Posts by tag: single cylinder

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Yamaha June 24, 2022 posted by

A Mild Thump – 1987 Yamaha SRX250

Yamaha wanted to extend the success of their singles and developed 600, 400, and more rarely 250 variants.  Though references to US imports are hard to find, this excellent example has an MPH speedometer.

1987 Yamaha SRX250 for sale on eBay

Even though there were similar Yamaha 250 singles, the SRX engine was its own animal with 10-to-1 compression and a four-valve head.  Its 32 hp were more than the dirtbike and quad engines, if not more than  enough.  Just about all the double downtube frame is visible, in red on the 80’s-era sports livery.  Even though it’s lightly built with a single front disc and economical with the drum rear brake, the sporting intent is evidenced by the staggered 16-inch front / 18-inch wheels.  A small frame-mounted fairing is accompanied by a chin scoop which hides the exhaust.

Evidently tucked away in Vermont garage for a while, this SRX has amassed 15,641 miles but looks like less.  Brake fluid has bubbled the paint on the reservoir and the owner’s keyring has scored the triple tree, but otherwise it looks a few years old and not 35.  Thinking the seat has been recovered but only because it looks that good.  Noted from the eBay auction –

This bike is very rare. This bike was only made for one year. This bike is in great condition for a 1987. See pictures, they will tell the story. Last fall I put on a new Petcock, rebuilt the carb, and disc brake caliper. Last week I had a professional mechanic tune it up and install a new Yuasa battery. The tank was sealed years ago. Everything works on the bike, lights, blinkers, horn. The speedometer is slightly foggy which I don’t understand because it’s always been kept in a heated cellar or heated garage.

Maybe not the thumpiest single out there, The SRX250 was more of a domestic market sport style for Yamaha fans who needed a 250.  For RSBFS readers, maybe a good starter or pit bike with impeccable taste.  Plenty of bids but hoping the reserve isn’t out of this world.

-donn

A Mild Thump – 1987 Yamaha SRX250
Harris January 25, 2022 posted by

Track Bike Tuesday: Special Framed Harris Single Cylinder

Any casual reader of RSBFS will know that must of us here are always very excited to see a special framed bike.  There is just something about the pure focus of them that stirs the emotions.  Many will be aware of Rickman, Egli, Bimota and maybe even Seeley.  Those of you over in the UK will undoubtable know of Spondon and Harris.  Here in the USA these British framed bikes are much less common, and that makes this Yamaha SRX powered Harris even more appealing.

This bike offers and amazing package for someone that is looking for something out of the ordinary to enjoy on track.  The Yamaha engine will offer low service costs and plenty of power.  There is still plenty of support for this engine, and Wiseco makes affordable pistons.  The less is more ethos means there are less components to wear, or need replacing over time, thus leaving more funds left over for track fees and slicks.  Seller states that much of the suspension is TZ250 so spares are available.  A factory service manual should help the new owner learn the ins and outs of the engine, another plus of having a race bike with a special frame, but standard based engine.

From The Seller’s Listing:

In 1993 and 1994, Harris Yamaha’s (SRX engine) won the British Singles Championship (Steve Ruth 1993; Dave Rawlins 1994). 1994, Jim Moodie won the inaugural Single Cylinder TT on a Harris SRX.  This Harris SRX is frame No. HPF1206.  I’ve owned and raced it, occaisionally, in AHRMA (SOS2), AMA (Mid-Ohio) and WERA (Clubman) since 2007. The frame, wheels, suspension (Ohlins shock) and brakes are TZ250 spec. The engine is built with +1 mm Arias 10.5:1 pistons, Megacycle cam, valves and springs, and oil cooler. Twin Mikuni flat slide carbs. 54 RWHP on MSP Cycle dyno.  It weighs nothing, has God’s own brakes, handles like a GP bike, is sized like a GP bike (it does not fit me at 6′-2″ and 200 lbs, and arthritis and multiple crashes no longer allow me to fold myself into the bike). It is a FUN bike to race.  The bike comes with gearing and some spares (footpegs, levers, clip-ons, brake pads, fork seals, belly pan for use without fairing) and the side stand shown.
$7,995 in Talking Rock, GA.

As with many of these types of bikes, pricing is difficult at best.  The $8k asking price feels inline with other options in the class.  With the rise in prices of 90s street bikes one would be unlikely to be able to track a stock framed bike for much less.  The only optional downside is that these GP style bikes normally demand a jockey sized rider.  There are ways people have adjusted foot and hand controls to accommodate a full sized rider though.

Track Bike Tuesday:  Special Framed Harris Single Cylinder
Gilera December 2, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Pristine 1990 Gilera Saturno Bialbero with 72kms!

Update 12.2.2019: This bike is now on eBay. -dc

This is the second of four motorcycles being offered from the Stuart Parr Collection. Thank you for supporting the site and good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Looking very 80s, the Gilera Saturno Bialbero could be mistaken for some sort of custom Ducati. But Gilera, of course, should be held in the highest regard by fans of this site, as they were the first company to slot an inline four into a frame transversely, solving in one fell swoop the difficult cooling issues that previously faced four-cylinder motorcycles. This bike has just one cylinder like the original Saturno and embodies the company’s racing ethos, stressing light-weight and handling.

In the 80s, Gilera was mostly producing a line of offroad-biased singles with a 350cc capacity that were obviously a far cry from their road-racing bikes of the 1950s. At the urging of a Japanese marketing company, they developed a retro-styled sportbike, and that updated Saturno sparked some minor interest worldwide.

In most markets, the Nuovo Saturno was motivated by a liquid-cooled, 491cc version of the company’s four-valve, dual-overhead cam single, although a smaller 350 was available in Japan. In fact, the “Bialbero” designation helps to differentiate the bike from the earlier Saturno and refers to the number of camshafts: two. That engine put out a seemingly unimpressive 44hp, but the complete trellis-framed machine weighted in at a claimed 302lbs dry. That’s 250cc two-stroke territory, with the same claimed peak output and a much broader powerband. Suspension was simple but modern, with 17” Marvic wheels front and rear and a set of Brembo brakes to slow things down. The ‘box has just five speeds, owing to the package’s off-road roots, but the torquey engine should make any gaps easy to ride around.

With just 72 kilometers on the clock, this may be the lowest-mileage Saturno on the planet, and you may be waiting a long time for an example this nice, regardless of miles: these very rarely come up for sale, as Gilera collectors aren’t flavor-of-the-week types. It helps that the Nuovo Saturno was intended for collectors in Japan, and only a few made it to other countries: in 1990, just 50 were imported to the UK.  However, in spite of their rarity, they don’t sell for huge money, making them a reasonable proposition for regular folks who want something out-of-the-ordinary.

From the seller:

Imported in 2016 from Germany. Comes with original German registration and U.S. Customs and Border Protection entry form (Form 7501). This one can be registered and ridden. It is in out of the crate perfect condition.

The Gilera Saturno Bialbero 500 is a motorcycle road made the motorcycle manufacturer Gilera and marketed between 1987 and 1991.

If you’re looking for something rare, affordable, and very fun: these are extremely nimble bikes that would make perfectly lightweight track or racing machines. Iinquiries can be directed to Gregory Johnston on (631) 537-1486 or via email – here -.

-tad

Featured Listing: Pristine 1990 Gilera Saturno Bialbero with 72kms!
Yamaha August 6, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1986 Yamaha SRX600

In a world obsessed with multi-cylinder madness, the Yamaha SRX was a breath of fresh air. Utilizing a XT600-derived air-cooled single cylinder power plant, the SRX series evoked simpler times of British cafe racers doing the ton. Impossibly light and narrow, the SRX was all about torque – squirting off of corners in a manner only a thumper can deliver. And the styling? The SRX stood out like a custom in a sea of mass-produced multis. Incredibly, the SRX600 lasted but a single selling season in the US before being discontinued. Finding one today that has not been neglected is not easy. Which brings us to this beautiful two-owner, low mileage example.

1986 Yamaha SRX600 for sale on eBay

Under the covers, the SRX sports a surprising amount of technology. The single cylinder breathes through four valves driven by an overhead cam. The crankcase contains a counter-balancer to quell vibration from the 96mm slug traveling through it’s stroke. Oil feed is via dry sump, minimizing the heft of the engine lower section. The alloy oil tank is tucked neatly away, contributing to the clean lines. The steel frame is minimalist, yet is cleverly integrated into the lines of the bike. The twin-shock swing arm was hardly cutting edge, but did provide a solid foundation at the rear and helped connect the styling back to the neo British design. There was some Yamaha parts bin raiding going on here too; the entire front end is lifted from the RZ350, and the switch gear is common to other Yamahas of the era. The brake disks were utilized on several bikes in the line, and the wheels have a common design element as well. Model specific tank, clip-ons and unique short-stack exhaust poking out the bottom of the right side of the bike complete the picture. Simple in looks, the SRX was a well-designed and well-engineered motorcycle that deserved much more attention than it received.

From the seller:
Very clean and original SRX Super Single. Only 3020 miles. 300 put on by me enjoying this special motorcycle. I got it from the original owner who lost interest when he got to a point in his life when he needed electric start.

When I got the motorcycle it had sat long enough that the gas and brake fluid had perished. I have rebuilt the petcock and carburetors. Brake system was flushed and the rear brake line was replaced. As far as I can tell, the rear brake line is the only non-original part.

Original tires are not dry rotted and are look great. As is all the other rubber parts. This is a very comfortable motorcycle, it is a pleasure to ride and capable of ton up speed too.

Full history starting from when is was bought new in 1989.

I have my reserve/opening bid set below the current market value. This motorcycle is for sale. It is only for sale here on eBay. I will miss this motorcycle.

The seller has included a nice video highlighting this beautiful example. Note the kick start lever; there is no electric start (but with 8.5:1 the SRX is not a chore to kick over). Enjoy the sights and sounds:

Worldwide to SRX was available in various capacities (including a home market 400 and a 250 in the US). The 600 was the most capable of the line, and offered for the shortest period of time. Today a clean SRX is a rare – and delightful – find. These are wonderful motorcycles, seamlessly melding practicality with enthusiasm and capability. It remains a unique riding experience, and is deceptively nimble in the corners. Stylistically it stands out, despite being minimalist. It is every bit a British motorcycle, but thanks to Yamaha quality it lacks one key English aspect; it doesn’t leak oil.

This particular SRX600 looks to be in fantastic shape – just check out the quality high-res picks yourself. With only two owners and barely over 3,000 miles, this just might be the nicest SRX we have seen in a number of years. The bike appears to be as original as you could ask for, right down to the tires (yes, those should be replaced if any serious riding is to be done). This eBay auction is on right now, and the opening ask is a very reasonable (cheap) $2,500. If you have been in the market for a great all-around motorcycle that doesn’t look like a NinjaBusa-RR – one that will stand out for years to come – do yourself a favor and check out this 1986 Yamaha SRX600. These are rare and unique, and this one will certainly find a new home quickly. Give it a look before it is too late, and Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1986 Yamaha SRX600
Sport Bikes For Sale June 4, 2019 posted by

Flavor of the Month: 2011 Husaberg FS570

6.7.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Welcome to the next installment of a new RSBFS feature, where we take a once a month trip out of our normal realm and look at some of the other amazing bikes the world has to offer when you leave clip ons and fairings behind. Last month we took a look at a TDR250 and this month we’re kicking things off strong, with a unicorn supermoto from an esoteric Swedish bike maker! -dc

The 2011 Husaberg FS570 graced our shores for just one model year, which is a shame, because it could have left the mark that the likes of the Husqvarna 701 Supermoto did just a few model years later.

The FS570 is essentially a big-bore dirtbike with some suspension tweaks and 17-inch sportbike wheels front and rear clad with sticky Michelin skins. The brakes were by Magura, and featured a four-pot radial caliper up front. The best part of the FS570, clearly, is its chameleon-like ability to be most things to most people, with just a few mods here and there. Granted, nobody is saying a new set of wheels for what was an $11,000 bike when new will be cheap, but it’s certainly more cost effective than buying a similarly high-end dirt bike.

The big ‘Berg made just shy of 60 horsepower if the forums are to be believed (official horsepower ratings are non-existent) out of the 566 cc laid-over thumper. In a chassis that weighed 257 pounds dry, this bike is fully capable of taking it to sport bikes, especially on tighter tracks or canyons. The Husabergs shared WP suspension components with KTM, and the swingarm was the same unit as the one on the KTM 560 SMR. They were initially intended to be the ultra-premium range from the Austrian company, but were eventually let go when Big Orange bought Husqvarna a couple years later. No need for two Swedish dirtbike companies that start with H in your portfolio, it seems.

 

From the seller:

Factory, street legal supermoto, only sold in the US for 1 year, but if you’re looking at this, you probably know all about it. Guaranteed to be the only one around. Stand out from all the other bikes!
-Clean title in hand
-Only 2900 miles
-Oil changed regularly, every few 100 miles or so.
-Valves checked 2 times. Still at factory specs. No adjustment ever needed.
Mods:
-Husaberg Race Map installed by Town & Country Cycle Center in Hamburg NJ
-FMF Powercore 4 slip on
-Upgraded fuel pump from Cycle Works
-Husaberg radiator fan kit
-Zeta handguards with LED turn signals
-SM mirrors
-Seat Concepts seat
Also comes with the original mirrors, exhaust, unmounted new parts include all new factory bodywork & seat, Shinko 705 tires,
& a brand new Fisher seat. (the most comfortable seats made!)

Located in Fairfield, CT. Will accommodate shipping but all associated costs are buyer’s responsibility.

Price: $7,000

With less than 3,000 miles on the dial and a new exhaust, race map and fuel pump, we suspect this thing will pull a little past the factory horsepower ratings. With comfort upgrades like a seat concept seat and Zeta handguards, this thing is as ready for short commutes as it is the track. As a bonus, it comes with all the stock takeoffs. With regular valve checks and oil changes, this bike is ready to make everything else in your garage seem like a compromise.

Flavor of the Month: 2011 Husaberg FS570
Harris March 29, 2019 posted by

Brexited: 1993 Harris Magnum Suzuki DR 650

You don’t need to get caught up in the UK drama as it steams towards its messy divorce with the European Union to enjoy the fruits of Great Britain. And it doesn’t matter if you cheer for the Conservative Party or the Labour Party, or if you even know who the Prime Minister is – what we have here today totally eclipses that minor kerfuffle. For here we have a US bred, California registered, Harris Magnum 4 chassis kit built out into a full bike. Think of Harris (or Spondon or Rickman, for that matter) as an English variant of the early days of Bimota – frame kits comprised of the chassis, suspension and bodywork sold to buyers who supplied donor motorcycles and the labor to build out the full bike. The resultant machines were nearly always more performant than the donor packages, and always very rare. In this particular case, we have never seen a Harris Magnum 650 offered for sale – much less right here in North America. What a cool opportunity!

1993 Harris Magnum Suzuki DR 650 for sale on eBay

As a frame builder, Harris is probably more well known for their Superbike level chassis supporting big bore machinery. But they have been involved in the two stroke game (both 250 and 500), offered frames for Ducati builds, as well as had some success in TT racing. No beginners to the racing scene, Harris products are drool-worthy and relatively exclusive. There is a passion in creating something as significant as a motorcycle, and the Harris website has all you need to fuel that fire. And today’s specimen could definitely light a few fires. Starting with a Harris Magnum 4 kit, this build-out results in a super single sport bike; undoubtedly light and agile, with loads of low-down torque. This kit must have been a complete custom order, as generally the Magnum 4 chassis are aimed at GSX-R750 and 1100 motors, not lowly DR mills. There is a considerable size difference between those lumps, which could explain why this chrome moly chassis does not resemble any Magnum 4 offering I have ever seen. But the end result looks great, and the build has Harris Performance parts sprinkled throughout. Even the Harrison Billet-6 braking components are UK sourced, making this bike a true ex-pat.

From the seller:
Harris Performance company in the U.K. manufactured the frame, bodywork, tank and other parts of this motorcycle as part of their Magnum 4 series. The Magnum 4 series was designed to house Suzuki oil cooled engines. This particular frame kit was designed to accept Suzuki DR 650 engines. The perimeter frame consists of chrome moly tubes. The swing arm is of rectangular section polished aluminum. The tank is polished aluminum. All body work is structural carbon fiber. The rear shock and spring is Ohlins. I think the front fork is Suzuki. Wheels are Suzuki. Based on the engine number, I estimate the Suzuki DR 650 engine was manufactured in 1991 or 1992. The Harris frame number is TMRSR004, so perhaps this is the fourth frame kit they made of this type. I don’t know the year the frame kit was manufactured, so I guessed 1993 when I titled and registered the bike. I have never seen another Harris Suzuki DR 650 motorcycle.

More from the seller:
This motorcycle has a California Special Construction VIN sticker because Harris is not listed as a motorcycle manufacturer in the California DMV database, although Harris did and still does manufacture complete motorcycles as well as frame kits. For information about Harris Performance, see www.harris-performance.com. This motorcycle uses unique and exotic Harris manufactured parts throughout. This bike has no paint other than on the Suzuki wheels and front fork. All else is polished aluminum or unpolished billet aluminum or unpainted carbon fiber. This bike handles incredibly well, which is not surprising since Harris is famous for the fantastic handling which their frame designs provide. The Suzuki DR 650 engine is a single cylinder engine which is counter balanced and air and oil-cooled. Due to its counter balance design, it is quite smooth. This bike is electric start and everything works on it. The bike is fully sorted and needs nothing: you can get on it and ride it and enjoy it. It is very quick, fun, unique, and gorgeous: I ride it around San Francisco and everywhere I go bikers and non-bikers ask about it and comment on its beauty. The bike has a California title and current registration. Mileage is unknown. There are 52 miles on its new speedometer.

Current prices for Harris frames start near $3k territory – that’s bare frame with nothing attached, and not counting export fees. Start looking at some of the pieces on this bike, and you can see how quickly the cash starts to fly. When you are building a dream, you are generally not building yourself an inexpensive motorcycle. And that is why the asking price for this rare little gem is a relatively steep $10k. It looks to be an amazing motorcycle, and I, for one, would love to ride it. But it begs the question of value. This is not a well-known kit model like a Bimota KB2 Laser. And while the Magnum 4 (or any Harris chassis, for that matter) is a well-regarded piece of kit, the sum of the parts is a relative unknown. You have the opportunity to own what literally nobody else will ever have. Even if you see another DR 650 kit bike yours will be different due to the choices made by the owner during assembly. This leads to another possible problem; what you are looking at is not exactly your “wash-n-wear” motorcycle experience. Sure, the Suzuki one lunger is going to be easy to find parts for, but nearly everything else on the bike is custom. And although Harris Performance is still around (now joined with the Royal Enfield group as part of Eicher Motors Ltd based in India), stock of parts is limited as nearly every kit they created was custom. This is not to scare potential buyers away – but rather to ensure readers have a healthy understanding and engage in a bit of a gut check in terms of self reliance.

I am a huge fan of specials such as this. The entire motorcycle industry was pushed along by the likes of Baker, Bimota, Egli, Foale, Harris, Rickman, Spondon and many others. The OEM bike builders would not be at the level where they are today – you would not be able to purchase a street bike that handles better than racers of not more than 5 years ago – had specialists not responded to the need for chassis solutions that worked. The difficulty in low-volume specials is establishing value and provenance. The seller seems to know about this bike and can likely help trace back its origins – although I was under the impression that Harris frames started with HR and then digits, and am unfamiliar with the TMRSR ID nomenclature. Perhaps I am thinking of the older vintage units (Magnum 2 & 3, and F1). If we have any Harris Performance aficionados in the gallery please do chime in! As for value, with so few units available – and only ONE known DR 650 configuration – this is going to be a true test of the market. It’s my estimation that you can’t build another one for the price listed here (especially if you count labor – even if it is your own), and this one appears to be complete and registered in California. That is a golden ticket for imports, to be sure (and no additional Brexit vote needed). Check it out here, and then share your thoughts in our comments section. Do you like the custom frame builder specials, or should we stick with OEM hardware only? Good Luck!!

MI

Brexited: 1993 Harris Magnum Suzuki DR 650
Kawasaki August 21, 2018 posted by

See Other – 2003 Kawasaki KRR150

Without much sporting history or intention, and no exports to the western hemisphere, Kawasaki’s Ninja KRR150 was last seen on RSBFS in 2011.  But the two-stroke single could still be a great lightweight racer, pit bike, or just a fun-around-town machine.

2003 Kawasaki KRR150 for sale on eBay

Kawasaki designed the KRR150 with the south Asian markets in mind, and the bottom line in the crosshairs.  The light steel perimeter frame and swingarm might not be advanced, but shares relevant geometries with the company’s other offerings.  30hp are available toward the top of the 10,500 rpm rev range and the engine has oil injection.  Riding 17-inch wheels, the single brakes are at least decently sized and the front has four pistons.  The impossibly skinny fairing is more to funnel air to the radiator and support the windshield than protect the rider.

The owner bought this KRR new and appears to have taken good care of it, though the pictures are almost criminal.  There probably isn’t huge money at stake, but an inspection might be a good idea since any parts will be coming from offshore.  Not seeing a license plate, title and registration issues will have to be explored.  The owner’s comments from the eBay auction:

This is a 2003 Kawasaki 150cc two stroke sport bike. This bike is not sold in the U.S. It was only available in Asia. It was manufactured in Thailand. I bought it brand new in the Philippines in 2003 and shipped it to the U.S. in 2005. It has 8,883 km on the speedo. It is in very good to excellent condition. Runs very good but haven’t started it this year. It has an expansion chamber, kick start and 17″ Enkai rims with 90/90-17 tires. Tires could use replacement due to age. Bike has a new chain and includes a new spare chain. Bike runs well and top speed is about 80 mph. If the bike sits long periods it is hard to start. It has always been this way since new. Maybe a 2 stroke expert could help with that. Bike has oil injection.

Kawasaki offered the KRR150 for quite a few years and improved the model later with their KIPS power valve, updated fairings and underslung bracing on the swingarm.  The model has a great fan base, though some website translating will be required, and parts appear to be readily available.  A fan of the brand or small-bore smokers might find this Kwak just the right project – light and simple, and can likely whip up on four-stroke 250’s…

-donn

See Other – 2003 Kawasaki KRR150
Honda September 12, 2017 posted by

Trophy Bike: 1986 Honda GB400

The cafe racer craze makes an appearance on a regular, cyclical basis. From the original cafe bikes “doing the ton” through sanctioned TT events such as the Isle of Man, the cafe racer evokes a rebel streak with a distinctly English flair. Sporting, brash, forward and yet somehow very basic, the cafe racer stirs your inner Mike Hailwood to life. And while authentic cafe racers are custom affairs, manufacturers such as Norton, Triumph, Royal Enfield, BSA and Vincent have all had a hand in producing models in this image. Honda, too, tried their hand at the cafe scene. The result was the “GB” series of Tourist Trophy-inspired bikes, including today’s rare GB400.

Rare 1986 Honda GB400 for sale on eBay

The Honda GB was born from humble beginnings. Utilizing a necked-down XL600 thumper motor, the GB was made available in both 400cc and 500cc configurations. The stone-simple and reliable air-cooled single was augmented by a a solo seat (a dual-seat model was available), a TT-style fairing, and clip-on bars. Wire wheels and a requisite megaphone-style muffler gives it some element of English authenticity. Those sidecovers? Made of metal, just like back in the day. Technology intervened in the manner of electric start (a kickstarter is attached to be period correct) and a single disk brake up front. The rest is basic but effective. Like the SRX models from Yamaha, the GB was a throwback to the past, a nod to lightness and simplicity and a relative failure.

From the seller:
It took me forever to find one of these and due to something coming up I have to sell it. I’d planned to keep it for the rest of my life so this is truly a regretful sale.

I bought it with 5600km. It currently has less than 11,000km. I have meticulously looked after it. This is the work I’ve done to it:

Three oil and filter changes up to now. It is important to change the oil on these often.
New front and rear brakes
Cleaned carburetor
New Bridgestone Battlax BT45 tyres put on at 6000km – great tyres in the rain
Installed gold DID525 X-ring Chain and aftermarket rear sprocket at 6000km
the guy at the shop said the front sprocket was good enough to not need changing.
Aftermarket foot pegs (still have the original pegs that you can have)
Shaken valid until 2019 (only important if you are buying in Japan)

I also have an extra carburetor kit that can come with it if you ever need to clean the carb further down the line.

More from the seller:
I never use the electric start but it works fine. This is my daily driver, it kick starts every morning literally on the first kick, every time. Exceptionally reliable. It’s really light, really forgiving, and fantastic for Japanese roads.

Never dropped, crashed or anything like that.

I think it had been sitting for a long time before I picked it up. There is some pitting on the engine block, handlebars and some faded paint behind the rocket cowl. Cosmetically I would say it is about 7/10.

Mechanically, it’s a excellent. I don’t know how to polish metal but I’ve always kept it clean. I have always parked it with a cover everyday and overnight. It also comes with the factory installed centre stand.

I have seen some online sell overseas for a lot more. These are rare and the value will only increase over time, especially ones like this with such low miles.

Available in Japan and export markets from 1985 – 1990 (and the US as a 500cc model in 1988-1990), the GB is a relatively rare machine. Sales were stronger in home markets and European pockets, but the US turned up its collective nose at this faux Brit bike. Today these are coveted machines for what they represent. This particular 400cc example was never seen in the US, and today resides in Japan where it was born. Check it out here if you are hankering for a reliable throwback – grab your pudding bowl and goggles and try for the ton. Good Luck!!

MI

Trophy Bike:  1986 Honda GB400