Author Archives: Norman

Buell September 25, 2022 posted by Norman

Carbon Drag – 2012 EBR 1190RS Carbon

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2012 EBR 1190RS Carbon Edition

After Buell had made it out of his garage and struck gold Harley, it’s safe to say he had saved up a couple of bucks along the way. He was tired of Harley management tying everyone up with red tape and decided to get back to his roots: designing and building bikes on his own terms. With an idea, confidence, and a couple extra zeros to his name, Erik Buell started EBR. Erik really only had time to produce 1 architecture at EBR which was used for the all the models that were released under the brand. Today, we have the cream of the crop that came out of East Troy, the EBR 1190 RS Carbon. The 1190 RX is the fully faired base edition which is a monster in itself. The 1190 RS came with racing-focused upgrades and the Carbon Editions were essentially the actual race bike. Roughly a 100 RS models came out of the factory and a sliver of those were draped in carbon fiber but no one is sure exactly how few were made.

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As made pretty evident from the pictures and name, the Carbon Edition came with full carbon body work. Very cool for 2012 and pretty easy to explain. However, the coolest carbon bit on this motorcycle is the brake cooling duct. Remember how we said this was a race-ready bike? The cooling duct kept the brakes in the operating window and maintained great feel over a race distance. On an EBR, especially on an 1190 RS, you’re going to need that due to the unmatched front end feel you can get out of this bike. The single caliper, rim mounted rotor, and magnesium wheels reduce unsprung mass over the front wheel and allow racers to trailbrake much deeper into corners. Just watch Danny Eslick race the 1190 in AMA and you’ll see what I mean.

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Aside from the Carbon drag, The 1190RS also had a few chassis and engine upgrades. You have an Ohlins TTX with a remote adjuster on the rear and an Ohlins fork with the race cartridges up front. I’ve had the pleasure of riding a set of their road and track cartridges and those are incredible. One can only imagine the competence of full race cartridges. The motor received Carillo rods, CP pistons, higher lift cams, titanium valves, and a slipper. Did I forget to mention all the RS editions were handbuilt?

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Forgive the turn signals, high beams, and horn.

From the seller:

2012 1190RS Carbon Fiber Edition. #73 of less than 100 ever made. (FB does not have the correct model and miles) Not many out there still in this condition. Made in USA. Over 175HP. Under 25 miles. Clear Title in hand. Its a little bit hard to let it go. But It needs to be driven and enjoyed more than I can give. Its under 400lbs. With magnesium rims. And needs nothing. Must go to a person that understands what this is. Asking 30k obo Located in New Rochelle NY 10801. Sold as is where is. No low ballers please I know what I have and not hard up to sell. Call Steve 914-576-3332 for more info. Check out our feedback. Buy from a trusted source.

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The technological innovation on this bike is arguably the coolest thing about it. A small of team of engineers were able to pull together something that was able to compete with the big 5 on tracks. Not only did they build something that was competitive, they built something totally different so there wasn’t an opportunity to peek at a neighbor’s test to see what they came up with. Aside from being different, it bucked the notion that all things American were heavy and sluggish. I would absolutely love to hear stories about what the other folks on the paddock were saying about this thing as it crossed the finish line.

As far as pricing goes, it’s tough to say where these should land. A carbon edition recently made it as high as $17,000 on BaT in May 2020. Our seller is looking for $30,000 which isn’t totally unreasonable as you have all the ingredients for a future collectible: low miles, rarity, racing history, innovation, and a story. Buells and EBRs are still relatively new so they’ll likely need some time before they get to ride the value curve. It’s certainly fair to say some of the early model Buells are starting to receive that recognition they deserve.

Thanks for reading!

-Norm

Carbon Drag – 2012 EBR 1190RS Carbon
Benelli September 17, 2022 posted by Norman

Bucket List Ride – BaT 2003 Benelli Tornado Tre Novecento 900LE

2003 Benelli Tornado Tre Novecento 900LE

2003 Benelli Novecento 900LE

China’s quest for world domination is truly an interesting story. From building strings-attached infrastructure in the third world to selling US companies suspect equipment, they are doing it all. The overall strategy is to slowly sink in their teeth over 20,30,40 years and play the long con. So that begs the question: Was the Benelli acquisition a hope to not only dominate the world economy, but also WSBK tracks? Jealous of the Japanese?

Today’s find is something that pre-dated Benelli’s transition to Chinesium frames and is truly, in my opinion, one of the more interesting bikes to come out of the region for a few reasons: rarity, technology, and looks.

2003 Benelli Tornado Tre Novecento 900LE

Likely inspired by the racing success of Aprilia and Ducati, the Benelli execs decided they wanted to venture over to the track and enter their own bike in the highly competitive WSBK Championship. Presumably, with the hopes of getting a slice of the exploding sportbike market with a few of their own offerings. With their sights set on WSBK, they needed to build 125 bikes, commonly referred to as homologation specials, for the market in order to gain a spot on the grid. Our seller today has number 107/150 so it is safe to say that there were not many of the much more well-equipped LE models out there.

In 2001, the Tornado did actually debut at Misano under Peter Goddard. Their WSBK hopes faded as they saw little success and the Chinese were looming amidst the lacking sales.

2003 Benelli Tornado Tre Novecento 900LE

The LE edition has all sorts of special go-fast bits. As seen above, the bodywork is carbon and an ExtremeTech steering damper came standard on the bike as well. Furthermore, you get Ohlins front/rear suspenders, 320mm Brembos,magnesium wheels, and an Arrow exhaust. A couple of design quirks that are not as visible are the glued frame and repositioned radiator. The engineers opted to go for weight savings by not welding the frame but rather using an aircraft-spec glue to hold it together. Many modern cars actually use a lot of adhesives nowadays in order to achieve more rigidity while not compromising on weight. The general idea is that glue can tie together more surface area than a weld. The other interesting design quirk is the positioning of the radiator. The Tornado’s radiator lives below the seat and uses two undertail cooling fans to help flow air through the back of the bike. The reason was to be able to decrease the rake to 23.5 degrees which makes the steering inputs more responsive.

2003 Benelli Tornado Tre Novecento 900LE

I personally think a lot of the Italian sportbikes from the 2000s are actually quite ugly, except the 748 and 996 of course. The designs just haven’t aged like the Japanese designs have for me. However, this Tornado is something else. All the aggressive lines just seem to work. The polished and gold aluminum mesh really well with the gray/green bodywork to give a fast, exotic look. The undertail fans look like jets too so that’s pretty cool.

From the seller:

“Equipment includes carbon-fiber bodywork and fuel tank, a solo seat, electronic fuel injection, a rear-mounted radiator, electronic ignition, a three-into-one exhaust system with a titanium Arrow muffler, a magnesium lower engine case, Öhlins suspension, triple Brembo disc brakes, a Robby Moto throttle and rearsets, and Marchesini 16″ forged wheels. The alternator gear and shaft were replaced per the Z25 service bulletin, and an oil change was performed in March 2022. This 900LE is offered in Oklahoma with a cover, a suitcase with suspension and sprocket parts, three stands, spare parts, and a clean California title in the seller’s name”

Values of the Tornado have been not been great over the years. However, the homologation specials are definitely the edition to have and would certainly keep up in any collection or bike show. It’s Italian exotica and they’re still relatively cheap as they don’t carry the brand equity today like they used to. The one downside would likely be parts and service as Benelli’s service network (if you can call it that) is likely not well-versed with this bike. The upside is that it’s simple drivetrain that a smart mechanic could probably sort out with the help of a service manual. The engine is also the exact same as the regular Tornado models so you can probably swap parts over except for some special magnesium engine cover parts on the LE model. Great condition. Low miles. Startup and walk around video are on the listing as well. Sounds nasty.

For some reason, of all the bikes I’ve written about here, this is one the that I would ride if I got to pick one. Unmatched cool factor. The bike is being sold on BaT and the bid is currently at $5,500. Good luck!

Bucket List Ride – BaT 2003 Benelli Tornado Tre Novecento 900LE
Kawasaki September 13, 2022 posted by Norman

40 Years Later…Kawasaki GPZ900R

1984 Kawasaki GPZ900R/ZX900 A1

Today’s find is almost legendary. Just one year later, the GPZ900R was rocketed to a superstar status as it was blessed to be straddled by the infamous Scientologist extraordinaire, TC. While TC has ebbed and flowed throughout the years, the GPZ has remained one of the more significant bikes and marks an important time in sport bike history. While this example is just 1 year shy of being one of the most recognizable bikes of the 80s, it still has the same mechanicals that brought folks directly from movie theaters to showroom floors.

Of course, the raw speed of the GPZ900 is the highlight of the bike. In 1984, this motorcycle was pumping out 115hp which could take you up to 151 mph. 40 years later, the current gen Z900 makes 111hp. It’s not that Kawasaki can’t make a more powerful 900cc bike as there really is a limit to what makes a bike usable on the street while also making the entire package make sense. Big power means more cost in the chassis to make a bike really work and feel right. The funny thing is that in 1984 Kawasaki decided to say screw it and tried it anyway by bringing a GPZ900 while their unsuspecting 750 sat quietly on showroom floors.

Making the 900 work was not as simple as just taking a cylinder hone to the bore of the 750 for a few hours. The 900 brought liquid cooling and 4 valves per cylinder with a higher compression ratio as well. Furthermore, the engine became a stressed member of the chassis which allowed Kawasaki to axe the downtubes on the steel frame. While the GPZ used a simple steel frame, it did come with triple drilled disc brakes and an anti dive suspension. Check out how their system works here.

 “…I have tried to detail in the pictures the worst places on the bike. It is actually beautiful original paint bike that could be wet sanded and be awesome. Fun to ride. I have ridden the bike three or four times and it runs wonderfully. Thanks to Kaplan. The bike is now 38 years old and there are some scratches and chips through life. I would expect that. Please let the pictures tell you what you need to know. I feel I’m a little too old to ride the bike now. I live on a dirt road. I would guess the bike has been dropped but not significantly just a few little scratches here and there which I have tried to point out in the pictures to the best of my ability. You could just about take it anywhere and it stops the show. You can read about top gun. I have a cold start video that I can send upon request. I have and can take additional pictures upon request.”

The owner seems to have got this one from Captain America, Ken Kaplan, which means it should be in pretty good working condition. Kaplan Cycles has an in house mechanic who tidies up everything that comes through the door before it hits the floor. I definitely appreciate the seller’s honesty towards the cosmetic condition and willingness to detail that out in photos. Not a show piece but an opportunity to get a deal for sure.

There seems to some action with 13 bids up to $3,750 and the reserve has not yet been met. Good luck!

 

-Norm

40 Years Later…Kawasaki GPZ900R
Sport Bikes For Sale September 3, 2022 posted by Norman

A Triumph Owner’s Worst Nightmare – 2000 Buell X1 Lightning

Image 2 - 2000 Buell Lightning

2000 Buell X1 Lightning 

As an ex-Buell owner, anytime I get the chance to write about one I’m going to take it. From start to finish, Buell has released some cracking bikes. There’s really not a single model, except for the Buell Blast, that people don’t stop and look at. It’s always a conversation piece at brewery bike shows littered with retro-modern Euro bikes ridden by hipsters with tight black jeans, suspiciously clean leather boots, and a few tattoos. If they don’t stop and look on their first pass by, they certainly will when they hear the Harley firing order which will make them wish their poor little Thruxton could carry the same tune.

Image 01 - 2000 Buell Lightning

The Buell story has been told many time on RSBFS. Track rat turned Harley engineer turned motorcycle builder. The X1 is a precursor to some of the more innovative designs that Buell came up with but what really shines about the X1 is it’s classic design. It’s a simple V-twin housed in a tube frame with a single round headlight up front.

One of the core tenets of the Buell engineering philosophy was keeping a low center of gravity. While that was taken to the next level on the XBs, you can see the beginnings in the X1. The X1 received the underslung exhaust and a battery tray that lives right above the gearbox. An upside down Showa front fork helps keep the front-end stable under braking and on corner-entry which is an ode to Buell’s pursuit of performance. A cheap, lanky front fork would’ve satisfied the bean counters but left riders with much to desire.

Image 41 - 2000 Buell Lightning

In all of the design craziness of the Buell lineup, one of the aspects that tend to get overlooked is actually the engine. The X1 got upgraded heads and and pistons that put out ~80 hp and ~80 lb-ft of torque which was significantly better than the 1200cc Sportster of the time. While that motor would have been exciting in a Sportster, it really shines in the shorter wheelbase X1 that was ~50 pounds lighter. People tend to think any and every Harley engine is a sluggish, overweight piece of metal that happens to create rotational movement. What they don’t realize is these juiced up Harley engines are torque monsters that don’t start wheezing as they get up in the rev range. Combine that with the soundtrack and you have a gem of a motor.

Image 14 - 2000 Buell Lightning

Aesthetically, the X1 is a great bike with one major flaw. The intake on the right side and air scoop on the left are truly atrocious. They make the X1 look bloated and ruin the visual lines of the design. Fortunately, there are a ton of aftermarket intake options to clean up the front of the bike. Aside from the that design flaw, the X1 has a cafe-esque design with a contrasting swingarm and subframe that nicely draw the eye to the back of the bike. The X1 also benefits from the inherent symmetry of the V-twin which adds to the cafe look. The polished rims are pretty sweet too.

Image 141 - 2000 Buell Lightning

Clean X1s are not that common to come by anymore. At one point, these were very cheap and lot of people did some things they shouldn’t have to these bikes. As far as price goes, for a clean bike this isn’t crazy but anything more than $5k would really be pushing it. That being said, people are going to wish they could pay $5k 5 years from now. This has all the elements of an appreciating classic: a great story, engine, and style. This X1 is also in incredible condition. It looks like it’s fresh off the showroom floor despite the 11k on the odo so that should help value as time goes on. Just double check with the seller on the exhaust as an R&D doesn’t yield any results on a quick google search.

-Norm

Ghezzi-Brian August 30, 2022 posted by Norman

Italians Gone Wild – 2003 Moto Guzzi Ghezzi-Brian Folgore

Image 1 - 2003 Moto Guzzi Ghezzi-Brian Folgore Supertwin

2003 Moto Guzzi Ghezzi-Brian Folgore

As petty as it may be, one of the most satisfying in the world is to see is the big guy lose. All the shiny tools and big trailers can only get you so far and that’s why every once in a while, the little guy is able to break through and take the top step. This type of story isn’t exclusive to motorsports but boy has motorsports been privy to some of the most romantic examples. Britten and Buell are two of my personal favorite stories but that’s not to take any credit away from all the enthusiasts who have done the same thing with custom builds, club races, top speed runs, etc.

Today we have a chapter of a similar story that is set in Italy starring Guiseppe Ghezzi and Brian Saturno. What’s it about?  An enthusiast who loved to toil around Northern Italy on Guzzis and decided his machine had so much more to give. It’s hard to say what exactly happened in the makeshift factory where these were built but one thing led to another and the duo ended up racing their V11-derived race bike in the Italian 1996 SuperTwins Championship. Not only did they compete but the ragtag outfit managed to take home the championship in a field littered with established BMWs and Ducatis. After topping the 1996 championship Ghezzi and Brian continued producing “trackified” Guzzis for a rather small niche of riders who lusted for a race-spec Moto Guzzi. One of those models is our RSBFS find for the day: a 2003 Ghezzi-Brian Folgore.

Image 2 - 2003 Moto Guzzi Ghezzi-Brian Folgore Supertwin

One of the things that allows the little guys to create some crazy fast bikes is that they aren’t limited by the constraints of being one the big guys. Red tape, investors, accountants, and so on and so forth. Without any of these things holding them back, Ghezzi-Brian was able to create an out-of-the-box design that accommodated the horizontal V-twin setup that Guzzis are famous for.

The V-twin in question today is 1,056 cc powerplant out of the V11 that pumps out ~90hp and ~80 lb/ft of torque. That’s very quick for 2003 and is still quick today.

Image 21 - 2003 Moto Guzzi Ghezzi-Brian Folgore Supertwin

There’s certainly a lot to look at here. One of the interesting aspects of this bike is the airbox. As seen in the picture, the intakes connect to the frame which also functions as a big airbox to help the 2 cylinders breathe. One of the keys to producing high hp twins is a huge airbox. Look at any Buell and you’ll see the airbox is quite large as well. The front brake is also a rim-mounted design which eliminates the need for a second rotor/caliper and reduces the unsprung mass over the front wheel.

The orientation of the engine also allows the multi-function steel frame to stay low and drop right through the center of the V and connect to the airbox. The exhaust side is connected to a Bub exhaust which is absolutely critical to bring any V-twin to life. An aluminum gas tank sits on top but is of course covered by the one-piece fiberglass tank and seat which adds visual length and sleekness to the design.

Image 181 - 2003 Moto Guzzi Ghezzi-Brian Folgore Supertwin

One thing that’s undeniable with the Ghezzi-Brians is the pursuit of performance. Not many stones were left unturned with these bikes. A Moto Guzzi V-twin will certainly have some inherent flaws that will make it perform below its Japanese counterparts but at the end of the day, the creators of this machine built exactly what they wanted. That’s the brilliant thing about these small outfits: they build what they want and by taking a different line than those in front, they get ahead even if it’s only for a brief moment.

This bike was listed on BaT in October 2020 and that listing mentions the seller acquired the bike in 2008. It was bid to $12,500 but did not sell and it seems that the seller is trying his luck again on Ebay. It’s estimated that 100 of these were produced and roughly 25 made it stateside so transactions are far and few in between. It’ll be tough to find a price point especially with the madness today but it’s certainly worth more that $12,500. At the time of writing, the bid is at $8,100 with 6 days to go.

-Norm

Italians Gone Wild – 2003 Moto Guzzi Ghezzi-Brian Folgore
Honda August 25, 2022 posted by Norman

What Goes Up… – 1993 Honda CBR900RR Fireblade

Image 1 - 1993 Honda CBR

1993 Honda CBR900RR Fireblade

It’s safe to say that the Fireblade prices over the past two years have set the 900RR on a new trajectory.  What was once a bike known for being shoved in a back alley with purple fairings and a tucked license plate became an overnight sensation. While the values today are still a couple miles too high off the Earth’s surface for regular folk, the one thing they did do is cement how important this motorcycle is. Our find today is one of the down to earth, black Fireblades that should scratch any collectors itch. 

Image 4 - 1993 Honda CBR

I won’t spend time on the specifics of the blade since any halfway-sport bike enthusiast should know the ancestry and how much the 1993 model shook things up for the sport bike market. It made a lot of people rethink what a sport bike should be and how you shouldn’t have to compromise between speed and handling. It’s displacement left it a bit short of the liter+ bikes but the weight made up the difference by giving feel and corner speed.

Image 41 - 1993 Honda CBRThe seller doesn’t list anything about prior owners but it’s fair to assume that a 30 year old bike with 10K miles has only switched hands a few times. It seems to be in incredible condition and looks good from 1 foot out. As much as I would love to see a good Yosh pipe on it, you have to appreciate the owner’s desire to leave it stock.

Image 8 - 1993 Honda CBR

Now to the good part. How much do you pay? How much has everyone else paid? The 900RR market has been a bit perplexing recently. The craziness has been documented but no one really knows what to make of it and more importantly, no one knows where it will settle in a few years.

There is a BaT auction of a 1993 900RR red, white, and blue with 2 days left at $17.5K.

High bid on this same same bike on BaT was $8.5K. Can anyone make sense of this whole thing?

It’s hard to see this moving for $15K but the seller may be a little more realistic after seeing the BaT high bid. There might be an opportunity here for those who aren’t willing to fork over their life savings for a color scheme but want to be part of the 900RR conversation.

-Norm

What Goes Up… – 1993 Honda CBR900RR Fireblade
Buell August 14, 2022 posted by Norman

Track Twin – 2003 Buell XB12R Firebolt Track Bike

Image 6 - 2003 Buell XB12R

2003 Buell XB12R Firebolt Track Bike

Motorcycling is something that people do out of passion. Most of us have a passion for riding but only a few have a passion to build and even less are any good at it. Of those who build, only a few can build something new and different. That’s what made Erik Buell so special.  He was an enthusiast who loved to race and engineer motorcycles that ended up making it in the big leagues. After many iterations, it’s fair to say most know him for his XB line of motorcycles that he built during his time at Harley Davidson. Today, we have an example of one his great designs that was taken one step further. A well-preserved Buell XB12R Firebolt track bike.

Image 11 - 2003 Buell XB12R

There’s a lot to digest here.  A stock Buell XB is already an interesting bike. One thing that makes them particularly interesting is actually the philosophy that governed the design of the XB. One of those philosophies is that it had to be a really good street bike. Big torque and comfortable ergonomics were key. However, many of Buell’s designs were brilliant because they brought new innovations that made them great track weapons.

Image 61 - 2003 Buell XB12R I won’t go through all of the quirks on the XB as I trust most of you have listened to the podcasts and seen the Youtube videos. The one thing I do want to mention that really made this a great track bike is the front end. At the top, you have fully adjustable Showas that very competent and easy to work on. Moving down, you have the rim-mounted disc and single 6 pot caliper. The use of a single disc/caliper lowers the unsprung weight. The rim-mounted disc allows for a lighter hub and spokes so you have less gyrospcopic inertia at the wheel. During corner entry, the lack of unsprung weight and inertia gives you loads of front end feel and more importantly, confidence. If you have a proper pair and ride this on the right road you can see for yourself.

Image 11 - 2003 Buell XB12R

As far as modifications go, you have the standard changes for a Buell track bike. Chain conversion, track fairings, and a kill switch. The folks who raced this went above and beyond with the engine modifications and race ECU to get every last bit of power out of the motor. The best bit is the factory race muffler. Almost worth their weight in gold at this point, this is what makes the Buell stand out to the common man. It’s weird but incredibly satisfying to hear the lopey v-twin shoot out of corners.

Image 1 - 2003 Buell XB12R

This is certainly an accomplished race bike and I’m sure the owner has many stories to pass down to the future buyer. Some of those stories will explain the battle scars this bike carries but no track bike is perfect so consider that when assessing value. Also, the seller mentions the bike has sat for a number of years which is probably a bigger concern but that doesn’t affect Buells more than other bikes. I’ve sat for 12 hours today and I feel like I won’t start tomorrow morning. Buell motors are Harley motors so they aren’t rocket science. There’s an incredibly strong community that that can help you through any questions and parts are easy to come by on the forums or from Harley.

At $3,950, the value won’t exist for every buyer. You have to be there for the story and appreciate the efforts of someone who wasn’t afraid to cut his own path. Or maybe you want something interesting to toss in the trailer for classic track days. After all, this is almost 20 years old.

-Norm

Track Twin – 2003 Buell XB12R Firebolt Track Bike
Featured Listing August 4, 2022 posted by Norman

Featured Listing – 1995 Triumph Speed Triple

Featured Listing – 1995 Triumph Speed Triple

Today, showroom floors, Facebook marketplace, bike shows, and twisty roads are all littered with 3 cylinders. It’s arguably the most desirable engine layout available today for your everyday rider but this wasn’t the case until the mid-2010s. For many years enthusiasts were drawn to big horsepower numbers and while the Japanese were spoon feeding them dumbed down supersport engines, Triumph was perfecting what has become the most balanced engine layout out there today. Today at RSBFS, we’re taking you all the way back to the beginning stages of Triumph’s 3 cylinder lineage with a 1995 Triumph Speed Triple.

After the 750 triple bolted to the Trident ran it’s course, the Hinckley-based outfit decided that stroking out the motor another 10mm is the kick in the ass that would take their streetfighter to the next level. However, when it comes to classic motorcycles, it’s never made sense to focus on technical specs. They’re all heavier and slower than the metal you can go out and buy today. What this engine improvement brought was more torque which ultimately made the bike a lot more streetable and punchy. Riders have loved triples because they pull smoothly to redline but still have a sporty feel. That is exactly the formula Triumph was dialing in but how can we be sure they were on the right path? If you have any doubt, I’m not sure this post or this bike can convince of you anything so head down to your Triumph dealer for the answer.

When people say naked bikes are a bit more streetable, they aren’t only referring to the engines but also the ergonomics. One of the intriguing aspects of the Speed Triple is that notion was completely ignored. The designers wanted this to literally be a naked version of their Daytona but with a cafe twist. You can see the pegs are relatively close to the seat but the clip-ons have been removed in pursuit of comfort by the seller. Fortunately, the clip-ons are included in the sale if you wish to experience this bike in it’s original form. The seller has also fitted a set of Micron slip-ons which are absolutely necessary for triples to deliver the Grammy-winning soundtracks they are known for.

From the seller:

36mm flat slide CV carbs. 5 speed gearbox. This bike is fast and sure-footed. And then there is the sound…. The bellow of this triple at speed through the Micron carbon fiber exhaust canisters is incredible! To make the overall riding experience a bit more comfortable, a set of Woodcraft clip-on risers was installed. Creates approximately 3″ of rise without detracting from the bike’s appearance. The original clip-ons are included in the sale. Also provided is the optional, color matching, rear seat cowl. Optional center stand is mounted on the bike.  All bodywork mounting pegs are intact and unbroken. This machine has received considerable attention on maintenance work. The carbs have been removed and rebuilt with all new seals, fuel lines, cables and intake boots. New air box and air filter. New battery, Dunlop tires, drive chain, speedo cable, etc. Rebuilt front forks with new seals. Fresh engine oil and a new oil filter. Shouldn’t need anything else except a very twisty road in front of it….  Comes with a comprehensive collection of factory literature including an owners manual, service manual, parts catalog, small and large sales brochures and a quite rare 1995 Triumph advertising campaign launch kit capturing the return of the Triumph brand back into the US that year.

A lot of enthusiasts complain that the Triumphs of this era were heavy. While that may be true, tip toeing around a track was never main the use case for the Speed Triple. However, Triumph didn’t shy away from the challenge that the track posed to their bikes. They hosted a single-make series around the UK where competitors would sling the Speed Triple through some of Britain’s most famous circuits such as Donnington and Caldwell. After watching these riders hustle the Triumph around Donnington you’ll realize that whole weight thing…well that’s only an issue if you haven’t got any muscle.

The Triumph Speed Triple is essentially the rookie card for many of the modern triples today. It was the blueprint for manufacturers who were looking to go put a street-oriented offering that can float around the city or carve up a b road. Our seller today has that rookie card and it’s great condition. Many of the items one would expect to address in an older bike have been sorted leaving you with no to-do list prior to startup. Nothing to complain about cosmetically as well. A true turnkey example with paint that will pop in any garage or on any road.

The seller is asking $5,900. Reach out at 336-408-9451 with any questions!

-Norm

Featured Listing – 1995 Triumph Speed Triple