Posts by tag: Grey Market

Honda May 9, 2017 posted by

Tiny Four: 1988 Honda CBR250R MC19 for Sale

“When it rains, it pours” seems to apply to cool motorcycles. Haven’t seen a GSX-R750LE in a long time? Suddenly, four or five examples come up for sale. I’m not sure why: maybe it’s that folks hoarding them with an eye towards eventual sale suddenly see a demand for them and want to get in on the action? Or maybe individuals who’ve stashed them away from new are all of a certain age and are looking to liquidate their collections as they get older and less able to ride? Whatever the reason, we’ve seen a number of small displacement, grey-market sportbikes like this Honda CBR250R MC19 come up for sale recently in excellent condition, so if you’ve a hankering for tiny fours, take a look!

250s have long been associated here in the USA with learner bikes and hypermiling commuters. Generally powered by economical twins and singles, they offer low cost and high reliability, with racy styling, garish graphics, and names that link them to bigger, more capable sportbikes. But in countries where engines with greater displacement are disproportionately expensive to purchase heavily taxed, or limited by licensing laws, small inline fours like this one wrote a fascinating, if short, chapter in motorcycling history.

At a glance, the specifications look like they could come from a typical race-replica: liquid-cooled inline four, six-speed gearbox, 337lb dry weight… Then you get to that displacement: 48.5mm x 33.8mm for just 249cc. The claimed 40 horsepower is shockingly respectable although the 18,000rpm redline speaks to how hard you’ll have to work to access it. This example has a bit of wear around the edges, but nothing you wouldn’t expect from a well cared-for, but nearly 30 year old motorcycle.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Honda CBR250R MC19 for Sale

For those of you that missed the Kawasaki ZXR250 sale, you get another chance for an exciting 250cc grey market Honda sport bike. This will be the last 18,000 RPM screaming 250cc inline four I will be selling. From the Honda room, comes a very special 1988 Honda CBR 250R MC19. This CBR has an inline four cylinder engine that revs to the moon and redlines at 18,000 RPM’s. Its a blast to ride! This CBR is a one owner bike with only 310 kilometers (192 miles). Completely stock condition just like the day it rolled off the assembly line. Every fairing and component is 100% original stock Honda. Bike has never fallen over or been down. This CBR has a few scratches here and there from moving around the garage but shows like new. Bike is in very nice original condition and shows light patina throughout.   Bike has been serviced with new oil, coolant and filters have been serviced. Runs like the day it was new. Bike comes with Utah title in my company name and will be presented to the new owner.

With just 192 miles on the odometer, this one is certainly worthy of being put on display. Bidding is up to about $2,400 at the time of writing, with plenty of activity. The usual titling issues may apply if you’re in a state with a strict DMV, so do your homework if you plan to do more than display this sweet little machine.

-tad

Tiny Four: 1988 Honda CBR250R MC19 for Sale
Kawasaki May 3, 2017 posted by

Tiny and Green: 1994 Kawasaki ZXR250 for Sale

Little sportbikes like this very nice Kawasaki ZXR250 were never imported to the USA for a very good reason: there was basically zero demand for them. In other countries, licensing limitations, high taxes on larger-displacement bikes, and much more expensive fuel mean that riders don’t necessarily graduate from a 250 to a 600 to a full-on literbike. In places where you’re incentivized to “think small” a bike like this makes perfect sense, since it has the big-bike styling, real sportbike handling, and mechanical sophistication an experienced rider might want, all in a fun-size package.

The bike was introduced in 1988 with a major mechanical and styling refresh in 1991. Displacing just 249cc, that little jewel of an engine produced a claimed 45 hp and just a sliver of torque at 18 ft.lbs and could push the 311 lb dry machine all the way to 124 mph. Obviously, the ZXR250 isn’t going to offer up all that much more in the way of straight-line performance compared to something like a modern Ninja 300: you can’t get blood from a stone. Or in this case, horsepower from just 15 cubic inches. And modern entry-level machines provide technology this little Kawasaki couldn’t dream of. But with modern 250s mostly built around torquey singles or economical parallel twins, this inline four with its positively shrieking 19,000 rpm redline may offer more noise than actual power, but it also provides plenty of rider involvement to go with that spine-tingling sound.

Modern entry-level sportbikes have powerplants chosen for their simplicity, economy, ease-of-maintenance, and torquey power delivery so new riders can focus more on riding and less on shifting gears to chase insane redlines. So obviously, a carbureted inline four-cylinder will require much more effort to maintain and more skill to ride effectively, but I expect fans of small sportbikes know exactly what they’re in for with a bike like this. Today’s example has had a few miles roll under the wheels, but looks from photos to be in exceptionally good condition. I prefer the earlier style fairings with twin round headlamps, but that’s simply a matter of taste. You certainly can’t argue with the condition of what’s on display here or those very 1990s HVAC hoses leading to the airbox…

From the original eBay listing: 1994 Kawasaki ZXR250 for Sale

Up for your consideration is a RARE MINT CONDITION low mileage 1994 Kawasaki ZXR250 with 19,518 Kilometers (12,127 miles). It is in mint condition and has new battery, Kawasaki filter & engine oil, new coolant flush, new brake fluid, new spark plugs and original air filter was serviced. This ZXR250 isn’t your typical Ninja 250 that was sold here in the states. This ZXR has an inline four cylinder engine that revs to a 19,000 redline. In my opinion, its one of the best bikes you can ride on a twisty road. Even though this ZXR250 is completely stock, it comes with an extra carbon fiber aftermarket slip on muffler included in the sale.

When we received the bike, It was taken apart and cleaned and inspected along with the full service. We noticed that the bike has been very well taken care of over the years. You can tell it was loved as a child, lol. The bike runs and rides like the day it was new. Would make a great addition to any collection. This ZXR250 comes with a clean Utah title in my company name that will be presented to the new owner.

Bidding is up just past $3,000 with several days left on the auction. Interest in these little machines seems pretty high when they come up for auction, and several CBR250RRs have been featured on this site recently. They offer good handling and great looks, but very modest power, so I think you’re mainly buying these for the novelty, that insane and very accessible redline, or as a Kawi completist. There are definitely more economical ways to sportbike, but fewer more stylish.

-tad

Tiny and Green: 1994 Kawasaki ZXR250 for Sale
Yamaha April 27, 2017 posted by

Collector Alert: 1988 Yamaha FZR400 with 94 Original Miles for Sale

Sometimes, the amazingly low-mileage bikes that we stumble across surprise me. I mean, who at the time it was new would think to ferret away a pristine Yamaha FZR400? Of course it was always a cool bike, but the kind of thing you’d buy and preserve as a collectible? Seems strange, but the upside is that someone gets to bid on this example that has the classic white-and-blue “speedblock” graphics and just 94 miles from new.

Modern vehicle technology is incredible, offering up reliability, safety, and efficiency at an affordable cost. New motorcyclists are almost spoiled for choice these days, with slick, utilitarian offerings from Honda, Kawasaki, Yamaha, Suzuki, and even KTM that look good and perform well. They don’t offer much in the way of inspirational engine notes or cutting-edge handling, however: all are powered by parallel twins or singles and sound a bit agricultural or slightly obnoxious, depending on whether you have a Two Bros exhaust fitted or not.

The middleweight sportbike class is fast disappearing as well, with just the GSX-R600 and R6 left as Honda and Triumph discontinue their 600cc sportbikes. But in the late 1980s, you were spoiled for choice, and the FZR400 offered a stepping-stone up in terms of refinement from something fast but a bit crude like a TZR250. Most of the 400cc sportbikes never made it to the USA officially, as demand for what would be considered “small” sportbikes has always been pretty non-existent. We got a few bikes with their genes like the Honda CB1, but those never sold well either, making all bikes in the class pretty rare and desirable these days.

The FZR400’s 399cc four-cylinder produced a claimed 64hp, still plenty of power for a bike that weighed 410lbs wet, but, with little power below 5,000 rpm, the rev-happy motor meant you had to work it like a two-stroke to make fast progress for maximum rider involvement. Interestingly, the FZR400 was a much more serious weapon than the bigger 600 although they look nearly identical at a glance. The 400 made less power but handled better due to the lighter, stiffer aluminum frame used by the smaller bike, versus the 600’s steel part. Yes, the 600 fits into the 400’s frame, so if you come across a 400 with a blown or high-mileage motor, you might want to consider finding a 600 to rebuild and slot in instead.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Yamaha FZR400 for Sale

Up for your consideration is a very RARE, very nice low mileage almost new 1988 Yamaha FZR 400 3EN1 with only 152 Kilometers (94 miles). It is in mint condition and has new battery, Yamaha filter & engine oil, new coolant flush, new fork seals and fork oil,  new brake fluid, new spark plugs and original air filter was serviced. Runs like the day it was new. Carburetor jets and needles are original and still comes with the factory jetting set from the factory. This FZR in mint condition and near museum quality. It still has the original factory tires, however there are age cracks in the sidewalls. There is patina here and there as you would expect from a 29 year old motorcycle. This FZR still has its original chain & sprockets, original brake pads and all original fairings and factory components. There is a small crack in the windscreen, however I have a new windscreen that will come with the bike. I haven’t installed it to preserve the originality of the bike.

When we received the bike, It was taken apart and cleaned and inspected along with the full service. The muffler was chromed and re-finished to look new again. This FZR would make a excellent candidate for restoration, making it a true museum piece for your living room or just keep it and ride the hell out of it and make your friends jealous, lol. This FZR comes with a clean Utah title in my company name that will be presented to the new owner.

Okay, so the $8,999 asking price is pretty stupid money for a 400cc Japanese sportbike. Or at least is is right now: scoff all you like but I bet in a few years, Yamaha fans will be wishing they’d jumped in when these were so cheap… Especially at this mileage, although part of what’s so cool about the FZR400 is the light weight and agile handling, so it’s kind of a waste as a museum piece. I’m also not sure even very many of your motorcycling buddies will be very jealous if you have this in your garage or living room, let alone your more normal friends. Bidding’s already up to $7,600 with plenty of interest, so I’ll be interested to see if it makes it to that Buy It Now price.

-tad

Collector Alert: 1988 Yamaha FZR400 with 94 Original Miles for Sale
Yamaha April 26, 2017 posted by

Hat on Backwards: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale

Competition between the Japanese manufacturers in the 250cc sportbike class was fierce, with each trying for some small advantage in terms of performance, given the limited displacement and government-mandated power cap. On paper, they all seem to follow a pretty standard template: a compact two-stroke twin cylinder engine, power-valves of one sort or another, and an aluminum beam frame. But each manufacturer went their own way trying to maximize performance within those fairly narrow parameters. While development eventually led to the NSR, RGV, and TZR all using v-twins, there were a few experiments along the way, and today’s TZR250 3MA represents an interesting attempt to solve the packaging issues inherent in two-stroke design.

Obviously, two-stroke engines are very compact by nature: with no overhead-valves or cams, they’re short, simple, and very light. But while the exhaust expansion chambers required for a performance two-stroke may not weigh all that much, their bulging shape takes up valuable real estate in a motorcycle. The famous “gull arm” swingarms of the period were one solution to the problem and allowed the chambers to tuck in close to the centerline of the bike to maximize cornering clearance. But the 3MA version of the TZR250 went a different route by reversing the cylinders so that the carburetors were at the front, with the exhausts exiting directly out the rear of the bike instead of curving around the sides or underneath. The bulbous expansion chambers fitted neatly into the seat, with the exhaust exiting through the tail.

The design was eventually replaced by the v-twin 3XV version introduced in 1991 after just two years, so the experiment can be considered a bit of a failure. But there’s nothing inherently wrong with the idea, and this is one of my favorite bikes of the era, at least in terms of looks and the weird factor: it’s my deep and not-so-secret shame that I haven’t ridden one yet, but here’s hoping that the stars will align and I’ll be able to find a decent California-titled example when the time is right. Scouting around the message boards, it seems that the bike’s reputation for poor reliability is exaggerated but, as these were not often seen anywhere outside of Japan, parts availability will prove difficult.

From the original eBay listing:  1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale

The parallel twin reverse cylinder version. The bike is imported from Japan. Not registered yet in the U.S. This bike is sold without title. (NO TITLE) Start engine. Original Cowl. New Aftermarket Front fork innre tubes. Dragging brakes. Need to change tires (flat tire) and a battery. Some scratches and rust, so look carefully all pictures and video. This motorcycle is 28 years ago. Sold as is.

11271km (7003mile) LOW MILE. Sold as is with NO warranty NO refunds NO return. Buyer responsible for vehicle pick-up or shipping to your location. (ITEM AT CARSON NOW)

There’s also a helpful clip of the bike starting, running, and revving. The seller’s English is a bit limited, but it looks like the bike runs from the video and just needs a little TLC: a brake rebuild, new tires, and some minor cosmetic issues. Normally nothing you’d find shocking in a 28 year old motorcycle, but make sure you’re prepared to troll eBay and use Google Translate to track down parts to keep this running. It’s certainly not pristine and it’s not the cleanest example we’ve featured on this site, but if the price is right, it won’t take all that much to get this one on the road. Obviously, the usual titling issues apply, so I doubt this bike will remain in Southern California.

-tad

Hat on Backwards: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale
Suzuki April 19, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1985 Suzuki RG400Γ for Sale

With prices of Suzuki’s RG500Γ “Gamma” through the roof right now, fans of 80s two-stroke exotica have had to look elsewhere for their smoky thrills, and today’s Featured Listing RG400Γ might be just the ticket for collectors seeking two-stroke performance on a less extravagant budget. Certainly, values of the Japanese-market RG400Γ have been below those of the bigger bike, in spite of it being less common, owing to a significant power deficit: claimed weight is nearly identical at 340lbs dry, but claimed power is down significantly from 93hp to 59. That’d still make for a pretty fun package in a road bike, and you’re still looking at better straight-line performance than the 250cc machines of the same period.

1985 Suzuki RG400 for sale on eBay

The Gamma was introduced in 1985 and lasted until 1987, although none of the bigger two-stroke machines lasted very long on the market. Suzuki’s race-replica two-stroke was powered by an unusual liquid-cooled, square four engine that was configured like a siamesed pair of parallel twins, with two crankshafts and the “rear twin” slightly higher than the front for a sort of stepped design. The firing order helped to cancel out vibrations and the Gamma was designed without a heavy, power-consuming balance shaft as a result. The smaller RG400 was intended specifically for the Japanese market and was powered by a version of the engine that used the same 50.6mm stroke, but a smaller bore of 50mm versus 56mm to arrive at the reduced 397cc displacement.

Two-stroke engines are simple and very light weight, making them perfect for off-road and commuter machines. But that same incredible simplicity and a relatively high power-to-weight ratio also make them ideal for road-racing motorcycles and, once Walter Kaaden’s two-stroke tuning secrets were “acquired” by Suzuki, they dominated Grand Prix motorcycle racing into the modern era. Riders familiar with performance two-stroke motorcycles love their incredible agility and savage power delivery, characteristics that defined the Gamma when it was new. As has been pointed out ad nauseam in the comments sections, even the RG500 isn’t really all that fast by today’s standards, although it’s still a challenging ride: handling was superior for a 1980s motorcycle, but suspension has come a long way since then and the 59hp of the RG400 is being channeled through a 120-section rear tire that you’d be more likely to find on the front of a sportbike these days… But fans of the Gamma love the rawness, the purity of the bike. Or are just high on sweet, sweet two-stroke exhaust fumes.

This particular example features Walter Wolf graphics, which could be a plus or a minus, depending on your tastes. Suzuki fans might prefer the iconic blue-and-white colors, but I think Gammas are a little bit bulbous in the traditional Suzuki colors, and the Walter Wolf graphics slim the bike down nicely.

From the original eBay listing: 1985 Suzuki RG400Γ for Sale

This early RG400 Walter Wolf is in good original condition with ~19,500km  / 12,100 miles. Recently purchased out of Japanese collection with 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca also listed on eBay. The mid to late 1980’s was a great time to be a motorcyclist. Technology was evolving rapidly with the Japanese and European manufactures innovating at a tremendous pace. There were a myriad of engine layouts, number of cylinders, 2-stroke and 4-stroke vying for top honors and in the case of the NR500 – oval pistons! Technology proven on the race-track inevitably made it’s way to the showroom to the great benefit of the riding public.  For a couple years in the later 1/2 of the 1980’s enthusiasts in the rest of the world could go to their local dealer and buy an honest-to-goodness 2-stroke 4-cylinder F1 race-replica! The RG400/500 Gamma – along with the Yamaha RZ500 and Honda NS400 – brought the sound, the smell, and the looks of the GP circuit within reach of the knowledgeable motorcycle enthusiast.

The RG’s square-4, twin-crank, rotary disk-valve RG400 is durable and reliable and easy to service and and readily modified for more power.

I’ve owned about a dozen RG500 as well as RZ500 in the early 1990’s and this really takes me back. This one is a great ‘rider’ that draws a crowd and thumbs-up. It starts right up, idles well with and runs like ‘back in the day’ (a little smokey). Still has original oil-injection, airbox, and the original paint and bodywork. The aluminum frame is clean and bright with no sign of damage. Chassis and brakes are original and work like they should. Riding down the road, it’s well-composed. A couple points worth noting 1) no belly-pan; 2) crack in upper fairing near windscreen at right rear-view mirror; 3) a couple touch-up on seat-section plastic; 4) turn-signal button missing (signals still work).

Ride it as it is, restore, or modify to suit your preference – whichever way you go, it’ll bring a smile on your face and make a fabulous addition to your collection.
Currently on it’s importation paperwork – Japanese de-registration certificate / English translation of certificate / NHTSA HS7 / EPA 3520-1 / CBP 7501 (stamped). Washington State title is available for $400 documentation fee approx. 5-week wait. WA state buyers responsible for Tax & License.

Happy to work with your shipper. In the past year I have shipped to/from Japan / Germany / England / Australia / Chicago / Georgia  / Arizona / California / Oregon / etc.i. I have been happy with Haul Bikes and would expect shipping to be in the $500 range to California and maybe $600-700 to the East Coast.

This looks like a pretty nice bike, considering the $9,250 asking price. There are a couple of cosmetic issues clearly disclosed by the seller and, although you might have to go with some aftermarket bodywork to replace that bellypan if you’re on a budget, the bike is obviously usable without it. As always, it’s important to do your homework if you plan to use this on the road: it sounds like the seller has all the paperwork needed to register this RG400, but whether or not that’s even possible will vary, depending on your home state. Hm. I wonder what a Washington State PO Box runs per year…

-tad

Featured Listing: 1985 Suzuki RG400Γ for Sale
Honda February 27, 2017 posted by

Rothmans Replica: 1991 Honda NSR250 SP for Sale

Racing fans naturally gravitate towards sportbikes that feature graphics and colors associated with their favorite racing teams. Since those designs are often chosen for their visibility over any concerns about taste, it’s rare that a design stands out for being both striking and classic. It’s a shame that some of the most memorable and iconic color schemes in racing history were those designed for tobacco products, but it’s hard to argue with the good looks of today’s Rothmans Replica Honda NSR250R.

This MC21 NSR250R was powered by Honda’s familiar 90° liquid-cooled 249cc two-stroke v-twin with a six-speed “cassette” style gearbox that allowed for quick gearing changes at the track. Obviously not something that’s all that useful on a roadbike, but still very trick and cool. The updated MC21 version of the NSR250 wasn’t just a restyled MC18, it was an extensively redesigned machine. It used a distinctive gull-arm swingarm to allow the expansion chamber on the right side of the bike to tuck in close for maximum cornering clearance, while the carburetors were controlled by Honda’s very sophisticated PGM-III system that used a three-dimensional map based on throttle-position, revs, and gear selection to adjust the RC valves and ignition timing for excellent flexibility compared to rivals.

Power output was bang-on the government-mandated 45hp, but that still gave the sub-300 pound [dry] machine plenty of pep and more is available with de-restriction. How much is available? Well, how much do you want to spend, and how long do you want it to last between rebuilds? This SP version added a dry clutch and an uprated rear shock to the mix for even more performance, exotic, rattling noises, and exclusivity: just 1,500 NSR250R SPs were sold during 1991, making this a rare machine in any market, let alone North America, and this one is in superlative shape.

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Honda NSR250 SP for Sale

Immaculate 1991 Honda NSR250 SP w/ 5,000 miles from Moto2 Imports

Available only from Moto2 Imports, this fully restored 1991 NSR250 SP two-stroke is our nicest machine to date! Beyond a standard R model, this SP features fully-adjustable front and rear suspension, trick dry clutch, and a close-ratio gearbox. A complete service and safety check has been performed by our partner Speedwerks. The electronics have been de-restricted and the engine makes full power. All gaskets have been inspected and engine compression & leak down tests were performed with no issues. New tires, chain, battery, brake pads & spark plugs. Carburetors cleaned, rebuilt and re-jetted. Fuel, oil and coolant systems drained, flushed, & refilled. All other mechanical & electrical systems checked and operating properly. Fairing and tank were just resprayed and are of the highest quality – see Hi Res images. Expansion chambers have been ceramically coated and aluminum wheels freshly powdercoated (Magteks available). Bike starts/runs/operates flawlessly. Additional pics and video available upon request. You will not find a nicer NSR. With just 5,000 original miles, you can bid with confidence on this amazing machine.

All Moto2 bikes are legally imported and come with a clear US title with the proper 11 digit VIN (frame number and title match). Buyer will receive the US title, Bill of Sale, Customs and importation paperwork, and a copy of the original Japanese title. Feel free to ask any questions about this bike. Moto2 Imports provides post-sales support including spare parts for our bikes now and in the future. We sell and ship globally. Visit our website for more information.

The asking price of $9,299 seems very reasonable, considering the ever-upwards trend of prices for these grey-market two-strokes in general and the fact that is is both the coveted Rothmans Replica SP model and in exceptional condition. Sure, the paint isn’t original but, considering the apparent quality of the work, that might not be a bad thing, and the bike has obviously been extensively reconditioned. If you’ve been waiting to add one of these to your collection, you won’t find one nicer outside of a museum.

-tad

Rothmans Replica: 1991 Honda NSR250 SP for Sale
Aprilia February 17, 2017 posted by

Tiny Titled Two-Stroke: 2009 Aprilia RS125 for Sale

Back when two-strokes ruled the entry-level sportbike class in Europe, Aprilia’s RS125 was designed to appeal to new riders who wanted something sporty, but were limited in terms of displacement and outright power by strict licensing laws that prevented the purchase of bikes that in the USA would be considered “learner bikes.” Sponsor logos and race-replica paint jobs were the order of the day and, made between 1992 and 2012, the RS125 had a pretty long and successful run. Details and styling varied throughout production, according to tastes of the period, but spec was similar: a 124.8cc two-stroke, single cylinder and six-speed gearbox, aluminum beam frame, racy big-bike looks, and a sub-300lb dry weight.

This version of the RS125 is clearly meant to resemble Aprilia’s range-topping RSV1000, with those angular, cat’s-eye headlights and stealth-fighter angles, although it shares those traits with the RSV4 that followed as well. Ultimately, the RS125 was superseded by the RS4 that more closely matched the look of the bigger RSV4 and was powered by a four-stroke single to meet today’s more stringent emissions requirements. It’s a perfectly competent machine and looks very sharp, but it lacks the pop and fizz of a manic two-stroke, and is far less tunable to boot.

The RS125 were never officially imported to the USA for road use, but some made it here “for offroad use only” and they do come up for sale from time to time. Unfortunately, the sleek little RS125 has two problems: one, you can’t just call it an “RS125” or people might not be clear what bike you’re talking about. Did you mean the Aprilia or the Honda’s entry-level race bike? Two, and obviously more significantly, the same titling and registration issues that affect all grey-market two-strokes apply here. If you live in a state with a liberal DMV, you may be able to find a way to make one road-legal without too much trouble: titled examples like this one have shown up on this site before. If not, you’re stuck with a handsome display piece or a very slow track day bike. If I was looking for a display bike, I’d probably want a bit of genuine racing machinery or something truly historic…

Fortunately, this example is ready for road use, at least in Pennsylvania…

From the original eBay listing: 2009 Aprilia RS125 for Sale

For Sale-York, PA. 2009 Aprilia RS 125 2 stroke. Clean and clear title. 798 miles. 34mm DeLorto carb, V-Force 3 reeds, pinned TPS, pipercross OEM style air filter, Arrow exhaust, Tyga carbon fiber rear hugger, chain guard and engine cover, Rhinomoto front and rear axle sliders, Driven Racing swingarm spools, R&G tail tidy, Evotech exhaust hanger, Woodcraft rearsets w/ GP shift, Aprilia OEM European ECU and harness to allow lighting, factory signals, mirrors and TS relay, Ohlins front fork springs, many replaced OEM parts included, Dyno tuned by Eraldo Ferracci of Fast By Ferracci. It comes with the factory Aprilia parts book and service manual. This was $5499 new in 2009 when only 150 were imported for racing only. It came derestricted with no lighting. Considering the amount of kit put on this bike and the rarity of this bike I think it is a more than fair price. I reserve the right to end this auction as the bike is also for sale locally. Serious bidders can contact me for more pictures or information. I will not ship this motorcycle so it will have to be picked up. Bike will have to be picked up within two weeks of auction end or deposit will be forfeited. You must have at least a 95% positive feedback rating to bid and at least 20 positive feedbacks. Deposit can be made through PayPal but the balance must be paid in cash.***It is currently tagged, titled, inspected and insured in York County, PA. It is titled as a regular motorcycle.

So what’s it worth? Well this seller has set the starting bid at $6,000 and there are no takers yet so he may be aiming a bit high. Certainly this one has that road-legal status, very low miles, and has been thoughtfully modified using quality parts and tuned by the famous owner of Fast by Ferracci. Eraldo had his hands on my Ducati Monster when I had it in to be rejetted and I was pretty happy with the results, so that’d certainly be a selling point for me. If you’re in the market for a little two-stroke sportbike you can thrash the living daylights out of without tripling the national speed limit and live somewhere it can be titled, this one might be worth a look.

-tad

Tiny Titled Two-Stroke: 2009 Aprilia RS125 for Sale
Kawasaki January 25, 2017 posted by

Bantamweight Sportbike: 1990 Kawasaki ZXR400 for Sale

While we see the occasional CBR400RR here on the site, and FZR400s aren’t too hard to find if you go looking, it’s been quite a while since we’ve been able to feature one of Kawasaki’s bantamweight superbikes, the ZXR400. With a liquid-cooled 398cc inline four and a six-speed gearbox to make the most of the high-strung powerband, the ZXR packs serious sportbike credentials into a very compact package. It was introduced in 1989 and produced through 1999. Claimed power for the earlier “H” bikes was slightly higher at 64hp versus the later “L” version at 61hp, and they made that peak figure further up the rev-range by a few hundred rpm. But torque was a bit lower, as you might expect, since the engine is mechanically nearly identical in both versions. The earlier model was also naturally a bit lighter, with a claimed dry weight of just 350lbs, which meant the bike was good for a top speed of over 140mph.

As has been stated in the past, there’s a reason that all this sophisticated technology was included in a bike with such limited displacement. Simply: it wasn’t aimed at new motorcyclists. Here in the USA, bikes under 600cc are generally cheap commuters with decades-old technology, and new riders are often steered towards 600cc sportbikes since there are no limitations for newer riders, insurance is cheap, and the market is saturated with 1000 sportbikes and 2300cc cruisers. But overseas, tiered licenses mean limited access to bigger bikes for many riders, and international racing series didn’t really have a 600cc class at the time, so these 400s were really just a step down from World Superbike displacement 750s.

From the original eBay listing: 1990 Kawasaki ZXR400 for Sale

This is the full power Japanese home market version not the usual detuned US market model.
The bike has just been imported in December 2016 and registered on a Florida Title in my name.
These superb looking bikes with ram air induction are now at classic status
This beauty has only covered 35,871 miles in 27 years
Tires are brand new front and rear.
The bike does stert up and run fine and clutch gears and brakes are all good the Carb’s could do with tuning and possibly rejetting for the low grade US fuel.

The bike looks good in the photos, but that’s not saying much, considering their low quality…  Certainly, the price is right: the Buy It Now is listed as just $3,000 which, although the mileage is on the high side, seems to make this a pretty good deal if you’re looking for something sporty, unusual, and are working with a limited budget. The seller mentions “the usual detuned US market model” although I’m not sure these were ever officially imported to the States. Either way, if you’re interested in picking this up, be sure to verify that you can legally register it in your home state and request some better images to verify the bike’s condition.

-tad

Bantamweight Sportbike: 1990 Kawasaki ZXR400 for Sale