Posts by tag: 750

Ducati March 13, 2017 posted by

Middle Child: 1986 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale

Until pretty recently, Ducati’s 750 F1 was the redheaded stepchild of the Ducati family: it wasn’t a bevel-drive and so wasn’t really considered worthy of being considered a “classic” Ducati, didn’t have the reliability [cough, cough] of the modern two-valve twin, or the performance credentials of the liquid-cooled four-valve superbikes. But values have been rising rapidly in recent years, and the F1 represents an important bridge between two eras of Ducati sportbikes.

The 750 F1 was built around their proven trellis frame and a 749cc version of the Pantah two-valve L-twin, tuned to produce 76hp and was wrapped in bodywork designed to resemble the successful TT1 racing machines. Wheels were the height of 80s fashion, with a tiny 16″ hoop up front and 18″ at the rear. This was the very last Ducati produced before Cagiva took over and it uses a pair of carburetors configured like the older bevel-drive bikes instead of the later machines that nestled both units in the engine’s vee. Not the most efficient from a packaging standpoint, with those air cleaners jutting out bodywork.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale

Original surviving example with 3850 original miles. Runs very well indeed. Its tight and everything works. Toolkit and owners manual included. Will need tires if ridden aggressively. An uncompromising street legal Italian thoroughbred.

Bidding is up above $10,000 with the Reserve Not Met and very little time left on the auction. These are the very last Ducatis before the modern era that was ushered in by Cagiva, and that gives them a special place in Ducati’s history, and the uptick in values reflects that. This example looks very clean and is in excellent condition, with low miles and the seller even includes a short video of the bike roaring up the street!

-tad

Middle Child: 1986 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale
Suzuki February 18, 2017 posted by

Unloved Kat: 1997 Suzuki Katana 750 with 1,300 miles

If we were to ask RSBFS readers what 750cc sportbike of the 1990’s they would most like to own now, I would bet most would choose a Suzuki GSX-750R Limited Edition or maybe a Yamaha OW01 or perhaps a Kawasaki ZX7R/ ZX7RR.  A few intrepid souls might throw a Honda VFR750 or Ducati 748 into the mix but would anyone have the Suzuki Katana 750 on their list?

1997 Suzuki Katana 750 with 1300 miles

The 2nd generation Katana 750 (also known as the GSX-S) was produced at a time when Suzuki couldn’t seem to figure out where to focus its efforts.  Suzuki’s lineup included race oriented machines such as the 4 cylinder powered GSX-750R and a new V-Twin powered TL1000 series.  These were offered along with several more two other street-oriented models; the Katana 750 and the “dramatically styled!” RF900.  And to make matters more complex, new models such as the GSX-600R, TL1000R, RF600R and Katana 600 were already in the pipeline and would be introduced within the next year.  This wide variety of offerings was great for potential buyers who could find a bike exactly suited for their particular needs and price range but it also meant intense competition for development and marketing monies.  The result was the Katana lineup (and to a large extent, the RF lineup too) didn’t received the attention/development monies to keep up with the competition and regularly came in last in model comparisons.

Even though it never got much development support from the Hamamatsu home office, the 2nd generation Katana wasn’t a bad bike.  Based on the same long-stroke 750 engine as the GSX-R750 but tuned to focus more on lower and mid-range torque delivery than top speed, the Katana was perfectly adept as a street oriented sportbike with light touring aspirations.  While the competition were all moving towards pressed aluminum featherweight frames and fuel injection, the Katana frame was still steel and 36mm carbs were used to preserve low and mid-range torque while not sacrificing too much top end, and suspension/forks were standard for the time 41mm.  Styling was contemporary for the period and build quality was good (although not a match of Honda of the period).

Its important to note the Katana did have one “ace” over the competition; price.  The wide lineup meant all the major components were already available to Suzuki.  The result was that while many other 750 sport bikes were bumping the $8,000 USD price barrier, the Katana 750 was offered for barely over $7000.

Overall the 750cc Katana sold well but not spectacularly.  A revision in 1998 (the year after this bike)  with updated bodywork and improved mechanicals did help make the Katana a bit more popular but it seems like the entire model line was never a priority for Suzuki.   The 2nd gen Katana/GSX-S seems to fall into the same category as the Kawasaki ZX6/ZZR600 or maybe the Yamaha FZR’s of the same period; a sportbike not really intended for track use, bikes with a focus more on price/value than pure performance.

This particular Katana 750cc has obviously been parked for quite a while and the seller freely admits it will need servicing.  Pictures are limited but everyone looks to be OEM and intact.  Mileage is only 1300 miles since new so its really not even been broken in.

Here is what the seller has to say

  • Only 1,300 miles.
  • Has been stored since 2004.
  • Has a small dent in the gas tank where I dropped my helmet on it and a broken mirror.
  • There are a couple minor scratches. Otherwise in excellent condition.
  • Will need a new battery.

Overall it seems like it was a bike that was bought, ridden for maybe a season or two and then tucked away with “I’ll get back into riding next year”.  Obviously any new owner would need to plan for fresh fluids and rubber as well as a possible shock rebuild and maybe front fork fluids being done.  Also the seller indicates some pending registration fees in California so this one might be best suited to someone intending to take it out of state?

Okay so now the question – why should you consider this 750cc Katana? Given its lack of breakthrough technology and historical reputation against the competition of the time it seems highly unlikely that it will appreciate much in value.  I only found one other post on RSBFS for a 2nd generation Katana and that was back in 2011 for a 1990 edition so the market value of this one can’t really be known.

Essentially this is a 20 years old bike that was never broken in.   Yes it needs a full refresh  so it will take some monies to enjoy it but the stupid low price of $1200 USD and ultra low mileage makes me think you really can’t go wrong on this one – its probably worth that price in parts alone given Suzuki’s interchangeable component philosophy of the times.  This really seems like a good opportunity for someone to pick up a 750cc sportbike that can easily be brought back into daily use, especially if they are looking for a daily driver with some light touring capabilities.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Unloved Kat:  1997 Suzuki Katana 750 with 1,300 miles
Yamaha July 12, 2016 posted by

The Real Thing Redux: 1999 Yamaha R7 for Sale

1999 Yamaha R7 L Front

A pure homologation special never intended for mass-production, the Yamaha YZF-R7 OW02 was a spiritual successor to the storied OW01 that took the fight to the famous Honda RC30 and the Ducati 851 Corsa featured this past weekend. But where the Honda used a different engine configuration than their more common mass production sportbikes and introduced a host of other parts that looked as trick as their specs would suggest, Yamaha’s superbike special appeared, at a glance, to be just a hopped-up YZF-750R. In reality, it was every bit as exotic as Honda’s V4 machine. By the time the R7 rolled around, Yamaha didn’t even have a 750 sportbike in production, which gave the R7 at least a little bit more exotic cachet when new. Looking very much like a slightly bulkier R6 or an R1 with smaller headlights, the familial resemblance is unmistakable, at least on examples that actually have headlights…

1999 Yamaha R7 L Rear

Sold for just two years, the R7 was discontinued after the disappointing performance of Yamaha’s WSBK team. To keep the racing competitive and encourage different manufacturers to participate, twins like Ducati’s 916 were allowed a displacement advantage to overcome their relative lack of power compared to four-cylinder machines. But parity is a moving target in racing and, by the late 1990s, the rules started to favor the v-twin bikes so even Honda switched to a new, two-cylinder engine configuration in order to compete.

1999 Yamaha R7 Engine

Equally disappointing was the R7 road bike’s tested performance: by 1999, emissions laws had evolved far past a point where it was possible to ride your racebike to the track, pull off the lights, win a race, then ride it home. The result? A dead stock, the R7 made just 106hp, on-par for 750cc sportbikes of the era, but very disappointing for a pricey exotic. That problem could easily be fixed by activating the second set of injectors sleeping within the motor and fitting a revised airbox that gave a ram-air effect, but the full 162hp also shortened service life of the engine. None of which was an issue if you planned to race your R7, but a bit of an issue if you wanted to use it on the road.

1999 Yamaha R7 Dash

I’m not sure the bike was ever officially sold for road use here in the USA, although I’m sure there are a few kicking around in states with looser regulations. That’s hardly a problem here, since this is a racebike.

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Yamaha R7 for Sale

Don’t miss Your chance to become an owner of very rare Yamaha YZF-R7. Only 500 was made. All documents in order, customs clearance. Very good condition. Can be delivered anywhere in Europe.

In 2001, the Russian company PANAVTO became the general sponsor of the Spanish racing team, taking on board the highly positioned at the time the Spaniard Juan Bautista Borja. It has at its disposal one of the most famous in the world, but same time very rare bike – Yamaha R7 (OW02). It was most advanced racing motorcycle for the World Superbike that time. It was the first and not the most successful attempt to join the Russians in WSBK, as the costs of participation in the series proved to be much more serious than it was then assumed management of the company, and Juan Borge managed to earn 12 points for the season, becoming the 33rd on its results (out of 44 pilots, published at the start at least once).

1999 Yamaha R7 ClutchThe R7 is a very exotic and desirable motorcycle, and this genuine World Superbike-prepped machine offers up tons of legitimate race-track performance, along with that eye-watering $29,000 Buy It Now price. So far there hasn’t been much interest, but is that because of the price, this bike’s undistinguished racing history, or because the bike currently resides in far-flung Latvia? Is someone out there brave enough to drop nearly $30k on a very exotic track-day toy? Let’s hope so.

-tad

1999 Yamaha R7 R Front

The Real Thing Redux: 1999 Yamaha R7 for Sale
Honda June 10, 2016 posted by

VFR=Very F’n Reliable: 1993 Honda VFR750 in white

The first generation VFR 750F was only offered with the uber-cool white bodywork in 1993 and it still looks quite good, especially in comparison to the other sportbike designs of the 1990’s (cough-cough-I’m-looking-at-you-1993 Suzuki GSX-750R).  Fairly cheap just a few years ago, trying to find a 1993 VFR with the OEM white bodywork in good condition is now getting to be quite hard. Values have been increasing recently, as shown by this under 10,000 mile edition we listed last year went that for about $5,500 USD, well above its book value.

This one has a significantly higher number of miles than the one from last year but condition looks to be excellent and more importantly, mostly OEM.

nr7501

1993 Honda VFR 750 on ebay

Back in the early 1990’s the 600cc class really started to upset the previously dominant 750cc class both in terms of performance and in sales. New 600cc bikes like the Honda 600 F2 and Kawasaki ZX6R were suddenly close performance rivals to the previously dominant 750cc class and while some companies such as Kawasaki and Yamaha responded by making their 750cc offerings even more track tech oriented, Honda decided to go a different route.

Instead of a single pure track oriented 750cc offering like the Yamaha OW01 or Kawasaki ZX7RR, Honda instead took a two-pronged approach.  Honda put their considerable technological efforts towards what would become the mind bending oval piston equipped NR750 while at the same time allowing their 750 street effort to take a more balanced approach.  The result were two epic bikes; a technological tour de force in the NR750 and possibly the best all around sportbike of the 1990’s, the VFR750.

nr7502

When the VFR750 debuted Honda had just come through a debacle with the bikes predecessor, the VF700.  Flaws in the camshaft casting process had produced a reputation for “chocolate camshafts…they melt when they get hot!” and Honda was determined to restore their engineering reputation.  Rumor is that the focus on reliability was so intense that Honda lost money on the VFR750 for several years just to restore its reputation.

While reliability was a focus, the performance side of the VFR750 was nothing to sneeze at.  The VFR’s handling was on a par with the best superbikes of the day. A stock VFR finished eighth at the Suzuka 8-Hour race and another nearly stock version finished in 3rd place at the Donnington park Trophy race against competition that included the legenday Kevin Schwantz.    The Honda VFR 750 offerred bulletproof reliability and performance that measured up to all but the most performance-oriented bikes of the time.   It should come as no surprise that the VFR would in later years become a big sales success, win bike of year numerous times in the mid to late 1990’s and was even crowned sportbike of the decade by numerous motorcycling publications.

nr7503

This particular VFR has a good chunk of miles on it; the seller indicates over 45,000.  Even so condition of the bike looks to be truly excellent, with no blemishes on the triple tree or gauges.   The only items that seem of note are the tailpiece and exhaust which appear to be non stock, there seem to be extra/non-stock reflectors on the front forks and perhaps a bit of paint bubbling or road rash on the lower mid fairing.

Here is what the seller has to say:

  • New brakes, grips, oil & filter
  • Good tires
  • Good chain and sprockets
  • Perfect seat
  • No leaks or other issues, Everything works, starts on first push
  • Yoshimura Pipe – subtle but noticeable
  • Needs 1 fork seal, plastics not perfect.

nr7504

So now the question – what is this lovely VFR in the cool white worth?  Well let me put it this way…when I saw that the Buy-It-Now price was only $2,350 USD I almost bought it myself.  The condition of this one looks to be very good, its the rare white bodywork scheme, maintenance history looks reasonable and while the mileage is kind of high, given the VFR’s build quality reputation I don’t think there will be major issues once any initial issues are resolved.

This may be one of those rare occasions when a seller has underestimated the value of his bike.    I expect this one to sell pretty quickly so if you missed out on the one from last year you might want to act fast.

Marty/Dallaslavowner

VFR=Very F’n Reliable:  1993 Honda VFR750 in white
Ducati June 6, 2016 posted by

Still Truckin’ – 1986 Ducati 750 F1

One of Ducati’s earliest racey replica’s the 1985-88 750 F1 was based on the engine from the Pantah.   Rather than retire and restore, this owner has continued to ride, update and repair the bike.  The result is a rider, not a museum piece, but one you could throw a leg over and enjoy today.

20160606 1986 ducati 750 f1 left

1986 Ducati 750 F1 for sale on eBay

20160606 1986 ducati 750 f1 right

20160606 1986 ducati 750 f1 dash

Presented as the factory was struggling with cash flow issues, the engineering done for the 750 F1 was limited, and the bikes lightweight, focused on sport.  The desmodue achieved 76 hp, routed through a dry clutch and 5-speed transmission.  Suspension was fairly basic with single-adjustable 40 mm forks and monoshock.  Stoppage provided by triple 280mm Brembo brakes, fronts semi-floating.   Now a classic Ducati look, the trellis frame peeks behind the tricolore endurance fairing.

20160606 1986 ducati 750 f1 right rear

20160606 1986 ducati 750 f1 tank detail

Showing a little over 27,000 miles, this 750 F1 looks great, as its age translates to less that 1,000 miles per year.  Beside only the normal patina of a road bike, the maintenance history is good news.  From the eBay auction:

1986 Ducati F1 (ZDM3AAALXGB751485) in excellent overall condition with very few minor cosmetic blemishes: two small dime sized dings on right top edge of tank, some spider crazing on fiberglass fairing, some minor paint scratches and touchups where needed. See pictures for some details. 3rd owner from new.

PHF 38mm carbs fitted. Two into one original Conti exhaust sounds great. Kill switch and switch gear from Bevel Heaven. Belts changed end of 2013; in 2014, less than 700 miles ago, new tires, new chain, replacement rear Hagon mono shock; overhauled front and rear brake calipers; new vacuum petcock. Has slight leak on front fork seals, need replacing sooner or later.

20160606 1986 ducati 750 f1 right fairing

20160606 1986 ducati 750 f1 left seat

In hindsight, Ducati’s laser focus on getting the F1’s out the door, while depriving them of the latest innovations, made for a lighter, more raw, and sportier build.  It also got them over the hump, and with Cagiva’s ( note Elephant decals ) help, they were on to bigger and better, as the belt-driven desmoquattros were just over the horizon.  Total production of the 1986 F1 was around 1,200 machines, now how many could say they were kept operational, ridden, maintained and updated over that 30 years ?

-donn

20160606 1986 ducati 750 f1 left tank

Still Truckin’ – 1986 Ducati 750 F1
Kawasaki May 26, 2016 posted by

Generation ZX: 2002 Kawasaki ZX7R with 4,380 miles

Back in the 1990’s a rule change made it so that racing bikes had to be based on bikes available to the public.  This change was known as the “homologation rule” and it meant that suddenly regular riders were able to get their hands on street legal machines that really did have track oriented components.    The new requirement would perhaps have its most drastic result on the 750cc market segment, as seen in the Suzuki GSX-750R, Kawasaki ZX7/ZX7R and for those with a bit more cash, the Yamaha OW01.

zx7r1

2002 Kawasaki ZX7R for sale on eBay

The ZX7R was not the ultimate Kawasaki of the period, that claim belongs to the ZX7RR.  But the P series ZX7R was the final iteration of the ZX7 series that began in 1989 with the H model lineup.  The P series incorporated all the changes since then and featured an engine with a shorter stroke/wider bore which gave it much more midrange than previous models.  It also came with distinctive twin ram-air intakes, Tokiko brakes and a suspension that was adjustable front and rear.

zx7r3

Mileage on this 2002 Kawasaki ZX7R is a very low 4,380 miles according to the ebay seller.  All items appear to be factory OEM including the often replaced turn signals and mirrors which is nice but the dark photos do make it hard to see the rear license plate assembly (which got cut/trimmed on a lot of bikes of this era).

Overall the bike looks great, with only things that jump out at me is a dirty/possibly discolored windscreen and tire condition that looks a bit odd.  But the seller indicates fresh tires so perhaps the picture was right after some stickers were removed from the tires?

Note:  the seller also lists a broken lower fairing that doesn’t seem to be shown in the pictures.

s-l1600

So, what is this low mileage P generation Kawasaki 750cc worth?   Well its not going to be as collectible as a first gen H1 or ZX7RR but it i its a last gen ZX7R, has low mileage and looks to have all the OEM pieces.  The Buy It Now price is only $3,500 USD is in line with current values.

While this one probably won’t appreciate much,  it would be a nice pickup for someone who wants to relive a little of their youth.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Generation ZX:  2002 Kawasaki ZX7R with 4,380 miles
Bimota April 3, 2016 posted by

Classic Italian Performance: 1986 Ducati Bimota DB1 for Sale

1986 Bimota DB1 R Front

The DB1 was the quintessential Bimota, packaging a reliable Italian powerplant into a lightweight package with excellent handling… Wait, what? Actually, in spite of what you might expect, the belt-driven, SOHC Pantah engine is very reliable when properly maintained, and can be tuned to make good power. Sure, the 75 claimed horses don’t sound like much, but the twin is very flexible and the noise, oh the noise!

1986 Bimota DB1 L Rear2

Although Bimota made its name building lightweight, nimble bikes around reliable Japanese powerplants, it’s no surprise that, time and again, they’ve gone back to Ducati to supply engines for some of their best-selling and most popular machines. Ducati haven’t always made the most powerful engines, but they’re a great match for Bimota’s lightweight ethos and the bikes that result are beautiful.

1986 Bimota DB1 Dash

The seller indicates that this was originally a Japanese bike, but currently has a California title, which should allay fears of its legality, as California’s DMV is notoriously strict.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Bimota DB1 for Sale

Up for action is early 1986 Bimota DB1 This is a original clean motorcycle that I am selling my collection bike. The Bike is only 21000 KM (about 13000 mile). There is little scratch but never been drop or any accident.

This bike have been currently service and maintained (spend $900). All functions on the bike work properly. No oil leaks! Run perfect as new bike and It is stable at 240Km high speed. You will not be disappointed. 

The Bike was imported form Japan currently has California Title. It is a 1986 model but has been titled as a 1980 Bimota DB1. I purchased this bike in 2006 from a good friend who own Famous Bike shop in CA. The bike was stored at his bike shop and taken care of.

And this bike is for not a beginner, only for those who know the value of a Bimota and what it is capable of… I have a clear CA title in hand and I will be happy to answer any questions you have. The bike is sold “as is.”

1986 Bimota DB1 Front Wheel

Built between 1985 and 1990, the DB1 was one of the best-selling Bimotas, with almost 700 produced. There’s plenty of time left on the listing, and bidding is up to just $11,000 with the reserve not yet met. I’d expect this one has a long way to go before it finds a buyer.

-tad

1986 Bimota DB1 R Side

 

Classic Italian Performance: 1986 Ducati Bimota DB1 for Sale
Kawasaki October 30, 2015 posted by

Hey Nineteen – 1996 Kawasaki ZX-7R

Way back when, in ’97 – no actually 1996, Kawasaki transitioned from the ZXR750 to the ZX-7R, and incorporated the steady evolution and innovation from the factory and AMA Superbike race teams.  Though the model continued until 2003, the 90’s were good years for the ZX-7R, Scott Russell winning the AMA Superbike in 1992 and WSBK in 1993, and Doug Chandler winning the AMA in 1996 and 1997, both on factory-supported Team Muzzy machines.

20151029 1996 kawasaki zx-7r right

1996 Kawasaki ZX-7R for sale on eBay

20151029 1996 kawasaki zx-7r left front

Based on the 748cc DOHC inline four, the ZX-7R has 112 hp available.  Ignition is electronic and the four carburetors are 38mm.  The twin aluminum spars look massive but are light in weight, and the rake and trail numbers ensure stability.  The rear swingarm is also alloy, with fully adjustable monoshock.  The 43mm inverted forks are also fully adjustable.  Good size brakes – 320mm front disks with 6-piston calipers, and 230mm rear.  The angular endurance fairing is great looking and provides ram-air to the engine.

20151029 1996 kawasaki zx-7r binnacle

20151029 1996 kawasaki zx-7r tank

Offered by a closet collector, the ZX-7R was bought because it was super nice and then restored pretty much to perfection.  Centered around the bodywork, the colors, and the decals are smoothed into the clear coat.  Not quite sure about the originality of the paint scheme or whether that’s even important, but it does look great.  The bike appears to have a -RR tail fairing, but perhaps the single seat was an option in ’96.  Neat color-matched Arai is part of the deal.  Other details are mentioned in the eBay auction:

I have a detailed list (several pages) of all the restorations performed for the new owner.  As a multiple Sport Bike purchaser, I am EXTREMELY picky when it comes to the exterior fuel tank condition.  This tank is 100% dent-free.  The in-laid and clear-coated “Ninja” decals are flawless and their color is vibrant and brilliant.  Other upgraded items include complete frame-up painting, cowling-matched painting, decal clear-coating, powder-coating, overall restoration, tire-hugger kit, numerous carbon fiber components including frame sliders and handlebar column cover, rear fender eliminator kit, integrated rear blinker kit, cowling-integrated front turn signals, ZX7R handle grip sliders, smoked windshield, Pro Grip Carbon Fiber “look” tank protector, carbon fiber top tank protector, checkered flag graphics on underside cowling, and upgraded Yoshimura RS-3 Stainless exhaust.  The tires are brand-new Dunlop Sportmax (Front 120/70ZR-17 and Rear 190/50ZR-17) that have less than 47 miles on them.

20151029 1996 kawasaki zx-7r right fairing

20151029 1996 kawasaki zx-7r left tank

The cosmetic and mechanical restoration work hidden by the fairing is also detailed, and is comprehensive:

The parts break-down for the restoration included disassembling the cycle to the bare frame for painting and powder-coating, engine modification services, shaving holes in the tail section for the blinker elimination kit, re-building the carbs, re-finishing the frame/swing-arm/rear sub-frame, sand-blasting, re-painting and re-finishing the front and rear wheel assemblies, re-finishing the rear brake holder, fork tubes, foot rest brackets, and sub-links, re-finishing the tail-section, adding the rear tire-hugger package, installing new battery, replacing all 4 spark plugs, adding a new “quick acceleration chain and sprocket, timing chain, timing chain guide, engine mount nuts and bolts, 16 new valve seals, cylinder head gasket cover, O-ring heads, clutch cover gasket, transmission cover gasket, oil pan gasket, spring-leaf, oil cooler rotator pump, rotor pump, oil pump body, oil filter O-ring, breather cover gasket, various seals, wheel bearing kits both front and rear, and mounting and balancing wheels.  Lastly, the entire engine was inspected and rebuilt with new cylinder base gaskets, new cylinder head gaskets, and piston ring sets.

20151029 1996 kawasaki zx-7r left front wheel

20151029 1996 kawasaki zx-7r left rear wheel

The signature of Scott Russell ( on both frame beams ) is a cool addition to a nice collector bike.  Well used at some point in its 21,000 mile history, though it’s hard to see it now.  While it would be sweet to put this 19 year-old back into service, an occasional ride to a show or fan corral might be a better choice.  Probably’d make the previous owner a lot happier too…

20151029 1996 kawasaki zx-7r right seat

-donn

Hey Nineteen – 1996 Kawasaki ZX-7R