Posts by tag: single

Cagiva April 3, 2021 posted by

1/2 Pint Performer – 2000 Cagiva Mito 125

This Mito sold while we were preparing the post, but might be a good warm-up for a Featured Listing next week !  -donn

If all you had was a 3/4 front view from across the street, it would be easy to mistake Cagiva’s Mito for a lovely red 916.  Quite a bit rarer than it’s full-sized inspiration, this 125 has had some serious attention, just a handful of miles, and boasts California reg.

2000 Cagiva Mito for sale on eBay

Introduced in 1989 for the European junior market, Cagiva had great competition success with the Mito, which had 34 hp on tap in the 2000 model year.  Legendary designer Massimo Tamburrini re-styled the bike in 1994, giving it a knife-edge fairing, winged tank and monoposto seat fairing reminiscent of the Ducati superbike.  Sales of the Evo II generation weren’t hurt by the 6-speed transmission, 17-inch Marchesini lookalike wheels, asymmetrical alloy swingarm, and 40mm usd Marzocchi forks.  Even the brakes are adult-sized at 320mm, but just a single front disk.

This collector bought his Mito new and didn’t leave well enough alone, but made some significant upgrades to the powertrain.  Condition is immaculate and shows just over 1,200 miles.  A great explanation of the engine work from the eBay auction-

This 916 Ducati look alike is a Cagiva Mito 125 2-stroke, the same type of motorcycle that Valentino Rossi started his racing career on at a young age. Back in the day they had a 125cc class of highly modified 2 stroke street bikes for upstart racers in Europe. Cagiva was the bike. Cagiva even sold an entire massive hop up race kit to convert these little rockets into race bikes. I was able to obtain many of these upgrades and incorporate them into this bike and maintain its street legal style. First thing I did was update the cylinder. I purchased a Polini 160cc kit. Now the Italian company Polini is famous for their products, but there 160cc Cagiva kit lacked a little quality. I sent the cylinder to England to my old friend Stan Stephens. He stripped and re-plated the cylinder with a more quality ceramic plating using the proper tolerances that Polini seem to lack. He then lightly cleaned up all the porting and milled the head for the larger displacement. I added a larger manifold to install a 34mm Dellorto flat side carburetor with carbon reeds. Stock Carburetor was a 28mm. Installed the Cagiva racing kit pipe along with the fork conversion, racing kit clutch springs, Carbon carrier disk with Titanium bolts, 415 chain conversion, aluminum sprockets, racing wind screen, Steel braided brake lines, Tail Tidy, Carbon Front Fender, and kick starter. This bike came with electric starting but I removed it to save a massive amount of weight of the starter and the big metal gear attached to the flywheel. The race kit comes with a kick start shaft and gear with a removal kick starter. But to sell it I put the electric starter back on, but still have the backup kick starter installed. I then powder coated the rims white from their original ugly colour. Added Michelin pilot tires.

Performance wise the 160 Polini kit didn’t really give it much more top end but a lot more torque. I’ve had it to around 115 mph with maybe a few RPM’s to go. Depends on the gearing, weight of the rider, outside temperature, wind, etc.. It will get up to 100 mph remarkably fast for a bike its size, and corner like you’re on a rail.

This bike only has 2,000 original kilometers or 1,200 miles on it and is 21 years old !  Maybe half of that since all the upgrades. The bodywork, cases and metal look like brand new. Bike never been in harsh weather. Stored in a climate controlled garage in sunny California. All the electrical such as lights, turn signals, horn, work without an issue. Oil injection is still intact. Just put in a new battery and did a fluid flush. Included with the bike is a new Polini 160cc top end, additional gearing and the stock exhaust.

Not many riders can keep the Mito on the boil to make the pace it’s capable of, and less might be inclined to sink the slighty-used-superbike ask into a 125.  But it’s a collector’s joy, a total rarity, impeccably prepared and ready to rock.  If that collector is you, we’d like to hear about it.

-donn

1/2 Pint Performer – 2000 Cagiva Mito 125
MZ July 27, 2020 posted by

Singular Simplicity: 1997 MZ Skorpion Sport

The sad thing about being a serious motorcycle geek is that most people don’t really understand my obsession with and enthusiasm for weird motorcycles. Even other motorcyclists. I was thinking about this today as I was poring over the engine of a friend’s Velocette Venom, trying to suss out the function of the little cable-actuated device at the base of the pushrod tube [compression-release, we decided]. I mean, I happen to think bikes like this MZ Skorpion Sport are incredibly cool, but most motorcyclists are ignorant of their existence. That’s a shame, since [East] German brand MZ has a storied history and basically single-handedly ushered in modern two-stroke performance when they developed the first expansion chambers for their race bikes.

The Skorpion Sport doesn’t have those, however.

What the Skorpion Sport does have is Yamaha’s five-valve single that displaced 660cc, just 6cc short of being an engine of pure evil. As it was basically an off-road drivetrain repurposed for sportbike duty, a Yamaha five-speed gearbox transferred power to the rear wheel, and the package was suspended in a tubular steel frame. The engine and frame formed the foundation for a whole range of interesting and generally very competent motorcycles from MZ, from the Mastiff supermoto and Baghira dual-sport, to the Traveller sport-tourer, Replika, and the Skorpion Sport.

Overall, the bike is simplicity itself, the purest incarnation of a sports motorcycle you’re likely to find at this price point. Weight was a hair over 400lbs wet, and handling generally considered to be excellent. Styling looks a big like a Gilera Saturno and the bike does feature passenger pegs, although there’s no guarantee there is a pillion pad hiding under the seat cowl, or included with the bike. The 1990s were weird like that.

From the original eBay listing: 1997 MZ Skorpion Sport for Sale

Looks great. Runs Outstanding. Low mileage. I’ve taken it on several long rides with no problems at all. Yamaha reliability. Made in Germany. Designed in England. Lots of Italian bits. Buyer responsible for pick up. I’ll help get it on to the transporter. I have the unsigned registration papers, and original manual. New tires. Small scuff on right side of engine where someone dropped it. It’s in the pictures. I have the under-belly fairing, and the original muffler as well. I never registered it in CA. (DMV-phobia) Bill of sale only.

There hasn’t been much interest in this MZ so far, with bidding up to $2,300 and about one more day left on the listing. That’s on the low side, but Skorpions don’t go for much more money than that right now: they’re rare, but not especially collectible. What they are is great value, with an exotic nameplate, nimble handling, stone-axe reliability. With single-cylinder classes a popular way to get into racing on a budget, Skorpions often get snapped up to be converted into lightweight track-hacks. They’re good for that, but it does seem a little sad that such interesting machines

-tad

Singular Simplicity: 1997 MZ Skorpion Sport
Aprilia April 11, 2020 posted by

Pint-Sized ‘Prilia: 2002 Aprilia RS50 for Sale

A rare sight here in the US, the Aprilia RS50 was pretty common overseas, where strict licensing laws made these a must-have for aspiring sportbike pilots who didn’t yet qualify for the overwhelming power of a 600 or even 400cc machine… Of course there are plenty of good reasons to ride an RS50, even if you’ve long-since graduated to a larger machine. Weight is the enemy of performance and, while the little Aprilia may not produce much power, at around 200lbs dry it also doesn’t have much in the way of weight.

The tiny displacement meant that the RS50 was classified as a moped, although it really was more a small motorcycle, with 17″ wheels and a six-speed gearbox. The overall package was more sportbike than scooter as well, with a twin-spar aluminum beam frame, a monoshock rear, and disc brakes at the front and back. It was sold here in the USA from 1999-2003, although it continued to be built much later in other markets.

As usual, Aprilia didn’t build the engine in-house, so the RS50 was powered by a liquid-cooled, two-stroke Minarelli AM6 engine displacing 49.7cc. All that snarling power could push the lightweight machine to 55mph, and this bike’s 75cc big bore kit should pretty much double the engine’s output… Keep in mind, these were raced in Europe, so plenty of tuning and suspension upgrades exist.

I haven’t shopped for RS50 parts, but these were popular outside the US, so it shouldn’t be too hard to track down a replacement fuel cell, or perhaps a professional repair might be possible?

From the original eBay listing: 2002 Aprilia RS50 for Sale

This owner of the bike modified and upgraded this Aprilia with the purpose of making it the best RS50 around. It has a 75cc top end with a moly coated piston. A 24mm flatslide Mikuni feeds water cooled cylinder and a silver ceramic coated Arrow exhaust has been added to round off all the performance enhancements.

It has AF1 triples and a custom backed instrument cluster. In addition to being a unique head turning motorcycle on it’s own this model sports the nearly endangered Black Lion body and logos. You’ll likely never see another one like it in the wild.
The bad: this is literally a “ran when parked” situation. The fuel cell cracked next to the the tap screws. It was fixed with a fuel tank epoxy and patch but that eventually started to leak. Ultimately it will need another tank. In mid-January the back tags for the registration in California came to $740. Fortunately we can arrange shipping to the other contiguous 47 states (or factor that into your bidding). I have a very reasonable and trusted shipper from whom I can get a quote and time. Just contact us before bidding to confirm the price and eta.
This is definitely a head turning joy to ride. When people hear it coming they don’t expect to see this pull up. It was genuinely built by the owner with the long term purpose of being reliable, ride-able and fun.  
Well, the leaking fuel cell will obviously need some work, but the price does reflect that: just $1,750 for this little hot-rod two-stroke. Miles are pretty low, and the bike does have a few nice extras, like that big-bore motor, top triple, and the Arrow exhaust. All together, the package should be good for more than 9hp at the rear wheel and 75mph with favorable winds, a huge leap from stock power. If you’re looking for a cool, low-cost project bike that shouldn’t take too much to get rolling, assuming you live outside California, and can dodge those back registration fees…
-tad
Pint-Sized ‘Prilia: 2002 Aprilia RS50 for Sale
Ducati February 4, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1959 Ducati Elite 200 for Sale

This Featured Listing is part of the The Edinger Ducati Collection. Thank you for supporting the site, David! -dc

If you’ve already got Ducati fatigue from the past couple weeks, scroll right on past today’s Featured Listing, this Ducati Elite 200. Or, if you didn’t realize that Ducati had a life before their big, booming superbike line existed, go ahead and read on. In fact, they didn’t even make a regular production multi until the introduction of the v-twin 750 in the early 1970s: their Cucciolo, the original Ducati, was actually a small, four-stroke engine designed to motorize a bicycle. Humble beginnings for a company whose name is synonymous with Italian exotica today.

Later machines used their light weight and handling to win victories in smaller racing classes. Fabio Taglioni designed their first overhead-cam engine, which eventually developed into the machine seen here that was introduced in 1958. The Elite displaced 204cc and used a four-speed gearbox with the heel-toe shifter that was characteristic of the era. The 18 horses and light weight meant a top speed of nearly 90mph, an impressive velocity for such a small motorcycle.

The distinctive candy-red “jelly mould” tank with mirror-like chrome details and Ducati wing logo, complete with mounting loops, to the copper-colored frame and amazing details like the “DUCATI” molded into the peg rubbers, headlight bucket-mounted speedometer, and tapered shotgun exhaust, it’s a surprise to me that they haven’t built a retro-styled model that references this bike yet. Even a Scrambler variant painted to match this might work, combining modern performance with classic style and colors…

From the Seller: 1959 Ducati Elite 200 for Sale

This is a rare, award winning piece of Motorcycle art. This bike was previously in a museum and is also an Antique Automobile Club of America winner “National First Prize”. The bike was purchased from Vicki Smith in 2013 who is well know among Ducatista. Apparently the bike was first purchased in Italy. I probably never rode the bike more than 20 miles and it was then properly put back into Museum mode by Revival Cycles in Austin and has complimented the other bikes in my house. I have all the receipts that came with the bikes and everyone since. The key in the headlight is one of my favorite things and the bike also comes with a Ducati tire pump. The one into two exhaust is rare and motorcycle art. This is the price I paid in 2013 and is more valuable and rare today.

Contact: David Edinger (Edinger.david@gmail.com) +1-317-908-2573

The seller is asking $20,000 for this very nice example of an appreciating classic. The bike isn’t perfect, but the paint looks amazing, it has great patina, and it comes with documentation and should certainly continue to appreciate. It’s a shame that most of these end up sitting in collections, since they’re apparently great to ride and would be lots of fun on a casual Sunday morning ride, or a great choice for a classic rally like the Motogiro.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1959 Ducati Elite 200 for Sale
Yamaha December 14, 2019 posted by

SRX and the Single Cylinder – 1987 Yamaha SRX250

Stateside fans would probably say Yamaha are generally at the forefront of technology and leading-edge fabrication, but bucking that trend was the little SRX250 and the SRX series in general.  The 250 wound up a single-year special for us, with an eye on fun and the bottom line, and that still might be case for this Ohio example.

1987 Yamaha SRX250 for sale on eBay

Yamaha introduced a line of four-stroke singles, with a 600, 400, and 250cc models, mostly for the domestic market.  A steel tubing frame loops smoothly around the upright air-cooled engine.  On the 250, a 22mm carburetor is on one side of the head, with seeming dual exhausts from the front.  The six-speed transmission is a relatively up-to-date concession to the 10,000 rpm required to make 32 hp.  A single front disk and rear drum suffice, along with 33mm forks and monoshock rear.  Tires are almost the same width but staggered diameters with 16-inch front and 18 rear.

With 10,700 around-town miles, it would be unfair to expect a creampuff and this SRX shows average wear.  The red frame and mostly white bodywork hasn’t aged badly, but could use a little sprucing up.  The wheels look very light and are in good shape.  Mechanically, there’s just not that much to go wrong.  From the eBay auction:

Rare 1987 Yamaha SRX 250.  These bikes were only made for one year.  Great collector bike but also a cool daily driver.  Runs great and right down the road.  It does idle a little ruff.  Just needs rode.  All the plastic is solid – no cracks.  Tank is in good shape it’s for age.  As you can see in pictures it’s not perfect.  No tears in seat.  All lights work.  Have a clear title.

Better suited to an occasional errand than a commute, the SRX250 could still make a massive pit bike or learner’s permit birthday gift.  The red and white livery echoes larger Yammers from the -80’s, though it wasn’t a long-term success here.  The sensible starting bid and what looks like an easy restoration might sway a fan of the brand.

-donn

SRX and the Single Cylinder – 1987 Yamaha SRX250
Norton December 23, 2018 posted by

Mystery Ship: 2010 Norton Manx

According to Wikipedia: “The Norton Manx or Manx Norton is a British racing motorcycle that was made from 1947 to 1962 by Norton Motors Ltd.” And as any avid motorcycle enthusiast will know, this is a truly iconic brand and model – dominating the TT as well as other races in the day. Knowledgeable readers will also know that Norton has not been in the motorcycle business for a number of years, having changed hands several times over the last few decades. Rights to the Manx name was sold off in the late 1960s, and currently resides (since 1994) with UK Engineer, Andy Molnar. If the date of the bike is correct, this looks to be a Molnar Manx – a faithful reproduction of the original Manx but NOT a true Norton.

2010 Norton Manx for sale on eBay

From the seller:
(translated with Google – the original text is in French)
Bore diameter: 90 mm
Reinforced motor bearings
Gardner carburetor: 40 mm
Box Quaife 6 reports with barrel
Maxton rear shock absorbers
Magneto electronic ignition
Öhlins steering damper
18 “wheels with Avon racing tires
Integral fairing with integrated recovery tray
Carbon front and rear fenders
Front brake Fontana 4 cams 230 mm
Electronic rev counter

Maintenance documentation as well as new maintenance parts are also provided with the motorcycle.

Molnar Precision Ltd. offers a number of reproduction parts, including chassis, suspension, engine and transmission pieces. They also offer complete bikes, which I believe this to be. They are not cheap, and including currency conversion from GBP to USD would result in $40k+ for a build. There is very little info on this bike – and even fewer pictures – but one can make the reasonable assumption that it is the 90mm bore spec, based on the ad text, which works out to 500cc (see the Molnar spec sheet). With a starting bid of $28,000 and a Buy It Now of $35k this could be in the money when compared to a new Molnar build, but interested parties should do some serious research before jumping in. The good news is that the bike is already in the US, so that makes the transport that much easier. Check it out here. Definitely not a core RSBFS offering, but we thought it interesting. Jump over to the Comments and share your thoughts on this remade classic. Good Luck!!

MI

Mystery Ship: 2010 Norton Manx
Aprilia December 17, 2018 posted by

Stocking Stuffer – 2009 Aprilia RS125

Even RSBFS is not immune to a little mission-creep, as our last two “stocking stuffer” posts were Aprilia RS50’s !  Anyway this late and low-mile if lightly documented RS125 looks like just the suggestion for your future ex- this holiday season.

2009 Aprilia RS125 for sale on eBay

Aprilia’s RS125 was introduced in 1992, and the 2009 came midway through the fourth generation.  By this time the RS125 was an RSV1000R lookalike, with twin headlights, four-piston front caliper, and Piaggio ECU to help meet Euro-3 emissions.  Power was great for a 125 at 28 hp, and alloy wheels were both 17’s.  The No.1 livery commemorated Jorge Lorenzo’s 125cc championship.

Not too many photos or words accompany this auction, but the second oil change miles and original condition speak volumes.  From the eBay auction:

2009 Aprilia RS125, two stroke, SC title, runs great, excellent condition, fun to ride.  Not too many of these in the US.  I have the bike listed locally and will remove ad if sold locally.

A number of current MotoGP starters have history with an Aprilia RS125, and while the sub-300 lb. weight might favor a youngster, anyone who wears mediums and wants to work on keeping the revs up through a corner will find joy in the RS125.  Aprilia brought a lot of the sophistication of their race bikes across to the showroom, with pricing to match their mid-size performance.  For a bike whose only purpose is fun, the asking price and condition are downright sensible…

-donn

Stocking Stuffer – 2009 Aprilia RS125
Ducati September 9, 2018 posted by

Super Single: 1993 Ducati Supermono for Sale

One of the most collectible Ducatis of all time, the Supermono isn’t even a v-twin. It is, as the name implies, powered by a single-cylinder engine. If you’re a bit confused by this and thinking, “Hmmmm… I don’t remember there being any Ducati singles in the 90s…” you’re not actually crazy. There weren’t any Supermono roadbikes and only about 65 Supermono racebikes ever built between 1993 and 1995.

Race bikes are built to race, but are generally designed to conform to a very specific set of series rules. In Supermono’s case, it was the European Sound of Singles, a single-cylinder class designed to support World Superbike racing. It won just about everything it was eligible to race in.

The reason is revs: where most big single-cylinder race bikes are derived from dirtbikes and hammering their riders to dust inside their leathers by 7,000rpm, the Supermono can happily spin up past 10,000. The Ducati’s party trick? It’s a single that thinks it’s a twin.

Looking at the engine, it’s pretty obvious that, in building their racing single, Ducati simply blanked off the rear cylinder on one of their liquid-cooled four valve v-twins, keeping the horizontal piston for a nice, low center of gravity. But they also used a dummy connecting rod that simulated the forces of the second piston, likely increasing friction and rotational mass compared to a normal single, but massively reducing vibration.

That ability to rev meant power as well, and the claimed 65hp at 10,500rpm from the 549cc engine gave the bike a serious advantage, compared to other bikes in the class. Later bikes had displacement increased slightly to 572cc for a bit more power. The rest of the bike was incredibly light weight, with liberal use of magnesium castings on the engine and a few other parts, so the complete Supermono tipped the scales at a featherweight 267lbs dry.

Brick-wall brakes from the much heavier 888 bring the bike to a very sudden stop when necessary, which probably wasn’t all that often, considering the bike’s cornering abilities. Interestingly, this one appears to have been upgraded with modern radial brake and clutch master cylinders, for improved braking and… clutching.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Ducati Supermono for Sale

1993 Ducati Supermono. #16 of 65. Originally delivered to Sweden.  

Video of #16 running https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tii5G9mm4wI

A new timing belt was fit prior to the video.

The video represents the last time it was ran.  It was set up for long term storage immediately after. Retrospeed, of Belgium Wisconsin was commissioned to prove that the bike was mechanically sound, change fluids and to set up for long term storage in February of 2014.

New slicks would need to be fit prior to track use.

Any and all questions can be directed towards Brady at Retrospeed 262-483-5399 

The owner, an Italian collector, is thinning his motorcycle collection to make room for a car purchase.

The Supermono is not titled, none were as they were produced for the sole purpose of racing.

The factory 955 Corsa in the last picture will be coming for sale soon.

The Supermono was never an entry-level racer like KTM’s RC390R and was pretty eye-wateringly expensive even when new: $30,000 or so in 1993. These days? You’re looking at something like this bike’s $125,000 starting bid, which seems to be in line with recent examples. This particular bike is in far away Belgium… Wisconsin! Happily, the seller includes a video of the bike running before it was packed up for storage, so those of us who merely have the means to debate the values of these bikes can actually get a sense of what one might be like in person.

-tad

Super Single: 1993 Ducati Supermono for Sale