Posts by tag: Yamaha

Yamaha March 26, 2018 posted by

Race ready: Deus-restored 1973 Yamaha TD3

As a road racing icon, the Yamaha TD series really needs no introduction. The internet is positively lousy with rhapsodic accounts of its achievements on a racetrack in the hands of big names and amateurs alike. Not just screamingly fast, the 250cc parallel twin TDs were reliable as the sunrise, which made them very hard for contemporary iron to top.

1973 Yamaha TD3 for sale on eBay

They’re still darlings of vintage racers, aided by simple air-cooled architecture and widely available parts. This 1973 Yamaha TD3 has been made race ready by Woolie’s Workshop, an arm of the Deus Ex Machina classic bike franchise. It has been updated with a front disc brake and an Ohlins steering damper to edge it closer to modern spec.

From the eBay listing:

Fresh from Deus’ Woolie’s Workshop

c.1973 Yamaha TD3 250cc Racing Motorcycle

The mainstay of 250cc and 350cc class racing at national and international level for many years, the twin-cylinder two-stroke Yamaha well deserved the title of ‘privateer’s friend’. The 250cc TD2 arrived in 1969, replacing the TD1C, and immediately proved capable of winning Grands Prix, privateer Kent Andersson triumphing in the German round at Hockenheim that year, one of Yamaha’s most significant classic victories. The giant leap forward from the TD1C had been achieved thanks to a comprehensive redesign that saw the porting and exhaust system updated, superior Mikuni carburettors adopted and the chassis, suspension and brakes greatly improved. Looking like a scaled down Norton Featherbed, the TD2’s chassis was a development of that used for the RD56 works racer. Kel Carruthers on the works Benelli ‘four’ denied Kent Anderson the 250cc World Championship in 1969 but the following year the TD2 came good when Rod Gould, riding a works machine entered by Yamaha Motor NV of Holland, took the title.

The TD3 was an evolutionary step forward in the long line of successful Yamaha air-cooled two-strokes, and as it happens it would also be the last in its line. Released by the Japanese marque in 1972, the TD3 benefitted from a horizontally split crankcase, which holds the 247cc internals, producing about 50bhp and a redline in excess of 10,000 revs, which can propel the diminutive little racer’s 230 pounds to blistering racing performance figures with incredible reliability.

Fresh from Deus Ex Machina’s “Woolie’s Workshop”, this 250cc Yamaha 2-Stroke screamer was built to be competitive. Like all the builds out of Woolie’s Workshop, it has that ‘final 5%”, which is always the most assiduously earned and separates the great bikes from the mere good ones. Every component was addressed, rebuilt, refinished and restored with Woolie’s exquisite attention to detail, including engine, gearbox, and all cycle parts. Upgrades include the Ohlins steering damper and disc front brake. Built to race, but with no track time since the build, this is a fantastic opportunity to own a custom purpose-built race bike to be a class winning AHRMA machine. Tuck in, hold on, and safety-wire your bum to the seat….

Sold on a Bill of Sale.

For further information and additional photos, please visit: GloryMotorworks.com/Motorcycle-Sale

The bike has been run but not raced since it was finished, so it is just waiting for a vintage racer to give it the neck wringing it so richly deserves.

 

Race ready: Deus-restored 1973 Yamaha TD3
Yamaha March 23, 2018 posted by

Me Too: 1982 Yamaha Seca 650 Turbo

While technically the 1979 Kawasaki Z1R TC was the first factory turbocharged motorcycle, that was more of a partnership and sales tool to move Z1R units – not a full production motorcycle. It was Honda who fired the first real salvo when it came to fully integrated factory turbos, with the intent that turbo power would become the future of motorcycling. The remainder of the Big Four jumped into the technology cauldron immediately, anxious not to be left behind. In the case of Yamaha, this reeked of a “me too” effort; the XJ650LJ had the necessary elements of a turbocharger and zoomy futuristic styling, but little else was new or noteworthy. Like all the factory turbos of the 1980s, the Seca quickly fell by the wayside as an expensive novelty. The world did not vote with their wallets, and all the manufacturers discovered that they already had better bikes of the normally aspirated variety on the showroom floor. The cost and complexities of turbo power did not immediately add up to the promise of a better future. Three decades later, bike such as this 1982 Yamaha Seca 650 Turbo remain rare and relatively unloved.

1982 Yamaha Seca 650 Turbo for sale on eBay

When it comes to approaches, Yamaha took no real risk in designing the Turbo variant of the Seca. Utilizing the existing Seca platform (four cylinder, air cooled, two valves, carbs), Yamaha engineers fitted a tiny 39mm Mitsubishi turbo behind the engine and below the tranny, just ahead of the rear wheel. This was nice from an overall packaging stance, but the long exhaust primaries to feed the turbine create some degree of dreaded turbo lag. The interesting exhaust piping doesn’t end there; while the Seca has two mufflers, only the left pipe is normally in operation. The sole function of the right muffler is to vent gasses once the wastegate fully opens. And unlike Honda, which stuffed their turbo bikes full of computers and electronic hardware to manage the fuel injection and engine functions, Yamaha utilized blow-through carburetors and eliminated much of the computerized complexity. Air cooling maintains simplicity and helps to keep weight down, although The Seca Turbo weighs in some 65 pounds more than the normally aspirated XJ650 on which it is based. Air-assisted suspension provides a nice level of adjustability, but the rest of the package (including the brakes – and yes, that is a drum on the rear) is pure XJ650 Seca. With only about 7 PSI of boost available before the wastegate shuts the party down, the Seca remains one of the more mild factory Turbo bikes to ride.

From the seller:
1982 Yamaha Seca 650 TURBO
This motorcycle has been in a climate controlled museum for the last 10+ Years. There is no sun fading – It’s a time capsule.
Comes with both Keys.

My Master Mechanic & I Un-Mothballed recently, Installed a new battery, Changed the Engine Oil & Filter, Flushed the Carbs & Fuel System (Which had been Drained and Oil Fogged) and 1/2 filled the gas tank with NON-Ethanol Premium Fuel. After a little cranking it came to life – but in checking everything out from sitting in a display mode for so long we noticed the turbo waste gate was partially stuck open – so – we removed the turbo. Instead of just cleaning everything up and putting it back together – we sent the turbo unit to G-Pop (see picture of the receipt) and had the Turbo totally Rebuilt – Cleaned – Balanced & Blue Printed before reinstalling it. I do not sell motorcycles out of my museum that do not operate mechanically correct for the new owners. The reserve will reflect this upgrade to the unit but is worth it for the service it will provide to the new owner.

More from the seller:
There are no fuel leaks. It idles with the choke off. It Revs & Restarts fine. If the plan of the new owner is to ride the bike – I’d recommend a general check over due to the time the bike has been idle. We haven’t driven it other than around the parking lot due to the age of the tires. If it goes back into another collection the tires won’t matter. It the new owner wants to drive it on the street etc. he’ll get to pick the tires of his choice. The bike is titled & licensed in Oregon.

Here is a You-Tube Link from the seller showing a walk around of the motorcycle and starting and running the unit:

This particular Seca 650 Turbo is coming out of a private museum. It has a few more miles on it that what would be expected from a museum example, but then again we should just be happy some of these odd bikes have been preserved. Overall this bike looks great for its age. The Alpinestars sticker and newer Yamaha logo on the right side of the lower chin fairing are flagrant non-stock items, but providing that these are not hiding some damage then no harm, no foul. The sticking wastegate is a normal issue for any turbo bike – regular usage alleviates these types of recurring problems. And regular riding is exactly what these bikes were designed for, turbo lag and all. Riders will find that the performance is not quite up to the hype, but even today these bikes offer a fun rush once the boost builds to its max. Heavier than contemporary 1100cc machines with performance nipping at the heels of the 750s of the day, the promise of a boosted future was put on hold after the 1983 model year (all 1984 examples are hold over units from ’83). This bike appears to be in decent condition, is clean and presents well. Located in Oregon, check it out here. You don’t see too many of these Seca Turbos any longer, so act quickly if you are interested. Good Luck!!

MI

Me Too: 1982 Yamaha Seca 650 Turbo
Yamaha March 18, 2018 posted by

Wild Kingdom – 1974 Yamaha TZ750

No less a rider than Giacomo Agostini abdicated his dynasty at MV Agusta when Yamaha introduced the 4-cylinder 2-stroke 700cc racebike. He won the 1974 Daytona 200 with it, and its 750cc progeny went on to a 12-year run on the beach.  This newly restored example has matching numbers and a nicely documented race history.

1974 Yamaha TZ750 for sale on eBay

As ever, specs for a race machine are a liar’s poker affair.  The engine had a nasty tone even at idle and was good for 140hp at full song.  The frame was a twin downtube arrangement and the swingarm was all new, spread at the rear wheel but converging at the bottom pivot and top where the shock mounted, the Monocross went on to bigger and better.  Initially a pair of RD350 race engines joined at the hip, the TZ750 was more purpose-built, water cooled though the crankcase bristles with fins.  Expansion chambers mostly taking the path of least resistance – except for the left which wound around and through the frame.  Triple hydraulic disk brakes provided the retro-force.

The owner has treated this TZ750 to a rare level of restoration, both mechanically and cosmetically.  Just part of the eBay auction’s comments :

This bike has The Holy Trinity for the most discerning collectors and enthusiasts: Provenance, Rarity and Condition! What you see here is the culmination of a 10 year, no cost spared, meticulous frame-off restoration. The resto was done on a complete, running, period correct, and ‘as raced’ TZ from the 1970’s. Amazingly, during the bike’s campaign both here and abroad, it appears to have never been crashed or blown-up. The exact Factory paint scheme and colors were precisely replicated from Factory original. The Shipping Invoice (see pic, courtesy of NATS Forum) shows #159 being a genuine 1st batch racer. There were a total of 219 TZ750A’s built;  few remain today.

Rather too specialized for a hobbyist, exercising the TZ-750 will take commitment.  Maintenance hours will be more numerous than “flight” hours.  But this race veteran is sorted and shouldn’t bring too many surprises.  As the owner states:

The bike was built to run, but assembled primarily for display and ease of cleaning.

Successful to the point of domination, the TZ-750 will likely be invited back to any event it attends.  The fairing’s well-drawn lines are sure easy on the eyes.  Mechanically, it’s better than new – improvements to the exhaust system made and impossibly light brake disks, with blank livery as shipped.  Likely never to turn another hot lap, the velvet ropes beckon.  But once photographed, the years of racing history are in the books, and the soundtrack from a demonstration lap or two is all that’s missing…

-donn

Wild Kingdom – 1974 Yamaha TZ750
Yamaha March 13, 2018 posted by

The beginning: 1998 Yamaha YZF-R1

After lagging slightly behind throughout the ’90s with a host of beautiful-but-dated or comfortable and fast-but-heavy steeds, Yamaha came out of its corner swinging in ’98 with the all-new R1. It was covered in decals advertising age-old Yamaha marketing terms like Genesis and Ex-Up, but the new machine was a beast the way the CBR900RR had been five years earlier.

1998 Yamaha R1 for sale on eBay

With the gearbox slammed on top of the output shaft, the R1 had a tiny wheelbase, weighed nothing and made in the neighborhood of 140 horsepower. There were few superlatives at the time to do it justice, and the line it spawned continues to set the benchmark for sportbikes.

This 1998 Yamaha R1 wears the distinct red-and-white livery, which I much prefer over the blue and silver that was also on offer. It is clean enough to eat your dinner off of, and has turned in just shy of 10,000 miles.

From the eBay listing:

1998 Yamaha YZF-R1

Quite possibly the most sought after collectible production Japanese Sport Bike of the last 25 years. No sportbike collection is complete without one and they are becoming very hard to find.

This is a wonderful example of a one owner 1998 Yamaha R1 in the coveted Red & White. Is it perfect? No. Is it super clean and probably the nicest one for sale in the country today? Yes.

A true 9993 miles, runs like new and everything works perfectly. This R1 has spent its whole life in an air conditioned garage.

The R1 has a couple of period correct mods that include an under tail eliminator and flush mount turn signals. The bike could easily be reconfigured to completely stock as the parts are all still available from Yamaha for around $300.

The amazing thing is that it still has its factory exhaust, windscreen, levers and the paint and decals are in exceptionally fresh condition. The only blem is a small crack in the paint on the tank that just appeared when it was about two years old.

As the magazines of the time dubbed it “Twitchy Bitch” it of course has an Ohlins steering damper.

Now for a couple of very cool and rare bits. Along with the R1 comes the original dealer large vinyl showroom marketing poster, original brochure and a genuine Yamaha accessory seat cowl. As a Yamaha dealer for the better part of twenty years, I had never seen another poster or brochure.

This is a “no reserve” auction and the bike will sell.

Bid strong as this may be the last best chance to add this to your sportbike collection.

If you have any questions don’t hesitate to email or call.

Happy Bidding!

Jason

It will not be long before these beasts start seeing their values climb, much the same way slab-side Gixxers have of late. This one is offered with no reserve, and yet is north of $5,000 with a healthy chunk of time left in the auction. We’d jump on this one while the jumping is good.

The beginning: 1998 Yamaha YZF-R1
Yamaha March 11, 2018 posted by

All chassis: 1992 Yamaha TZR250R 3XV4

This 1992 Yamaha TZR250R 3XV4 is the last of a bunch in our buddy Gary’s extensive collection of grey-market machines. He’s right up front that this one looks good in a parking space, but shows its age up close. He notes that it has its fair share of scratches and cracks, and says that it looks like the tank has been repainted.

Be that as it may, the bike has had a mechanical once-over and is low mileage, which makes it a good candidate for just about anything. It would be easy enough to restore to showroom, or it could be ridden without a lot of worry.

And what a ride. The TZRs upheld Yamaha’s long-standing reputation for sweet-handling steeds. The brakes are good, the bikes are light, and corner speeds can get hairy very quickly, provided you keep the revs up. Unfortunately, uncorked TZRs are rare beasts, as it takes more than a pipe and a jet kit to extract more than about 40 horsepower.

From the eBay listing:

Up for auction to the highest bidder with NO RESERVE is a 1992 Yamaha TZR250R 3XV4 with 15,214 kilometers (9,454 miles). Bike looks very nice and has great curb appeal but has scratches, scrapes and a crack in the upper left fairing. Appears the tank has been professionally resprayed. This bike would make a great candidate for restoration since it has such low miles. All fairings are 100% genuine OEM factory Yamaha. Bike is completely stock except for hand grips. Bike runs excellent and was just serviced with new tires, carbs cleaned, new battery, new fork seals and new engine fluids. This TZR has so much potential. Fairings are nice. There are no dents in the gas tank and the windscreen is very clear. Bike is solid. This is the last TZR250R I have. My collection is almost gone. Bike comes with Utah state title and is titled as a street bike for road use. $200 deposit due immeadiatly after auctions end thru PayPal. Remaining balance due within 5 business days by check, bank wire or cash in person. Please text 801-358-6537 for more photos and questions.

There’s no buy-it-now set for this bike, so the auction will run its full course. Jump in early and stay in late to get your best shot at this little beast.

All chassis: 1992 Yamaha TZR250R 3XV4
Yamaha March 8, 2018 posted by

Rev happy import: 1989 Yamaha FZR400R

Yamaha FZR400s were available in the States for a good part of their run, and attracted a loyal club racing following thanks to liter-bike embarrassing corner speeds and engines that begged for revs. This 1989 Yamaha FZR400R is an import from the UK, and carries the bulbous front end from the legendary OW01 and a few go bits we didn’t get.

1989 Yamaha FZR400R for sale on eBay

With a Tennessee title and registration already secured, it shouldn’t be too difficult to get the bike plated anywhere. The ’89 FZR400R carries the aluminum Deltabox swingarm and four-pot brakes that didn’t make our shores until the 1990 Fizzers broke cover.

It looks to be in decent condition overall, with about 15,500 miles on the clock. The fairings and paint look decent overall, but the bike shows minor rash down the left side.

From the eBay listing:

Up for No Reserve Auction is this completely stock Yamaha 3EN2 FZR400R. These rarities are little brothers to the Yamaha ow01 FRZ750R superbike. This all aluminum cycle displays its age well, and is in great shape, with only light scrapes and minor corrosion. The bike has been registered, tagged, and titled, in Tennessee.

I am selling several grey market bikes. Please check my other listings or inquire as to availability. I may be able to assist with delivery at a competitive rate. I ask that a non-refundable deposit of $500 be paid within 24 hours of purchase, and the balance be paid within seven days. Thank you for taking interest in my listing. Feel free to call or text with questions to 423 747 3265

Footage shows the bike on or near The Tail of the Dragon in the East Tennessee hills in warmer months. Those days are just around the corner, and the bike is ready and willing for a new rider to experience its cornering prowess.

Rev happy import: 1989 Yamaha FZR400R
Sport Bikes For Sale March 7, 2018 posted by

Handful of bees: 1985 Yamaha RZ350

The Yamaha RZ350 represents the last available road-going two stroke available in the U.S., and it brought to bear the full might of Yamaha’s research and development into oil burners up to that point. In ’85, the bikes paid tribute to King Kenny Roberts, sporting his factory bumble bee livery and his signature on the upper bikini fairing.

1985 Yamaha RZ350 for sale on eBay

The RZs reviewed well, as sharp-handling, powerful street bikes. They didn’t shine until above 6,000 RPM, but above that threshold they got down the road with aplomb.

This 1985 Yamaha RZ350 has had a recent once over, during which it got a new chain, tires, brake pads, fluids and a carb clean. The seller says his mechanic gave the top end a clean bill of health. The bike has done just 4,500 miles from new, so it should be fully ready to be an occasional summer mount.

From the eBay listing:

Really nice running low mileage Rz350. I had my mechanic who knows these well go through it last fall. He changed all the fluids, cleaned the carbs, new front brake pads, new tires, new gold 520 chain. He said the top end was like new. There are a couple of very small dings on the left side of the tank. These bikes are really fun to ride and they handle great. Bike is for sale locally and I reserve the right to end the auction early if it sells. Deposit at auction end through PayPal, balance by certified check or wire transfer. I can keep the bike for a while until shipping arrangements are made. Here’s a link to see it running.

 

Handful of bees: 1985 Yamaha RZ350
Yamaha March 2, 2018 posted by

Big Fizz: 1990 Yamaha FZR1000 3GM

It’s hard to find an FZR 1000 that isn’t as cool as a snow cone in a blizzard, but the ’89s and ’90s really speak to me. Maybe it’s the Bike of the Decade designation for the ’89s. Maybe it’s the Ow01-aping bug-eyed fairing. Maybe it’s the sub-three-second 0-60 and 170 mph top end. Probably it’s a little of each.

1990 Yamaha FZR1000 3GM

In any case, the drool comes on hard and strong when one of these comes up, and today’s 1990 Yamaha FZR1000 3GM is from a friend of the site whose rides are always a cut above the rest. It has one aftermarket fairing to replace a cracked original, but the bodywork is otherwise untouched. The cracked original piece is included, for those who have to have everything just as it was.

From the eBay listing:

Time to sell the big guns! Up for sale is a very nice 1990 Yamaha FZR1000 with only 14,640 kilometers (9,097 miles). This FZR is in excellent condition and looks beautiful. Upper fairing had a crack in it so I put on a new very high quality FRP upper fairing from Italy. (Original fairing included in sale if you’d like it). The rest of the fairings are 100% genuine OEM Yamaha factory. Bike has stock exhaust and OEM factory passenger seat cover for that solo look. Bike would be in perfect condition if not for the right side inner plastic panel. There is a very small piece that has broken off. You wouldn’t notice it if I didn’t tell you but it’s there. Original windscreen has a few scratches and blemishes but very clear. Regardless, this is a very nice bike. No dents in the tank, the muffler is perfect no scratches, the fairings are perfect no scratches and the bike runs like new. Just serviced with new Dunlop Sportmax tires, new battery and new engine fluids. Bike comes with Utah state title and is titled as a streetbike for road use. $200 deposit due immeadiatly after sales end thru PayPal. Balance due within 5 business days by check, bank wire or cash in person. Please text 801-358-6537 for more photos or questions.

It’s a great piece of early ’90s nostalgia, and remains a ridiculously fast motorcycle, even in the face of 30 years of development.

Big Fizz: 1990 Yamaha FZR1000 3GM