Posts by tag: Yamaha

Yamaha November 12, 2018 posted by

Yellow jacket: Zero-mile 2006 Yamaha R1 LE

To celebrate its 50th anniversary. Yamaha busted out the paint booth and the option sheet to create a limited run of hopped-up versions of their R1 literbike. The 2006 Yamaha R1 LE delivered the perfect birthday present to the storied brand, showing that Japanese brands were indeed capable of and interested in building special versions of their already potent road weapons. Just 500 LEs came to the states, wearing the black and yellow livery that made Kenny Roberts and the bikes famous in the 1970s, and bedecked with Ohlins suspension front and rear and a set of gold featherweight Marchesini rims.

2006 Yamaha R1 Limited Edition for sale on eBay

Like a couple of the Ducatis we have posted recently, the owner of this R1 LE took its aspirations as a collector bike seriously and never rode it. At all. In its 12 years, it has racked up exactly zero miles. The only alteration from stock appears to be 500 cc GP World Champion Wayne Rainey’s signature on the front numberplate. The seller offers very few details, but the pictures speak for themselves.

From the eBay listing:

New 2006 Yamaha R1 LE #428 of 500 sold by Yamaha. Always on display never ridden. It is New. Signed by Wayne Raney.

Please note we are an Ohio motorcycle dealer and are required to process the title into your name. We are also required to collect sales tax if you are an Ohio buyer and also buyers from AZ,CA,FL,IN,MA,MI and SC. Questions please call Al at 740-928-4454

The buy-it-now on this special, rare Yamaha is set at $17,500, sliding it in well below the price point for a similarly bedecked Italian machine. The R1 LEs may have flown under the radar, but to the right collector they are gold, and this one is a literal museum piece.

Yellow jacket: Zero-mile 2006 Yamaha R1 LE
Sport Bikes For Sale November 4, 2018 posted by

Buzzsaw: 1985 Yamaha RZ500 on eBay

The seller of this 1985 Yamaha RZ500 keeps the details light in his eBay posting, but the details he does share are certainly intriguing. The iconic GP replica sports a set of very nice aftermarket Lomas pipes, upgraded forks and wheels from a four-stroke Yamaha FJ, and a top-end rebuild. You cannot really say fairer than that when it comes to an aged two-stroke sport bike. The weird tire sizes and anti-dive forks have gone the way of the Dodo and any questions about maintenance have been answered.

1985 Yamaha RZ500 for sale on eBay

In ’85, the Yamaha RZ500 was used to making light work of the big, heavy four-stroke superbikes that comprised its competition, and was riding the wave of Kenny Roberts’s Grand Prix successes upon a similar-on-paper machine. It lost a few horsepower and a few kilograms to the Suzuki RG500, but the Yamaha was still no slouch, and was to go down as the more refined and rideable of the two machines. Where the Suzuki shrieked, the Yamaha would bellow.

From the eBay listing:

1985 rz500. Great driver quality bike. Could use some touchups but mechanically very nice. Lomas pipes. 20,000 miles on chassis. 1200 miles on new gaskets, seals, and top end. Have receipts. Has FJ forks and wheels. Oil injection has been removed but comes with bike along with the proper throttle cable. Email any questions. Can send pics of anything you’d like. rd500 2 stroke street legal.

As mentioned, the details are few, but the ones we get are important. The pictures show a beautiful example of a legendary machine, and one that will be just as easy to ride as it will be to collect.

Buzzsaw: 1985 Yamaha RZ500 on eBay
Yamaha October 4, 2018 posted by

Historic Stroker: 1977 Yamaha TZ750 for Sale

Update 10.04.2018: Back on eBay for $60k or make offer. Too cool not repost 🙂 Links updated. -dc

Update 10.23.2017: We first saw this TZ750 for sale in March 2016 with a buy-it-now of $95k. It is now listed for $62k. Good luck to buyers and seller! Links updated. -dc

1977 Yamaha TZ750 R Side

It’s pretty much raining Yamaha TZ750s this week, with no less than three of these valuable and iconic racers available for sale, of the 600 or so that were built throughout production. It’s a bit older than the bikes we normally feature here on the site, but I think we can make an exception in this case. If you’re not familiar, the TZ750 was Yamaha’s two-stroke roadracing machine that was dominant in AMA racing during the 1970s.

1977 Yamaha TZ750 L Side Tank

Early bikes put out around 90hp but that jumped to 140 by the time 1977 had rolled around. That may not sound like much by today’s standards, but combined with the bike’s light 345lb weight and the primitive frame, suspension, and tire technology of the time, it was a true test of a rider’s skill to keep the beast pointed in a straight line, to say nothing of the curves…

1977 Yamaha TZ750 R Side Lower Fairing

The first bikes actually displaced 700cc and were reportedly built up from a pair of Yamaha’s racing 350s, a rumor borne out by the fact that some of the early TZ700s appear to have “347” stamped into the cases. But the later machines that debuted in 1975 shared no parts at all with the parallel twins. Apparently based around a bored-out 500cc Grand Prix engine, the TZ750 eventually moved from a twin-shock to a monoshock rear suspension for vastly improved handling. In any case, they were the bikes to beat throughout the 1970s, with both power and reliability. They just needed brave and skilled riders able to exploit them.

1977 Yamaha TZ750 R Side Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1977 Yamaha TZ750 for Sale

This is the 1977 Vesco/Romero/Busch Beer TZ750. Lots of history.

The engine cases in the bike now are an early spare. The original cases have just had a repair to the shift fork rod support boss and are ready to go back in the bike.

The original engine was also used as the rear engine in the Vesco land speed record streamliner.

Bike is sold as is and with Bill of Sale.

Some spares will also be included in the sale.

1977 Yamaha TZ750 L Side Engine

With a Buy It Now price of $95,000 I’d hope that “all the spares” would be included in the sale. Or that the seller would include a few more details regarding exactly what spares: when you’re trying to keep a forty year old racing machine running, every bit helps. That’s obviously a lot to pay for any motorcycle, but I’ve no doubt this thing is worth some serious cash, given its rarity and racing history.

-tad

1977 Yamaha TZ750 R Side Rear

Historic Stroker: 1977 Yamaha TZ750 for Sale
Bimota August 29, 2018 posted by

Nice Price: 1997 Bimota YB11 for Sale

It seems like most of the Bimotas that come up for sale these days aren’t really for sale. I mean, if people wanted to actually sell them, the asking prices would probably be a bit lower… Bottom line: the Bimota YB11 is a cool bike and still pretty fast, even compared to modern bikes. But prices for 90s Bimotas in particular are at a low point right now. Honestly, I’d be very surprised if this continued indefinitely but, for the time being, these represent some pretty great bang for your collecting buck. Even if you end up not being able to source fork seals for the beefy, right-way-up Paioli forks on your Bimota YB11, you can always park this thing in your livingroom and no one will wonder why… Even if they think you’re crazy for replacing your flat-screen with an Italian motorcycle.

The YB11 is pretty classic Bimota: the engine is from Yamaha’s YZF1000R and basically unchanged, aside from being slotted into Bimota’s own aluminum frame that hugs the Genesis engine closely. Perhaps too closely: more on that later. The lightweight bodywork is swoopy and dramatic, the riding position pretty odd, and the bike actually was available with pillion accommodations, although this one is missing the rear pegs.

They’re elegant, exotic and, at least in terms of finding engine parts, pretty simple to keep running. Tales abound of strange little quirks that can keep them from being enjoyable: the weird, twin six-volt batteries in the nose of the SB6, the frames that block access to carburetors and prevent adjustment while they’re on the bike or the engine is in the frame, iffy fuel pumps, and so on. But for a person who wants something truly different, these Bimotas are pretty hard to beat.

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Bimota YB11 for Sale

Emilia Motors is happy to offer this 1997 Bimota YB11, these Bimotas really show the attention to detail that the Italian motorcycle builders put into the design and suspension of the bikes they build. The Bimota is truly a handcrafted work of art and are a must for any real motorcycle collection, plus the beauty and design are second to none. This bike has new tires, battery and starts and runs top notch. Manuals, rear stand and Bimota cover are included. Please feel free to call with any questions thanks Anthony 954-540-8495

So what is the seller asking for this one? $9,000 or $10,000? Nope. Just $6,799 buys you a slick, low-mileage Italian exotic a mechanically competent enthusiast could keep running for peanuts. Just don’t drop it: a whole new engine won’t be hard to find or expensive to rebuild, but that bodywork will be pricey if you drop it. Which is why I’m hoping this one doesn’t have damage on the right side, since the photographer couldn’t be arsed to turn the bike around for some additional pics…

-tad

Nice Price: 1997 Bimota YB11 for Sale
Bimota May 1, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

I’ve mentioned this before, but everything just sounds cooler in Italian. If you want to intimidate someone, just shout gibberish at them in German: anything you say sounds clipped and military and very, very serious. But yell at someone in Italian, and it just sounds like you’re trying to very emphatically seduce them. I mean, Italian car and motorcycle manufacturers don’t even have to try, they just basically describe the thing, and it still sounds cool, exotic, and expensive. A Maserati Quatroporte? You mean a Maserati “Four-Door”? And bikes are even lazier: Testastretta is just “Narrow Head” and Desmosedici sounds plenty exotic, but it’s just “Desmo Sixteen [Valves].” Today’s Featured Listing Bimota YB10 Dieci might be the worst offender though. In English, it’s just the “Yamaha-Bimota #10 Ten.”

While giving your bike a simple, two-digit number for a name may not be all that creative, it suits Bimota’s pragmatic approach to making impractical motorcycles. Seeing the potential in the powerful, efficient, and reliable engines being churned out by the Japanese manufacturers packaged into overweight, overbuilt, and under-suspended roadbikes, they took that performance and stuffed it into machines as much as a hundred pounds lighter. Spared any need to be affordable or practical, Bimota was free to experiment with exotic, weight-saving materials, the newest ideas in frame design, and the best suspension components available at both ends. Bimota’s creations might not have been very versatile, but they were pretty good at the one thing they were supposed to be good at, which was going fast and looking cool. Okay, I guess that’s really two things…

Of course, the fact that they were freed from any need to be practical also means that they can be a real pain to service. The stiff, light aluminum beam frame that was Bimota’s signature during this period was wrapped tightly around the engine to keep weight down and centralize mass, so many of their bikes need to be pretty much completely disassembled before you can perform basic maintenance. Thankfully, they were also designed with body panels that are easily removed with a minimum of fuss. Seriously: look closely at those plastics and note how few seams and mounting points are visible: the tank cover, seat, and tail section are all one piece.

Of course, there’s a downside to that simplicity as well: drop a modern sportbike and you might just have to replace a couple sections of fairing or a side panel or two. But when your bodywork consists of just four or five separate pieces and only 224 machines were ever produced… Well let’s just say that if I owned a Bimota Dieci and planned to ride it regularly, I’d order a set of Airtech fairings and have them painted up to look like the original parts, then hang the stock bodywork on my livingroom wall.

I’m not sure exactly what changes were made between the 1987 YB4 and the 1991 YB10, but the bodywork and frame look suspiciously similar. That’s no bad thing, as Italian vehicles always do seem to get better with each successive generation as the kinks are worked out, right up until they finally get it right and then promptly discontinue the model. Similar-looking Yamaha-engined Bimotas were powered by 750 and 400cc versions of their five-valve Genesis liquid-cooled inline four, but this is the big daddy, motivated by a nearly stock 1002cc engine and five-speed gearbox from the FZR1000 that produced 145hp. With a claimed weight of 407lbs, nearly 70 less than the donor bike, the slippery superbike could hit a tested top speed of 172mph, with stability provided by the fully adjustable 42mm Marzocchi upside-down forks up front and an adjustable Öhlins shock out back, which the seller has helpfully photographed for prospective buyers.

From the Seller: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

VIN: ZESS8YA23MRZES041 In 1991 the first of 224 (total production) YB10 Dieci machines were produced with many of the best bits from previous models. Named Dieci (ten) in recognition of the 10th collaboration between Bimota and Yamaha, the YB10 represents the evolution of the series YB6 and YB8 with a 4 cylinder 1000cc Bimota tuned Yamaha engine. Pierluigi Marconi used inverted Marzocchi forks, super strong lightweight aluminum beam frame, redesigned aero, larger high-flow carbureted intake and more comfortable riding position. Dieci is the perfect name for the final development of the YB line. Weighing in at 407lbs (65lbs down on the stock Yamaha FZR) with 145BHP on tap, gives the rider power with a comfortable and balanced ride. Great brakes were a must so Marconi used a pair of 320mm front discs plus a single rear 230, combined with Brembo calipers. Whilst this Dieci is 25 years old and shows just over 12000 miles it doesn’t appear tired or dated. It has been well preserved and restored where necessary. The bodywork is less rounded than current trends but the ‘stealth’ look still works well, especially with its silver over red combination. Overall the body panels are well preserved and in very good condition. Recent performance and service includes Ohlin rear shock, new Pirelli Corsa tires, Termignoni carbon muffler, new chain and sprocket, new braided lines and new battery. The Dieci was originally sold and serviced by Bob Steinbugler at Bimota Spirit. Needs nothing, ready to ride. $10,500. Contact Matt with your interest: mattshaw@comcast.net

The $10,500 the seller is asking is right in line with the asking prices we’ve seen for similar Bimotas recently, and is pretty much chump change for such a rare, exotic, and good looking machine that can still show many modern sportbikes a clean pair of heels. You might have to work a bit harder, and avoid pissing matches with modern literbikes, but your buddy on an R6 or GSX-R is going to be very shocked to see those two big, round, endurance-style headlamps in his rear-view mirrors on a brisk Sunday morning ride…

-tad

Featured Listing: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale
Yamaha April 9, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1992 Yamaha FZR1000 in Ohio

Update 4.11.2018: Sold in a day! Congratulations to buyer and seller, both friends of the site! -dc

The early ’90s were a special time to be a sportbike enthusiast, as myriad racing series commanded wide audiences, and the big bike companies were busily trying to outgun each other every year. In ’92, the Yamaha’s FZR line was in the prime of its street dominance, with bikes in three engine classes winning the hearts and minds.

This 1992 Yamaha FZR1000 is a true time capsule to that heady era, having been ridden sparingly in its 26 years and stored fairly carefully in that time. It has been treated to a few aftermarket touches, including a Yoshimura can and appropriate jetting, but they are all reversible and period-correct.

As it sits, it is collector quality, and has been treated more as a display piece than a rider with its last two owners. As a consequence, it’ll need tires to be a regular mount. We’d probably give the mechanicals a once-over, too, though the seller says it runs and rides well.

From the seller:

1992 FZR1000, 3rd owner. Original owner was a mechanic at a Yamaha shop and the second owner was an older gentleman who had 2 of these exact same bikes for years – he had sold off the other one a couple years before I bought this one from him. Original except for the period-correct Yosh slip on (original muffler in good shape is included with sale, the Yosh has good packing and is not obnoxiously loud), jetting (runs nicely with the Yosh, warms up quickly), windscreen, slightly cut rear fender (license plate mount not altered) and tires. Bike runs and rides as it should. 16k miles. Tires have plenty of tread but are old – I’d replace them if you’re going to ride it – I’ve only putted around on it. All original fairings/paint. The bike shows no evidence of being down while moving but there are some minor imperfections in the fairings – I took closeups of every flaw I can find. Previous owner said the original owners garage was over-filled with bikes and that was the cause of the imperfections. See pics for details.

Overall this is an extremely clean, original bike, clear title in my name, not much else to say really. I have several (too many?) other bikes and want to thin the herd a bit. Located about an hour east of Cincinnati. I make occasional trips to Atlanta and could meet a buyer along I-75 between Cinci and Atlanta if that helps, or I can work with your shipper.

Price: $4800

This bike stands out for its condition and originality, which have become hard commodities to come by for bikes like this on the open market.

-Aaron

Note: Billy asked that comments remain open on his Featured Listing. Feel free to ask questions! -dc

Featured Listing: 1992 Yamaha FZR1000 in Ohio
Bimota April 9, 2018 posted by

Old School Superbike: 1997 Bimota YB11 for Sale

Bimota’s formula for success involved plentiful, reliable engines supplied by outside manufacturers, top-shelf braking and suspension components, frames designed with pure performance in mind, all wrapped in sleek, often wildly-styled bodywork. The use of well-developed and widely available engines meant they managed to survive much longer than most other boutique motorcycle manufacturers and their style and performance mean they’re pretty striking motorcycles in the flesh, and I’m sure you’d get tons of questions about a Bimota YB11 like this one anywhere you parked it.

The YB11 is obviously an old-school analog motorcycle, with a torquey engine and a peak power figure that is unimpressive by today’s standards. But keep in mind that the only thing letting modern motorcycles get away with their outrageous power figures are the very sophisticated electronics that keep riders with less than professional skill levels from crashing into the nearest hedge. This was a full-blown exotic superbike in its day, and the 145hp available from the YB11’s five-valve Genesis engine is plenty to have fun with for even an experienced rider, considering the bike’s 400lb dry weight and 170mph potential. There’s no digital safety net here, and every single horse is present and accounted for, and happy to do the bidding of your right hand. Just make sure you know exactly what you’re asking them to do before you twist that throttle…

I’d read that the YB11 has an “odd” riding position and can confirm: the legs are weirdly cramped and there’s a long reach to the bars. Maybe it makes more sense on the move, or with time you just get used to it, but by comparison, the SB6R parked next to the one I sat on seemed surprisingly comfortable… Like every other Bimota, maintenance is an issue here. Parts for the Yamaha engine and transmission may be relatively plentiful, but the beam frames of the YB and SB series are wrapped tightly around them, making access difficult with the bodywork or even the engine in place. Great for the experienced home mechanic, as you’re basically looking at a lot of labor instead of expensive parts, but still a pain if you don’t like disassembling your motorcycle every time you want to adjust the carburetors or valves…

I’m a fan of 90s Bimotas in general, mostly because they’re both extremely exotic and currently extremely affordable, and they epitomize all that’s stereotypically good and bad about Italian motorcycles: sophisticated materials, high-end components, striking looks, and sharp handling, combined with indifferent build-quality, incomplete development, and unreliable electrical systems. In terms of style, I don’t think the YB11 is one of their best efforts, but it’s still great-looking motorcycle and parts for the engine at least should be no trouble. You’re on your own if you need fork seals or bodywork though. Still interested? The asking price for this Italian exotic is just $6,700, although there is an issue with the mileage…

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Bimota YB11 for Sale

Specialized Motors is proud to offer this Bimota YB11 . This bike was bought to put into our motorcycle in 2003 with 5800 miles since then this bike has been cared for and stored in our Museum, as of now the gauge pack is inop – MILEAGE AND TEMP ARE NOT WORKING, this seems to be a common issue with these Bimota motorcycle. We estimate 500-1000 additional miles BUT WE CAN NOT LIST MILES , BIKE WILL BE SOLD AS IS . Bike is in excellent condition never down starts and runs perfect . Bike will be sold mileage exempt ot TMU (true mileage unknown)

Speaking of “unreliable Italian electrical components…” Well, there are many good aftermarket options these days, and ones that look much better than the stock gauges and include everything you could possibly want to know about your motorcycle. As far as I’m concerned, the 11,000 miles indicated are a good thing for a bike as finicky as a Bimota: it means it’s been functional often enough to actually be ridden regularly! Plus, inactivity seems to kill vehicles, especially Italian vehicles. It’s like they’re sitting there, angry at not being used, slowly corroding, drying out, crumbling…

-tad

Old School Superbike: 1997 Bimota YB11 for Sale
Yamaha April 3, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1990 Yamaha RZ350

Update 4.24.2018: This bike is SOLD, and to an RSBFS reader as well! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

As far as two strokes go, the RZ350 (also known as the RD350LC in some geographies) needs no introduction. Available in various markets and configurations between 1983 and 1995, this peppy two stroke was legally imported the world over – including the United States. And while U.S. readers might be most familiar with the bumble-bee black/yellow Kenny Roberts commemorative edition – or even the red/white Yamaha racing livery – there is a very special and very rare in the US model that was released in Yamaha blue. This 1990 RZ350 out of Canada is one such example.

Featured Listing: 1990 Yamaha RZ350 in Canada


As is undoubtedly known, the RZ350 is really the last of the factory imported two strokes when it comes to the US market. Born of a time when air-cooled 550cc four strokes ruled the roads, the RZ350 was a generational evolution of the older RD350 smokers. With a liquid cooled parallel twin cylinder format, the RZ350 introduced Yamaha’s first exhaust power valve – which helped to quell the peaky nature of two stroke power delivery. And unlike the US which was blessed by exhaust chambers that contained catalytic converters (read: restrictive and heavy), the rest of world models made due with more standard – and powerful – expansion chambers. Talented riders able to keep the RZ on the pipe could wreck havoc with riders of heavier four-stroke machinery. And with a trellis-style perimeter frame, decent suspension and triple disk brakes, the RZ was a delight both in the canyons as well as on the racetrack.

From the seller:
I am selling my 1990 Yamaha RZ350 after purchasing it in April of 2011. The bike is located east of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and the odometer reads 20,610 km., or 12,806 miles. To my knowledge that reading is accurate. There might a handful of miles more because I replaced the odometer cable after noticing the original had expired on my way back from a ride about five years ago.

Again, to my knowledge, the bike is bone stock, and hasn’t experienced an engine refresh, nor has it been raced or used for track days here in Ontario. The bike starts and runs perfectly, and the tires have fewer than two hundred miles on them, and has received a recent battery.

More from the seller:
The previous owner admitted that the bike has experienced the ubiquitous driveway tip-over, and I have tried to document the resulting scratches in the photos. Having said that, the bike presents very well, and the plastics are in very good shape. One of the mounting tabs was broken and when I bought the bike a large washed held the inside of the right fairing to the frame. I have since used a fairing repair plastic to repair that blemish, which I show in a couple of the photos. The decals on the bike are all there however, because of the way Yamaha chose to put the mounting holes through the side decals they have shifted in a couple of small areas.

There are about four pin-sized chips on the gas tank, but because they’re so small I have no idea what could have caused them. The fairing, while complete and sound, has a couple of small stress cracks which can’t be seen unless during a thorough inspection. There are two small areas (about the size of a quarter) on the fairing where it almost seems like the paint has worn off, but there are no cracks or abrasion there.

More from the seller:
The right side mirror, while replaced (I’m told) after the tip-over, had lost its collar where the mirror swivels. Because a new mirror is now unobtainium through Yamaha Canada I attempted to repair it with the same fairing repair plastic I used to fix the fairing stay. It looks OK, but if you can source a new or good used one, I leave that to the buyer. There was a crack at the tip of upper cowling where it meets the windscreen which I repaired with the plastic compound and a small strip of fibreglass. It is painted and not noticeable under normal scrutiny.

I rebuilt the front brake master cylinder in 2012, and has not needed maintenance since. The
radiator has been topped up with Water Wetter, and the bottom end has been drained and refilled with
fresh lubricant. The bike also has new spark plugs installed

I won’t attempt to review the history of the RZ350, as there are many sites online that can fill you in on that. However, this is the last year Yamaha made this model, and it wasn’t exported to the U.S. It’s odd, but even Yamaha Canada doesn’t have a record of this model in spite of the fact that they clearly were imported into Canada.

The bike, while not perfect, is a very good example of the model.

Price: $4400 (USD)

So what you are looking at here is a strong example of the RZ lineage. While the US only received the RZ in 1985 and 1986 (and California only in 1985), the rest of the world continued to enjoy this stout little smoker for many years thereafter. There were not too many changes to the hardware or output after the late 1980s, but the bones of this bike were so good that the model continues to be sought out to this day. This bike appears to be honestly presented by a fellow rider, which is always a benefit in a world full of short-term flippers. Purists will be quick to point out that the 1985-86 models are the most collectable from an investment perspective, but when it comes to riding finding a later variant that has been ridden and cared for is much more important. This sub-13,000 mile example ticks all the right boxes when it comes to a rider. No, it is not a museum piece or garage queen. Yes, it proudly wears the scars of some use. But most importantly, it is priced competitively for what it is. If you are looking to bolster your fleet with something that is worth hanging onto, this might just be your lucky day. Ping Brent if you are serious – and blue smoke and a silly grin will be just a few thousand RPMs away!

MI