Posts by tag: World SuperBike

Honda May 30, 2019 posted by

Time capsule superbike: 2003 Honda RC-51

The Honda RC-51 was Big Red’s answer to Ducati’s twin-powered attack on turn-of-the-century World Superbike, with a big v-twin stuffed between the generous alloy framerails. The big-bore twin immediately paid off for Honda, with Colin Edwards cracking off to the 2000 World Superbike Championship on the bike’s first try. It won the WSBK crown again in 2002 with Edwards and took the AMA Superbike Championship the same year with Nicky Hayden.

2003 Honda RC-51 for sale on eBay

This 2003 Honda RC-51 is an SP2 model, meaning it is stiffer, lighter and slightly more powerful than the 2000-2001 models, and easily the more desirable version. It’s not too hard to find an RC-51 in decent shape these days, as they didn’t sell in astounding numbers and tended to go to Honda and superbike fanbois who took excellent care of them. This one takes that to a new level, though, with fewer than 1,000 miles on the clock courtesy of two previous owners.

According to the seller, the first owner was an elderly man who bought the bike to hold on to. The current owner bought it three years ago, and has since brought it back to running condition, though he stopped short of replacing the original tires or brake fluid. The bike certainly deserves to be ridden, though that choice will not be made easier by the prospect of disturbing an all-original machine.

From the seller:

This is a true unicorn, I’m curious how many are out there with less than 1,000 miles! The bike is completely free from corrosion, it was stored in a climate controlled garage. She has never seen the track and the finish is in amazing condition. The original factory torque markings are still found throughout the bike as well as the factory grease on the brake and clutch levers!

I purchased this RC51 out of an elderly gentleman’s collection earlier this year. He was the original owner and used the bike very sparingly and gently as indicated by the odometer and it’s condition. The RC was prepped for storage and sat for about 3 years before I brought it back to life. The gas was swapped and a new fuel pressure regulator was needed to get her running again. The bike has just received a fresh oil change as well. She is now running beautifully and everything works flawlessly as it should.

This bike is currently collector status with the original date-coded Metzler tires. The brake fluid and coolant is original as well. I think it would be taboo to ride this bike considering it’s condition and mileage. However, if you intend to use the bike, the buyer should replace the brake fluid and tires (17 year old tires and fluids, even if they look good are unsafe)

Please take a close look at all the pictures. There is little evidence that this bike has been used. There is a tiny flaw on the left side exhaust that is barely noticeable, see photos for a close up. Auction includes original rear seat, solo cowl cover and also the original tool kit with all the tools and owners manual.

I highly recommend we use “Haul Bikes” if you are an interstate buyer. I’ve used them twice before and they are super professional.

I will ship worldwide but if you are an international buyer, please contact me before purchasing and research your shipping logistics. The bike is in San Diego CA 92101. Cash in person, Wire transfer or Cashiers check from a national bank is preferred.

Though RC-51s don’t carry the same ooh-ahh aura as the RC-30 and RC-45, they were aimed at the same target and were, without question, successful. The bikes might carry the same panache as their Italian rivals, but they are gorgeous, fast and ridiculously capable.

 

Time capsule superbike: 2003 Honda RC-51
Benelli May 23, 2019 posted by

Across the Pond: 2003 Benelli Tre Novacento for Sale

It’s always interesting to see the disparity in terms of bike values, depending on market. It seems like you can make a decent living, finding bikes where they are cheap and plentiful, and shipping them to places where they ain’t… In Japan, the 250cc two-stroke sportbikes of the 80s and 90s are relatively cheap, although they obviously have an enthusiastic following. Here in the USA? They were never officially imported and, until certain models recently cleared the 25-year import restrictions, were extremely rare. I haven’t looked recently, but many classic Laverda models are much less expensive in Europe than here as well. Looking at the £3,650.00 asking price for this very cool Benelli Tre Novocentro, it looks like the same holds true for these stylish and quirky machines, since that works out to just $4,623.00 in US currency.

Obviously, the Tornado has rarity going for it, along with distinctive Italian looks. But it’s also a pretty functional motorcycle, with a solid 140hp from the 898cc three cylinder, good handling, and quality braking and suspension components. A six-speed cassette-style gearbox is probably overkill on a roadbike, but the slipper-clutch with an adjustable engagement point is pretty cool, as is the frame that’s glued-together using aerospace-grade adhesives. It lacks the radial-mount calipers and eyeball-flattening power of today’s fastest bikes, but these have more than enough performance to keep even expert riders entertained.

I’d take great pains to stay in front of other riders, to keep them confused looking up the tail of the Tre to see bright yellow cooling fans under the tail. With the underseat-mounted radiator, the engine could be mounted further forward in the frame for better handling. Parts are likely the biggest issue for any Benelli, although there were some minor issues with reliability, as you’d expect from a brand-new, low-production, high-performance Italian sportbike. Nothing that can’t be handled by the patient owner, but still a headache if you’re not prepared.

So what happened? Why wasn’t the revitalized brand a bigger success? Well partly it was the unknown of a newly-reborn brand flogging an expensive, top-shelf sportbike. But the bike’s original 900cc displacement was meant to allow it to be homologated for racing, and the bike was a victim of changing World Superbike rules that basically made 900cc triples obsolete, since the bike would have been uncompetitive in it’s original form. Later machines bumped displacement to over 1100cc, but that just made it a more effective roadbike as it was too large to race.

From the original UK eBay listing: 2003 Benelli Tornado Tre Novocentro for Sale

Here we have my truly iconic Benelli Tornado TRE 900                                                                       

These bikes made quite a stir back in the day – for some good and some bad unfortunately but now when you have one with all the modified bits dealt with and niggles ironed out they truly are an absolute brilliant thing to be out on when the sun comes out… My example is as expected – equipped with what was back then some top notch equipment and even by today’s standards it’s still quite trick 

The engine has had the cam chain replaced (June 2018) before the manuals suggest as this is very important – also the valve clearances done then too as these engines naturally sound tappety. The infamous recall mods – Z25 gear on the alternator shaft and clutch bolt all inspected and are fine. The suspension and brakes are from the best makes along with a titanium Arrow exhaust system – all original equipment…

The bike is in what’s arguably the best colour scheme of silver and green with black accents here/there and of course the rear yellow under seat fans. These bikes are really something else and the triple cylinder 900cc engine loves to be used – the sound up the revs is amazing and just puts a smile on my face EVERY TIME I take it out. The bike is 100% mechanically spot on – does everything expected of it and needs nothing doing. Please do all your research required online as these bikes were all made 2003-2004 so don’t be fooled by the late registered bikes for sale as they are all the same! 

Factory fitted alarm/immobiliser.

MOT until sept 2019 – only 16k miles…

I have documents – manuals – keys – history – receipts – V5 

The honesty part… The bike has a small crack along side the r/h front indicator as per pics due to being pushed into something in my garage and the tail unit has some mark where an item fell onto it… Neither are of any issue but want to point out faults also… My cars/bikes are only being sold due to an impending house move this summer and I need to downsize somewhat so please only genuine interest is wanted as were always busy.

Thanks for looking.

As stated before, the price is shockingly reasonable for a bit of functional Italian exotica, although maybe that’s considered expensive on the other side of the Atlantic? The 16,000 miles aren’t all that low, but the bike appears to have had considerate ownership by a knowledgeable enthusiast, and my understanding is that these Benellis are pretty robust mechanically, once you get your head around some of the unconventional engineering and idiosyncrasies. Parts availability would be the big unknown here, and I’d expect OEM bodywork to be nearly unobtainable. If there are any owners out there, we’d love to hear about your experiences in the comments!

-tad

Across the Pond: 2003 Benelli Tre Novacento for Sale
Yamaha May 22, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR1000

Update 5.22.2019: This minty FZR1000 is back on eBay with a starting bid of $5k and NO RESERVE! Parts are now available separately for purachse. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

This 1987 Yamaha FZR1000 is what we’re all about. It is, at this point, rare, it set the industry on its ear when it hit the streets, it’s the textbook diagram of a sportbike and we want it. Badly. We’d wager a fair penny that you do, too. When Yamaha unleashed these in 1987, they joined the growing ranks of bikes from the Japanese manufacturers that would come to define the segment. Suzuki had the GSXR, Honda had the Hurricanes and Yamaha had the FZR1000.

1987 Yamaha FZR1000 for sale on eBay

With five valves per cylinder, water cooling and an astronomical 135 horsepower, though, the Yamaha stood apart. Like the Honda CBR900RR did six years later, it combined a svelte frame with prodigious power and grip to incredible effect. They’d hit 60 in around three seconds and go on to a top end of about 160 mph. At the end of the 1980s, Cycle World dubbed them Bike of the Decade.

As you can see, this one has few flies on it. It’s a two-owner machine with under 5,000 miles on it and most of its original parts intact. The seat and windscreen are aftermarket, but the original seat is included in the sale. The paint appears to have few, if any, blemishes and the original fairings are in great shape. Tired of taking our word for it? Check out the seller’s detailed rundown in the eBay listing:

Bike comes with $1k in NOS + few used parts! Bid with confidence!!! Click for two video links to hear the bike run: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Olpfe0GYss&t=23s

Click for additional photos of the bike and all parts that go with it.

https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipO9YuIdNxiIWcSczGr44Pf9F2LzNnljEOowgr0C-B8P99l9QqPv7U-xH5w5amQi6g?key=Y3R0TWVIMnVyb0lndXhFQXJmRUluZkhNd0Q2cl93

Up for sale is this rare, iconic 1987 Yamaha FZR1000 with 4,700 original 2-owner miles. This motorcycle is incredibly period-correct, sporting all its original plastics and paint, and even exhaust system! The only aftermarket/non-original components I have found are the smoked windscreen, windscreen fasteners and Corbin seat (bike comes with original black seat). When I purchased the bike in February 2018, it had been in a private collection as one of the cleanest, lowest-mile, first-year FZR1000 in the world. And from the photos and video hearing it run, it’s easy to see why!

The ’87 FZR1000 was truly groundbreaking motorcycle, with Cycle Guide naming it “The Fastest Streetbike in the World”, due to the bike’s legendary, bulletproof 20-value Genesis engine delivering massive amounts of power from the lowest RPMs to its 11,500 redline. Yamaha’s 998cc 20-valve inline four is one of the most reliable powerplants Yamaha ever assembled (valve adjustments every 26k!), with the engine just beginning to scream at 7,000 RPMs, force fed by factory ram-air induction plumbed through dual openings in the front of the fairing, adding to the bike’s power at speed.

One of the greatest characteristics of this particular FZR is its extreme light weight and maneuverability, making it a blast to handle around town or throttle and lean through the twistees. It’s ground-breaking Deltabox frame makes the bike an extremely rigid, solid and secure machine to ride. Unlike many modern sportbikes that require you to perch on top, this FZR is super comfortable and allow you to become one with the motorcycle with little effort.

The story:

I’m no stranger to these vintage Yamaha sportbikes, owning an ’85 FZ750 followed by an ’88 FZR1000 back in the day (30+ years ago) when these were new. And this particular ’87 FZR1000 is so much better balanced and more powerful than any FZR I’ve ever ridden.

I purchased this FZR a little more than a year ago when it had 4,300 original miles, when I signed the original title from the original owner (who purchased the bike new in 1988), transferring the FZR1000 into my name last year. At some point the original owner sold the bike to a collector, who had the bike in a private collection for several years without ever transferring the title. It was then sold to a motorcycle shop managed by a former Yamaha mechanic and FZR expert, who spent many hours and dollars on NOS parts refreshing the bike’s mechanical, braking and cooling systems prior to me purchasing the bike. And that’s when I came into the picture and snapped her up. Without a shadow of a doubt, after seeing and riding this FZR for the first time was love at first sight for me (and will, no doubt, be for you as well).

I spent the last year having a blast rounding up NOS parts, some super rare, for this motorcycle. Fast forward 12 months and 400 easy/careful miles later, and I’m now offering the bike and all the NOS parts up for sale for another person to fall in love with and ride, or better yet, to complete a collection with a highly original, beautiful low-mile bike that you’ll be set up to own and service for many years to come.

The ONLY reason I’m selling is another bike caught my eye and is now in the garage – and don’t have the room to keep three bikes. Plus, I don’t ride the FZR much as to not add too many miles to it. However, YOU sure could, as this FZR is a dream and better than you remember they were back in the day.

What you’re getting:

(Note: The RH hand grip / throttle end cap is not in place in the video; I didn’t realize it had come off and is now back on the bike. I took a few new pix the morning of 3/10 in the same spot in the driveway with the RH throttle end cap back in place.)

1987’s fastest streetbike in the world and the first of a nearly 10-year run of FZR100s; a bike with nearly the same powerplant and transmission as the ’97 YZF1000R “Thunderace” (which I also own!) and the predecessor to the infamous Yamaha R1 that debuted in 1998.
Starts flawlessly every time and reaches/maintains operating temperature as she should, pulling hard toward the 11,500 RPM redline from any RPM and in any gear. Smooth, constant/linear power delivery results in a bike that absolutely files from a dead stop and from any gear.
Idles and runs down the road like a sewing machine. And there are none of the lags, EXUP valve “chirping” or failures as with the later EXUP-valved FZR1000 models.
Fantastic bike in every way – looks, operating, riding. This machine feels like a new bike due to the low miles.
This bike is inspiring to ride, and is much better than you might expect for a 32-year-old sportbike.
Original plastics and paint (with zero evidence of the bike ever having been down)
All service is up to date; all fluids have been changed (brake, clutch, coolant); oil and filter
New front fork seals and fork oil
Front brake calipers freshened with new seals internally
Front master cylinder has been rebuilt with NOS parts
Clutch master cylinder has new NOS seals internally
New NOS Thermo Switch assembly (#3LN-82560-01) installed
New NOS temp gauge #2GH-83590-00 installed (used original gauge and packaging provided)
Clutch slave cylinder replaced with an NOS unit
New Yuasa sealed battery less than three months old
Main fuel petcock disassembled and refreshed with a new o-ring (solving a fuel drip)
Original exhaust
Bike passed Texas inspection two weeks ago (all lights, signals, horn work flawlessly)
No coolant, oil, fork, or brake fluid leaks
Needs nothing (zero issues with this bike (e.g., does not pop out of gear on hard acceleration, strong clutch lever and grip, does not use or drip oil, etc.)
New (less than 400 miles ridden) Michelin Sport Pilot 3 tires (120/70-17 front and 160/60-18 rear
Wheel bearings checked during tire install
Both cooling fans come up when bike reaches proper temperature; she does not overheat in the Texas summers
Super strong, confident brakes
Firm, sporty suspension feels as it should on uneven road surfaces, road imperfections, etc.
Has only been fed non-ethanol fuel for the past year + Sta-bill additive = zero carb. issues (I don’t run ethanol-blended fuel in either of my bikes)
Comes with a period-correct Corbin seat that matches the ’87-88 red/white/blue paint scheme (in addition to original black seat)
All original fasteners used on bike with the exception of the windscreen attaching hardware
Comes with $1000+ in spare parts (see list below) to allow you to run/maintain the bike for many years to come!
Two original ignition keys come with the bike
·

The flaws

Overall condition is very good for its age, but it is not absolutely perfect. The right fairing (next to the air scoop) has a crack from shipping to Dallas (as shown in the photos). Also, there is a crack in the edge of the RH cowl (next to the mirror). This the only actual damage on the machine and did not even happen while riding.
Some light scuffing and marring in the original plastic (as shown in photos). I bunched all pix of the scuffs/cracks in the google image link here: https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipO9YuIdNxiIWcSczGr44Pf9F2LzNnljEOowgr0C-B8P99l9QqPv7U-xH5w5amQi6g?key=Y3R0TWVIMnVyb0lndXhFQXJmRUluZkhNd0Q2cl93

Parts (new/NOS and used) that come with the bike:

(1) NOS emulsion tube (carburetor) #1AE-14141-90-00.
(8) emulsion tubes (Japanese made) 1AE-14141-90-00
(1) NOS FUEL COCK ASS’Y (under tank) # 2GH-24510-01
(1) used FUEL VALVE PETCOCK (main; LH side of bike)
(1) NOS Flasher (fuel pump) Relay #41R-83350-71-00
(6) NOS #36Y-13441-00 OEM oil filter elements
(5) NOS Yamaha O-RING Oil Pump, Cyl Head, Chain (oil filter bolt o-ring) #93210-16629
(4) NOS Plate Washer 90201-21608-00 (washer next to oil filter)
(2) NOS oil filter O-Ring #93210-87723-00
(1) NOS Rear Sprocket 47 tooth 2GH-25447-22-00
(1) NOS front sprocket 16 tooth #2GH-17460-00-00
(1) NOS DID Drive Chain DID532ZLV-110 X-Ring
(2) NOS sets of front brake pads 2GH-W0045-01
(1) NOS Radiator Hose [long hose under radiator to water pump] #2GH-12578-00-00 HOSE 3 + (1) used spare house
(1) NOS Radiator hose [short 90 degree hose under thermostat housing to top of radiator] #GH-12577-00 + (1) used spare house
(4) used radiator hoses (4 total radiator hose – upper (small) 2GH-12577-00-00, radiator hose out of thermostat (larger molded) 2GH-12576-00-00, lower hose 2GH-12579-00-00, lower hose 2GH-12578-00-00)
(2) used radiator hoses 2GH-12577-00 + 2GH-12576-00 [long hose out of the top of the thermostat housing to the cylinder pipe] and (1) thermostat housing, thermo switch and cap
(1) NOS Clutch lever #1AE-83912-00
(1) NOS Brake lever 36Y-83922-00
(1) NOS throttle cable 1 #2gh-26311-00-00
(1) NOS throttle cable 2 #2GH-26312-00-00 US
(2) OEM Assembly Manual FZR1000T/TC FZR750RT
(1) OEM FZR750/1000 Service Manual
(1) Owners Owner’s Manual 1987 Yamaha FZR1000T FZR1000 T
· Please review the photos and videos in the listing and hyperlinked within. Serious bidders may contact me at 214-289-sixtwo98 to answer any questions. I am offering this as a no-reserve auction, with all parts listed with the bike (over $1,000.00 worth). I’m selling this bike “as-is” with no refunds or warranty. However, in my honest opinion, this bikes needs nothing. A $250 non-refundable deposit is due via paypal within 24 hrs of the auction end. Winning bidder can pick up the bike in Dallas, Texas. If you need a transport company, I’d highly recommend www.keyboardmotorcycleshipping.com/ ($625 door to door across the U.S.- they are GREAT!) Good luck bidding and don’t let this one get away! It’s perhaps one of the nicest examples of an original, un-molested FZR1000 in the world.

The starting bid is roughly the price of a middling used Honda, so if you’re looking for a new mount for the 2019 season, look no further.

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR1000
Honda May 9, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1995 Honda RC45

Gary in Utah has several bikes Featured on RSBFS right now. Check them out too:

Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Our friend Gary in Utah is back, and he’s picking right up where we left him — offering up a slew of recently acquired, maniacally clean sport bikes, even after he has sold so many through this site. Today, we’re ecstatic to feature his nearly-flawless and totally de-restricted 1995 Honda RC45. If you’re coming up short on the RC45, allow me to remind you.

The bike was the mid-1990s update to the highly successful and much loved Honda RC30, which by ’94 was starting to lose a step to its rivals. Honda needed something new and equally mean to regain World Superbike Glory, and the RC45 was born. They built 200 in 1994 for homologation purposes, and a few more over the next five years or so. The bikes immediately went out and swept the Formula One TT and the Senior TT at the Isle of Man. They remained dominant until the end of the decade.

The bike took the World Superbike Championship in 1997, and the AMA Superbike titles in ’95 and ’98, and a Daytona 200 win in ’96. Carl Fogarty, John Kocinski, Miguel Duhamel, Colin Edwards and Joey Dunlop all made their presence felt aboard the svelte V4. The engine was revised from the RC30, with more piston rings, a bigger bore and shorter stroke, revised heads and fuel injection.

Gary’s bike has done just over 10,000 miles, which means it has been thoroughly enjoyed, but you wouldn’t know it to look at it. It has all of three blemishes, despite its age and mileage. As with everything Gary sends us, there are no flies on it whatsoever.

From the seller:

1995 Honda RVF750 RC45 with 10,392 miles. It is a full power model. I bought it from the original owner in Japan that reverse imported it. He bought it new. Bike runs and idles like new. All maintenance performed by Honda dealer according to schedule. Bike will be sold with new fluids. All fairings are 100% genuine Honda OEM. Bike has been cherished and it shows. The owner said the bike has never seen the rain, never crashed and never on it’s side. Frame protectors have been installed when new and luckily never used, lol. Bike is mint condition with no rust and very little oxidation present. The bike is in original unrestored condition. The only flaws I can find on the bike is a small rub on the right side lower fairing and two pin head size touch up paint on the gas tank. Rear cowling, upper cowling and left lower look mint. Bike comes with original unused tool kit, two Honda RC45 factory manuals, factory stand and two original keys. Bike will come with Utah state title and is titled as a street bike for road use. Pictures of above mentioned flaws to follow. I’d like to see $48,500 or best offer for this example. Feel free to contact me at (801) 358-6537 or by email: rmurangemasters@aol.com

Gary

These bikes have never been cheap, fetching $27,000 when new, or about what a Ducati 916 SPS brought. But they remain special, they aren’t making any more of them, and there is little better way to celebrate the golden age of roadracing than to stick one of these in your garage.

Featured Listing: 1995 Honda RC45
Ducati May 6, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1998 Ducati 916SPS

Update 5.10.2019: SOLD IN 4 DAYS! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

In the heady days of the late-1990s, people were buying sportbikes left, right and center and roadracing was so popular that there were two all-in series in the U.S. alone. If you couldn’t get a superbike ride in AMA, you could turn your attention to the madness that was Formula USA for another shot.

For bike buyers, that meant not only was there an endless variety of nearly race-ready machines coming out of Japan and Europe in small batches, but manufacturers had an incentive to update them every couple years to stay competitive. Enter, the 1998 Ducati 916 SPS.

When the ever-evolving Ducati 916 SP reached its pinnacle in 1997, with bores so large the barrels were prone to stress cracks, Bologna added stouter cases, to punch the mill out to a 996 and Ducati 916 SPS was born. The trick SP forks, Ohlins rear shock, Brembo wheels and lightened frame carried over from the SP. With the standard set of race-only Termignoni cans, the bike made somewhere north of 125 horsepower. The exact figure varies with who you ask.

This 1998 Ducati 916 SPS is about as nice an example as you could ask for, though it is much better suited at this point to a museum. Number 853 in the production run, it appears to have all its original parts intact, down to the chain and tires.

From the seller:

1998 Ducati 916SPS
Up for sale from my collection is a rare low mileage Ducati 916SPS. Moving forward with higher specification of the 916. In 1997 Ducati introduced the 916 SPS to replace the 916 SP.
If not familiar with rarity and performance of the 916SPS, please read the article by Odd Bike. https://www.odd-bike.com/2013/02/ducati-916-spsps-ultimate-
desmoquattro_18.html
Of the 916SPS produced this is the last model year! The SPS was a homologated model so that Ducati could stay competitive with rule changes. In addition to many motor upgrade and changes, the 1998 model featured the following upgrades over the 1997 model. Newer lighter frame, Ohlin adjustable steering damper. updated brake calipers and Titanium connecting rods now standard equipment. This bike was purchased and imported by me from Centre Hamel Honda Montreal in 2014. I’m familiar with the fact that Ducati never sent the 916SPS to the U.S as a road going bike, but for race purposes only after signing a waiver, however upon registering the bike I received a clean Washington State title that allows the next owner to road or track the bike as they choose. The bike has very low miles on it and is in like new condition. I collect bikes for investment and do not ride them. Yes, the guy you love to hate
until your looking for that low mileage, rare, unmodified bike of your dreams.
With just 123 miles showing on the odometer, other than a scratch behind the steering damper (shown in pictures), the bike is like new! No modifications, no aftermarket parts. When the bike was with such low miles, it did not require and service work. Since the bike has been sitting in my collection since purchased, preventative maintenance service would be recommended before riding. Bike comes with the original tool kit, keys and manual.

916SPS were rare and special when new, and are becoming increasingly harder to find in original condition. This 916 SPS is truly a collectable, museum quality piece!

Since it’s been so well maintained despite being dormant, the options for this one are nearly endless. Throw some tires at it and make a (very) occasional cruise night hero or race weekend campsite candy. Or throw it on a piece of carpet in your living room and never worry about a TV subscription again.

Featured Listing: 1998 Ducati 916SPS
Yamaha May 5, 2019 posted by

M is for More: 2015 Yamaha R1M

As we speak, four-time World Superbike champ Jonathan Rea is throwing an unholy hissy fit over the spec of the 2019 Ducati Panigale V4R that Alvaro Bautista is using to convincingly pinch the crown that has become all but a foregone conclusion for him. The reason for the mud slinging is the big Ducati’s world-beating tech and eye-watering price tag. It’s not attainable for the average human, Rea argues, so it’s not exactly a fair fight.

2015 Yamaha R1M for sale on eBay

There may be some merit to that when you look at bikes such as this 2015 Yamaha R1M. When it broke cover as the tuning fork’s baddest offering in 2015, it carried a raft of tech and sexiness that was unheard of at its $21,000 pricepoint. Four years on, that cost has gone up a little, but the bike is no less astonishing now. It packs carbon fiber bodywork, a smartphone-controlled onboard computer (dial in suspension settings from your phone) and a 200-section rear tire. Not bad, considering it still goes for just over half of the R’s ask.

This 2015 Yamaha R1M has done just 4,000 miles and is in immaculate condition. It has a computer chip and a Graves can, but is otherwise stock. Fresh-looking Michelins have replaced the sticky original Bridgestones. There’s a lot of life left, but this bike for sure deserves a more aggressive set of meats.

From the eBay listing:

LIKE NEW!! -2015 YAMAHA R1-M
4377.8 ORIGINAL MILES WITH CHIP AND PIPE!
There’s really nothing else to say, the bike is super clean with receipts of the work done.
After payment we can assist your shipper loading or stop by, pick it up and ride away!
Don’t postpone joy, blow minds at the bike blessing or on the track next weekend!
BID WITH CONFIDENCE!

The reserve hasn’t been met at $13,800, which is still a deal for what this bike is. With the tasteful mods and just 4,000 miles under its belt, this might be the neatest way to get ahold of what is a truly mad street bike.

M is for More: 2015 Yamaha R1M
Ducati April 27, 2019 posted by

Good Things In Small Packages: 2004 Ducati 749R for Sale

With the general level of competence from modern sportbikes, along with rules that don’t seem to favor limited-production homologation bikes, it’s easy to forget just how special some of them are. Bikes like the Yamaha OW01 might have looked nearly identical to the regular production machines from ten feet, but were often hand-built to a much higher quality, with high-performance engine internals, hand-welded frames, and other small changes that were intended to help the bikes perform in production-based racing clases. Ducati’s 749R is one such machine, and its superficial similarity to the regular production 749 and 749S belies just how much of a hot rod it was.

Not to say that the 749S wasn’t a good motorcycle. It was, and carried on Ducati’s less is more trend that started with their sweet-handling 748 that had just the right amount of power and superior agility, compared to the bigger 916/996/998. Much of that was down to the narrower 180-section rear tire, but it was a bit lighter as well, and the 916’s midrange torque made the bike faster than it looked on paper and race versions like the SPS could be a bit overwhelming.

Why was the 749R so trick? Well it was out of necessity: the 999 competed in various Superbike championships that generally allowed a degree of latitude in modifying the road platform for racing. The smaller 749 was destined for World Supersport against 600cc inline fours. Intended as a much more entry-level class, the rules were very strict to keep costs carefully controlled and allowed very limited modifications: even OEM wheels were required!

Basically, in WSS, if you wanted it on your racebike, you pretty much needed it on your roadbike. And to compete in terms of power output with a grid full of screaming fours, Ducati had to throw the whole catalog of performance updates at the 749R. Built between 2003 and 2006, the 749R had bigger valves made of titanium, high-compression pistons, a lightweight crank, and magnesium cam covers. Bore was up from 90 to 94mm and stroke was down to 56 from 71mm for a total of 749.5cc, with power climbing from 108hp to an eye-opening 121hp, although it’s obviously going to cost a bit more to service.

As you’d expect, suspension was top of the line Öhlins at both ends, and radial Brembo brakes offered the best available stopping power and feel. A slipper clutch was included for rapid downshifts free of drama and the bike uses a double-sided swingarm patterned after the World Superbike 999’s stiff, lightweight unit. Other details included a set of lightweight Marchesini wheels, an adjustable steering head, and carbon-fiber bodywork on the early bikes. All were solo-seat models, and so had adjustable ergonomics. But the R had a smaller range of adjustments, as the larger-diameter race exhaust took up some of the available space and, as previously mentioned, rules specified very minimal changes to the roadbikes, so the roadbike subframe needed to match the racebike’s.

From the original eBay listing: 2004 Ducati 749R for Sale

This is your chance to have one of the ultra limited collectible Ducati Superbikes for a fraction of what it cost new.
The bike is a 2004 Ducati 749R. Only 2348 miles
Almost all original including the stock tires. If you want to ride the bike you will need to replace the tires.
I just had the belts and fluids changed from a Ducati Master Tech. Bike has a new battery. Bike hasn’t been used at all since service was done. I only changed everything to make sure nothing would be needed other than tires if someone wanted to ride bike.
One small blemish on left lower fairing that has been touched up so really hard to see in photos but is there. Could easily be repaired and bike would show nearly perfect. Rear swing arm has small flaws from rear stand rubbing on black paint. The seat is doing the normal thing where the cover sticks to the base and looks a little weird. Normal on this generation of Superbikes.
Bike has no owners manual.
Has red key and one black key

There’s an $8,500 starting bid with no takers yet and plenty of time left on the auction. The 749/999 may be the least desirable Ducati superbikes, but they’re still Ducati superbikes, with all the performance, heritage, and style you would expect, and the 749R is one of the most collectible versions. This example looks bone-stock and very clean, with less than 2,400 miles on it. These were pretty trick bikes, straight from the factory, and would probably cost a small fortune to duplicate if you planned to build your own, so why not just pick this up, and save yourself the trouble?

-tad

Good Things In Small Packages: 2004 Ducati 749R for Sale
Ducati April 25, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1992 Ducati 851 Strada

Update 4.27.2019: Sold in just two days to an RSBFS reader. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

The Ducati 851 is the father of modern Ducatis, from the world-changing 916 to the astonishing Panigale V4R. Without this boxy, lithe very red machine, those bikes would not be. The 851 arrived in 1987, with a very hopped up version of Ducati’s venerated Pantah engine. The air-cooled 90-degree, two-valve twin in the Pantah was updated with liquid cooling, four-valve heads and fuel injection for the 851, and Ducati shot back to the top of racing leaderboards.

Spitting out 93 horsepower and gobs of torque in a 430-pound chassis, the 851 was a statement that Ducati could use its agricultural engine tech to devastating effect. In 1990, the bike took home the World Superbike title, among a raft of other accolades over its five-year run.

This 1992 Ducati 851 Strada is from the last year before the 888 broke cover, and it has been kept largely unridden in a climate-controlled storage facility. Though it hasn’t crossed 3,000 miles since it was purchased as a leftover in 1995, all the major services have been done on a strict interval. Aside from the Fast by Feracci carbon cans, it is a stock machine.

From the seller:

This is a rare find, super low miles, Ducati 851 Superbike. This bike was purchased used from Bellevue Suzuki Ducati in 1995, at the time it was under 1000 miles on the clock. It has not seen much more use by its current owner as it was purchased to round out the collection of Ducati Superbikes, the 851/888/916. All three bikes have remained in owners collection until recently when he let the 888 go up for sale. Now we have been asked to find proper homes for the 851 and 916 still in his possession. Both the 851 and 916 have been kept serviced and stored in a heated shop/garage space. Run from time to time, oil changed and belts replaced at regular intervals. Other than the ever popular Fast by Ferracci carbon exhaust and a tank protector this beauty is all original. Ducati 851’s rarely come up for sale as it is, let alone one as clean as this one. Hurry, it will not last long. We have it scheduled for complete safety inspection and a 2-year service which will include oil, filter, hydraulics, coolant along with new timing belts. The owner has kindly provided some service records as well. It does have a clear WA title, all original keys and manuals included.

Here is some of the early press about these;

Ducati came of age in the late 80s, using ideas that the Far East thought as antiquated and as such not worth pursuing, the Italians enjoyed staggering race successes, and with it many sales to the public, motorcycling hasn’t been quite the same since. Chris Pearson samples the bike at the beginning of it all

Based upon the 1978 Pantah bottom end, the design was the first real modern day Ducati Superbike and successfully bridged the gap until the arrival of the 916 some seven years later. The first sight of the all-new Ducati road bike was caught at the Milan show in the autumn of 1987 although the prototype race bikes had provided more than their fair share of clues and insights into what was waiting just around the corner. Developed as a direct descendant of the Daytona winning twin from 1987, the production version of the 851 differed little from that prototype race machine. Ducati’s intentions for the new model were clear from the outset being offered in both Strada (road going) and Kit (race track) specification, for those wishing to put their 851’s directly on to the track. 200 examples of the latter were hurriedly assembled to satisfy the homologation required for the inaugural 1988 World Superbike championship, a roadster based race series that Ducati were more than keen to be a part of.

The basis of the 1987 spec Ducati 851 lived on until the end of 1993, gradually growing in capacity up to the 888cc model of 1992, proving so dominant on the rack that the planned update, the iconic 916 series, was held over for more than a year finally making its debut towards the end of 93 ready for its full onslaught in 1994.

Credits cards accepted, up to $150.00 documentation charge may be added.

You’d be hard pressed to find another 1992 Ducati 851 in this kind of shape anywhere for any price. At $9,200, we have a low-mileage perfectly-preserved example of the superbike that put Ducati back in the conversation.

Featured Listing: 1992 Ducati 851 Strada