Posts by tag: supersport

Ducati September 30, 2019 posted by

99% Super – 2002 Ducati 900 Sport

Early Oughties, Ducati’s new Supersport was struggling in the showrooms, and the company introduced a budget-conscious 900 to generate interest.  Not often seen, this Sport model shows just over 5,000 miles and looks great.

2002 Ducati 900 Sport for sale on eBay

Reading the specs, the down-rated Sport has just a few differences with the Supersport.  The 904cc air cooler puts out a reliable 80 hp, with Marelli fuel injection for the new century.  Trellis and forks were from the SS, though the monoshock was Showa rather than Sachs.  A bit finicky to find brake specs but likely the same 320mm Brembos are aboard.  Saving on finishing costs, most Sports arrived in semi-gloss black with an integral tank protector and dual seat, though this one’s tail has been changed to a monoposto with bespoke seat.

Despite three custodians, this Sport has low miles and niceties like a Silmoto exhaust, clear signal lenses, double bubble Zero Gravity screen, plus gold anodized frame caps and clutch cover.  From the eBay auction:

1992 Ducati 900 Sport…NOT Super Sport. Condition is Used.  Third owner, purchased in 2012.  Open clutch cover.  Lots of nice $$ bits.  Small ding on the tank where the bars must have hit it.  You really can’t see it…The timing belts have been done.  Completely gone through.  Almost new tires.  I’ve ridden only 65 miles.  Currently shaving down the fleet.  Starts easy…thunderous.  I have the owners manual.

While not nothing, the $1,400 MSRP difference between the 2002 Sport and Supersport beg the question of which model was intended to subsidize the other.  Of course, list price is just an ask and a lot of the Terblanche Sport ( and SS ) facelifts left the showroom on sale.  At this point though, a lot of water has passed under the bridge, the rounded turn-of-the-century design has aged well, and even the Sport can be appreciated as an air-cooled classic whose sole compromise to modernity is fuel injection.  Even with its sensible starting amount, this no-reserve auction hasn’t yet garnered a bid, but this could be a bunch of SS for mere Sport money.

-donn

99% Super – 2002 Ducati 900 Sport
Ducati September 19, 2019 posted by

NIH – 1993 Ducati 350 SS

RSFBS readers might not care about the National Institutes of Health or the Not Invented Here corporate posture – but a small sporty Ducati that was Never Imported Here might raise a few eyebrows.  This 350cc twin is built on the early 1990’s engineering and shows nicely with just under 10,000 miles.

1993 Ducati 350SS for sale on eBay

Built for the progressive license markets in Japan and Italy, the 350SS ( and sibling 400SS ) used the frame from the 750SS and were variously equipped with 2-into-1 or dual exhausts.  Just like its big brother, a 6-speed, Showa inverted forks and Brembo brakes were part of the package.  Equipped for a passenger, but gently with 36 hp.  From thirty feet it’s almost indistinguishable from the bigger bikes.

Over a generation old, this 350SS won’t need to conform to EPA regulations, but the owner is selling on a bill of sale so title will be required for street reg.  Looks very stock and quite nice, evidently kept out of harm’s way.  From the eBay auction:

BE THE ONLY ONE TO SHOW UP ON A 350, NEVER SEEN IN USA !!!!!!
VERY RARE AND UNIQUE 350 CC DUCATI SPORT, MADE ONLY FOR THE EUROPEAN MARKET, ALSO SOLD IN JAPAN.
SPEEDO SHOW IN KILOMETERS WHICH EQUAL 9994 MILES. RUNS WELL, VERY CLEAN ALL OVER.

Seeing the full-sized Supersport with a junior engine, some riders ask why.  But it might be the perfect bike for an adult fan to take to the track, with roomy cockpit and sensible power.  Add in the parts availability and the fact that any indie Ducati mechanic can work on it, and it’s got a lot going for it.  Relatively budget-minded, certainly a special interest machine, the little SS allows ( forces ? ) a rider to work on technique.

– donn

NIH – 1993 Ducati 350 SS
Sport Bikes For Sale September 14, 2019 posted by

The King in Yellow: 1996 Ducati 900SS/SP for Sale

Not too many bikes look good in yellow, and that very short list is mostly made up of Italians, Ducatis in particular. Red may be the most traditional color for Ducatis but the 916, Panigale, and this 900SS/SP look so striking in the bold yellow seen here, especially with the half-fairing that reveals most of the classic, air and oil-cooled v-twin. Most of the half-faired bikes here in the US were the lower-spec CR model with much more basic suspension, but some apparently did come that way from the factory, and I’d definitely configure my dream-build SP that way. Yes, I do have a dream-build SP, and it’s basically this one, with a two-up seat.

The Supersport was a mainstay of Ducati throughout the 90s, and was available in 900, 750, and even 400cc flavors, depending on the market. Here in the US, we got the 900, although 750cc examples do show up for sale from time to time, apparently sneaking in over the border. The 900SS came in two flavors: the SS/SP and the SS/CR. The motors for both versions were in an identical, as was most of the bodywork. As mentioned earlier, bikes could be had with a full or half-fairing and the SP generally had a carbon fiber front fender for, you know, weight savings. The aluminum swingarm doesn’t look quite as trick, but probably offered a greater performance benefit.

The biggest difference was the suspension. The CR or “cafe racer” came with non-adjustable suspension, because apparently cafe racer people don’t really care about handling all that much? Anyway, the SP or “sport production” came with a fully adjustable Showa front end and shock. Parts are completely interchangeable, so some CRs have been updated, but this example does have the plaque on the top triple that indicate this is an original SP.

It’s not completely stock, with a white frame, solo tail, and graphics meant to evoke the very limited-production Superlight, along with a low-profile LED taillight instead of the chunky 90s piece, but this 900SS still has the brackets for the passenger pegs, so it would be a relatively simple thing to put it back closer to stock. The Öhlins shock is a welcome update and the bike appears to be very nicely put together, as long as you’re okay with the non-standard paint.

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Ducati 900SS/SP for Sale

1996 Ducati 900 Supersport SP Half Fairing Monoposto 

I’m selling my 1996 Ducati 900 Supersport SP.
The bike was rebuilt by Johann Kaiser of Moto Motivo in Raleigh, North Carolina in 2017. 
The bike is powered by a 904cc desmodromic V-twin paired with a six-speed transmission. 
It features yellow bodywork with a white-colored trellis frame, and features include new Brembo brakes, upgraded Ohlins rear shock, cast aluminum wheels, and a carbon fiber exhaust and fenders.
The bike has a clean NC title in the seller’s name.
Has been garaged and has about 1000 miles after rebuild, and runs great.

You can find the bike on Moto Motivo’s website:
https://www.motomotivo.com/restorations

As mentioned above, I have a soft spot for these bikes. I’m a huge fan of the engine and the looks are a little bit retro and a little bit modern at the same time. It’s not really sleek, but solid and handsome, a practical sportbike that doesn’t overwhelm with power but can still handle well enough to entertain. With nice, original examples beginning to increase in value, the $6,000 asking price is a steal, if it’s anywhere near as nice as it looks in pictures. I’d look for a set of classic Termignoni cans to really finish it off and just enjoy the two-valve boom and midrange shove while bombing along a set of canyon roads.

-tad

The King in Yellow: 1996 Ducati 900SS/SP for Sale
Ducati July 23, 2019 posted by

BFF – 1996 Ducati 900 SS/CR

Ducati has had a Supersport in their line-up since most of us have been riding, and the 1990’s were good years for the SS with excellent chassis, Brembo brakes, Showa suspension and the easy air-cooled desmodue.  This example has miles, and though the owner went lightly on upgrades, maintenance is up to date.

1996 Ducati 900SS/CR for sale on eBay

The carburetted era was winding down at Ducati but the 900SS still sports 38mm Mikunis, helping deliver 85 hp, pretty good for a two-valve air cooled engine.  Components were in a sweet spot as well, with dual 320mm disks, inverted forks and lightweight if not quiet dry clutch.  A good-sized pillion is available under the beauty cover, and the cafe racer fairing insures easy access for maintenance and cleaning.

This owner has made a few nice mods with the alloy swingarm and wider rear wheel, looks like an updated monoshock though it isn’t mentioned.  The oil change schedule has a seasonal sound, so likely not too many recent miles, and for that odometer it looks phenomenal.  Generously photographed, there’s also video of – startup – and – walkaround – ( better soundtrack on the startup ).  From the eBay auction:

1996 Ducati 900SS with 35,146 miles.  Meticulously maintained.  Very clean.  Always stored indoors (inside basement shop).  Oil and filter changed every 500 miles or so.  Valve adjusted 34,235.  Belts replaced, new Ferodo clutch plates, brakes/clutch bled 34,934.  This is basically an SP model (sans the carbon fiber and remote reservoirs) with CR bodywork.  Showa 41mm usd 3-way adjustable forks.  Aluminum SP swingarm.  5.5″ rear wheel.  Regina chain.  41t rear sprocket.  Adjustable brake and clutch levers.  Napoleon bar-end mirror.  Stock exhaust and cans (though mildly jetted to accept slip-ons).  Updated (2001+) clutch slave cylinder and rod.  Vented 1/2 clutch cover.  Lightly tinted windscreen.  New Yuasa YTX20HL-BS High Performance AGM battery.  Did I mention how clean this bike was?

The later Supersports had a tough row to hoe, second fiddle to the superbikes with the new Monsters breathing down their corner of the showroom.  Only a few hundred were imported in ’97-98, and Pierre Terblanche provided a re-styled SS for 1999.  Though there is a reserve on this auction, this SS/CR should still be a down payment-sized entry into the sportbike affliction.

-donn

BFF – 1996 Ducati 900 SS/CR
Ducati June 29, 2019 posted by

Semi Senna – 2002 Ducati 748S

The original desmoquattro designed for Cagiva was a 3/4 liter, so a supersport from the 916 gene pool was a forgone conclusion.  Some reviewers thought the higher revving 748 was a better choice for the road than the superbike.  From Miami, this 748S has just 7,776 miles and looks excellent.

2002 Ducati 748S for sale on eBay

With its smaller bore, the 748 could rev more freely, reporting 98 hp at 11,000 rpm.  Luckily the cooling system built for the 916 can cope more readily with the 748’s heat.  Premium Showa dampers soak up the road’s realities, with Ti nitriding on the fork legs to reduce stiction.  Retro-grade operations are conducted by Brembos’s excellent dual 320mm front disks, which fully occupy the Marchesini five-spoke wheels.  The bodywork was available in mono or biposto and many of the single seaters had a sporty number plate area behind the seat.

With under 500 miles per year, the semi-gloss finish on this 748S looks great.  Updates appear to be limited to Silmoto mufflers, Rizoma reservoirs and aftermarket levers.  Bar risers might be a thought for riders of a certain age, as the aggressive riding position is shared with the 916.  Tires and cam belts would want renewal if they’re original.  From the eBay auction:

Selling my Ducati 748S ‘Semi Senna’. All the best add-ons, she is fast and stops on a dime. Sounds AMAZING! Let me know if you have any questions. Thanks for looking.

Besides its classic good looks, the 748 got good marks for the close ratio transmission and just-about-superbike power.  Early years had issues with the hard plating on the rocker arms failing, but were resolved before this last year example.  Bidding has been active, and should really take off if the seller posts answers to the questions they must be getting.

-donn

Semi Senna – 2002 Ducati 748S
Ducati May 2, 2019 posted by

Simple Pleasures: 1996 Ducati 900SS SP for Sale

Ducati’s two-valve “Desmodue” may not be the most powerful engine, or the lowest-maintenance, but there’s a reason it’s stuck around from the 1980 Pantah all the way through to today. Besides the obvious budgetary reasons: some of that tooling is probably long paid off… Joking aside, today’s Desmodue is heavily evolved, compared to the original version, now punched out to 1100cc and packing dual plugs per cylinder and modern electronics. But the qualities of the original are still there, and make for a very entertaining ride. Ducati’s mid-90s 900SS SP may not have been a powerhouse and was handily outclassed by every Japanese sportbike available at the time, but the aging thoroughbred still offered stable handling, good brakes for the period, a punchy midrange, and plenty of dry clutch rattle.

At the time, the 916 was making headlines for its ferocious performance on and off track, but the Supersport of the same period was a much better motorcycle to actually live with. Compared to the painfully focused 916, the 900SS almost felt like a sport-tourer. Along with the Monster it gave Ducati a range of bikes with real racing heritage, but without the expensive maintenance, high-strung histrionics, and performance most riders didn’t really need anyway, especially on the road.

By 1996, the 900SS was available in two flavors: the cost-cutting 900SS CR that generally came with a stylish half-fairing, and the higher-spec 900SS SP seen here. The engines were the same, but the CR used non-adjustable forks from either Showa or Marzocchi on later machines, while the SP had a carbon front fender and three-way adjustable suspension up front and at the rear. There were other minor details as well, like a narrower 4.5″ rear wheel on the CR, versus a 5.0″ hoop on the SP. If you’ve got a CR, don’t despair: suspension swaps between models and even years is pretty simple, and upgraded valving kits for the Showa forks are available. Unfortunately, the famously horrible Marzocchi units on the later CR models are pretty much best abandoned in the wilds to be savaged by wild dogs.

Ownership isn’t necessarily as much of a headache as you’d expect. In spite of their reputation, the two-valve Ducatis are generally pretty bomb-proof, and you’ve got to be riding like a bit of an idiot to overrev one. First of all, no valve springs means no valve float! And second of all, in spite of an indicated 9000rpm redline, any remotely standard carbureted 904cc Ducati engine runs out of puff way before that. Power was a claimed 80hp with a pair of Mikuni CV carbs, and 75hp at the wheel from a strong example. More is available via head work and tuning, since these were originally built to race, although performance gains won’t be particularly cheap.

As for Ducati’s infamous lack of reliability: the valves do require regular maintenance, although they tend to stay in spec after the first couple adjustments. The toothed rubber timing belts require biennial replacement to prevent an expensive transformation from motive force to paperweight, but many competent home mechanics find these tasks aren’t too difficult to tackle. Italian bike electrical components, however, generally deserve their poor reputation, and it’s worth regularly checking connections and using a bit of dielectric grease to make sure your lights light and your starter starts.

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Ducati 900SS SP for Sale

Excellent Condition, always well cared for, Ducati Limited Edition  500 SS SP SUPERLIGHT.  Low production number 47 of 500 made.

Full fairing, floating cast iron rotors and original factory oil temp gauge. New tires, carbon fiber mufflers. Includes owners and shop manuals, Hand written previous Owner records of services dating back to 8/12/97 with 2363 miles. 

Fresh timing belt, starter relay. Runs excellent sounds even better. Also have stock pipes to go with sale. This is a beautiful , air cooled, dependable, dry clutch classic example that will put a smile on your face.

Bike is currently on consignment at local Dealer in S.F. Paperwork to be  handled by them upon sale. 

The 900SS used to be an amazingly affordable entry into Italian bike ownership, especially if you’re fairly handy with basic tools. The only cheaper Ducatis are the original Monsters, but both have started to climb in value, especially for nice, low-mileage examples. This one has 13k or so on the clock which, if it’s been maintained by the book, means it’s barely broken in. Higher-resolution pictures would be nice but, from what I can see, it looks to be a very clean example. Get one now, while they’re still fairly cheap, since clean examples are getting hard to find.

-tad

Simple Pleasures: 1996 Ducati 900SS SP for Sale
Honda March 30, 2019 posted by

Low Tech, Big Fun: 1997 Honda CBR600 F3 for Sale

When the original “jellymould” CBR600F Hurricane was introduced in 1987 the enclosed, sleekly aerodynamic fairing hid a dark secret: a steel frame. While racier competitors had switched to lightweight aluminum construction, the simple, effective CBR600 F3 stuck with the less expensive material until the CBR600 F4 was introduced in 1999. Although the styling was hyper-modern, it also helped Honda save money on manufacturing and development costs. Instead of a finished frame and engine cases, or carefully routed wiring and hoses, the whole functional mess could all just be hidden behind relatively cheap, sleek plastic. So while pragmatism may have driven the design and the ingredients were, on their own, not very exotic, the complete package was a world-beater when it was introduced.

Produced between 1995 and 1998, the F3 was an evolution of the earlier CBR600 F2. Compared to that bike, it offered adjustable cartridge forks, a Pro-Link rear, and and ram-air to feed the engine. The result was a few more ponies from the 599cc inline four and a 454lb wet weight. That might sound heavy for a 600, but it was just a couple pounds heavier than a ZX-6R or GSX-R600 of the same period, and actually a good bit lighter than the aluminum-framed YZF600. At a claimed 105hp, peak power wasn’t best-in-class either, but the CBR offered a smooth spread of power with no real dips or flat spots, the perfect balance in a road engine and pretty handy on track as well.

The CBR600 was always pitched as a more versatile mount than competitors from Suzuki and Kawasaki, a bike that was at home in the canyons, in the city, and could even do a bit of commuting or light touring. The CBR600 was never really about the numbers, it was about the complete package, a sort of Goldilocks solution to the Supersport problem. It didn’t make the most in-class horsepower. It wasn’t the lightest. It didn’t have much in the way of headline-stealing innovation. It didn’t even have any acronyms plastered across the fairings!

It also made a perfectly good foundation for a racebike, winning multiple AMA SuperSport Championships, and didn’t seem to suffer at all for its relatively ordinary underpinnings. Eventually, the entire class became more and more track focused, and led to the development of the CBR600RR that was sold alongside the CBR600 F4i as a direct alternative to the high-strung offerings from Suzuki, Kawasaki, and Yamaha. But for a while, Honda’s versatile CBR meant you really could have your cake and eat it too.

This particular machine needs a bit of maintenance before it time-warps you back to your youth, but the miles are shockingly low for such a practical machine, and it looks to be in exceptional cosmetic condition. It may never be as desirable as a CBR900, but I these are certainly functional classics and much more attainable, since prices for the bigger machine are currently spiraling upwards and nice examples are hard to find.

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Honda CBR600 F3 for Sale

Hello, up for sale is my 1997 Honda CBR600F3 with 2,916 orig miles.  Clean title in hand in my name. Bought it 4 years ago and spent lots of time and money trying to make it near perfect (it’s the same model, year and color as what I had in college so it was me trying to relive my youth). Sadly, my bad back in combination with it being too dangerous for a slow, fat guy like myself to ride in Vegas forces the sale.  I have all receipts and replaced parts baggies/boxes for every OEM part I put on it. I saved the old parts to prove it wasn’t wrecked. Feel free to contact me to see it in person 850-five 86-38two8.  Not showroom perfect but damn nice for a 1997! PS: front chock included!

The bad: carbs need to be cleaned. Ran fine in 2014 and I did drain bowls before tear down but no luck in getting it started. Needs battery too as no point in buying one and letting it rot.

The good: over $1,000 in brand new parts. No cracked fairings at all!

  • Brand new oil and filter
  • Brand New Dunlop Q3s with not 1 mile on them – $285 mounted
  • New Ariete 90degree valve stems in gold – $29
  • Powder coated rims in gold – $175

The following all new OEM parts

  • Front lower chin – $35
  • Left side lower fairing – $374
  • Alternator cover and gasket – $69
  • Parts below over $400
  • Various OEM decals still new in OEM packing for spares – $149

The CBR600 may have been anything but exotic, but that was exactly the point: it was an everyman sportbike, and it was damn good at being that. The shape has aged pretty well I think, and the non-standard gold-painted wheels really flatter the Erion Racing-inspired colors. It’s a shame that this attempt to capture the seller’s youth has been put up for sale, but his loss is your gain! Can you really put a price on reliving the dreams of your youth? Apparently you can, and those dreams are going to cost you $3,950.00. That Buy It Now price is obviously on the high-end for an F3, but if this one is as nice in person as it looks in pictures, I think you’d be hard-pressed to find a better example with so few miles.

-tad

Low Tech, Big Fun: 1997 Honda CBR600 F3 for Sale
Ducati March 5, 2019 posted by

Street Smart – 2004 Ducati 749S

Shopping for a road machine ?  Determined not to fall into the displacement arms race ?  Take a look at this Ducati 749S, a lot of good stuff and a limited amount of attitude.

2004 Ducati 749S for sale on eBay

The 749 looks and was built like the Pierre Terblanche designed 999, and the innovative design suffered the same short run.  The 749S had a niche though, the rev-happy 748cc engine had higher compression than the base model, and brought 116 hp to the game, with a surprising 61 ft.-lbs. torque.  Nicer Showa forks have nitrided fork tubes for less stiction, and forks and monoshock are multi-adjustable.  Variable seat and footpeg positions accommodate the rider, and steering head angle can be set for the track.  Stateside -S models were all single-seaters.

 

No word on the number of owners, but this 749S appears maintained and cared for.  Beside the requisite tail tidy, just seeing aftermarket levers and clutch cover.  Not sure what race exhaust is fitted, but likely the factory cat is no longer.  The owner has a new Duc coming, but must be of a certain age, “brakes are good – tires fair” echoing a fifties song Hot Rod Lincoln and the most popular version is from – 1971 –.   Recent maintenance is claimed in the eBay auction:

Very nice top of the line bike. Essentially a 999 with downsized bore and stroke. Adult owned and well maintained. 12.3:1 compression 110HP @10500 RPM. 6 speed. Showa fully adjustable TiN upside-down fork, progressive rear fully adjustable Showa monoshock. Steering damper. Adjustable headstock rake. 5 position footpegs. Adjustable levers. New chain. Seat/tank assembly adjustable 20 mm fore/aft. Carbon fiber tail and race exhaust. Open clutch cover. Cosmetically a 9 out of 10 minor nicks, no dents. Brakes are good – tires fair. Runs, shifts and stops as it should. Recent belts and valve check. Minor fairing repair (1 inch not visible in pics. Well done and hard to spot.). Enthusiast owned and never down.

The 749S is a good alternative to a liter-plus superbike, often more fun to ride in Dragon-like sections, and of course easier on the ways and means committee.  Long low ergonomics might be something to try before you buy, and starting and cooling systems should be under less stress than on the superbike.  The old question of whether Ducati was giving away the similarly built 749S or the not-all-that-much higher priced 999 is largely past for a 15 year old machine, and this should be an efficient entry into a real exotic supersport.

-donn

 

 

Street Smart – 2004 Ducati 749S