles, there are iconic motorcycles and there are truly beautiful motorcycles. The re-introduction of the fabled MV Agusta brand in 1999 seemingly achieved all those goals thanks to the vision of Massimo Tamburini and the might and wealth of the Cagiva Research Center.

2000 MV Agusta F4 750 for sale on eBay

Following the well-trodden path to sport bike glory, the MV Agusta F4 utilizes an in-line four cylinder engine with four-valve heads, fuel injection, and novel variable length intake runners to help control engine power across the rev range. Dubbed Torque Shift System (or TSS for short), that intake wizardry is one of two Formula 1 technologies utilized by the F4. The second is the oft-hyped hemispherical head chamber with 4-valves per cylinder. And while the hemi head and radially splayed four valves definitely maximize the airflow and flame front during combustion, neither are particularly new in terms of technology. All told the 750cc power plant was good for a stout 126 HP.

From the seller:
This motorcycle looks like is brand new…..it’s a model year 2000. 750 cc engine. sounds fantastic… bought it from the original owner who use to keep it in his own room…..always garaged and covered. it only has 3,900 original miles on it, it has good tires and all the fluids have been exchange recently. runs beautifully. it has quite a few carbon fiber pieces and the previous owner did some polishing on the engine cover, chain cover and foot pegs along with the rims… . too many things to list here. Look at the pictures and give me your thoughts about it. This one of a kind has to go to a good home. If you are looking for a unique, head-turner, clean bike, blast to ride, this is it….check what is available in the market!

In addition to the F1 technology, the F4 borrowed heavily from the fertile past of designer Tamburini. Both the single sided swing arm and the under seat exhaust are derivations of the Ducati 916 (which Tamburini also designed). The exhaust pokes out of the underside of the seat in a not-so-subtle fan out of four separate pipes, and sounds glorious. The rest of the bike relies upon yards of aluminum for the frame, beefy front forks (Showa), and a fair bit of carbon fiber flair.

The introduction of the F4 was a massive investment into technology, and the resultant bikes were as beautiful as they were fast. Limited production and high prices kept them to the exclusive territory of well-heeled riders or even better heeled collectors. Today they are available on the used bike market at more realistic prices – but still not cheap. This particular example is an early model with few miles (<4,000) and what appears to be a great deal of care bestowed upon it. With a Buy It Now price of $7,500, this bike is asking strong, but not outrageous money. The seller is open to offers, so there may be an opportunity to pull this down somewhat. With bikes of this caliber, prospective buyers would do well to find the cleanest, best example possible. I could do with less of the polished bits, but this 2000 MV Agusta F4 750 looks to be better than most we have seen in some time and is worth checking out. The full details are here. Good luck!!

MI

Beautiful Boy: 2000 MV Agusta F4 750