Posts by tag: Yamaha

Yamaha December 23, 2020 posted by

Almost Famous: 1985 Yamaha RZ350

How much does star power help with motorsport sales? It helps if the figure connected with the sale is related to the vehicle in question. And in the case of the RZ350, the connection is very, very good. Sporting the signature of “King” Kenny Roberts, the RZ350 came emblazoned with the bumble bee livery that made Yamaha famous on the race track. As the last factory two stroke to be imported into all 50 US States, the RZ350 is held near and dear as a truly special bike from a bygone era.

1985 Yamaha RZ350 for sale on eBay

For those that have been living in a cave without AOL dial-up, let’s go over the basics: Take the spiritual heart of a RD350/RD400 – namely the two stroke parallel twin – and throw go-fast technology at it in the form of liquid cooling and a computer-adjustable exhaust port that enhances the typically peaky two-stroke power curve (YPVS). For those that like to breathe, the RZ came with an exhaust system that incorporated catalytic converters and air injection to prevent mosquito fogging the street/canyon/track with bllue smoke where these bikes played. The rest of the gear was fairly conventional, including a mild-steel frame, a single shock rear suspension system and triple disk brakes.

From the seller:
1985 Yamaha RZ 350 Kenny Robert’s edition. The most desirable year of the most desirable color combination Yamaha RZ 350. Very low original 6809 miles. Runs well, idles perfectly, fires up first kick. Stock oil injection system remains intact. Stock carbs, rejeted for the Toomy pipes and 2 into 1 K&N air filter. It is stock bore with new high performance pistons. I pulled the top end just to inspect and check everything, replaced the pistons because I had an extra set.

This bike came from The American Pickers in LeClaire, Iowa and was on of their shows. It was purchased locally by a motorcycle collector, and I purchased it from them. I have the bill of sale from Iowa.

The bike is in over all in decent rider quality condition, it has the normal nicks and dings as it is a 35 year old motorcycle. This bike would be a great candidate for an easy restoration or enjoy as is.

Like most RZs, this particular example has shed it’s restrictive, heavy catalytic converters in favor of some old-school expansion chambers. That is one way to really wake up an RZ. The air filter mod – in conjunction with the exhaust swap – requires changes to jetting, since the motor is now able to flow more air. Racers usually disabled the oil injection system in favor of mixing oil right into the gas (again, old-school), but street riders will appreciate the ability to fill up the tank without the use of a mix-rite cup.

This particular bike was apparently featured on the TV show “American Pickers.” I’m not really sure if that adds any value, but does prove that many people think the RZ is cool. Pictures show a bike in pretty good condition. This is not a meticulously spotless museum piece by any means, but nor is it a thrashed, crashed and trashed example asking for an outrageous price. With no reserve and a single bid at time of writing, this RZ is in the $6,500 zone – which is close to where you might expect. There are a significant number of folks watching on, though, so you might see some last minute activity on this auction. Check out all of the details here, stay safe and good luck!!

MI

Almost Famous: 1985 Yamaha RZ350
Yamaha December 14, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1979 Yamaha RD400F Daytona Special

Update 12.14.2020: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Before race bikes had to have fairings, custom suspension, and forged rearsets, they looked a lot like streetbikes with number plates, and the 1979 Yamaha RD400F Daytona was among the best. Lighter by half than most of the 750cc and 1,000cc superbikes of the time, the RD could run inside outside and around just about any of its peers. Usually, that means you sacrifice something in acceleration or top speed, but the RD’s parallel-twin 400cc two-stroke mill damn near made up for that.

With ~43 horsepower to push around just 365 pounds, the little RDs were darlings on the street, too. Their modern equivalent is probably something like the Yamaha FZ07, practical, lithe, fast enough to scare you and still accessible enough for a commuter.

This 1979 RD400F Daytona is a beautiful example of the brand, in the classic red/white/gold livery. It’s not perfect, but it isn’t that far off. It’s easily nice enough to put on a stand in your basement and stare at, but I wouldn’t be scared to take it out for a few nice weekend rides, either.

From the seller:

Canadian model 1979 RD400 F Daytona Special sold for only 1 year.
Bike is all original stock.
Low 8100 Miles.
Starts, runs and rides amazing for a 40 year old bike, no issues.
Numbers matching. Low number #403
Matching locks for all 3 – tank, ignition, and seat.
Rust free gas tank, no liner, truly in great shape inside.
Bodywork and paint in very nice shape,
Side covers in great shape very clean no brakes.
All electrical working and no cuts or repairs to wiring loom.
All chrome in great shape including the forks are clean no pits or rust, and gas cap.
Has tool OEM kit.
Things to note the Canadian model received a different crank, electronic ignition, as well as separate carbs similar to the earlier model (that doesn’t have the goofy carb tops and rubber accordion boots that came with the mechanical synchronizing system. Other changes from US model is the exhaust pipes, and have larger diameter for the header and inlet to the exhaust cigar pipes. The Canadian exhaust system also don’t have the butterfly valve.
Huge list of work done including,
Full tune up,
Carburetors just meticulously overhauled.
All work done by red seal mechanic.
140 PSI compression left and right cylinders. Can’t get better than that!!
Many fresh 0km OEM parts.
New air filter.
New spark plugs.
New neutral switch seal.
New shift shaft seal.
New clutch push rod seal.
New seat cover.
New fuel tank rear mounting rubbers.
Petcock rebuilt with new parts.
New exhaust pipe rubber joint gasket.
New black rubber fuel lines.
Fresh Motul trans oil.
Rear brake caliper rebuilt
Fresh brake pads, front and rear.
Bike roles very freely when brakes release.
1 season old battery.
Low km chain and sprockets.
Low km tires.
Probably more just can’t think of it at the moment. many months of love, sweet and work has gone into freshening up this nice original Daytona Special
I would rate this bike as a solid 8.5 out of 10.
Small deficiencies;
1 handle bar mounting bolt is not a match.
Black paint on wheels is starting to fade. comes back nice and black with a little mag product and work.
Front brake is a bit spongy from 40 year old rubber line, looks great, no cracks or splits just flexes more than I like. Yes I’m that picky.
Small marks on fuel tank.
Headlight ears have the dreaded RD400 creases.
Scratches and small weld repair on right exhaust pipe near passenger peg.
Tail fairing underside around mounting bolts has a small piece missing, can not be seen from outside.

Asking price is $7,500$6,995 US
Location: Vancouver, Canada

This one is a Canadian model, which means it’s a little harder edged than the versions we got in the U.S. At $7,500 $6,995, it’s not exactly a bargain basement collector’s piece, but it’s definitely one you should want to own.

Featured Listing: 1979 Yamaha RD400F Daytona Special
Yamaha December 10, 2020 posted by

Front Loaded: 1994 Yamaha GTS1000

While not particularly sport bike-like and definitely less rare than many unicorns posted on this site, the RSBFS staff nonetheless flocks to the unique – if not a bit porky – Yamaha GTS1000. A gem of the sport touring set with its own rabid following, the GTS stands out due to the RADD/Parker front suspension. The rest of the bike is competent and reliable, but otherwise unspectacular. Think of the GTS as competence accomplished in a slightly different way.

1994 Yamaha GTS1000 for sale on eBay

Motorcycle engineers have long envisioned an alternate type of front suspension – one that could isolate road irregularities from weight transfer and steering. The attempts at alternate nose gear developed the moniker of “funny front ends” by many. And while the various suspension designs all had merit in some aspects, the overall package was always compromised in some fashion. The RADD/Parker design offers a single-sided swingarm hanging off the front of the “chassis” with a strut on the left side only. Steering is accomplished via a telescopic column, and braking duties are managed via a single disk mounted centrally and squeezed by a six-piston caliper with antilock functionality. All in all the designed worked – but packaging (such as the C-shaped “Omega” frame) was best accomplished by something larger than a sport bike. Thus, the FZR1000-powered GTS was born.

From the seller:
1994 Yamaha GTS1000 A low mile original bike in fantastic condition. Runs and drives great. No issues. These were groundbreaking in their time and are getting very difficult to find in this condition.
Prices are steadily climbing. Collectors are moving in on them the last couple years.
A great opportunity still affordable for now. This bike will never go down in price.
The back rest is removable and the hard cases for touring come with bike.

Redesigning what has been a staple of motorcycling for more than 50 years took some guts by Yamaha brass. The years of massive experimentation during the 1980s were largely over, and the buying public had consistently voted to follow standard conventions when it came to buying new bikes in the showroom. To be fair, the front fork must compromise size in order to combat flex (which the upside down fork was designed to combat) and is far from an ideal solution for a device that has to deal with so many different force vectors. But it works well enough that creating a new mousetrap did not earn Yamaha a long line for the new GTS. That makes this example a relatively rare survivor, despite its otherwise conventional UJM features.

If you question how well this whole setup works, consider that this 1994 GTS is sporting 33,500 miles on the clock. In truth once you are seated in the well-appointed cockpit you would be very hard pressed to identify any differences from riding a conventional motorcycle. That is perhaps the biggest benefit – as well as the biggest detraction – to the GTS. It does everything you would expect from a well-engineered motorcycle without feeling different or special – even though it was much more expensive than its conventional peers. Today these are well-loved and sought after machines. This particular example looks to have been used and cared for, and includes a Corbin seat upgrade and hard bags to further encourage time in the saddle. With a Buy It Now of $6k, this 1994 Yamaha GTS1000 is looking for a new home. Check out all of the details here. Stay safe, and good luck!!

MI

Front Loaded:  1994 Yamaha GTS1000
Yamaha November 18, 2020 posted by

From the Cheap Seats: 1984 Yamaha FJ600

The 1980s were an amazing decade for motorcycle development, from cruisers to tourers, from sport tourers to all out sport bikes. Every manufacturer made strides during this time, and what you are looking at today is a 1984 Yamaha FJ600 – the middleweight king (for a short while, anyway). This was the ultimate evolution of the air-cooled sport bikes, but thanks to technology advancements it already had one foot firmly in the next generation of advancement; it was a capable sport tourer and a dominant club racer in the day. As a mass produced UJM, the smaller of the FJ series (Yamaha released the FJ in 1100 and 1200 models as well) was never very expensive, nor very rare. So why post this one? 1984 is long past, as are the best days for most FJ600 examples. But rare is the day you find one in this type of condition. Sure, everyone wants to lovingly restore and care for an RC30, but not many will do so for a more, er, pedestrian model. This is a unique opportunity to pick up what has to be the best conditioned FJ600 out there.

1984 Yamaha FJ600 for sale on eBay

The FJ-six was a little bit of a parts bin special, and a whole lot of evolution. Based on the 550cc Seca that preceded it, the 600 was air cooled and aspirated through only two valves per cylinder. This was the norm for the day, and compared favorably with the Suzuki GS550 and Kawasaki GPz550 designs. Of course the displacement advantage and Yamaha’s focus on overall power certainly helped the little FJ, and with 72 ponies on tap and a 10,500 RPM redline, the FJ600 was ready to rumble. The chassis was conventional round-section steel, and little of the GP-inspired racer tricks of the time are evident, save for the rising rate rear monoshock (adjustable for preload), and triple disk brakes (267 mm all around). Wheels were a conventional 18″ front and back, and even the bodywork was simple, with a main fairing and a large chin spoiler. Overall, the FJ600 worked very well as a commuter, a weekend canyon companion, and was a force to be reckoned with on the racetrack (until the other manufactures introduced technically superior 600cc models).

From the seller:
“I owned the same bike in the 80’s and thoroughly enjoyed it.
Last image is me in 1990 leaving for a ride to Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia.
This is not the same bike. This is my passion project.
I still have the Eclipse bags (from 1990) and tank bag if you’re interested in them.”

More from the seller:
A beautiful example of the classic Yamaha FJ style

1. Cherry condition (some wear/touchups)
2. Super low miles
3. Stored in the living room
4. Matching numbers
5. Original key
6. Straight in every way
7. New tires with less than 50 miles (nubs still on)
8. New brakes front/rear
9. New front brake master cylinder
10. Rebuilt calipers front/rear
11. New brake fluid
12. New steering head bearings
13. New wheel bearings front/rear
14. New fork seals and dust caps
15. New fork oil
16. New grips
17. New period mirrors
18. New battery
19. New oil+filter
20. New petcock, also have factory petcock with rebuild kit
21. Newly replaced factory shock
22. New chin cowling still in box (primer grey-requires paint/decals)
23. New clutch cable
24. New throttle cable
25. New intake manifolds
26. Newly rebuilt carburetors
27. New spark plugs
28. Fuel removed from tank and carbs in 2018
29. Clean cases
30. New front sprocket
31. New rear sprocket
32. New DID 520 O-ring chain
33. Clean Florida title in hand

Motorcycle collections tend to take on a life of their own. And while many collectors wish for a well-rounded class of bikes – say the homologation machines of the 1980s-1990s – there is little doubt that this beautifully kept FJ600 would fit right in to any gathering of motorcycles. Whether you are collecting one or dozens, a clean example such as this should always have a home. The best part? A mere $3,500 will buy it now. Parts are plentiful, there is nothing so unobtainium that you cannot ride and enjoy it, and it is a great motorcycle to boot. Welcome to the cheap seats – where only the price of admission is low; the standards are still as high as ever. Check it out here, because this 1984 Yamaha FJ600 is a beaut that deserves a loving home. Stay safe, and good luck!!

MI

From the Cheap Seats:  1984 Yamaha FJ600
Featured Listing November 3, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 Yamaha TZ750 Racer!

When it comes to bikes that have made their mark on history, few can stack up with the Yamaha TZ750. A winning GP factory racer built for the Formula 750 class, the TZ750 was remarkable in its adaptability; from dominating Daytona, to winning the Isle of Man TT, to being converted into a dirt tracker of sorts, the mighty TZ sent a message to the world that to win you needed to be on a Yamaha. And far from the factory-only efforts of today, the TZ750 was available as a customer race bike. Show up to your local dealer with references and some cash, and factory speed and power was in your hands. Today’s 1974 example of the TZ750 is just such a privateer bike, and includes some interesting history and a trip to Daytona as some of the stories it has to tell. This Featured Listing is an amazing part of our motorcycling past, and can be raced in historics, parked in your man cave museum as artwork, or even ridden on the street (!). The sheer volume of quality pictures should say enough, but read on about this labor of love.

Featured Listing: 1974 Yamaha TZ750 Racer!

From the seller:
This is a 1974 Yamaha TZ750A, with true 750cc D-model cylinders. It was purchased by the current owners in 2015 from the previous (2nd) owner who had it since 1979. It was raced at the 1975 Daytona 200 by the original owner Doug Libby (from Michigan). We have been in touch with him, and he confirms that he did race this bike there, finishing mid-pack (pictures of Doug on this bike below).

The bike will come in the original race trim, as seen in the pictures with the flat-side open pipes and the #1 bodywork. The TZ also comes with a rare, clear Nevada Title so that it can be ridden on the street. We have the street trim equipment available to the buyer which can be negotiated separately, and includes the street exhaust (Swarbrick pipes built by Rusty Bigley), extra bodywork #40 (AirTech), kickstand, and electronics (headlight, taillight, license plate holder, turn signals, cooling fans and battery). All street parts were all installed with a “do-no-harm” mentality. Nothing was drilled or damaged to the bike in any way and parts can be added/removed as if they were never there. Both sets of bodywork have been professionally painted with automotive grade paint and clear coat over the pinstripes/color. The stickers are over the clear and can be removed by new owner.

First-year TZ750’s are very rare and we know of fewer than 10 in the United States and most of those are in museums. Ours also comes with a clear Nevada title and is the only twin-shock TZ that is street legal that we know of in the United States. Historically there may only be 3 or 4 TZ’s of any generation that were titled in the United States for the street.

More from the seller:
The bike went through a full restoration about 10 years ago by the previous owner. It has run 2-3 hours since 2015, when we purchased it. The previous owner stated that he inspected the engine for wear and compression and all is within spec, we have done a borescope inspection on cylinders and gearbox with no concerns found. Some of the fasteners i.e., bolts, washers, etc are non-factory Yamaha. It is always stored inside our home. A new set of Mikuni carburetors are installed that have idle screws (originals did not have them, making it hard to idle at a stop sign). The original 409 carbs will come with the bike and are in excellent condition however, they were all drilled for idle screws by the previous owner (see photo), as such the drill holes would need to be sealed to return them to original condition. Also, a new aftermarket radiator has been installed and the original is preserved and comes with the bike. Finally, a set of mid-80’s Michelin slicks will come with the bike if someone wants to make it truly period-correct for show. The slicks are not showing cracking but are only good for static display (due to age). The engine case does not come stamped with a serial number, indicating it was a factory replacement. The frame # is: 409000177 meaning it was the 76th TZ750 built in 1974.

For reference, we attended the Mecum motorcycle auction in Las Vegas in January 2020 where another first year TZ sold for $60k plus $6k premium for a total of $66k. That machine wasn’t even close to the quality ours is. It was missing various parts, and the finish was subpar at best. We constantly keep track of TZ750s that are for sale and only one or two per year come on the market. Most have not been restored or require significant time/money investment to become ridable. Ours is a ready to ride, race, or show either on the track or on the street.

Asking price: $65,000 USD

Contact: Jerall Lawrence (jerall.w.lawrence@gmail.com) for more details

More from the seller:
The street gear can be negotiated as part of the sale. The original flat-side “open” pipes will come with the bike in race/original trim. We also have significant spares that can be negotiated as we have another CMR chassis TZ750 that we are building to race. We are located in Las Vegas, Nevada, and can assist with shipping or transporting, depending on the situation and location of the buyer.

All of the pictures and videos posted in this ad were taken on 10/31/2020 (except for the vintage pictures, of course). We have put comments on the pictures to make it clear what comes with the bike. We took photos of all the parts available and made comments on each photo stating which come with the bike and which are negotiable.

A bike this magnificent needs to be seen in motion to truly appreciate the visceral elements of the breed. Check out this video of the bike running (in full race trim), and tell me that the sound does not send chills up and down your spine!

How do you like this view from the office? Not many riders have had occasion to enjoy this particular view, but the lucky buyer can chose what they see through the bubble: the racetrack, the canyons, or the man cave!

Another video provided by the seller shows this incredible TZ750 sporting street trim. That’s right. Forget all about those “GP Replica Racers” such as the RG500 Gamma or RZ500 – how about an *actual* race bike on the street? Where do I sign?! Once again, the sound is glorious – and I could only imagine how this would feel on my morning commute:

The TZ750 went through several iterations over the span of years, including frame updates (and a change to single shock rear suspension) and motor mods that greatly increased horsepower. Weight was also marginally reduced over the years. But like all racers, these privateer machines were generally used hard and funds were not always available to put them back together again. Many were crashed – hard. Others were destructively modified as rule books changed and teams struggled to keep older bikes competitive. Surviving racers in this kind of condition are a rare gift; we do not see them often because they did not live in a collector world. With a comprehensive restoration behind it, tons of documentation and photos, and the rarity of being a first-year, twin shock bike, this 1974 Yamaha TZ750 is sure to drive a lot of interest. Serious parties should contact father and son team Jerall & John Lawrence for questions or negotiations. At $65k USD, this bike is priced right in line with the market, and has plenty to offer in terms of history and potential add-ons. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1974 Yamaha TZ750 Racer!
Yamaha October 28, 2020 posted by

The Clean Side of Dirty: 1985 Yamaha RZ500

The legendary Yamaha RZ500 – the twin-crank, V-4, 500cc two stroke GP bike for the street – never officially came into the United States. By the late 1970s the EPA had their sooty little hands in, well, everything, and raucous power plants such as internal combustion two strokes were strictly off the list. Yamaha tried for a couple of years with the 500s baby brother, the RZ350, but ultimately shelved the clean air catalytic converter project. They didn’t even bother trying with the bad boy 500, and perhaps it was better that they didn’t. The RZ500 was a down and mean smoker, and never tried to apologize for that fact. It landed on the shores of North America and rolled on Canadian soil, but such was as close as it came for eager and lusting American riders. Thankfully many were unofficially imported into the US as used bikes, which brings us to this particular example.

1985 Yamaha RZ500 for sale on eBay

The seller of today’s bike has quite a bit to say, and I will let him pick up the tale from here:

From the seller:
Yamaha Other. 1985 Yamaha RZ500 2 stroke. Low miles. Speedo is in KM and bike has 5300 miles. I purchased this bike from the 2-stroke guru Rick Lance a few years ago before his passing. http://www.lancegamma.com He gave it a once over inspection and replaced the crank seals and gave it a tune up. Those who knew Rick can attest to his competence regarding two strokes and his integrity. He was aware of the history of this particular machine and stated he believed the engine had never been apart and was a great example of a stock, unmolested low mileage RZ500. I’ve seen numerous RZ500s over the years and have even raced them and this is one of the nicest, cleanest survivors. Upon receipt, I took it for a quick test ride to ensure everything was working properly. Lights, turn signals, horn, brake lights, etc. function as designed. The bike shifted through the gears and there were no mechanical issues. The bike even has the original tool kit and fuel tank service cable. The interior of the tank has no rust and the bike has new tires and battery. Because of the altitude of my location (4200 feet MSL),the bike did tend to bog and was in obvious need of a rejetting as it was running rich. After consulting with Rick, he said the bike had run clean at his altitude in North Carolina before shipping. Not having the time to work on it, I drained the float bowls and tank and put the machine into storage with the intent to rejet the carburetors and ride it in the future.

More from the seller:
Unfortunately due to work and personal commitments, I never did rejet and have decided to sell off several of my collector bikes. Not knowing where the machine would be shipped, I decided to leave the jetting for sea level instead of taking the time and effort to set it up for my altitude. Overall, this is a classic machine in great condition. It does not appear to have had any crash damage. Check out the YouTube link below of the bike running. It fires up on the first or second kick. Please feel free to ask any questions. When I sell on Ebay, I try to be as honest and forthcoming as possible. If you have a shipper, I’ll work with them on pickup or dropping the bike off at a location in the Salt Lake area. Please feel free to ask any questions. The bike has a clean Utah title. $500 non-refundable deposit required in 24 hours and full payment in 7 days. Bike is sold as is with no warranty although honestly, it’s in great shape and Rick Lance gave it a clean bill of health. The bike and title will not be released until payment clears. Thanks for looking.

If you doubt my earlier statement about “Ole Smokey” the 500cc two stroke, allow me to share the video created of this bike by the seller. I can practically smell the castor and revel in the sounds (and undoubtedly the lack of mosquitoes!).

This bike looks clean, clean, clean. The fact that it went through Lance Gamma’s shop is a real plus as few people knew and lived this era’s smokers like Lance. This bike has been wonderfully photographed, and shows its originality proudly. The miles are low, but I’m sure the riding smiles are off the charts! These big RZs are getting harder and harder to find in clean and original condition, and prices are definitely on the collector side of the fence these days. If you want one, the time to get in was yesterday – but better late than never. The current auction bid is up to $14k with reserve still in place. Check out all of the details here, and Good Luck!!

MI

The Clean Side of Dirty: 1985 Yamaha RZ500
MZ July 27, 2020 posted by

Singular Simplicity: 1997 MZ Skorpion Sport

The sad thing about being a serious motorcycle geek is that most people don’t really understand my obsession with and enthusiasm for weird motorcycles. Even other motorcyclists. I was thinking about this today as I was poring over the engine of a friend’s Velocette Venom, trying to suss out the function of the little cable-actuated device at the base of the pushrod tube [compression-release, we decided]. I mean, I happen to think bikes like this MZ Skorpion Sport are incredibly cool, but most motorcyclists are ignorant of their existence. That’s a shame, since [East] German brand MZ has a storied history and basically single-handedly ushered in modern two-stroke performance when they developed the first expansion chambers for their race bikes.

The Skorpion Sport doesn’t have those, however.

What the Skorpion Sport does have is Yamaha’s five-valve single that displaced 660cc, just 6cc short of being an engine of pure evil. As it was basically an off-road drivetrain repurposed for sportbike duty, a Yamaha five-speed gearbox transferred power to the rear wheel, and the package was suspended in a tubular steel frame. The engine and frame formed the foundation for a whole range of interesting and generally very competent motorcycles from MZ, from the Mastiff supermoto and Baghira dual-sport, to the Traveller sport-tourer, Replika, and the Skorpion Sport.

Overall, the bike is simplicity itself, the purest incarnation of a sports motorcycle you’re likely to find at this price point. Weight was a hair over 400lbs wet, and handling generally considered to be excellent. Styling looks a big like a Gilera Saturno and the bike does feature passenger pegs, although there’s no guarantee there is a pillion pad hiding under the seat cowl, or included with the bike. The 1990s were weird like that.

From the original eBay listing: 1997 MZ Skorpion Sport for Sale

Looks great. Runs Outstanding. Low mileage. I’ve taken it on several long rides with no problems at all. Yamaha reliability. Made in Germany. Designed in England. Lots of Italian bits. Buyer responsible for pick up. I’ll help get it on to the transporter. I have the unsigned registration papers, and original manual. New tires. Small scuff on right side of engine where someone dropped it. It’s in the pictures. I have the under-belly fairing, and the original muffler as well. I never registered it in CA. (DMV-phobia) Bill of sale only.

There hasn’t been much interest in this MZ so far, with bidding up to $2,300 and about one more day left on the listing. That’s on the low side, but Skorpions don’t go for much more money than that right now: they’re rare, but not especially collectible. What they are is great value, with an exotic nameplate, nimble handling, stone-axe reliability. With single-cylinder classes a popular way to get into racing on a budget, Skorpions often get snapped up to be converted into lightweight track-hacks. They’re good for that, but it does seem a little sad that such interesting machines

-tad

Singular Simplicity: 1997 MZ Skorpion Sport
Yamaha May 18, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR400 in Arizona

Update 7.6.2020: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

This gorgeous little JDM ripper is an RSBFS alum, listed here in late 2017 by our buddy Gary out in Utah. Today, it makes a triumphant return, this time in Arizona and bearing its correct model year. Japanese market 1WG models are rare as hen’s teeth as it is, and this one ups the ante with its unobtanium blue bodywork  and stellar condition. Gary has always been a fastidious and particular collector, and the current seller clearly carried on that proud tradition.

The Yamaha FZR400 is a gem of a motorcycle in any guise, with a rev-happy water-cooled four banger pushing around a gorgeous aluminum frame. Club racers loved these things when they were new, and you can still catch them tearing up AHRMA grids today. As with any welterweight ripper, they require handfuls of throttle and reward bravery and momentum with millimeter-precise handling.

The bike appears to have been treated to new tires in the current owner’s care, and he has added just shy of 1,000 kilometers. It remains in incredible condition.

From the seller:

1987 Yamaha FZR 400 1WG , approx 10,399 KM or 6,461 Miles. I take it out at least once a week in AZ. Rare blue JDM bike, Very clean, Japanese tank sticker, Excellent running condition, Excellent overall condition, Everything works like new, New Tires, Previous owner’s recent refresh includes: replaced front master cylinder with new OEM, Engine covers (caps) replaced with new OEM, New fuel petcock, New fork seals, New battery and fluids. All fairings, exhaust, and components not mentioned are 100% factory Yamaha original parts. No rust in tank. No paint touch-ups. Very minor normal light wear. Some corrosion on top of motor. Clean AZ title. $7600

The bike is also listed here on Craigslist, where seller Chris’s contact info can be found. In these trying times, we can’t think of a more entertaining way to practice physical distancing.

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR400 in Arizona