Posts by tag: World SuperBike

Ducati January 11, 2019 posted by

Sport Production Special: 1998 Ducati 916 SPS for Sale

Looking at the history of the 916/996/998, it’d be easy to think that you were just looking at regular bumps in displacement as allowed by homologation requirements, especially considering that the bike itself appeared mostly unchanged throughout its development, minor changes in graphics aside. Even this very exclusive Ducati 916 SPS really looks like a 996 with a solo seat and white numberplates on the tail section.

But while all three models of Ducati's 90s icon are similar, and do share some parts interchangeability, they represent a continual development of the model. It made little sense to “throw the baby out with the bathwater” when the original 916 was such an impressive piece to begin with, and Ducati couldn’t really afford to start from scratch anyway, so evolution made more sense than revolution.

Given that every ounce counts on a motorcycle, especially one intended to be raced, each component is designed with a minimum of excess material, and Ducati’s original liquid-cooled, four-valve v-twin was limited to 955cc before the cases started cracking under the extreme pressures of racing, and the engine needed a significant redesign in order to safely allow additional displacement increases. The regular production 996 that followed used the updated cases and the larger displacement, but didn’t get all the other goodies included in the homologation model.

This 916 SPS in fact displaced 996cc, and was Ducati’s first use of their new reinforced engine cases and other changes that allowed the bike to continue growing in response to rules changes that increased displacement limits for Superbike racing. Externally, it looked pretty similar but internally, there were new heads, barrels, pistons, injectors, and a lighter crank. It was mated to a close-ratio gearbox from the 748. Up front was a Showa fork and an Öhlins shock helps keep the rear wheel in contact with terra firma. This 1998 year model also had a lighter frame and titanium connecting rods.

Originally, the SPS wasn’t technically road-legal in the US, but you could buy them here, and there wasn’t really much stopping you from buying a “for off road use only” bike and then registering it, since it had a VIN, lights, and mirrors. And of course Ducati damn well knew people would do just that. Thank goodness.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Ducati 916 SPS for Sale

For sale, 1998 Ducati 916 SPS Superbike. Like new condition. Second owner. Extremely rare bike. Number 401 of 1058 total manufactured, for both US and Europe. Homologated for racing, only 50 were officially imported into the US. This is a true collector bike. New timing belt and battery. Tires are in excellent shape. Meticulously maintained, this bike is ready to ride!

Introduced for 1994, the Massimo Tamburini-styled 916 superbike and its subsequent evolutions captured the motorcycle world’s imagination and finally established Ducati as a brand of note. Within a short time the original 916 Strada was superseded by the Biposto (two-seat) and the higher-specification SP. The engine remained at 916cc for both models but the SP came with twin fuel injectors and bigger valves for more performance, together with a single white panel seat and an Ohlins rear shock. Next came the ultra-exclusive homologation-special 916SPS or Sport Production Special for 1997 and 1998. The SPS enjoyed a 996cc engine – complete with reinforced crankcases, new heads and barrels with both bigger combustion chambers and valves, high lift cams, a 11.5:1 compression ratio, close-ratio gearbox and various lightweight parts – delivering a mighty rear wheel 132 horsepower.

Ducati made 1,058 SPS models for 1998, so it’s less rare than earlier SPS and SP bikes, but still very much a collectible. This example has just 2,150 miles on the odometer, and bidding is up to $11,000 with the reserve not met and very little time left on the auction. The 916 was always going to be collectible, and even the most ordinary models are beginning to appreciate in value. But for collectors, this one's at the top of the list with serious exclusivity for a "production" bike and historical significance, with serious racing links. It also helps that it has a reputation for being a pretty ferocious bike to ride, and feels far faster than the claimed power would suggest.

-tad

Sport Production Special: 1998 Ducati 916 SPS for Sale
Kawasaki January 8, 2019 posted by

Kiwi Kawi: 2001 Kawasaki ZX-7RR for Sale

Slathered in Kawasaki’s traditional lime green, the ZX-7RR was the homologation version of their 750cc superbike. It wasn’t quite as trick as Honda’s RC45, but its more pedestrian underpinnings make it a bit of an underdog, and the bike had surprising success and longevity for a machine that was updated in 1996, as you can see from this 2001 example. It was obviously pretty long in the tooth by then, but still provided a solid foundation for production-based racing.

The parts you’d expect are there: an adjustable steering head and swingarm pivot, and suspension provided an even broader range of adjustment, compared to the regular bike and, up front, Nissin six-piston calipers replaced the stock Tokico units. The bike had a close-ratio gearbox, and the cases were reinforced, and the engine used a heavier flywheel in an effort to improve traction off corners.

Interestingly, the bike was homologated with both 39mm and 41mm flat-slide carburetors, up from the 38mm CV units on the regular R. Kawasaki was covering their bases by offering that choice to racers, but conventional wisdom is that the 41s are just too much carburetor, especially on the street and even some racers went with the smaller 39mm units.

At 441lbs dry, the bike is a bit of a porker, but these Kawasakis were always more than the sum of their parts. Track down an old magazine article, or read a more recent review of these now “classic” sportbikes, and the writers will wax poetic about the bike’s “sublime front-end feel” and stability.

As you’d expect, it was pretty expensive for what was really pretty close to the standard model, but didn't work as well on the street, or even on track for that matter, in the hands of ordinary riders. The RR was $11,999 compared to the R’s $8,999. $3,000 was a hefty chunk of change then and even now, but compared to the RC45’s $27,000, it was a screaming bargain, and one of my favorite Japanese superbikes.

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Kawasaki ZX-7RR for Sale

Kawasaki ZX-7RR Ninja (750NNA - 2001 Registered)

Genuine motorcycle, which has traveled just over 5,200km from new. I purchased this example about 5 years ago on a trip to Tokyo, Japan and shipped it to New Zealand where it has been in my private collection. It is an exceptional example, all original, and appears not to have ever been ridden in the rain! The spare key still has its factory protection on it. The motorcycle was featured in a newspaper article on the model a couple of years ago.

https://www.stuff.co.nz/motoring/bikes/74403132/null

The original Japanese registration documents show it was first registered in Japan in 2001, and may well be one of the last of these RR versions manufactured. I have not complied and registered it in New Zealand, but have the paperwork and can arrange this if this buyer so desires.

I own a classic motorcycle restoration business and have shipped many motorcycles worldwide. It will be securely wrapped, packed and shipped in a steel crate, clad in plywood for safety. Feel free to contact me for a shipping quote, we use a broker and CFR Rinkens for shipments to the USA.

This is a very rare opportunity to secure what I consider may well be amongst the best ZX-7RR examples in existence.

Excellent condition, has been part of a private collection for a number of years. Run up about every six months, but seldom ridden.

Well, this particular collectible Kawi looks to be in great shape, with low miles and a sharp Buy It Now price of $20,000, although bidding is only up to $15,000 with very little time left on the auction. The only downside? It's in New Zealand, and that makes shipping a bit of a pain if you're here in the US.

-tad

Kiwi Kawi: 2001 Kawasaki ZX-7RR for Sale
Bimota January 3, 2019 posted by

Sponsored Listing: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

Update: comments are open! -dc

For the money, 1990s Bimotas offer some pretty incredible bang for your buck. Obviously, a more modern machine of equal value will be faster, as well as more reliable and practical, but if the goal is to own something different, something exotic, and something with real style, not much can compete. This Bimota YB10 Dieci being offered by Iconic Motorbikes has an asking price of $11,100 which is barely a third of what an RC30 is currently worth.

Of course, there are some compromises. An RC30 from the same period represents some of Honda's very best engineering, with an almost obsessive attention to detail and few mechanical quirks. The YB10 Dieci is a rolling monument to quirk: Bimota's motorcycles of the period were really racebikes first, with concessions to practicality an afterthought at best.

The Dieci obviously has the design cues common during the 90s, with a pair of round headlamps up front, an aluminum beam frame, and sleek, fully-enclosed bodywork. If that looks overly familiar, as if Bimota was just following a trend, you've got it all backwards: Bimota basically started the trend with the race-only YB4 that debuted back in 1987, a bike that only appeared in roadgoing trim after World Superbike rules required a run of street-legal machines be sold to the public. They're mostly forgotten by everyone but us motorcycle geeks now, but Bimota was one of the original competitors in World Superbike and nearly won the inaugural event. The YB10 is an evolution of that bike, with a larger engine.

Invariably, Bimota tuned its borrowed powerplants for increased performance, although the results were often dubious and the claimed power gains generally minimal anyway. Bimota's real claim to fame was chassis design that resulted in light weight and incredible agility. In an era when Suzuki's GSX-R was using an antiquated double-cradle frame, Bimota's gorgeous aluminum beam design pointed the way forward, and a close look at the craftsmanship on display is impressive. Racy styling is easy to do, and the term "sportbike" gets thrown around pretty liberally, but the YB10 was the real deal. If you've never seen one of these without the bodywork, it's amazing how spare and minimalist it is: there's almost nothing there that isn't dedicated to speed.

Bodywork consists of just four major pieces, plus a couple inserts for the radiator vents. The tail and tank cover is one piece, there are two side panels, and the upper fairing, all held on by quarter-turn fasteners, so the bike can be naked in minutes. Which is good, since working on the bike is frustrating at best, with that gorgeous frame wrapping so closely around Yamaha's 1002cc five-valve Genesis engine and five-speed box that access can be difficult, depending on what you're trying to do.

Also guys, it's pronounced "bee-mo-tuh" not "by-mo-tuh." Just as Italian cars with two turbos like the old Maserati Biturbo are actually "bee-turbos" not "by-turbos." Just had to get that off my chest.

From the Seller: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci – Rare 1 of only 224 – Fully Serviced!

Bimotas are well known for their Italian style, class and over the top engineering.  This YB10 is no exception to the rule with its billet machined frame, its one piece (and seamless) upper fairing, billet triple, classic style wheels… so cool!

The YB10 wasn’t just eye candy either, it was tested my a few magazines and came back with a top speed of 172.9 mph which is quite respectable for 1993!

Only 224 of these were every made!

Not only do you get Italian style but you get the reliability of a Japanese motorbike with the YB10.  The power is supplied by a FZR1000 which means motor parts are never a problem to source!

This Bimota was serviced by Bob Steinberger, a very well known Bimota expert about 2 years ago with very few miles after the tune.  Service included new tires, new chain and sprockets, new battery, fresh oil, new jets, etc.

She’s in fantastic condition with only 12,885 miles and ready for a new home.

Want to see her in person, fly into LAX, we’re only 15 minutes away and ride out!  We’re right on the border of Venice beach and only a few miles from Santa Monica.

Nice to see this one's been ridden a bit, so you can actually put some time in on your new exotic without "ruining" a zero-mile museum-piece. As indicated, parts for the powertrain shouldn't be a problem, although the aforementioned tight packaging within the frame means servicing will be more time consuming and expensive than it would be on the donor Yamaha. Bodywork, on the other hand, could be a real issue, although Airtech does have Dieci panels available. I've long said that if I ever bought one of these, I'd buy a set from them, have it painted to match, and display the OEM bodywork so I could ride the bike without worrying that a patch of gravel would ruin one of the 224 ever made!

-tad

Sponsored Listing: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale
Ducati January 3, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2000 Ducati 748RS track bike

1.3.2019: Dave has renewed his Featured Listings and is adding a couple more in the next few days, stay tuned. Thanks for supporting the site and good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Showing up to your local track day on any late '90s or early-aughts Ducati is pretty close to the best way to elevate your cred above the herds of hammered SV650s and GSXRs buzzing around each other like a mobile swap meet. To be the guy on the 2002 996 is to be the guy the pimpled youths suddenly revere. But at RSBFS, we exist to take you to the stars. Behold: the 2000 Ducati 748RS. The never seen, seldom mentioned carbon fiber-bodied race homologation version of the already serious 748R. We're bringing you this bike as a featured listing from our buddy Dave at Seattle Used Bikes. You're welcome.

The 748RS was made in insanely low numbers -- something like 50 were built -- and its engine cases were filled with unobtanium parts that made the bikes fragile, expensive and ludicrously fast. It sports thinner chromoly frame rails than the stock machine, and the chassis is bedecked adjustable with Ohlins suspension at each end. Handling the gases produced by the special mill was a 54mm Termignoni exhaust system unique to the 748RS. Slowing things down is a humongous set of Brembos bolted to featherweight Marchesini wheels. They came from the factory with stunning naked carbon fiber bodywork, though this bike has been given the proper Ducati Corse paintwork.

Into the mid-aughts, the 748RS saw success in the AMA Battle of the Twins and Pro Thunder categories. Sadly, this machine's first owner, who was campaigning it in Pro Thunder, died racing an SV650. Time and the relentless march of technology mean that this bike won't be competitive in anything but classic racing series now, but that seems more fitting than to just throw it at a few track days.

This example has sat mostly dormant since its turn of the century racing career. Its engine was overhauled and further hot rodded to 853cc in 2007 when the second owner acquired it, but it hasn't seen any action save for a break in and some dyno runs. We'll let Dave fill in the details:

This is another bike from our friends private collection of very special bikes. A very limited edition 2000 Ducati 748RS. Ducati produced a very limited run of 748RS machines (around 15 first year), which were intended as full racing machines and as such came with no road-going equipment. The engine internals and components were vastly different from any road-based Ducati, using a variety of light-weight, high-strength materials making them extremely expensive to purchase, run and maintain. The RS came with a 54 mm exhaust system and a slightly smaller size and gauge of Chromoly tubing was used on the frame to reduce weight even further.

This particular bike was campaigned in Southern California in the AMA Pro Thunder series back in the day. Sadly, in the early 2000’s, the owner of the bike passed while racing an SV650. The ‘RS sat unused for several years until GP Motorcycles in San Diego was tasked with making it ready for sale on behalf of the former owner’s family. It was purchased by our customer in 2007 as a local track day toy. He immediately shipped it to Mark Sutton at the DucShop in the Atlanta area for a freshen-up. They found the motor to be a bit tired so it was decided to build an 853cc trackday weapon out of the ‘RS motor. No expense was spared in order to create one serious package, we have full build receipts as well. . $6500 later it was shipped back to Seattle and has been in storage here ever since. Sadly never making its way back to the track. The only use the bike has seen since then was on the dyno and around the DucShop parking lot. There were some upgrades performed along the way, the previous owner upgraded the bike with an even larger kit radiator from a 996RS and the longer magnesium swingarm. Along with Superbike spec Marchesini magnesium wheels with a 16.5″, we also have a new 17″ in a box available for sale.. Also if someone is serious about tracking this bike, there is a 2nd fresh 748RS crate motor available as well, it too was completely gone through and broken in at DucShop.

Sold with Bill of Sale only

No Financing options available on this one

Credits cards accepted.
Up to $150.00 documentation fee may be charged.

Seattle Used Bikes4905 Aurora Ave N.
Seattle, WA 98103
dave@seattleusedbikes.comClosed Sun/Mon Find us on Facebook and the Web

If you wanna go truly fast, the same money will buy you a next-to-new Yamaha R1. But that would miss the point, and the glory of owning such a focused weapon. The bike will require the attention that only true thoroughbreds do, with new valves a necessity every 750 miles or so. Helpfully, this bike is available with a spare 748RS engine (but is not included), which should at least allow you to rotate mills at rebuild time.

The price for all this 748RS is just $14,000, spare 748RS not included. If you have the means, we'd highly recommend contacting Dave before it's too late.

Featured Listing: 2000 Ducati 748RS track bike
Featured Listing January 2, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2005 Honda RC51 SP2

Update 1.2.2019: Brent has renewed his Featured Listing for this RC51. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

The Honda RC51 got right to the point when it came out, knocking Ducati and the other Japanese brands off their seats at the top of the World Superbike grid beneath future MotoGP star Colin Edwards. To do it, they had taken a page from the Italians' book, relying on rules that let v-twins have 1,000ccs to take it to the 916 and 998. It won the title again in 2002, and accomplished the same feat in AMA Superbike with the peerless Nicky Hayden.

The RC51 did it all with reliability, aplomb and majestic build quality -- the only way Honda knows. It was a death blow to Suzuki's wayward TL1000R, which never really hit its stride as either a street or race bike, and it showed the Italians that mechanical sex can also be totally reliable. The critical numbers from the throaty, snarling v-twin are: 130-ish horsepower at the crank, and the better part of 165 mph on the big end.

This 2005 Honda RC51 looks incredible, wearing the pretty charcoal fairings of the later bikes, and blessed with the SP2's updated fueling system, which nixed spotty low-end fuel delivery from the SP1 machines. It has done just 5,000 miles, and wears a Sato titanium exhaust system and a custom-tuned Power Commander.

From the seller:

The RC is #189 and tastefully
modified with all original equipment mint and in my possession . The bike has under 5500 miles and has less than 1000 miles on the latest Q3+ Dunlop’s . Sato Banzai titanium exhaust, Kyle Racing tuned power commander and tail tuck kit.

The bike has never been down or repaired in any way. Spark plugs have been replaced at 4000 miles. Meticulously maintained. I am second owner . Have owned for last 1500 miles. Bike is is in top shelf working condition and needs nothing. Bike was built as is from zero miles . Has gear adjustment and speedo correction performed as well. As previously stated I never intended on selling but the 2017 CBR1000RR SP2 is on the menu. Although I haven’t completely convinced myself that it is a true legacy bike.

Brent, the seller of this magnificent beast, is asking $10,000 and can be reached at 405-613-7607.

Featured Listing: 2005 Honda RC51 SP2
Sport Bikes For Sale December 21, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1990 Yamaha FZR750R OW01

There was a time in the late 1980s when you could wander into your local powersports dealer and, if you planned properly, walk away with a bike so close to the WSBK kit that could scarcely be ridden on the street. The 1990 Yamaha OW01 was one such bike, crafted to homologate Yamaha's efforts to beat Honda at the World Superbike game, and released to the hands of the unwashed and under-insured with a handshake and a stiff monthly payment.

Where Honda used its might to build the RC30 from scratch, Yamaha made its bones by lightening, strengthening and adding go bits to the FZR750. The Deltabox frame on the OW is hand-welded and unanodized, and held off the ground by a nearly full-race suspension, including an Ohlins rear shock. The bikes also had titanium connecting rods pushing two-ring pistons. The cylinders were fed by five-valve heads breathing through a rack of flatslide carbs. Exhaust was kept manageable on the street and screaming at the track with an Exup valve. The trick engine meant peaky delivery, a voracious appetite for oil and slim maintenance intervals.

This one has been kept stock, ridden mostly on the street and has covered 9,000 miles. You wouldn't know it to look at it. From the seller:

1990 Yamaha OW01 FZR750R. 9800 miles, (15k in Kilometers). Completely stock. Arizona titled and plated. This bike has seen most of its miles on the street and a few track days early in its life. Never damaged, all original paint and body pieces. If you know bikes, you know these are extremely rare. Looking for a good home for this unicorn. Located in Sunny,Dry, Arizona for the last 27 years. It’s Christmas. How good have you been?

The asking price for this gorgeous piece of superbike history is $25,000. It might not have the track record of its rival from Honda, but the OW01 is a serious piece of kit to this day, and as RC30 values push the stratosphere, the OW is sure to be close behind.

Contact Dave with our interest by email (Realexotica1@gmail.com) or cell phone: (520)977-4541

Featured Listing: 1990 Yamaha FZR750R OW01