Posts by tag: WSBK

Yamaha May 9, 2019 posted by

Lucky Luc – 1994 Yamaha YZF-750SP

Yamaha continued developing and racing the YZF750 after the hallowed OW-01 with good results, even though the -SP homologation special never made it here with a motor vehicle title, they showed up as race machines on a bill of sale.  This street registered Canadian example has around 25,000 miles but a newly rebuilt engine.

1994 Yamaha YZF750SP ( Quebec ) for sale on eBay

With revised cams and 39mm flat slide carburetors, Yamaha’s 749cc Genesis engine delivered 125 hp, great for the era.  The alloy chassis sports a monoposto alloy seat console, and fully adjustable suspension.  320mm brakes came with 6-piston calipers and reviewed as magical.  “Torn paper” graphics were all the rage and look complete despite a note in the listing.

Just a few pictures will require investigation, but it does look worthy of the time.  With Canadian registry, the owner had the engine done in suburban Montreal, but maybe the Vermont location suggests free delivery to our northern border.  Normally an owner would be advised against refreshing and engine just before a sale, but that makes it intriguing.  Comments from the eBay auction:

Yamaha YZF750sp 1994.

This is the only ONE registered in Canada.

Engine refreshed by Luc Lapièrre from Moto RL in Saint-Jude Quebec.

The motor has less than 1,000 km on it. (600 miles)

The bike has 40,000km and it is all ORIGINAL. (25,000 miles)

Testers gigged the SP for a balky powerband and turn-in that needed a firm hand.  Remembering that this bike was intended for private race teams to acquire and modify to the limits of the rules, it makes more sense.  Engines would be blueprinted to accommodate what the carbs were feeding, and race-tuning the suspension and slick tires made it handle as intended.  But carefully set up for the road ( and with evident engine work ) this one might be all you could ask in a mid-size superbike.

-donn

Lucky Luc – 1994 Yamaha YZF-750SP
Ducati May 8, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2008 Ducati 1098S for Sale

Update 5.8.2019: Back on eBay and price dropped again. Good luck to buyers and seller! Links updated. -dc

Made for just a couple years between 2007 and 2009, the Ducati 1098 was a more conservative approach to their top-flight superbike after the radically-styled 999 threatened to upset Ducati’s apple cart. It’s almost like the bikes were released out of order, and that the 1098 should have been the direct successor Tamburini’s 916, as it had the same slab-sided bodywork, undertail exhaust, single-sided swingarm, and side-by-side headlights. Today’s Featured Listing 1098S is typical of many Ducatis, in that it’s been lovingly maintained, has low miles, and has had an entire catalog of aftermarket parts thrown at it.

So the 1098 was introduced to reinvigorate Ducati’s superbike fortunes and the bike indeed proved very popular and sold well, so why was the bike only made between 2007 and 2009? Well rules changes in WSBK conveniently allowed an increase in displacement to 1200cc and the 1098 was quickly succeeded by the 1198 that displaced… 1198cc. In the early days of World Superbike, v-twins got a decent displacement advantage that kept them approximately equal to the inline fours that had 25% less displacement. But with the inline fours allowed a full 1000cc for the 2007 season, Ducati had to work hard to stay competitive, and there was a noticeable jump in power between the 999 and the 1098, from 138 to 160hp, with the new bike punching out a stout 90 lb-ft of torque.

Ergonomics took a bit of a backward step from the surprisingly user-friendly 999’s adjustable seat and pegs, but you do have to suffer for art… This example, as stated earlier, has had a raft of aftermarket parts thrown at it, most notably a set of full carbon-fiber bodywork, including the tank. That’s not a wrap, it’s actual carbon fiber, thoughtfully lined to prevent damage from modern gas that seems to particularly plague Ducatis of this era. The entire, detailed list can be seen at the end of the seller’s listing.

From the Seller: 2008 Ducati 1098S for Sale

Gentlemen’s Express: DUCATI 1098S Full Carbon, Low Miles, Perfect Condition!

My Ducati 1098S Show bike is available for sale. It has been a prized part of my collection, but it’s time to move on to a new platform. This bike is exceptional in every way.  Stunning full carbon body and tank, Galfer Superbike Racing Brakes, Driven Racing Quick Change Sprockets, and much, much more!

The modifications to this bike were targeted in three areas; weight reduction, aesthetics and performance.

This bike draws a crowd everywhere it goes.  Extremely well cared for with full maintenance performed every winter. An impeccable machine with outstanding performance. It’s what all sports bikes should be, and given the extreme weight reduction it went through it still competes with today’s current sports bikes! There was a liberal use of titanium bolts (caliper bolts, rotor bolts, fender bolts etc., and the entire rear racing drive is all aluminum. The bike sits on two new brand new Michelin Pilot Tires and has the Ducati Racing ECU.

With less than 7800 miles, its just broken in. Everything works as it should, you will not be disappointed adding this to your collection or as a rider! This bike was over $35,000 to build (pretax), and comes complete with a Bursig Paddock Stand! All maintenance was just completed (as was done every winter) and is shown below along with the build list.  No rock chips, dings dents or scratches. It also has two Tec mounts – one for radar and one for a cell phone. Currently set up for an Escort 360 Radar unit and Smart Phone Blue Tooth Interface. The radar unit is not included. 

This bike has always been adult ridden, never wheelied (but it wants to), never down, has never seen rain never been raced or tracked.

Anyone that knows this generation of Ducati knows how beautifully the body flows. The exhausts sound awesome as does the open dry clutch. And the braking system is literally being used on superbikes across the country today.

The bike is available for inspection and pick up in East Texas (Tyler) or pickup at our performance shop in Dallas. We will also help prepare the bike for your shipper at your expense. We can recommend a great one we use for domestic white glove shipping, door to door.

Please note an immediate deposit of $500 is due upon purchase with full payment made within 5 business days. 

Serious parties only, please. If you want to discuss the bike, or arrange a viewing, send me a note with your phone number and name and I will contact you that day or feel free to call at (214) 585-3354. 

Thank you for looking, and happy eBaying! 

1098S Maintenance Completed Includes:

  • New Timing Belts $104.64
  • Changed Oil & Filter $42.00
  • Changed Filter $19.95
  • Changed Front Fork Seals $86.53
  • Changed Front Fork Oil $32.00
  • Changed Air Filter $58.99
  • Changed Coolant $28.00
  • New Front and Rear Tires $462.00
  • Replaced Rear Axle Hub with NOS $700.00
  • Changed Brake Fluid [Front and Rear] $24.00
  • Check Steering Head Bearings $0.00
  • Check Swingarm Bearings $0.00
  • Check Wheel Bearings $0.00
  • New Shift Return Springs $39.00
  • New Lightweight Battery $119.00
  • Fresh Dry Clutch Plates and Springs $368.00
  • Valve Stems $38.00
  • Shop Labor $821.00
  • Total $2,943.11

Upgrades Include:

  • New Galfer Superbike Rotors [Front] $812.00
  • New Galfer Superbike Rotor [Rear] $119.00
  • New Ferodo Carbon Ceramic Pads [Front and Rear] $211.00
  • Replaced Brake Lines with New Spiegler Thin-Wall Stainless $174.95
  • New Full Carbon Fiber Upper Cowl $599.00
  • New Carbon Fiber Side Panels $618.00
  • New Carbon Fiber Lower Cowl $299.00
  • New Carbon Fiber V Panel $111.00
  • Carbon Fiber Chain Guard $119.00
  • Carbon Fiber Rear Fender $106.00
  • New Carbon Fiber Solo Seat $439.00
  • New Carbon Fiber Rear Draft Panel $132.00
  • New Carbon Fiber Front Draft Panel $89.00
  • Carbon/Kevlar Fuel Tank $2,600.00
  • New Carbon Fiber Side Panels $185.00
  • New Carbon Fiber Heat Shields $85.00
  • Caswell Tank Seal to Protect Tank From Ethanol $54.99
  • New Puig Smoked Windscreen $92.50
  • New Puig Aluminum Screen Bolts $22.00
  • Full Dzus Quick-Release Body Fasteners $105.00
  • Puig 2.0 Short/Folding/Adjustable Control Levers $237.00
  • Rizoma Superbike Grips $112.00
  • Rizoma Frame Plugs $69.00
  • Ducabike Folding/Fully Adjustable Rearsets $580.00
  • Carbon Fiber Shift Rod $58.00
  • CNC Racing Carbon Fiber Racing Gas Cap $218.00
  • Ducati Corsa/Race ECU Flash $500.00
  • Termignoni Carbon Fiber Exhaust $854.00
  • Saddlemen Gel Seat $209.00
  • Ducabike Hydraulic Reservoir Covers $86.00
  • 520 GP Chain $189.00
  • New Driven Racing Quick Change Sprocket Carrier $219.00
  • New Driven Racing Rear Sprocket $89.00
  • New Rental Front Sprocket $54.00
  • Changed Gearing to 17/39 $0.00
  • New Aluminum Flange Race Cover $119.00
  • Chain Case Saver $39.00
  • Carbon Sprocket Cover $86.00
  • Black Billet Clutch Cover $129.00
  • Sprocket and Carrier Aluminum Nuts $98.00
  • Aluminum Front Axle Nut $36.00
  • Rear Aluminum Axle Nuts $89.00
  • Aluminum Flange Cone $64.00
  • ProTi 64 Titanium Rotor Bolts [Front and Rear] $119.00
  • ProTi 64 Banjo Bolts on Calipers $69.00
  • ProTi 64 Caliper Bolts [Front and Rear] $99.00
  • ProTi 64 Keyguard Bolts $39.00
  • Tech Mount Radar Mount $189.00
  • Tech Mount Cell Phone Mount $139.00
  • Escort 360 Radar $599.00
  • Skeletonized Fork Preload Adjusters $39.00
  • Fender Eliminator/Plate Mount Kit $119.00
  • Integrated Tail/Turn Light $89.00
  • Battery Tender Pigtail $6.99
  • Ducati Performance LED Mirrors $206.00
  • Bursig Paddock Stand $599.00
  • Shop Labor $3,500.00
  • Shop Supplies $72.00
  • Build Expenditure $16,991.43
  • Base Bike $18,000.00
  • Pretax Cost $34,991.43

The asking price for this very well-documented machine is a cool $25,000 $20,000. But if you’re looking for something truly one-of-a-kind, this 1098S should be almost as fast and less likely to kill you, with or without traction control.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2008 Ducati 1098S for Sale
Ducati April 11, 2019 posted by

On Form: 2008 Ducati 1098 R

When Pierre Terblanche took over the Ducati styling reins from Massimo Tamburini he had very big shoes to fill. For years the 916 / 996 / 998 series captured the hearts, minds and wallets of riders everywhere. In retrospect, the reception of the 999 (pronounced “ugly”) and the short span of three years availability was a pretty big clue to the powers that be that the new design language wasn’t cutting the showroom mustard. Enter Giandrea Fabbro, chosen to pen the successor Ducati Superbike – the 1098. Evoking elements from the 916 line – including the glorious single-sided swing arm – yet in a modern day form, Fabbro created an update to the iconic silhouette and evolved the Ducati Superbike for the next series of models.

2008 Ducati 1098 R for sale on eBay

But the 1098 didn’t just turn heads in the magazines and dealership showrooms. You see, part of the reason for the 1098 was WSBK racing. Ducati was already at the limit of their performance technology in World Superbike with the 999cc limit for twins. The next step to get on par with the might of the Japanese was more displacement. Ducati decided to buck the rules and evolved the 999 mill to just under 1100cc, thereby petitioning the sanctioning body to change the rules. A standoff ensued, and no side wanted to give. Ducati – a key mainstay of WSBK – threatened to boycott the series. Eventually, the sanctioning body came to an understanding with all of the players in the series: the maximum displacement for twins was raised to 1200cc, but concessions were introduced to maintain parity among the manufacturers. Thus, the Ducati 1098 was allowed to enter the 2007 WSBK series.

From the seller:
2008 Ducati 1098R ,mileage 3353 ,number 99 of 450 like models in the United States, carbon
rear shock guard,key and F/Sprocket, full termi system,dyno tuned with power commander installed

Despite the return of classic good looks, the Ducati 1098 introduction was not all smooth sailing. Initial tests indicated that the 999 was actually the easier bike to ride fast; the 1098 was more sensitive to setup. But the 1098 was definitely successful at the racetrack, winning the 2008 WSBK series championship. The 1098R model, as we see here, follows the unique formula that makes Ducati “R” bikes so special. Sure, it has more carbon fiber and better, more adjustable suspension. But the real trick with Ducati R bikes is in the engine, where there is more. More engine, that is. You see, the Ducati 1098 R actually displaces 1198cc, built right up to the (new) limits for Superbike racing. With 180 HP on tap in stock form, the 1098 R was the most potent twin cylinder sport bike available at the time, and had an equally impressive price tag.

Today’s example is a 2008 model, and appears to be very well cared for. From the pictures it is obvious the owner is a Duc fan, as there is also a 999R in some of the photos. Ducatis are lonely machines, so it is nice that this one had some company. With only 3,353 miles there is not much that should be wrong here. The Power Commander is a popular fueling mod that can help throttle response and gain back some HP that was donated to those evil folks from the EPA. The clutch cover is practically a mandated aftermarket necessity. Otherwise all looks to be in order. No mention of a service, belts or valve adjustment, so interested buyers might want to ask some questions. Check it out here. When it comes to Ducati R models, you could certainly do worse than a 1098. Good Luck!!

MI

On Form:  2008 Ducati 1098 R
Ducati February 23, 2019 posted by

Putting the R in Race Replica: 2009 Ducati 1098R Bayliss for Sale

Created to celebrate his 2008 WSBK title win for Ducati, this Troy Bayliss Replica 1098R features the Aussie’s racing number, along with livery matching the bike he rode during the very last race of his career, sans sponsor logos. Ducati’s status as a sort of “Ferrari of Motorcycles” puts them in a tricky position. MV Agusta might be the much more appropriate bearer of that title for all the reasons obvious to the enthusiast community, but if you say “Ferrari” to anyone, even a non-enthusiast, they know exactly what you mean. They know it’s Italian, they know it’s fast, they know it’s expensive. And probably red. The same holds true for Ducati. If you say “MV Agusta” to your average non-rider, and all you’ll likely get are blank looks.

That sort of association is great for marketing and image, but it means the bike are under a lot of pressure, not only to perform, but to look the part. It’s a tough balance to manage, and Ducati has learned the hard way that sometimes form needs to take precedence over function. That was clearly the case with the Ducati 999 that was introduced to replace the 998. It was a radically new bike, and threw every design cue, aside from a transverse v-twin’s natural wasp-waisted silhouette and Ducati’s signature trellis frame, out the window. The style was aggressively modern, with a futuristic stacked projector beam face, fairing winglets to guide air around the bodywork, adjustable ergonomics and, horror of horror: a double-sided swingarm!

And it backfired.

So Ducati took a stylistic step backwards and introduced the 1098, a bike that continued to develop the Desmoquattro engine and their superbike platform, but incorporated a style more familiar to fans of the brand. Out went the stacked, cyclopean headlights and in came a slit-eyed face that still reminds me of a great white shark. It remains my favorite element of the design. Out went the odd, technical, unequal-length two-into-one undertail exhaust and in came twin exhaust cans clearly meant to evoke the 916. I still hate them, especially the stock parts. And back, much to the relief of the Ducatisti, was the iconic single-sided swingarm.

The homologation 1098R offers up prodigious performance and specs that are still eye-opening today: almost 190hp and 99ft-lbs of torque with the included race ECU and exhaust. That’d be terrifying without some form of safety net, and the 1098R was revolutionary for offering eight-level traction control in the form of DTC, or Ducati Traction Control. Assuming of course that you had the above-mentioned race ECU and exhaust installed, since they were required for the DTC to function. The traction control was crude by today’s standards, but was the first of its kind, a system designed to improve lap times, not provide all-weather safety, and a DDA Ducati Data Analyzer meant you could do a detailed trackday postmortem on your home computer, something of a revelation for sportbike pilots.

The R’s Testastretta Evoluzione was larger than the stock bike’s, displacing 1198.4cc, right on the WSBK limit for v-twins, and had titanium internals, twin injectors per cylinder, along with a slipper clutch to keep the rear tire under control during hard downshifts. Suspension was state-of-the-art with an Öhlins TTX36 twin-tube shock out back and a 43mm Öhlins fork up front. Brembo Monobloc calipers were the best available at the time.

From the original eBay listing: 2009 Ducati 1098R Bayliss Replica for Sale

Up for auction (or trade for collector cars) is a very rare 2009 Ducati 1098R Troy Bayliss bike. These bikes are limited production, only 500 made in total and 150 imported to the United States. This bike is unmolested, and it has 450 actual miles. I bought it because I love Ducatis and this example, in my opinion, is one of the most beautiful bikes they have made. I do not have any of the original take-off parts, t-shirt, placard, etc. This bike is actually an 1198 engine, putting out 180hp@9750rpm and 99.1ft-lbs of torque. The bike has no issues, is ready for a collection or ready for use. I don’t need to sell the bike but would like to free the $ up. It is located in Sarasota, FL.

“Unmolested”? Well, let’s be honest here: it has been molested. Luckily, the farkles [except for the red swingarm] can be removed and original parts sourced, but it says something about the previous owner that he’d add those godawful grips and multi-color bits, and Ducati collectors can be snobs about stuff like that… I get it: you were trying to replicate the bike’s multicolor style, but just because there’s blue in the design doesn’t mean you can just use any color blue to… nevermind. Otherwise, this might be a great bike for collectors, with just 450 miles on the odometer. But that’s a double-edged sword, since neglect is the worst thing for any Ducati. Interestingly, a bunch of these Ducati 1098R Troy Bayliss Replicas have cropped up for sale recently, which is odd, since just 500 were made, and the seller is asking $23,198.00 for this example. Obviously, if you plan to ride the bike, you’ll need to go through it completely and do all the services, unless the seller can provide documentation. And then you might want to do them anyway, just to be safe.

-tad

Ducati February 9, 2019 posted by

#388 of 400: 2002 Ducati 998S Bayliss Replica for Sale

Ducati’s lineup of superbikes has long included three main tiers: the “entry-level” exotic standard version, the S-version that generally includes some trim and suspension updates, and the homologation R-version, that is sometimes a step up from the S, and sometimes an altogether different beast entirely… The most desirable bikes are most often the R-version, but when you make 400 examples of the Troy Bayliss replica 998S, you create something that combines the power and dynamics of the very best of the 916 era bikes with racing heritage.

The 998 was the end of the line for the iconic Tamburini-designed four-valve superbike that began with the 916, itself an evolution of the earlier 851 and 888. And although there is some parts interchangeability between the 916, 996, and 998, they represent a pretty significant evolution of the platform that’s much more than skin-deep. Bodywork appears largely unchanged, although subtle massaging of the shape between generations is noticeable if you look closely. In the 998, it was redesigned to fit the new frame originally used in the 996R, and allow different airflow to the reworked cooling system.

Most significantly, the 998 saw the widespread introduction of the narrow-angle “Testastretta” engine originally seen in the 996R for a big boost to performance. “Narrow-angle” doesn’t refer to the angle between the cylinders, which remained at Ducati’s traditional 90° for perfect primary balance. Instead, the Testastretta engine featured new, more compact and efficient cylinder heads with a reduced included valve angle of 25°, down from 40°, along with bigger valves, larger pistons, more aggressive cams, and shower-type fuel injectors. The result was a claimed 123hp in the regular 998, up from 112 in the 996, with an increase to 136 for the 998S.

From the original eBay listing: 2002 Ducati 998S Bayliss Replica for Sale

Offered for sale is this stunning 2002 Ducati 998S Baylis #388 of only 400 made.

Built as a tribute to Troy Bayliss’ 2001 WSB Championship, this 998S is in incredible condition and recently serviced.

Only 2200 miles!

Virtually stock with an Arrow exhaust, levers, Sargent seat, integrated turn signals and open carbon clutch cover with pressure plate.

A rare opportunity to own a classic. These 998’s are as amazing in person as they looks in pictures.

Clean title as always.

Bayliss was a popular rider, but this particular race-replica graphics scheme is a bit bland to my eye, the kind of thing you could replicate on a box-stock 998 with Photoshop and a good quality printer. It’s almost too authentic race-bike, in that it’s a rolling billboard first and foremost. 916s and 996s have dipped pretty low in terms of values and seem to be on an upswing, but the 998 was never really very cheap. It was still being produced when the… controversial 999 was introduced, and many people seem to have been aware that they’d eventually be considered collectible. This one’s $17,450 asking price is more in line with one of Ducati’s R-model bikes, but extremely limited production and low miles make it a very desirable bike.

-tad

#388 of 400: 2002 Ducati 998S Bayliss Replica for Sale
Ducati January 11, 2019 posted by

Sport Production Special: 1998 Ducati 916 SPS for Sale

Looking at the history of the 916/996/998, it’d be easy to think that you were just looking at regular bumps in displacement as allowed by homologation requirements, especially considering that the bike itself appeared mostly unchanged throughout its development, minor changes in graphics aside. Even this very exclusive Ducati 916 SPS really looks like a 996 with a solo seat and white numberplates on the tail section.

But while all three models of Ducati’s 90s icon are similar, and do share some parts interchangeability, they represent a continual development of the model. It made little sense to “throw the baby out with the bathwater” when the original 916 was such an impressive piece to begin with, and Ducati couldn’t really afford to start from scratch anyway, so evolution made more sense than revolution.

Given that every ounce counts on a motorcycle, especially one intended to be raced, each component is designed with a minimum of excess material, and Ducati’s original liquid-cooled, four-valve v-twin was limited to 955cc before the cases started cracking under the extreme pressures of racing, and the engine needed a significant redesign in order to safely allow additional displacement increases. The regular production 996 that followed used the updated cases and the larger displacement, but didn’t get all the other goodies included in the homologation model.

This 916 SPS in fact displaced 996cc, and was Ducati’s first use of their new reinforced engine cases and other changes that allowed the bike to continue growing in response to rules changes that increased displacement limits for Superbike racing. Externally, it looked pretty similar but internally, there were new heads, barrels, pistons, injectors, and a lighter crank. It was mated to a close-ratio gearbox from the 748. Up front was a Showa fork and an Öhlins shock helps keep the rear wheel in contact with terra firma. This 1998 year model also had a lighter frame and titanium connecting rods.

Originally, the SPS wasn’t technically road-legal in the US, but you could buy them here, and there wasn’t really much stopping you from buying a “for off road use only” bike and then registering it, since it had a VIN, lights, and mirrors. And of course Ducati damn well knew people would do just that. Thank goodness.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Ducati 916 SPS for Sale

For sale, 1998 Ducati 916 SPS Superbike. Like new condition. Second owner. Extremely rare bike. Number 401 of 1058 total manufactured, for both US and Europe. Homologated for racing, only 50 were officially imported into the US. This is a true collector bike. New timing belt and battery. Tires are in excellent shape. Meticulously maintained, this bike is ready to ride!

Introduced for 1994, the Massimo Tamburini-styled 916 superbike and its subsequent evolutions captured the motorcycle world’s imagination and finally established Ducati as a brand of note. Within a short time the original 916 Strada was superseded by the Biposto (two-seat) and the higher-specification SP. The engine remained at 916cc for both models but the SP came with twin fuel injectors and bigger valves for more performance, together with a single white panel seat and an Ohlins rear shock. Next came the ultra-exclusive homologation-special 916SPS or Sport Production Special for 1997 and 1998. The SPS enjoyed a 996cc engine – complete with reinforced crankcases, new heads and barrels with both bigger combustion chambers and valves, high lift cams, a 11.5:1 compression ratio, close-ratio gearbox and various lightweight parts – delivering a mighty rear wheel 132 horsepower.

Ducati made 1,058 SPS models for 1998, so it’s less rare than earlier SPS and SP bikes, but still very much a collectible. This example has just 2,150 miles on the odometer, and bidding is up to $11,000 with the reserve not met and very little time left on the auction. The 916 was always going to be collectible, and even the most ordinary models are beginning to appreciate in value. But for collectors, this one’s at the top of the list with serious exclusivity for a “production” bike and historical significance, with serious racing links. It also helps that it has a reputation for being a pretty ferocious bike to ride, and feels far faster than the claimed power would suggest.

-tad

Sport Production Special: 1998 Ducati 916 SPS for Sale
Ducati January 9, 2019 posted by

Ital-Lebanese Delight: NEW 2009 Ducati 1098R Bayliss Edition

Ducati has an enviable record when it comes to performance motorcycles. Not only do they succeed on the racetrack, but the bikes from Bologna seem to be at home on the street, in museums, as artwork, and in collections everywhere. This is partly due to the legendary record of wins delivered by the big desmo twins. Some of the biggest names in WSBK and MotoGP have enjoyed success on a Ducati, and with that brings a mythical element to the equation. It certainly does not hurt that styling is an equal partner to horsepower, as is the Italian way. To complete the trifecta, Ducati has always capitalized on the supply-demand ratio, producing limited edition and short production run examples, numbered to prove exclusivity. Many of these specials are based on famed riders for the brand, such as today’s beautiful Troy Bayliss Edition 2009 Ducati 1098R.

2009 Ducati 1098R Bayliss Edition for sale on eBay

If you’ve been following RSBFS for any period of time, you already know that the “R” spec versions of Ducati models are special. Usually bestowed with carbon fiber components and riding on upgraded suspension, the R bikes also usually offer more HP than a standard edition base model. In many cases, the R specification had a different engine entirely: late year, top spec 851s were 888cc, the SP0 versions of the 888 were actually 916 configurations, etc. So too, did the R version of the 1098 herald the coming of the 1198 – at least in displacement. This was good for 180 horsepower, making the 1098R no slouch on the dyno. Traction control was included.

From the seller:
A great opportunity to own a Superbike, a piece of history, which would take pride of place in any serious collection. Ducati saluted Troy Bayliss career with a great special edition -R in 2009, with his race number and Aussie flag livery.

Bayliss Limited Edition has been drenched in carbon fiber and has a special colour scheme designed by Aldo Drudi. comes with rear paddock stand.

No track work, very reluctant sale. Number 355 of 500. This bike still brand new, never registered. available for pick up in Beirut, Lebanon. also available for International shipping

Ducati introduced the Troy Bayliss Edition 1098R to celebrate Troy’s swansong. After winning the 2008 WSBK championship Bayliss retired from competition, a 3-time crown winner. The 1098R Troy Bayliss Edition is essentially a R model with some minor additions (carbon fiber pieces and model specific wheels). The major highlights were in the graphics: livery that resembled the WSBK racer, replete with the famous Bayliss 21. With only 500 examples produced worldwide, this was a fitting tribute to one of the greats.

This particular example is claimed new (as in never been registered), wears a reported 150 miles on the odo, and is located in Beruit. Given than only about 150 examples were imported into the US, it is natural to find good examples elsewhere in the world. But certainly this is the first RSBFS post highlighting a bike in this particular region. If I had to nitpick, the pictures are not as high-res or clear as I would like. Still a rare Duc is a rare Duc; the question is really about importation. Prospective buyers need to consider paperwork and shipping as part of the bargain. Starting bid for this one is $22,500 – which is in the money zone compared to most Bayliss LE models we have seen, however it may be a bit high for the opening ask. No bids as of this writing, which gives you time to jump in. Check it out here. Once you look at the details, come back and share your thoughts in our Comments section. If you were in the market for a Limited Edition Ducati, does the Australian-flagged Bayliss model make your top 3? Let us know, and good luck!!

MI

Ital-Lebanese Delight: NEW 2009 Ducati 1098R Bayliss Edition
Kawasaki January 8, 2019 posted by

Kiwi Kawi: 2001 Kawasaki ZX-7RR for Sale

Slathered in Kawasaki’s traditional lime green, the ZX-7RR was the homologation version of their 750cc superbike. It wasn’t quite as trick as Honda’s RC45, but its more pedestrian underpinnings make it a bit of an underdog, and the bike had surprising success and longevity for a machine that was updated in 1996, as you can see from this 2001 example. It was obviously pretty long in the tooth by then, but still provided a solid foundation for production-based racing.

The parts you’d expect are there: an adjustable steering head and swingarm pivot, and suspension provided an even broader range of adjustment, compared to the regular bike and, up front, Nissin six-piston calipers replaced the stock Tokico units. The bike had a close-ratio gearbox, and the cases were reinforced, and the engine used a heavier flywheel in an effort to improve traction off corners.

Interestingly, the bike was homologated with both 39mm and 41mm flat-slide carburetors, up from the 38mm CV units on the regular R. Kawasaki was covering their bases by offering that choice to racers, but conventional wisdom is that the 41s are just too much carburetor, especially on the street and even some racers went with the smaller 39mm units.

At 441lbs dry, the bike is a bit of a porker, but these Kawasakis were always more than the sum of their parts. Track down an old magazine article, or read a more recent review of these now “classic” sportbikes, and the writers will wax poetic about the bike’s “sublime front-end feel” and stability.

As you’d expect, it was pretty expensive for what was really pretty close to the standard model, but didn’t work as well on the street, or even on track for that matter, in the hands of ordinary riders. The RR was $11,999 compared to the R’s $8,999. $3,000 was a hefty chunk of change then and even now, but compared to the RC45’s $27,000, it was a screaming bargain, and one of my favorite Japanese superbikes.

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Kawasaki ZX-7RR for Sale

Kawasaki ZX-7RR Ninja (750NNA – 2001 Registered)

Genuine motorcycle, which has traveled just over 5,200km from new. I purchased this example about 5 years ago on a trip to Tokyo, Japan and shipped it to New Zealand where it has been in my private collection. It is an exceptional example, all original, and appears not to have ever been ridden in the rain! The spare key still has its factory protection on it. The motorcycle was featured in a newspaper article on the model a couple of years ago.

https://www.stuff.co.nz/motoring/bikes/74403132/null

The original Japanese registration documents show it was first registered in Japan in 2001, and may well be one of the last of these RR versions manufactured. I have not complied and registered it in New Zealand, but have the paperwork and can arrange this if this buyer so desires.

I own a classic motorcycle restoration business and have shipped many motorcycles worldwide. It will be securely wrapped, packed and shipped in a steel crate, clad in plywood for safety. Feel free to contact me for a shipping quote, we use a broker and CFR Rinkens for shipments to the USA.

This is a very rare opportunity to secure what I consider may well be amongst the best ZX-7RR examples in existence.

Excellent condition, has been part of a private collection for a number of years. Run up about every six months, but seldom ridden.

Well, this particular collectible Kawi looks to be in great shape, with low miles and a sharp Buy It Now price of $20,000, although bidding is only up to $15,000 with very little time left on the auction. The only downside? It’s in New Zealand, and that makes shipping a bit of a pain if you’re here in the US.

-tad

Kiwi Kawi: 2001 Kawasaki ZX-7RR for Sale
Honda December 25, 2018 posted by

Christmas Bonus: 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale

Long before “mass centralization” became a popular marketing buzzword for sportbikes, Honda was investing its bubble economy-inflated budget in a bike that took advantage of that very concept, the exquisitely-engineered VFR750R, otherwise known as the legendary RC30. Honda was so invested in sportbikes at the time that it actually sold an I4 and a V4 range of bikes concurrently, with their CBR and VFR filling slightly different niches. But when it came to their homologation bikes, Honda took their hard-won knowledge from the street-oriented V4 bikes and used it to develop the bike seen here, the VFR750R.

If you’re passingly familiar with Honda’s roadbikes, “VFR” probably evokes images of practical and engaging sport-touring bikes that lean on the sport end of the spectrum. This is not one of those bikes. The RC30 was developed to win production-based racing classes, specifically the then-new World Superbike Championship, although the ELF-designed single-sided swingarm hints at the bike’s endurance racing capabilities as well.

At the heart of the bike is obviously a compact V4 engine with a relatively narrow frontal area for good aerodynamics and very centralized mass, gear-driven cams for extremely precise valve control, and a 360°crankshaft that improved traction at the rear wheel, compared to a more traditional 180° unit. The concept of the 360° crank is that the combustion events are clustered close together, instead of spaced evenly throughout each engine revolution to allow the rear tire to “recover,” increasing traction and improving tire life. It also gives the bike a flatter powerband and a distinctive soundtrack that can be appreciated, even if your skills don’t extend to tire-spinning corner exits. The downside of a V4 is generally increased weight compared to an inline-four and tight packaging, especially with a 90° v-angle, as used here. Stripped of its fairing, the RC30 looks very dense and packed with mechanical bits, and V4s can be a bit of a bear to work on.

Reviews then and now describe it as an easy bike to take full advantage of, a bike that rewarded finesse, a bike that just did as it was told and allowed the rider to get on with winning. Power was unremarkable, weight was average, and nothing about the bike screamed “race winner.” But win it did, even against stiff opposition from Ducati, Bimota, Suzuki, Yamaha, and Kawasaki, and Honda only abandoned the V4 formula when it decided that rules in WSBK favoring v-twins were onerous and biased. So they built a v-twin and showed everyone they could win with those as well, but it was clear their hearts would always belong to the V4…

The RC30 is a handsome bike, with nearly perfect proportions and a wealth of amazing details, although it doesn’t have the easy wow-factor of something from Italy. It’s not often you can accuse Ducati of cribbing styling elements, but the 916’s taillights and distinctive single-sided swingarm look awfully similar to what you can see here. And unlike those Italian machines, every single component is carefully thought out to work as part of a complete package, and engineered to near-perfection.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale

  • Long term ownership and fewer than 5,000 miles
  • 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30
  • Frame Number: 2100129
  • Engine Number: 2100162
  • Legendary 16-valve gear-driven DOHC 90 degree V4 engine
  • Reportedly fewer than 3000 produced
  • Single owner since 1990
  • Fewer than 5,000 miles from new.

One of the modern era’s few immediately collectible classics, the Honda VFR750R – better known as the ‘RC30′ – was created for just one reason: to win the World Superbike Championship, a feat it achieved in the nascent series’ first two seasons of 1988 and 1989. And while American Fred Merkel was bringing Honda its first two WSB crowns, Britain’s Carl Fogarty used an RC30 to win the TT F1 World Championship in 1988 and 1989, and the equivalent FIM Cup in 1990. No mere short circuit scratcher, the RC30 and its derivatives proved durable enough to win a hat-full of Endurance Classics too. That this latter requirement was also part of the design brief may be determined from the fact that a quick-release front fork and single-sided swinging arm – essential for speedy wheel changes – were part of an unrivaled specification that included a twin-spar alloy beam frame, 16-valve V4 engine with gear-driven cams, close-ratio six-speed gearbox and four-pot front brake calipers.

All of which did not come cheap: at the time of its launch in 1988 an RC30 cost near double that of other super-sports 750s. Despite the passage of time and progress of motorcycle technology, the RC30 remains a match for the latest generation of sports bikes but possesses an exclusivity that none of them can approach. ‘No other bike from the late-Eighties is lusted after like the RC30’, reckoned Bike, and few would disagree. And then there’s the exhaust note – loud, of course, but soulful enough to bring a pit crew to tears.

This RC30 was only very recently liberated from its second and very long-term owner. Purchased in the UK in 1990, fewer than 5,000 miles have been put on the bike since it was new. Not long after acquisition, the superbike was taken to the Isle of Man where it was driven around the race track, but not actually raced. In 1991 the machine was brought stateside. Regularly maintained since new, the previous owner reports that the RC30 was taken to the local Honda dealer for a pre-sale service within the last couple of months.

Fresh from nearly three decades of single owner care, this legendary machine is offered in excellent condition throughout. The engine starts readily, idles smoothly and has an abundance of power. The clutch is silky-smooth and brakes and suspension are near perfect. I would opt for a new pair of tires before serious road use and am happy to negotiate your tire choice in to the price.

This is a rare opportunity to acquire a motorcycling icon of performance and provenance and a must-have for a discerning collection.

For additional information and photos go to ClassicAvenue.com

V4s are all the rage these days, but Honda really pioneered them for modern motorcycle applications. Because who the hell else would want to design around such a packaging headache? Obviously, Honda has a history of doing things just because they can, practicality be damned: their oval-pistoned racebikes grew out of a staunch refusal to adapt to the changing technology of the Grand Prix scene and simply build a competitive two-stroke. And although that particular experiment was a failure, it shows the lengths to which Honda will go when they believe in an engineering concept. Luckily, the V4 wasn’t quite so complex and was ultimately vindicated by both in-period success and by the legacy it left behind. This example has very low miles and appears to be in very nice, original condition with an asking price of $44,900 and just one more day on the listing, so if you didn’t get what you wanted for Christmas this year and happen to have a bit of your holiday bonus left lying around…

-tad

Christmas Bonus: 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale