Posts by tag: VFR750R

Honda April 16, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1990 Honda VFR750R RC30

Update 4.22.2019: This RC30 has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Often considered the darling of the collector world, the RC30 reigns supreme as being one of the most approachable of the highly sought-after rare bikes of the 80s & 90s. Volumes of research are readily available for these fascinating machines, and values remain strong with steady and continued appreciation. In short, the RC30 contains everything that RSBFS readers crave: A fantastic sport bike with racing DNA; A gorgeous silhouette that is THE iconic shape of the era; A mythical soundtrack that matches the good looks; A limited numbers homologation bike… and a good investment. There may be haters out there, but they are vastly outnumbered by those who understand what the RC30 brings to the table.

Featured Listing: 1990 Honda VFR750R RC30

Officially known as the VFR750R, the RC30 differs from the more pedestrian and economical VFR750F in more ways than the similarities. Both bikes have VFR in the title and both utilize a V4 engine arrangement. Apart from the Honda badge on the tank, that is where it ends and where the RC30 takes off. Throwing off the chain-driven engine internals of the previous VF series, the RC30 makes use of a gear-driven DOHC architecture which provides for ultra-precise valve timing and control. This is the piece that contributes to the characteristic whine of these VFR motors. And while the newer VFR-F models also utilized gear driven cams, the motor internals of the RC30 were decidedly more racy. Connecting rods were made of titanium to reduce reciprocating weight and raise the redline. The crank timing was changed to a 360 degree “big bang” sequence instead of the F-bikes 180 degree crank (the latter being smoother for street riding). The transmission was configured for racing – meaning a close-ratio box – and a slipper clutch was fitted. The twin spar chassis was all aluminum, including the revolutionary single sided swing arm. Suspension was all top line offerings from Showa. Devised for endurance racing and facilitating quick wheel/tire changes, even the front of the RC30 has quick-change hardware to minimize pit lane delays. And that is what the RC30 was built to be: a race bike with lights made available to the public. A total of 3,000 units were built.

From the seller:
1990 Honda RC30 For Sale

This beautiful motorcycle is for sale after 18 years of ownership. Its owner is selling his collection of desirable motorcycles due to health issues. It is complete, runs like it should, and has never been down. The bike has been ridden approximately 400 miles under its current owner. In its time it was never raced or abused, and always stored indoors in a dry and temperate climate.

More from the seller:

Because the bike has seen very limited road use over the past few years it received a total carb cleaning and synching within the past few months. At the time, while the carbs were removed, the fuel petcock was also dismantled and thoroughly cleaned by a former Honda mechanic.

The RC30 comes with its original factory tool roll, and the rear swing arm stand.

If you’re reading this post you already know this bike’s legacy both in Honda’s history, and in racing history. The bike was purchased from a collection in Georgia, and imported it into Canada after taking delivery there. It has been licensed in Ontario since that time, and has a clear ownership (title) in the province of Ontario. There are no warranties expressed or implied.

More from the seller:

Price: $28,000 (USD) or $35,000 (CDN)

The bike is located east of Toronto, Ontario. For you U.S. readers, importing a bike from Canada to the U.S. shouldn’t be anymore trying than it was to bring it to Canada. Filling out the appropriate forms, and having a bit of patience is all you really need. The owner can assist in shipping, but all planning and costs are the responsibility of the buyer.

This RC30 is in amazing condition, having traveled only some 2,200 miles in it’s lifetime. This is helped by the limited ownership; RC30s tend to be coveted and kept in collections for longer periods of time than other machines. This one is no different, and has been fawned over for nearly two decades. These are the types of bikes you hang on to for as long as you can, and those fortunate enough to own one have realized significant gains in valuation. Year after year, this is about as reliable a sure thing that one can find when it comes to collecting motorcycles. And even if you are more into riding than collecting, the RC30 has much to offer. There are those who ride these bikes regularly, which is really how it should be. These bikes were built to go racing, and while they look fantastic as a static display they are much more beautiful at full song.

This particular bike is located in Canada, although it looks to have been a US bike originally. The clocks are in MPH and it has already been federalized. That should help with bringing it back over the border (that, and the fact it is more than 25 years old). This bike comes with some cool RC30 extras, and has been recommissioned to boot. Check out the pictures – feel free to drool a little. At $28k USD this RC30 is priced to sell in the real world. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1990 Honda VFR750R RC30
Honda March 2, 2019 posted by

A Nordic Natural: 1988 Honda VFR750R RC30

The multiple motorcycle auctions in Las Vegas in January each year are somewhat of a bellwether for prices overall. Sure, pricing is a bit over-inflated due to peer-pressure, bidding competition and the general excitement of the auction atmosphere, but what sells high at these auctions will generally do well on the open market. If you’ve never been, you should definitely consider going – at least once. The lights, the noise, and the thousands of bikes that cross the block over multiple days and multiple auction houses are a sight to behold. It also gives you an appreciation for what is hot, and what has cooled off (or failed to make the cut). But you didn’t need to attend – or even follow – this year’s auctions to know that the RC30 is hot. Possibly the most collectible of the 80s vintage homologation racers, the VFR750R tops the bucket list of many, and remains on a rocket ship trajectory in terms of value. If you want one you will have to stand in line, and bring your wallet.

1988 Honda VFR750 RC30 for sale on eBay

The RC30 is known for good looks, sharp handling, and glorious sound. The latter comes courtesy of a mass-centralized V4 engine, utilizing gear-driven cams for precise valve control – which contributes to that legendary and iconic whine. The flatter sound of the RC30 exhaust is the result of a 360°crankshaft. The approach results in greater traction due to the more widely distributed power cycles (when compared with a conventional 180° crank). Everything that makes beautiful noises also helps with the sharper handling; pull the bodywork off of an RC30 and you quickly realize how packed in tight everything is. Mass centralization is the real deal, and the more you can concentrate weight centrally and down low, the easier the bike will be to flick from side to side, etc. And while those who are lucky enough to see an RC30 in its naked form will call that magical V4 beautiful, the good looks really come from the beefy aluminum twin spar frame and endurance racing inspired bodywork. The twin headlamps are straight out of the 80s, and they went straight into the book of classic looks. The single sided swing arm completes the package, and proved its worth during wheel changes at the racetrack – especially during those endurance events.

From the seller:
Selling my rc30 vfr750r, very low mileage (3553km) and extremely well take care of. 100% working order. Been standing in the living room as eye candy since bought in 2002.
Got first bought in Germany by the original owner,then driven to Monaco and back, after that parked in his office. I then later purchased it. (2002)

The bike is located in Norway (Sarpsborg).
Contact me for more info/pictures.
Price is 500,000 nok (Norwegian Kroner)
We can help with shipping.

Most RC30 we find these days are collector bikes. It is pretty rare indeed to find a RC30 thrasher, and few are regular riders. This particular bike has but 3,500 KM (2,200 miles) and appears to be in complete, original order. Which brings us to problem #1: as RC30 enthusiasts are not limited to North America, this wonderful example is located in Norway. US-based buyers might want to start consulting shipping and importation guides now. Problem #2: RC30s are no longer $15k, $20K, $25K or even $30k. The asking price on these models continues to rise. This particular example is asking well neigh on $60k. And the worst part for those that have a hankerin’ for homologation is that the asking price is not really out of line with where the market is going. We have seen higher asks – much higher – and not just at auction. Check it out here. Look over the pictures. And then decide if you want to board the RC30 price elevator. We have seen nothing but up for these models with nary a dip in valuation over the years. If you want in, you best commit before these are $75k and then $100k bikes. Good Luck!!

MI

A Nordic Natural: 1988 Honda VFR750R RC30
Honda December 25, 2018 posted by

Christmas Bonus: 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale

Long before “mass centralization” became a popular marketing buzzword for sportbikes, Honda was investing its bubble economy-inflated budget in a bike that took advantage of that very concept, the exquisitely-engineered VFR750R, otherwise known as the legendary RC30. Honda was so invested in sportbikes at the time that it actually sold an I4 and a V4 range of bikes concurrently, with their CBR and VFR filling slightly different niches. But when it came to their homologation bikes, Honda took their hard-won knowledge from the street-oriented V4 bikes and used it to develop the bike seen here, the VFR750R.

If you’re passingly familiar with Honda’s roadbikes, “VFR” probably evokes images of practical and engaging sport-touring bikes that lean on the sport end of the spectrum. This is not one of those bikes. The RC30 was developed to win production-based racing classes, specifically the then-new World Superbike Championship, although the ELF-designed single-sided swingarm hints at the bike’s endurance racing capabilities as well.

At the heart of the bike is obviously a compact V4 engine with a relatively narrow frontal area for good aerodynamics and very centralized mass, gear-driven cams for extremely precise valve control, and a 360°crankshaft that improved traction at the rear wheel, compared to a more traditional 180° unit. The concept of the 360° crank is that the combustion events are clustered close together, instead of spaced evenly throughout each engine revolution to allow the rear tire to “recover,” increasing traction and improving tire life. It also gives the bike a flatter powerband and a distinctive soundtrack that can be appreciated, even if your skills don’t extend to tire-spinning corner exits. The downside of a V4 is generally increased weight compared to an inline-four and tight packaging, especially with a 90° v-angle, as used here. Stripped of its fairing, the RC30 looks very dense and packed with mechanical bits, and V4s can be a bit of a bear to work on.

Reviews then and now describe it as an easy bike to take full advantage of, a bike that rewarded finesse, a bike that just did as it was told and allowed the rider to get on with winning. Power was unremarkable, weight was average, and nothing about the bike screamed “race winner.” But win it did, even against stiff opposition from Ducati, Bimota, Suzuki, Yamaha, and Kawasaki, and Honda only abandoned the V4 formula when it decided that rules in WSBK favoring v-twins were onerous and biased. So they built a v-twin and showed everyone they could win with those as well, but it was clear their hearts would always belong to the V4…

The RC30 is a handsome bike, with nearly perfect proportions and a wealth of amazing details, although it doesn’t have the easy wow-factor of something from Italy. It’s not often you can accuse Ducati of cribbing styling elements, but the 916’s taillights and distinctive single-sided swingarm look awfully similar to what you can see here. And unlike those Italian machines, every single component is carefully thought out to work as part of a complete package, and engineered to near-perfection.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale

  • Long term ownership and fewer than 5,000 miles
  • 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30
  • Frame Number: 2100129
  • Engine Number: 2100162
  • Legendary 16-valve gear-driven DOHC 90 degree V4 engine
  • Reportedly fewer than 3000 produced
  • Single owner since 1990
  • Fewer than 5,000 miles from new.

One of the modern era’s few immediately collectible classics, the Honda VFR750R – better known as the ‘RC30′ – was created for just one reason: to win the World Superbike Championship, a feat it achieved in the nascent series’ first two seasons of 1988 and 1989. And while American Fred Merkel was bringing Honda its first two WSB crowns, Britain’s Carl Fogarty used an RC30 to win the TT F1 World Championship in 1988 and 1989, and the equivalent FIM Cup in 1990. No mere short circuit scratcher, the RC30 and its derivatives proved durable enough to win a hat-full of Endurance Classics too. That this latter requirement was also part of the design brief may be determined from the fact that a quick-release front fork and single-sided swinging arm – essential for speedy wheel changes – were part of an unrivaled specification that included a twin-spar alloy beam frame, 16-valve V4 engine with gear-driven cams, close-ratio six-speed gearbox and four-pot front brake calipers.

All of which did not come cheap: at the time of its launch in 1988 an RC30 cost near double that of other super-sports 750s. Despite the passage of time and progress of motorcycle technology, the RC30 remains a match for the latest generation of sports bikes but possesses an exclusivity that none of them can approach. ‘No other bike from the late-Eighties is lusted after like the RC30’, reckoned Bike, and few would disagree. And then there’s the exhaust note – loud, of course, but soulful enough to bring a pit crew to tears.

This RC30 was only very recently liberated from its second and very long-term owner. Purchased in the UK in 1990, fewer than 5,000 miles have been put on the bike since it was new. Not long after acquisition, the superbike was taken to the Isle of Man where it was driven around the race track, but not actually raced. In 1991 the machine was brought stateside. Regularly maintained since new, the previous owner reports that the RC30 was taken to the local Honda dealer for a pre-sale service within the last couple of months.

Fresh from nearly three decades of single owner care, this legendary machine is offered in excellent condition throughout. The engine starts readily, idles smoothly and has an abundance of power. The clutch is silky-smooth and brakes and suspension are near perfect. I would opt for a new pair of tires before serious road use and am happy to negotiate your tire choice in to the price.

This is a rare opportunity to acquire a motorcycling icon of performance and provenance and a must-have for a discerning collection.

For additional information and photos go to ClassicAvenue.com

V4s are all the rage these days, but Honda really pioneered them for modern motorcycle applications. Because who the hell else would want to design around such a packaging headache? Obviously, Honda has a history of doing things just because they can, practicality be damned: their oval-pistoned racebikes grew out of a staunch refusal to adapt to the changing technology of the Grand Prix scene and simply build a competitive two-stroke. And although that particular experiment was a failure, it shows the lengths to which Honda will go when they believe in an engineering concept. Luckily, the V4 wasn’t quite so complex and was ultimately vindicated by both in-period success and by the legacy it left behind. This example has very low miles and appears to be in very nice, original condition with an asking price of $44,900 and just one more day on the listing, so if you didn’t get what you wanted for Christmas this year and happen to have a bit of your holiday bonus left lying around…

-tad

Christmas Bonus: 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale
Honda May 28, 2018 posted by

A Couple Hours Remaining on Memorial Day: 1990 Honda RC30 in Costa Mesa

Just a quick post to keep an eye on this Honda VFR750R currently on eBay. We’ve seen this one come up on Craigslist several times but it’s the first time in my memory that it’s been on eBay. Current bid is $25,600 reserve not met and just a couple hours left.

1990 Honda RC30 for sale on eBay

from the seller:

What you have here for your consideration is a 1990 Honda RC30 VFR750R homologation race bike of which only 300 were imported into the USA to make eligible to race.
This bike was not built at the Honda factory instead it was hand made at the Hamamatsu HRC race plant and for it’s time was an amazing thing to behold with honeycomb frame, multiple magnesium parts and specialties to make it lighter along with the single side swing arm which was a 1st in the industry along with the high revving V4 gear driven cam engine that red lines at 12500 on 49 state models.
The bike has been serviced with all fluids changed, new battery and new tires and has a clean title only covering 6900 miles and also has a lot of HRC parts including exhaust system, carb cooler tray, radiator, temp gauge along with other internals and also has marvic wheels so you can run decent rubber which it has new tires on.
The bike was serviced a while back and has sat since and needs to be run.
You don’t see these once in a blue moon or an eternity so here is your chance to own the fabled Honda RC30 to add to your collection.
https://www.instagram.com/p/BfUi44InJX9/

We hope you’re enjoying the long Memorial Day weekend, and thanks to all Veterans for your service!

dc

A Couple Hours Remaining on Memorial Day:  1990 Honda RC30 in Costa Mesa
Honda May 11, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1991 Honda VFR400R NC30 for Sale

A little brother in terms of displacement and a virtual twin in terms of style, Honda’s NC30 packs the same technological punch as the famed RC30 in a smaller package. And like the RC30, the NC30 was designed to homologate a motorcycle for racing, although in this case it was for classes with a 400cc capacity limit. Here in the USA, the 400cc sportbike class is barely represented at all, with examples only occasionally appearing as the result of intrepid collectors or Canadian smugglers sneaking bikes in across our northern border. In the US, they were basically bikes without a racing class, and expensive ones to boot: they had all the complexity, and therefore cost, of their bigger 600 and 750cc brothers, without the straight line performance.

1991 Honda VFR400R NC30 for sale on eBay

Sure, they handled with all the agility you’d expect but, when a 600cc sportbike is considered “a great first bike” you’re not going to find many takers for a 400. Of course, it was another story entirely outside the USA and especially in Japan, where tiered licensing and heavy taxes on bigger bikes meant a great deal of interest in the 400cc class as roadbikes and the relevant racing series, and bikes like the CBR400, GSX-R400, and ZXR400 competed fiercely.

So what are we looking at in terms of that reduced performance? Well you’re not taking quite as big a hit as you might expect: the NC30 produced 59 claimed horses, versus the RC30’s 118, 313lbs dry versus 400lbs, and a top speed of 130mph versus 153. So you’ve got a bike with almost half the displacement but with far more than half the performance, mostly due to that very light weight. What’s possibly far more surprising than the performance differential between the two are the relatively low numbers for the famed RC30… Both machines featured six-speed gearboxes and the NC30 got a 360° “big bang” crank to match its bigger brother along with gear-driven cams, so you get the distinctive V4 soundtrack and wide powerband that helps make them such popular trackday bikes overseas.

From the seller: 1991 Honda VFR400R NC30 for Sale

For your consideration is a GORGEOUS almost mint condition 1991 Honda VFR400R NC-30 with only 10,823 Kilometers (6,725 miles). Bike is very clean and well taken care of. Bike would be flawless except for the crack in the lower fairing under the bike. It has been repaired. Has a three tiny paint chip marks in the tank, and the left rear fairing has a rub mark on it from transportation & shipping (see pics.) This NC30 has 100% original OEM Honda fairings and components and is completely stock except for a few racing sponsor decals that can be easily removed. This bike would make an ideal candidate for restoration or enjoy it in its original condition… Bike has been serviced with new battery, new oil, coolant and filters serviced. Runs like the day it was new. A Utah state title in my company name will be presented to the buyer.

This particular machine appears to be in the same sort of condition as the seller’s other offerings: not completely perfect, but in low mileage, extremely well cared-for condition. There are a couple of minor cracks in the fairing that are clearly indicated by the seller, and wear is limited to some minor surface corrosion and discoloration. Not museum-quality perhaps, but a very good-looking machine for someone who plans to occasionally ride the bikes in their collection. With the RC30 now out of the reach of ordinary enthusiasts, prices of the NC30 are on the rise as well and offer up a similar style and experience at an affordable price. For the moment at least.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1991 Honda VFR400R NC30 for Sale
Honda May 10, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1990 Honda RC30!

Update 5.15.2017: SOLD in just 5 days. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

When it comes to collecting, the Honda RC30 (i.e. VFR750R) is one for the ages. This is perhaps THE most collectable bike available insofar as modern machinery goes. With sensuous curves, striking paint and race-bred features, the RC30 is the ultimate homologation bike and the real deal on the street. Powered by a V-4 with gear-driven cams (oh, the music!) and titanium connecting rods, the RC30 was first released in Japan in 1988, followed shortly by a European version. Ultimately, this rare bit of unobtanium came to America as a 1990 model.

Released in order to qualify for the inaugural FIM Superbike racing series – where racing motorcycles are required to be based off of a street bike – the RC30 dominated the first season out. “Flyin” Fred Merkel had the piloting honors in 1988, and followed up with a repeat victory season in 1989. By that time, the legend of the RC30 had been secured. It seems that wherever the RC30 showed up, it won; be it the Superbike circuit, the Isle of Man TT, or the showroom. An estimated 3,000 bikes were produced, and carried the absurd price tag of approximately $15k USD. Today, that number seems like a bargain – if you can find one. This RC30 is being sold by a RSBFS reader and fan who found this bike right here on these pages. I’ll let him pick up the story:

From the seller:
1990 RC30 – 49 state model – 3,540 miles. New battery, brake and clutch fluids. All original. Includes rear stand, tool kit, and 4 NOS Honda spark plugs. I also have the original tires, if you would like them for display purposes. This rare bird was last registered in 1994 in NY (there is a sticker on the left fork leg).

For some reason, it was put into long-term storage, then later sold to a man in Portland OR from whom I bought the bike. I have had the 30 for 5 years, but am moving and don’t have space for it in the next garage.

Study the photos – this machine is almost cosmetically perfect – it has a tiny chip in the paint on the fairing which I’ve photographed, a scratch on the bottom of the belly pan, and some slight discoloration at the bottom rear of the belly pan (I attempted to get it out using mirror glaze, but to no avail) – the discoloration is so minor I can’t get a decent photo of it. These tiny imperfections were present when I purchased the bike.

I put fresh fuel into it today, and it fired up immediately (see video). Now, the caveat – when it fired up, it also leaked some fuel due to a stuck float in one of the carburators (turn off the petcock and the leak stops – I cleaned the bike to remove any fuel residue). I’m a sorry excuse for a mechanic, and I’m not anxious to take this jewel to our local shop, so I’m selling it as it is, and the new owner will need to service the float.

Video of RC30 startup:

I am a Rare sports bike fan, and that’s how I found RC30 #37. I am hoping it goes to someone who will truly appreciate its originality, as I have.

RSBFS finds and posts the best sport bikes found for sale every day. But it’s not every day that you come across as original and protected an example of “rare sport bike” as this beautifully cared for RC30. Yes, there may need to be some sorting out of the carbs (if you are keen to ride this unicorn) – but that seems to be proof that the bike really hasn’t been fueled or run in a long time, and is all original as claimed. Gotta give props to full disclosure.

Tim is accepting offers on this beauty right now. Send him an email with your best shot (tmerrill@fulcrumlegal.com), and see if you can’t add the most collectable modern sport bike to your collection. Good luck!!

Featured Listing: 1990 Honda RC30!
Honda December 26, 2016 posted by

Boxing Day Dream: 1989 Honda RC30 with 1,550 miles in the UK

1989 Honda RC30 for sale on ebay uk

Any RSBFS readers not familiar with the Honda RC30/VFR750R can read our previous RC30/VFR750R posts to learn about this legendary bike but to quickly summarize, Honda decided to show the world what it was capable of when all the limits (financial, manpower, etc) were ignored.  The result was the Honda RC30, a machine built to win and boy did it.  In just the 1st year after its introduction the result was pure domination with 15 of the 25 finishers in the top F1 class being on the new Honda.  As this was the homologation era, street versions also had to be available, an a total of 1,500 were produced each year over a 2 year production run.

A large block of the RC30’s that were produced were dedicated to the Japanese market and this particular RC30 is apparently one of these Japanese editions but interestingly, is currently located in the UK.  Despite its travels, it is probably the most pristine/intact one we have had on RSBFS, with mileage at only 1,550 miles.

The pics* seems to match the mileage with the bike looking like it just came out of the factory.  The seller does mention some slight staining around the frame plate but this is not apparent in the pics and everything looks completely OEM/stock.   Given the low miles and the statement that this is a formerly japan market bike I would assume the Japan market CDI/top speed limiter is still installed but info on how to remove/replace it is available on the web so it would be fairly straightforward to enjoy the full RC30 experience.

*NOTE:  The listing includes both standard pics and additional classified ad pics which are located at the bottom of the ebay.co.uk listing.

The Honda RC30/VFR750R is one of those bikes that every serious collector wants to have in their collection.  It is probably the homologation bike that had the most top level track success, although the Ducati Desmosedici and Kawasaki ZX7-RR are both close runners up.  But even given its legendary success on the track and the pristine condition of this example the question remains; is this example worth the asking price of 28,000 GBP/$35,000 USD?  That price seemed a bit high at first but then again it is very unlikely you will see one for sale in this condition anytime soon and prices do seem to be steadily increasing.

I guess the question is what is this bikes destiny?  Is it already fated to exist only as a halo bike in a collection?  Or will its next owner give it some fresh fluids/rubber and do a bit of riding to see what all the fuss was about?  All I know is that if I was able to acquire this one, I would be in that second camp for at least a bit.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Boxing Day Dream:  1989 Honda RC30 with 1,550 miles in the UK
Honda November 18, 2016 posted by

Out of the Winter Darkness: 1989 Honda RC30 in Canada

Before heading out for the holiday weekend, here is a bit of unobtanium: a 1989 Honda RC30 located in Canada.   Perhaps if you are heading towards Ontario for the holiday anyway, a short detour is in order?

rc302

1989 Honda RC30 for sale on eBay in Canada

The RC30 is a bike that every serious collector wants to own at one point, and for good reason – it was about as true a homologation bike as was ever produced.  The RC30, also known as the VFR750R, came with what was at the time unheard of specs for a street bike; titanium and magnesium cast components, track-type “slipper” clutch, a first gear designed for track starts up to 80 mph, a single-sided swingarm, etc.

The story of how the RC30 originated usually goes something like Soichiro Honda declaring he wanted to show the world what Honda could do if decided to put all its efforts towards producing a no-holds-barred sports bike and that the mandate was that there would be no compromise, no corners cut, and no bowing to the bean counters.  In short, the mandate was that the bike was to be the best and the result was the RC30, a bike built to win…and win it most certainly did.   The RC30 carried “Flying” Fred Merkel to consecutive WSB titles in 1988 and 1989, and powered Steve Hislop around the famous Isle of Man TT course at a then unheard of/first 120-mph lap.  How dominate was the RC30?  Think of it this way – in 1990 fifteen of the 25 finishers in the top F1 class were on the VFR750R/RC30.

A good review of the RC30 by visordown.com can be read here.

rc306

Given its been over 25 years since this bike was introduced, the RC30 ought to look and sound dated, but its elegant lines and tiny size (more like a big 250cc 2-stroke than a full 750cc 4-stroke) produce a stunning reaction even today.  Perhaps what keeps the RC30 an object of lust is the way it puts everything together; incredible feel from the suspension, outstanding build quality, a stupendously wide and usable powerband and the lightest weight in its class allowed the the 750cc powered machine to pretty much make the competition look stupid.  The only downside was that that all this top shelf performance didn’t come cheap. The RC30 was priced at an eye popping $21,000 in 1990 (about $39,000 USD in today’s dollars).

To put it simply, the word masterpiece can be commonplace when describing a rare sportbike, but in the case of the RC30 it was and still is truly justified.

rc301

This particular RC30 looks to be in good condition but I really wish the seller hadn’t taken the pictures at night, had used a higher quality camera, and somehow changed the flash results.  Overall the bike looks to be OEM with the possible exception of a cut rear fender?  Also the tires look a bit off, perhaps the rear wheel is non stock?

Note:  The RC30 had different trim based on the destination country and while this particular model appears to be the dual headlight US version, it might actually be a bike produced specifically for the Canadian market (supposedly there was about 25 of these).  Unfortunately, the seller is not providing ownership history info and there is a somewhat ominous “rebuilt due to age” reference which could mean anything from a fluid change to a former track bike.

Here is what the seller has to say

  • Only 11000 km
  • All Original
  • Has been professionally rebuilt due to age to perfect spec
  • Bike rides perfect and needs nothing
  • Also has the race pkg includes race cams gives more power

rc304

Current bid price on this is only about $14,000 USD but that given that we have seen recent posts range from $22,000 to over $28,000 USD, I expect price on this one to jump.  To be honest I not sure if this is a bike produced specifically for the Canadian market or if this is a US bike (only 300 of these were reported as coming into the USA) but regardless, this one will probably hold its value over time.

Here at RSBFS we have some regular readers who will be able to offer better insight on the current fair price for this RC30, so if its time for you to add one to your collection, I suggest you check out the the comments on this post or the previous RSBFS posts linked above.  But anyone who is seriously interested will want to be quick as eBay auctions of these bikes often end early.   I would also be curious to hear from anyone who has imported a bike from Canada to the USA, suggestions for shipping companies…no reason…nothing to see here…move along now…

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Out of the Winter Darkness:  1989 Honda RC30 in Canada