Posts by tag: Yamaha

MZ July 27, 2020 posted by

Singular Simplicity: 1997 MZ Skorpion Sport

The sad thing about being a serious motorcycle geek is that most people don’t really understand my obsession with and enthusiasm for weird motorcycles. Even other motorcyclists. I was thinking about this today as I was poring over the engine of a friend’s Velocette Venom, trying to suss out the function of the little cable-actuated device at the base of the pushrod tube [compression-release, we decided]. I mean, I happen to think bikes like this MZ Skorpion Sport are incredibly cool, but most motorcyclists are ignorant of their existence. That’s a shame, since [East] German brand MZ has a storied history and basically single-handedly ushered in modern two-stroke performance when they developed the first expansion chambers for their race bikes.

The Skorpion Sport doesn’t have those, however.

What the Skorpion Sport does have is Yamaha’s five-valve single that displaced 660cc, just 6cc short of being an engine of pure evil. As it was basically an off-road drivetrain repurposed for sportbike duty, a Yamaha five-speed gearbox transferred power to the rear wheel, and the package was suspended in a tubular steel frame. The engine and frame formed the foundation for a whole range of interesting and generally very competent motorcycles from MZ, from the Mastiff supermoto and Baghira dual-sport, to the Traveller sport-tourer, Replika, and the Skorpion Sport.

Overall, the bike is simplicity itself, the purest incarnation of a sports motorcycle you’re likely to find at this price point. Weight was a hair over 400lbs wet, and handling generally considered to be excellent. Styling looks a big like a Gilera Saturno and the bike does feature passenger pegs, although there’s no guarantee there is a pillion pad hiding under the seat cowl, or included with the bike. The 1990s were weird like that.

From the original eBay listing: 1997 MZ Skorpion Sport for Sale

Looks great. Runs Outstanding. Low mileage. I’ve taken it on several long rides with no problems at all. Yamaha reliability. Made in Germany. Designed in England. Lots of Italian bits. Buyer responsible for pick up. I’ll help get it on to the transporter. I have the unsigned registration papers, and original manual. New tires. Small scuff on right side of engine where someone dropped it. It’s in the pictures. I have the under-belly fairing, and the original muffler as well. I never registered it in CA. (DMV-phobia) Bill of sale only.

There hasn’t been much interest in this MZ so far, with bidding up to $2,300 and about one more day left on the listing. That’s on the low side, but Skorpions don’t go for much more money than that right now: they’re rare, but not especially collectible. What they are is great value, with an exotic nameplate, nimble handling, stone-axe reliability. With single-cylinder classes a popular way to get into racing on a budget, Skorpions often get snapped up to be converted into lightweight track-hacks. They’re good for that, but it does seem a little sad that such interesting machines

-tad

Singular Simplicity: 1997 MZ Skorpion Sport
Featured Listing June 25, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1979 Yamaha RD400F Daytona Special

Update 6.25.2020: 32 new images added to the gallery below and price reduced to $6,995 USD. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Before race bikes had to have fairings, custom suspension, and forged rearsets, they looked a lot like streetbikes with number plates, and the 1979 Yamaha RD400F Daytona was among the best. Lighter by half than most of the 750cc and 1,000cc superbikes of the time, the RD could run inside outside and around just about any of its peers. Usually, that means you sacrifice something in acceleration or top speed, but the RD’s parallel-twin 400cc two-stroke mill damn near made up for that.

With ~43 horsepower to push around just 365 pounds, the little RDs were darlings on the street, too. Their modern equivalent is probably something like the Yamaha FZ07, practical, lithe, fast enough to scare you and still accessible enough for a commuter.

This 1979 RD400F Daytona is a beautiful example of the brand, in the classic red/white/gold livery. It’s not perfect, but it isn’t that far off. It’s easily nice enough to put on a stand in your basement and stare at, but I wouldn’t be scared to take it out for a few nice weekend rides, either.

From the seller:

Canadian model 1979 RD400 F Daytona Special sold for only 1 year.
Bike is all original stock.
Low 8100 Miles.
Starts, runs and rides amazing for a 40 year old bike, no issues.
Numbers matching. Low number #403
Matching locks for all 3 – tank, ignition, and seat.
Rust free gas tank, no liner, truly in great shape inside.
Bodywork and paint in very nice shape,
Side covers in great shape very clean no brakes.
All electrical working and no cuts or repairs to wiring loom.
All chrome in great shape including the forks are clean no pits or rust, and gas cap.
Has tool OEM kit.
Things to note the Canadian model received a different crank, electronic ignition, as well as separate carbs similar to the earlier model (that doesn’t have the goofy carb tops and rubber accordion boots that came with the mechanical synchronizing system. Other changes from US model is the exhaust pipes, and have larger diameter for the header and inlet to the exhaust cigar pipes. The Canadian exhaust system also don’t have the butterfly valve.
Huge list of work done including,
Full tune up,
Carburetors just meticulously overhauled.
All work done by red seal mechanic.
140 PSI compression left and right cylinders. Can’t get better than that!!
Many fresh 0km OEM parts.
New air filter.
New spark plugs.
New neutral switch seal.
New shift shaft seal.
New clutch push rod seal.
New seat cover.
New fuel tank rear mounting rubbers.
Petcock rebuilt with new parts.
New exhaust pipe rubber joint gasket.
New black rubber fuel lines.
Fresh Motul trans oil.
Rear brake caliper rebuilt
Fresh brake pads, front and rear.
Bike roles very freely when brakes release.
1 season old battery.
Low km chain and sprockets.
Low km tires.
Probably more just can’t think of it at the moment. many months of love, sweet and work has gone into freshening up this nice original Daytona Special
I would rate this bike as a solid 8.5 out of 10.
Small deficiencies;
1 handle bar mounting bolt is not a match.
Black paint on wheels is starting to fade. comes back nice and black with a little mag product and work.
Front brake is a bit spongy from 40 year old rubber line, looks great, no cracks or splits just flexes more than I like. Yes I’m that picky.
Small marks on fuel tank.
Headlight ears have the dreaded RD400 creases.
Scratches and small weld repair on right exhaust pipe near passenger peg.
Tail fairing underside around mounting bolts has a small piece missing, can not be seen from outside.

Asking price is $7,500$6,995 US
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Contact Eric: ericheemskerk31@hotmail.com or by phone 604 837 2967

This one is a Canadian model, which means it’s a little harder edged than the versions we got in the U.S. At $7,500 $6,995, it’s not exactly a bargain basement collector’s piece, but it’s definitely one you should want to own.

Featured Listing: 1979 Yamaha RD400F Daytona Special
Yamaha May 18, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR400 in Arizona

Update 7.6.2020: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

This gorgeous little JDM ripper is an RSBFS alum, listed here in late 2017 by our buddy Gary out in Utah. Today, it makes a triumphant return, this time in Arizona and bearing its correct model year. Japanese market 1WG models are rare as hen’s teeth as it is, and this one ups the ante with its unobtanium blue bodywork  and stellar condition. Gary has always been a fastidious and particular collector, and the current seller clearly carried on that proud tradition.

The Yamaha FZR400 is a gem of a motorcycle in any guise, with a rev-happy water-cooled four banger pushing around a gorgeous aluminum frame. Club racers loved these things when they were new, and you can still catch them tearing up AHRMA grids today. As with any welterweight ripper, they require handfuls of throttle and reward bravery and momentum with millimeter-precise handling.

The bike appears to have been treated to new tires in the current owner’s care, and he has added just shy of 1,000 kilometers. It remains in incredible condition.

From the seller:

1987 Yamaha FZR 400 1WG , approx 10,399 KM or 6,461 Miles. I take it out at least once a week in AZ. Rare blue JDM bike, Very clean, Japanese tank sticker, Excellent running condition, Excellent overall condition, Everything works like new, New Tires, Previous owner’s recent refresh includes: replaced front master cylinder with new OEM, Engine covers (caps) replaced with new OEM, New fuel petcock, New fork seals, New battery and fluids. All fairings, exhaust, and components not mentioned are 100% factory Yamaha original parts. No rust in tank. No paint touch-ups. Very minor normal light wear. Some corrosion on top of motor. Clean AZ title. $7600

The bike is also listed here on Craigslist, where seller Chris’s contact info can be found. In these trying times, we can’t think of a more entertaining way to practice physical distancing.

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR400 in Arizona
Bimota March 9, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: Bimota YB11 Superleggera

Update 3.12.2020: This bike has SOLD in 3 days! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Bimota has had a long standing history of offering up sublime rocket ships crafted with ingenuity and Italian flair. Throughout the years Bimotas have been powered my many different engine combinations, including all of the Japanese Big Four. Of those, the Yamaha YB series just might be the most interesting on offer, spanning 250cc through 1200cc variants. Today’s Featured Listing is a YB11 Superleggera, the last in the YB line of Bimotas and motivated by Yamaha YZF1000R Thunderace power.

Featured Listing: Bimota YB11 Superleggera

In Italian Superleggera literally translates to Super Light – which is pretty descriptive of the YB11. A full 30+ pounds lighter than the Thunderace that donated it’s guts, the YB11 tips the scales at well neigh 400 pounds. And although the YZF1000R mill remains in stock form, Bimota claims the larger airbox (with cold air intake) and modified exhaust provide more than the 145 HP stated by Yamaha. Light weight and big horsepower has always been the recipe for going fast – in a straight line. But if you know anything at all about Bimota, you will know that cornering is where the Rimini madmen excel. Utilizing a stout perimeter frame that efficiently ties in the steering head with the rear swing arm pivot, the aluminum chassis on the YB11 is as beautiful as it is effective. This is actually an evolution of the chassis developed for the YB6, but made more rigid in key locations to aid in stability. Substantial 51mm conventional forks anchor the front end, while a Paioli shock tunes out the bumps fed through the sculpted swing arm.

From the seller:
Thank you for looking at my 1996 Bimota YB11. If you are looking for one in mint condition, that’s completely stock, this is the one. It has less than 2000 original miles, never down, abused, it the rain, cold, pollen you name it. It’s had a very sheltered life in a temperature-controlled garage, hooked up to a battery tender, with Stabil mixed in the fuel. In 1986 Bimota’s were much more than just eye candy, make no mistake the detail along with fit and finish are amazing to look at. However, YB11’s weighed substantially less and produced more power than the Yamaha R1 it’s derived from, making it an all around better performer.

I’m a sixty-year-old collector that is very particular, I’m told that I treat my bikes better than I treat myself. I looked for this one for a long time as I wanted one as close to new as possible. It’s amazing for a thirty-four-year-old bike. The only imperfection anywhere are a couple of very small chips on the left side of the swing are, see pictures. Other than these it’s museum quality, ready to be ridden or collected. If the new owner wanted to ride it I would suggest cleaning the carburetors as even though it has Stabile in the fuel ethanol still gums things up. I would also put on new tires as they are original. Other than that it’s ready to ride, no leaks, issues, fire right up. If it were to be put in a collection, I’d drain the fuel, take out the battery, fog the engine and put it away.

The only reason I’m selling it is over time I find myself only riding on the track, rarely on the street. I’m happy to answer any questions you may have. As I’m thinning the herd I am not interested in any trades. Scott

Asking Price: $9,750.

Detail accents abound on this bike. Stare at any one picture long enough, and you will start to see what I mean. The frame side plates are CNC milled in a jeweled fashion. Cap screws replace traditional fasteners and provide an upscale appearance. The rear wheel adjuster is a classic slider, but implemented so cleanly that it is noteworthy. The carbon accents on the fork mesh nicely with the carbon front mudguard, which contains aerodynamic elements to aid in brake cooling. And all this is with the bodywork on. Undress a Bimota and be prepared to be amazed by the concept of mass centralization and packaging.

Yamaha-powered Bimotas are currently the bargain of the hand built exclusive super bike set. These bikes offer bulletproof Yamaha 20-valve motors and transmissions, exquisite handling thanks to light weight, good suspension and top-shelf Brembos, and the cachet of exclusivity that comes from being only 1 of 600-ish examples ever made worldwide. This particular YB11 SuperLeggera shows less than 2,000 miles and looks absolutely top-notch. The pricing is right in the ballpark for YB11s, if not a tad low for the condition and miles. Check it out, and then give Scott a shout – with Bimota being acquired by Kawasaki these amazing Yamaha-powered models are likely to never come around again. Good Luck!!

Featured Listing: Bimota YB11 Superleggera
Yamaha January 10, 2020 posted by

Winter Blues: 1984 Yamaha RZ350

As many parts of the United States are deep in the throes of falling frozen water, riding is an activity that must wait for warmer weather and more favorable road conditions. There are locales, however, where riding can commence year ’round. The southern states on both coasts serve as a great example. And it is from one of those states where we find this immaculate 1984 Yamaha RZ350, ready to ride. If you are snowed in and looking for that winter project that might require TLC and lots of mechanical know-how, stop reading now. This particular bike looks to need nothing but high RPMs and silly grins. If that is your idea of a winter project, read on!

The RZ350 is well known as the last of the factory 50-state street legal two strokes. Known as the RD350LC in other geographies, the RZ was the continued evolution of the parallel twin RD lineup, but with a healthy dose of modern tech thrown in. Sure the chassis was mild steel and not aluminum, but that did not stop the RZ from sharp handling. Brakes were triple disks, rear suspension was of the new-fangled single shock design, the venerable twin was now liquid cooled for tighter tolerances and greater power, there was a computer controlled bridge attached to the exhaust port to spread the notoriously peaky powerband around some, and the exhaust pipes were fitted with catalytic converters to help the dirty two-stroke meet EPA emissions. In most ways it was a toned down version of itself, but the beast within was woken up easily with a few common two-stroke tricks. The party only lasted two years, but it remains a very memorable party indeed.

From the seller:
1984 YAMAHA RZ350. Bike has less than 500 miles on a total renovation. Stripped to frame, wheels, bodywork all painted. Original exhausts go with the bike. Brand new Original CDI Spare also goes with the bike. The bike does not need anything. I never ride it anymore to many other things going on. Clear title, the bike is in ORMOND BEACH FL.

I have a reasonable reserve for this bike in this condition. Please do not message with silly offers. The bike sits in my climate controlled building and is available to view anytime. Everything works as you would expect. The gas cap area has been treated with an epoxy to resist any gas overflow from affecting the paint in the silly recess around the gas cap. (yes I have overfilled it) Not much more I can say. If you are looking for an RZ that requires nothing but a rider then you know what you are looking at.

There is a fair bit of interest in this particular RZ, and the eBay auction has a good number of followers. Bidding history shows the relatively quick escalation from $2k to the current bid of $7,400 – but we can be pretty certain it won’t stop there. The seller indicated that there was a reasonable reserve set for the bike, and that is clearly the case; the reserve has already been met. Whatever happens from this point forward, this bike is going home with somebody. Check it out here and let us know if this isn’t the cleanest RZ you have seen in quite some time. It has some aftermarket expansion chambers (great for waking up the beast) and the seller will even throw in the original pipes with the deal – which is great for someone looking for an original collector. The RZ is a constantly sought-after machine, and we anticipate prices to continue to rise. If you are in the market, best jump in while prices remain somewhat sane. Good Luck!!

MI

Winter Blues: 1984 Yamaha RZ350
Yamaha December 18, 2019 posted by

Fantastic Four: 1988 Yamaha FZR400

In today’s world, the thought of a serious, small bore sport bike is, well, normal. With the Kawasaki 250/300/400 Ninja series, the Honda CBR250/300R, the Yamaha YZF-R3 and the KTM RC390, there is no shortage of sharp handling and lightweight quasi racers. However this was not always the case here in the United States, where anything sub-600cc was considered a budget starter bike for the masses; built more for a price point than an apex. We all know the benefits of lightness, drilled into our head by the likes of Colin Chapman and the astounding performance capabilities of the foreign 250cc two strokes. This of course lead straight into the build up of the grey market bikes that we all know and love, and the trend that started RSBFS. And somewhere in all of that, Yamaha introduced a vanguard motorcycle to our shores: the FZR400. The FZR400 was everything we said we wanted – perhaps not quite as sharp as some of the smokers, not quite as trick as the NC30, but very, very capable – and somehow buyers turned up their noses at it. Sales lagged from 1988 through 1990, and then the party was over. Today, these are recognized for what they are: a rare, and sweet handling machine deserving of attention. Prices are starting to reflect the new attitude.

1988 Yamaha FZR400 for sale on eBay

Unlike the more sophisticated Honda, Yamaha retained a standard inline four. However this was no entry-level machine, and contained technology and features that were improvements over its bigger brother, the FZR600. For while the 600 class bike made due with a steel frame, the 400cc had a full-blown deltabox chassis made of aluminum. That kept weight down – way down – with a claimed 346 lbs dry. With a blend of light weight and decent power (64 hp claimed – with a 14k redline), the FZR400 rider needed to make good use of the six-speed gearbox to keep with bigger bikes on the straights, but excelled in braking and cornering when compared to larger machines. It is no surprise that many, many FZR400s found their way onto the racetrack; these were weapons in the right environment.

From the seller:
1990 Yamaha FZR400 . Condition is Used.
This Bike was bought in an auction from a private colector and te reason to buy was to add tis bike to my private collection. Although because of another current projects i will pass and move forward with others .

These days the FZR400 is not a high dollar machine, but scarcity of parts and good options has helped elevate the pricing somewhat. This is especially true for exceptionally original machines. But even then, a FZR400 will put a smile on your face without breaking the bank. Today’s particular machine is a mixed bag, to be sure. There are a few inconsistencies in the advert, too few pictures, and the pictures that are there show a solid – but rough – project. The seller lists this as a 1988 model, but calls it a 1990 in the text. Decoding the VIN indicates it is a 1988 model. There is both some rash on the bike, as well as a few clean looking bits. The rear mudguard hasn’t been cut, and the pipe looks to be stock. The 12,000 some odd miles don’t appear excessive, making this a potentially good project bike. I’m sure that is what the seller originally had in mind.

So if you’re looking for something to do this winter, check out this FZR400. Zero bids thus far on a $3,000 opening ask AND a reserve in place. This is a higher starting price than most 400s in this condition, but depending on where the reserve is set this could still turn out well. If you’re of smaller stature you will be amazed what you can do on one of these amazing machines from the late 1980s. Research, ask questions, and let us know if you win. Good Luck!!

MI

Fantastic Four: 1988 Yamaha FZR400
Yamaha December 13, 2019 posted by

King Kenny’s steed: 1985 Yamaha RZ350

The Yamaha RZ350 lived a pretty short life on these shores, eventually leaving us in the face of EPA fleet emissions regulations and sales that paled in comparison to its bigger four-stroke stablemates. But, if you were serious about roadracing, or were a serious fan of the 500cc Grand Prix races of the time, the RZ was your mount. The little parallel twin leaves none of its inspirations to the imagination, wearing the signature of American 500cc ace Kenny Roberts front and center on its red, white and blue frame and bodywork.

1985 Yamaha RZ350 for sale on eBay

With just about 45 horsepower, none of which was available until about 6,000 RPM, the 375-pound RZ rewarded momentum and bravery over raw power and speed. Still, even with limited horsepower, the thing managed to click off a 13-second quarter mile at 100 mph in the hands of CycleWorld. That is musclecar shaming performance in a package that will turn with aplomb when you ask it to.

This 1985 Yamaha RZ350 has a few tasteful mods and has covered just under 12,000 miles in its 34 years. It is in very nice condition, with just a few scratches, dings and touch ups on the frame and body work.

From the eBay listing:

1985 Yamaha RZ350 Kenny Roberts

NO RESERVE

11,983 Miles
Fox Shock
New Battery
Powder Coated wheels
New Fork seals and oil
Brakes completely gone through
New EBC rotors and yamaha pads
KN y-boot filter
Hard to find Stock pipes
Tank is clean and rust free inside
Great condition ready to ride
Few minor scuffs as seen in photos
Touch up on frame

Buyer pays shipping (I can assist with shipping) Local pickup in Sarasota, FL area

With no reserve, this thing will sell come hell or high water. With the best part of a week to go in the auction, we’ll be curious to see what this pretty little smoker fetches.

King Kenny’s steed: 1985 Yamaha RZ350
Bimota November 30, 2019 posted by

Underappreciated: 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

This Bimota YB11 Superleggera isn’t just a sportbike, or even an exotic sportbike. It’s a high-performance boutique motorcycle, one of just 650 ever built. Of course, that’s pretty much mass production by Bimota standards. It doesn’t have quite the cachet of Honda’s limited-production homologation superbikes, but consider that Honda made almost 5,000 Honda RC30s, compared to just 650 YB11s. It’s still incredibly rare and plenty fast and, as a bonus, you can take your significant other with you on your high-performance boutique motorcycle: this was one of very few Bimotas ever built with passenger accommodations, although they’re about as comfortable as you’d expect. Still, it’s great to have that spare seat, in case of emergencies…

The “Superleggera” part of Bimota YB11 Superleggera refers to the focus on lightweight construction that allowed huge performance from an existing engine, along with the agile handling you’d expect. At the time, the bike weighed 403lbs dry, a full 80lbs less than the Yamaha YZF1000R that donated its 1002cc five-valve Genesis engine and five-speed transmission. Power was rated at 145hp, with an impressive 80lb-ft of torque that allowed the five-speed box to be fitted to the open-class superbike in the first place, a characteristic it shared with Suzuki’s rival GSX-R1100. The light weight and power were enough to push the bike to nearly 170mph. All the way back in 1997.

Somehow, because of their hand-built nature and flaws, it doesn’t seem all that criminal to modify or improve Bimota’s 1990s motorcycles if it helps sort some of their more annoying quirks: a YZF750R six-speed can replace the original five-speed found in the YB11, and I’m sure somebody can figure out how to fit a stand-alone fuel-injection system to replace the carburetors. This example luckily has the earlier gauges that should hopefully prove more reliable than the later style, while looking better to boot.

It can be tricky to tell if we’ve posted a particular YB11 on the site previously: they all came in the same colors, have low miles, and are generally well cared-for. It’s even trickier when the seller refers to the bike as both a 1997 and a 1998 and appears to have “borrowed” some content from RSBFS in their description… Other than the occasional Termignoni system, aftermarket exhausts and accessories are virtually unheard of, and bolt-on farkles are generally considered undesirable. There appear to have been a few different exhaust hangers used, with and without passenger pegs, although it’s also possible those were fabbed up by the owners when new.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

One of only 650 produced

1998 Bimota 1,002cc YB11 Superleggera 

Frame no. ZESYB1100TR00047

A Rimini-based manufacturer of ducting for heating and ventilation, Bimota soon turned to their first love of motorcycles. Founders Guiseppe Morri and Massimo Tamburrini began manufacturing in the early 1970s and have since built a reputation of exclusive and limited with inimitable Italian styling machines of performance. Using the best cycle parts and an array of the best outside manufacturers’ powerplants, the Bimota was always an uncompromised and expensive foray in to exclusive motorcycling. 

Powered by Yamaha’s superb Thunderace engine, the Superleggera YB11 was Bimota’s last word in Italian exotica of the 1990s. The 131bhp ‘four’ in stock form breathed through a Bimota-designed exhaust system, which could squeeze out a little more power. It was shrouded by the firm’s trademark aluminum beam frame and complemented by some of the finest cycle parts available, including fully adjustable Paioli 51mm forks, fully adjustable Paioli shock, Brembo brakes, 17” Antera wheels and carbon fiber-abound. At 403lbs, the YB11 Superleggera weighed some 80lbs less than the donor bike and its handling and performance were in a different league altogether; as was the price, which at about $20,000, was a staggering 50% more than the Yamaha.

In the late 1990s Bimota went through one of its periodic financial convulsions and production of the YB11 ended in 1999, although a second batch of bikes was completed later using stocks of existing parts. 

The bike offered, an early 1997 example, the 46th built, is presented in excellent condition throughout. With an indicated 8,700 miles, racked up in the first decade of use, the bike has been on static display since 2007, though regularly maintained. A fresh service was performed to ready the bike for sale and no back-fees are due to a California buyer, as the last registration was due over ten years ago.

With only 650 machines produced, this represents a perfect combination of Italian exotica, Japanese reliability, ease of maintenance and power and with such qualifications, is bound to be a future classic.

For additional information, photos, etc. please visit ClassicAvenue.com

Look, the Bimota YB11 is a flawed motorcycle. And maybe the flaws would be unacceptable in a bike that originally sold for the equivalent of $47,000 in today’s money, but they don’t cost that much currently: this one is being offered at $9,900. That seems to be a little bit on the high-side for a 90s Bimota currently, although I doubt that will still be the case in the future. For that kind of money, you’re getting a hell of a lot of exclusivity and performance that will still peel your face back, even today.

-tad

Underappreciated: 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale