Posts by tag: pantah

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Ducati March 7, 2018 posted by

Uncompromising: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale

Ducati’s mid to late-80s bikes existed in a kind of limbo: the modern sportbike was taking shape, and the Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca was birthed during this transitional period. The 750 F1 and its variations weren’t quite the refined-ish, modern-ish, mass-produced-ish machines of the Cagiva era, but they weren’t the nearly hand-crafted bikes of the Fabio Taglioni era either. The Laguna Seca was named after the famous California race track where Marco Lucchinelli found success in 1986, and just 200 examples were built.

The 750 F1 used a Verlicchi-designed steel trellis frame that gave it a look familiar to fans of later Ducatis, and the bike was powered by a 749cc version of their air and oil-cooled engine, here producing a claimed 76hp. Notably, the F1 still has the rear cylinder in its original configuration: later SS models had the rear cylinder rotated 180° to place both carburetors in the vee of the engine for much more elegant packaging. The bike was wrapped in bodywork designed to resemble Ducati’s successful TT1 race bikes, with 16″ wheels front and rear, while a dry weight of just 385lbs meant the now-familiar two-valve Pantah engine didn’t have much mass to push around, giving the bike a 136mph top speed.

Quality was a bit kit-bike and the bikes were relatively crude as delivered, but the potential was there for a seriously fast motorcycle, if one took some time to develop it. Almost as if Ducati didn’t bother finishing the bikes, knowing that most owners would modify them to suit their needs anyway.

From the original eBay listing: 1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca for Sale

The only changes to this bike upon delivery was the installation of the proper directionals, rear brake light switch and horn for street use. I installed a proper muffler in the place of the very loud Verlicchi megaphone. The bike also received an upgrade to the wheels and discs although retaining the 16″size. Magnesium Marvic/Akront rims as on the Monjuich and full floating discs replaced the original cast F1 style wheels and semi floating discs. All original parts are included in the sale. The bike is in excellent condition with only 2830 miles and has never been raced. Mileage as shown in photo is in kilometers.

The F1 and its variants spent years undervalued, but at this point, values have increased significantly, and the opening bid for this example is a cool $20,000. The bike is, as the seller indicates, not completely original, but the changes made are period correct and the parts needed to return it to stock are included. The original machine was basically a race bike with lights, so the addition of some small, folding bar-end mirrors is probably a wise concession to road safety: “First rule of Italian driving: what’s behind me is not important…” I’d probably see about adding some low-restriction foam pods to those carburetors as well, since plenty of grit and sand can get past the mesh screens currently serving as “air filters.”

-tad

Uncompromising: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale
Ducati January 5, 2018 posted by

Pristine Entry-Level Italian: 2003 Ducati 620 Sport with Just 936 Miles!

Made for just two years between 2002 and 2003, the Ducati 620 Sport was intended as an affordable way into Ducati ownership for riders more interested in the Ducati brand than in actual speed. But Ducati being Ducati, they were unable to build a sporty bike that actually handled badly, and they managed to create an entry-level machine that encapsulated the best and worst of the brand. Of course, that means that it may not be ideal for the newer riders it was obviously targeting: the riding position is extremely aggressive for a bike with such modest ability, typical Ducati steering lock means an inconveniently large turning circle, and the suspension is harsh.

The silver and black on the 620 recalls the style of the original 1980s Pantah, which is closely related to the 620 Sport in more ways than one. The Pantah was the very first Ducati to be powered by their then-new 500cc L-twin that had the single overhead-cams driven by toothed rubber belts, instead of a complex arrangement of tower shafts and bevel gears. This change to belts meant the engines were simpler to produce, but at the cost of maintenance, since the rubber belts require regular replacement, a service that’s ignored at the owner’s peril: second-hand two-valve Ducatis are currently very cheap, but a wrecked engine can quickly turn your affordable exotic into a pricey proposition…

The 620 uses the crank from the 750 for a slight increase in displacement to 618cc and a bump in torque, compared to the earlier 583cc 600SS, while the addition of Marelli fuel-injection means a broader spread of power with fewer hiccups, compared to the original’s carburetors. Like the Pantah, the 620 uses a five-speed gearbox and a wet clutch, instead of the 900’s six-speed and dry clutch arrangement. A gearbox with fewer cogs in a smaller-engined bike might sound like a retrograde step, but the torquey, flexible v-twin works well with the wider ratios of the five-speed and the wet clutch means it will take more abuse, which is ideal for the newer riders and commuters dealing with traffic.

Although the bike is down on power compared to its bigger siblings and pretty much anything in the 600cc class, the 60 claimed horses and 29 lb-ft of torque mean the bike is responsive, if not particularly fast when you’re hustling the 400lb machine through a set of curves, which is really where the Ducati shows its breeding. The fork and shock are relatively primitive and non-adjustable, but the bike shares its frame and basic geometry with the 900SS so handling is very good, even if the ride quality is a bit harsh, while a pair of Brembo calipers and discs up front mean stopping power on par with much more powerful machines.

Interestingly, these rare bikes seemed to get snapped up by racers looking for an affordable v-twin platform to modify into a production race bike when they come up for sale. You may be thinking, “Why the hell would you do that when there are loads of liquid-cooled, four-valve Suzuki SV650s lying around?” Apparently, the Ducati’s sporty frame geometry makes for a better-handling foundation, and I’m sure there are also some weight penalties imposed on the more sophisticated SV to keep racing close.The air and oil-cooled, two-valve twin responds very well to tuning and is supposedly much more reliable than the Suzuki unit as well, especially when used in racing applications.

From the original eBay listing: 2003 Ducati 620 Sport for Sale

Collectors dream! 2003 Ducati 620 SuperSport with 936 original miles!

I purchased the bike from the original owner with 580 miles on it who had it stored in a climate controlled garage.

No wreck or “tip over” damage, stock original except for some tasteful decals the original owner added on, I just left them on.

Clear NC title in my name.

Owned by mature 55 year old, I’m needing to change to a different riding position so selling my sporting motorcycles.

No wheelies, no gearbox abuse, no track use, just country roads near my house.

No smoking or weird engine noises. Starts, idles, shifts gears and runs as new.

No leaks of any kind, oil, fuel, forks, brakes.

Stock motorcycle, no intake, fuel, exhaust or electrical modifications, no aftermarket computers, no headers, none of that stuff

Recent maintenance performed:

Oil and filter change
Timing Belts
Spark plugs
Brake fluid change (with new Ducati caps and seals on reservoirs)
Internal rubber fuel lines (OEM Ducati)
Fuel filter (Mahle)
Tires (Shinko 009 Radials)
Yuasa MF battery
Kaoka cruise control

Chain and sprockets still as new, no rips or tears on seat, windshield nice and clear.

Mufflers have no dings or scratches.

Inside fuel tank perfectly clean, no rust, no sealant. Some very small scratches on top of tank near filler, hard to see but if you look closely at the photo of right side of tank you can make them out.

Still has a full set of original keys, owners manuals,tool kit, owners card,etc. as shown in photo. Also still have the original key fobs from the factory with ID numbers.

Sale also includes Factory Service manual and a Haynes manual.

It is ready to ride, collect or display, a beautiful time capsule Ducati.

Runs great, just had it out last week for a ride in nice weather. The motorcycle rides great, nice and smooth, gears change effortlessly. It is ready to ride and needs nothing… No disappointments here!

Motorcycle is located near the coast of NC, if you would like to see in person let me know.

This thing is pretty immaculate, as you’d expect from a bike with just 936 miles on the odometer. I’m not sure the matte silver really flatters the lines of the Terblanche-styled SuperSport, but it’s certainly more subtle than the usual red or yellow. Bidding hasn’t even reached $2,500 yet with the reserve met and time left on the auction. So whether you plan to buy this nearly museum-quality Super Sport as a rider, an odd footnote to complete your air-cooled Ducati collection, or as the raw material for forging a class-dominating v-twin race bike, this looks like a pretty good place to start. Although it would be a shame to chop it up… Power will never really be much to write home about, but a quick stop on eBay will turn up some nice, used suspension bits from a 900 or 1000 SuperSport that should bolt up easily and improve the bike’s handling further.

-tad

Pristine Entry-Level Italian: 2003 Ducati 620 Sport with Just 936 Miles!
Ducati August 19, 2017 posted by

Rare Duck: 1986 Ducati 400 F3 for Sale

The stories of our favorite motorcycle manufacturers are often littered with failures and bankruptcy. Some brands even saw multiple deaths, followed by zombie-like resurrections where the victim simply came back wrong, like Gage from Pet Sematary… Truly, “Sometimes dead is better…” Luckily, Italian purveyor of accessible exotics Ducati seems pretty stable these days, rumored purchase by Harley Davidson notwithstanding. But it wasn’t always that way, and today’s Ducati 400 F3 represents a rare collectible from a transitional era of their history when they teetered on the edge of failure.

Designed before Ducati was taken over by Cagiva but produced during their ownership, it was styled to resemble the successful TT race bikes of the late 70s and early 80s. The 750 F1 and lookalike F3 used Ducati’s signature trellis frame developed by Verlicchi and wrapped around the company’s two-valve, air and oil-cooled Pantah engine. In this application the v-twin had yet to have the rear cylinder rotated 180° to situate both carburetors together in the engine’s vee as seen in the later SS and Monsters, so you can see the rear velocity stack/filter sticking out in the breeze, where it probably interferes with the rider’s leg but hey, it’s a Ducati!

And that was really the problem with the F1/F3 to begin with: build quality was generally pretty poor, more kit-bike than the product of a major motorcycle manufacturer, and the suspension was crude. But the elements were there to make a great bike, it just needed a bit of development… It was almost as if Ducati assumed buyers intended to race them, and didn’t bother finishing them. Today’s F3 was a Japanese market version of the F1 with a smaller, 400cc displacement. The seller suggests that it may be the only example in the USA and certainly, I can’t remember seeing one for sale here. It’s had a cosmetic restoration, but is otherwise in original condition.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Ducati 400 F3 for Sale

VERY RARE and might be the only one of these models in the USA.

Japan was one of the biggest markets for Ducati in the 1980s but limited motorcycles to only 400 cc, so smaller versions of the Ducati 750F1 were sold there as the Ducati 400F3 from 1986-88. This 1986 Ducati 400F3 with only 7657 km (4758 miles) was imported from Japan in 2016. 

The paint on the bike was badly faded and the complete bike was torn down and frame and complete bodywork were repainted (powder coating on the frame).  All decals are factory correct decals for this year model.

A Limited run of 509 Ducati 400 F3 bikes were built in 1986 and this bike is number 209 (VIN ZDM400R*400209) and is shown on a numbered factory plaque fitted to the top of the seat fairing, see picture.

The bike is in very good running condition and include:

  • New paint
  • New decals
  • Powder coated frame and swingarm
  • New battery
  • New chain
  • New steering bearings
  • New petcocks
  • Engine serviced (Oil, Oil filter, Timing belts)
  • Engine is 100% factory stock

This vehicle is being offered as-is with no warranty expressed or implied. Please call for specific details on this vehicle.

PLEASE NOTE! THIS MOTORCYCLE IS SOLD WITH A “BILL OF SALE” ONLY AND DOES NOT HAVE A TITLE.  EBAY DOES NOT HAVE THE OPTION TO LIST THIS IN THE ITEM SPECIFIC SECTION! CONTACT ME FOR MORE INFORMATION IF NEEDED.

Obviously, a two-valve, 400cc v-twin isn’t going to be particularly fast, but I doubt anyone considering a purchase will seriously care. This is a bit of history, a collectible. The lookalike 750 F1 has experienced a serious spike in value the past few years. Although the smaller-engined F3 won’t offer the same performance, it should represent a solid investment as it is very rare, especially here in the USA, although bidding is very low so far, at just over $4,0000 with the Reserve Not Met.

-tad

Ducati March 14, 2017 posted by

Odd Duck: 1982 Ducati Pantah 600TL for Sale

Pantah Week continues with this very rare, and very oddly-styled machine. When you say “Ducati” to pretty much anyone, it conjures up images of sleek, exotic, often uncomfortable machines designed to win at all costs on track and inflame the desires of motorcyclists all over the world. What you wouldn’t normally imagine is something like this basically brand-new Ducati Pantah 600TL…

While the sport-touring oriented bodywork of the 600TL may not be to everyone’s taste, there’s nothing wrong with the components under the skin: it’s motivated by the same 583cc, two-valve v-twin and five-speed gearbox as the 600SL sportbike. It uses the same as well, so handling should be excellent, although it is less stable at high speeds than its sportier brother and the top speed is lower. That funky black front fender looks like a replacement item, but period ads and photos suggest that this is in fact the original part.

 

Obviously there have been a few styling misfires from Ducati over the years: their Giorgetto Giugiaro-styled 860GT was certainly not well-liked when new, although time and a general love of all things bevel-drive have seen values of even that much-maligned machine steadily increasing in value. And sportier 600SLs languished in unloved obscurity until recently, when prices have begun to rise, along with bikes like yesterday’s 750 F1. Will time be as kind to the the 600TL? It may be too soon to tell, but this particular bike has virtually no miles on it and is basically a museum-piece, so it might be a good place to start for weird Ducati speculators.

From the original eBay listing: 1982 Ducati Pantah 600TL for Sale

This is a brand new 1982 600TL.  It has 2.9 miles on it.  It comes with book, tools and parts manual.  I bought this bike from the stocking Ducati dealer in Ohio.  He told me that in 1982 30 600TL came to the US and that this is one of them.  The bike has never been driven, the battery has never had battery acid in it.  It has a Conti muffler, 36 Din Delorto carbs.  This bike has all custom papers and duty paid for Canada, but the US title is still on hand.  This bike is extremely rare, it may be the only new one in the world!

Normally rare, zero-mile bikes are a recipe for a static display. But in this case, all the parts you’d need to get it roadworthy should be readily available. You could probably even slot in a much larger, more powerful version of the venerable L-twin with a bit of work… The starting bid is set at $8,250 with no takers as yet although there is still plenty of time left on the auction. I’ve never seen one for sale before, and it’s very rare here in the USA, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that it’ll ever really be worth all that much to collectors, except as an oddity.

-tad

Odd Duck: 1982 Ducati Pantah 600TL for Sale
Ducati March 13, 2017 posted by

Middle Child: 1986 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale

Until pretty recently, Ducati’s 750 F1 was the redheaded stepchild of the Ducati family: it wasn’t a bevel-drive and so wasn’t really considered worthy of being considered a “classic” Ducati, didn’t have the reliability [cough, cough] of the modern two-valve twin, or the performance credentials of the liquid-cooled four-valve superbikes. But values have been rising rapidly in recent years, and the F1 represents an important bridge between two eras of Ducati sportbikes.

The 750 F1 was built around their proven trellis frame and a 749cc version of the Pantah two-valve L-twin, tuned to produce 76hp and was wrapped in bodywork designed to resemble the successful TT1 racing machines. Wheels were the height of 80s fashion, with a tiny 16″ hoop up front and 18″ at the rear. This was the very last Ducati produced before Cagiva took over and it uses a pair of carburetors configured like the older bevel-drive bikes instead of the later machines that nestled both units in the engine’s vee. Not the most efficient from a packaging standpoint, with those air cleaners jutting out bodywork.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale

Original surviving example with 3850 original miles. Runs very well indeed. Its tight and everything works. Toolkit and owners manual included. Will need tires if ridden aggressively. An uncompromising street legal Italian thoroughbred.

Bidding is up above $10,000 with the Reserve Not Met and very little time left on the auction. These are the very last Ducatis before the modern era that was ushered in by Cagiva, and that gives them a special place in Ducati’s history, and the uptick in values reflects that. This example looks very clean and is in excellent condition, with low miles and the seller even includes a short video of the bike roaring up the street!

-tad

Middle Child: 1986 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale
Ducati February 28, 2017 posted by

Pantah-stic: 1981 NCR Ducati 600TT for Sale

Ducati’s first motorcycle was the Cucciolo [or “puppy” in Italian], which was basically a simple engine strapped to a bicycle, an affordable tool to get the Italian population mobile and back to work after the end of World War II. Certainly a far cry from the frameless, race-inspired exotica they’re famous for today. This NCR 600TT hails from the middle period of Ducati’s history, and is powered by the grandfather of all their modern v-twin engines, the single overhead cam, two-valve Pantah.

They’re famous for the format today, but Ducati didn’t start out making v-twin sportbikes. Instead, once they graduated from producing simple, efficient people-movers, they built and raced single-cylinder motorcycles of various displacements, before eventually building their first v-twin. The hottest versions of those earliest v-twins featured Ducati’s trademark Desmodromic valve-actuation that has become their engineering trademark. But they also used a complex and expensive-to-manufacture system of tower shafts and bevel gears to operate the overhead cams, and Ducati needed to increase profitability to stay afloat, so introduced a parallel twin that was much more compact and affordable to produce and assemble, much to the horror of famous engineer Fabio Taglioni.

That parallel-twin engine proved to be a massive flop, but Taglioni continued to develop the v-twin on his own, and the Pantah was the result. The revised v-twin swapped the tower-shaft and bevel-drive cam-drive of the earlier engine for a much simpler rubber belt arrangement. This meant the engine was less expensive to manufacture, but also meant owners needed to religiously maintain their bikes, as failure of the toothed rubber belt led to catastrophic engine damage. Today’s Ducati engines are direct descendants of that original two-valve v-twin.

This particular Pantah-powered machine is literally a racebike with lights, and includes frame, bodywork, and preparation by NCR. If you’re not familiar, NCR are best known today for their high-performance and obsessively lightweight Ducati parts, as well as for converting already expensive exotica into completely un-affordable, even more exotic exotica. But before that, they were originally a race team. The race team, in fact, responsible for Ducati’s many racing successes until the creation of their in-house racing division, including Mike Hailwood’s famous TT-winning bike, so they’ve been around the track a few times. Although the bike does include a headlight, a tail light, and turn signals, it appears that wasn’t enough to get past rigorous TÜV certification and the bike couldn’t be registered for road use in Germany where it was stored for many years. Maybe a new American owner will have more luck?

From the original eBay listing: 1981 NCR Ducati 600TT for Sale

The 1981 Ducati Scuderia N.C.R was one of the preeminent motorcycle racing teams of all time. They were the de-facto Ducati factory race team from the early 1970s until Ducati took it in-house with Ducati Corsa in 2000. They continued as privateers and had success with rider Ben Bostrom. The company was then sold and continues as a specialist builder of very high end motorcycles.

NCRs wins on the world stage are almost too numerous to mention. But Imola 200 winners Paul Smart, Isle of Man TT winners Mike Hailwood were all on the bevel drive NCRs. The string of wins by Tony Rutter on the belt drive TT2 were all Nepoti and Caracchi machines that made NCR a household name with their distinctive logo of a speeding helmet clad dog.

Nepoti and Caracchi Racing designed their own frame for the belt drive Pantah based series. This was the 600TT. It differs from the more common TT2, which was more of a Ducati design. A total of nine frames were made by Verlicchi and a further two by DM. All but two were racing frames. Of these two street bikes produced, this is the only one built with an alloy gas tank. Imagine a genuine NCR with a steering lock.

This bike has spent most of its life unused in Germany. The owner tried to convert his Pantah to a NCR framed machine, but the TUV would not allow it, due to their ultra-strict type certification. Throughout 1980s, 90s and 2000s it was in hiding. It re-surfaced in 2006 and was recommissioned. However the German owner was still not able to use it.

It came to America several years ago and has been in a private collection museum ever since. It has a US tile as the original donor Ducati Pantah.

Gas has been drained and battery removed for storage and display. We are selling this incredible machine for a client of ours and all technical questions will be answered as quickly as possible but may take time to get as he has limited access. Sold on a clean, mileage exempt US title.

VIN#DM500SL661261

Bidding is up to just north of $9,100 with plenty of interest and plenty of time left on the auction. In general, the earlier bevel-drive bikes are considered the most desirable and collectible Ducatis, but this is an exceptionally rare and cool motorcycle, considering the direct links to NCR and the fact that it’s theoretically a roadgoing racebike. Obviously you should be careful to consult with your local DMV if you plan to register this machine for road use, but this one might be best used as the crown jewel in a collection anyway, considering it’s status as just one of two ever built.

-tad

Pantah-stic: 1981 NCR Ducati 600TT for Sale
Ducati September 29, 2016 posted by

In the Beginning… 1980 Ducati Pantah 500 SL for Sale

1980-ducati-pantah-500sl-l-side

By the late 1970s, it was pretty obvious that Ducati needed to update their line: performance wasn’t really all that much of a problem, but their famous L-twin was very expensive to manufacture. So when the time came… They simply tossed the whole thing out the window and started over, with a parallel-twin that used simple springs to actuate its valves. On paper, it probably seemed like a great idea, as the new machine offered up improved packaging and was much cheaper to manufacture. In reality? It was a disaster, since the new 500GTL wasn’t especially good-looking, ate crankshafts for breakfast, and generally offended everyone. Luckily,  Fabio Taglioni had continued work on the belt-drive L-twin he’d wanted to build as a replacement all along and descendants of the Pantah 500 SL still power air-cooled Ducatis today.

1980-ducati-pantah-500sl-r-side

The new engine swapped the complicated and expensive tower-shaft and bevel-drive arrangement for a simple set of rubber belts to operate the cams, and the Desmo system that was formerly reserved for the most sporting Ducatis was made standard across the board. The changes made for a quieter engine that was less expensive to build, but meant that owners were stuck with pricey and frequent maintenance requirements unless they planned to do the work themselves. It was the first Ducati to use their signature trellis frame and the engine as a stressed member. In spite of the modest displacement, these have the usual Ducati sound and flexible powerband, and handling is generally considered to be exemplary.

1980-ducati-pantah-500sl-dash

From the original eBay listing: 1980 Ducati Pantah 500 SL for Sale

This ground-breaking 500 twin established the pattern which Ducati would follow for the next 20 years and on. 

Ducati’s foray into the world of vertical parallel twins in the mid-1970s proved to be a horrid experience, so designer Fabio Taglioni called a halt to those 350 and 500s and went back to the drawing board. The result was the Pantah 500 SL which first appeared in Milan in 1979 and went on to spawn entire subsequent generations of belt-driven, OHC, 90-degree V (or L) Ducati twins.The first Pantah used the engine dimensions from the Grand Prix racer of 1973 at 74mm by 58mm to give 499cc. Apart from the bore and stroke dimensions, this was an entirely new design of air-cooled engine although the five-speed gearbox was a development from earlier machines. Running 9.5:1 compression, the Pantah output 50bhp at 8500rpm, which was measured as an impressive 46bhp at the rear wheel and equated to a top speed of around 115mph. Weighing just 180kg, the Pantah was nimble and peppy and it impressed the test riders of the time. ‘The handling and roadholding are quite exceptional,’ said Bike magazine. ‘There’s nothing like a thoroughbred Italian for finding out how a motorcycle should really handle.’

This example has been garage stored for the last two years, and was in running condition when placed into storage. In need of battery and carb job. Brake lines, fuel lines, tires replaced in 2013. Bike has traveled less than 100 miles since then. The bike is complete and will make a fine ride for a luck rider.

1980-ducati-pantah-500sl-front

With under 10,000 miles on the odometer, this bike obviously needs a bit of cosmetic work and the battery and carburetor rebuild the seller mentions, but appears very complete, aside from the popular but non-standard two-into-one exhaust. These were languishing at the bottom of the Ducati heap for a while there, but prices have been steadily rising in the past few years.

-tad

1980-ducati-pantah-500sl-l-side2

In the Beginning… 1980 Ducati Pantah 500 SL for Sale
Ducati July 2, 2016 posted by

#becauseracebike: 1984 Ducati 750 TT1 for Sale

1984 Ducati TT1 L Front

What looks good doesn’t always work well: some of the most beautiful cars ever built were created by eye, without the aid of modern aerodynamics. Sleek machines like the Jaguar E-Type and the Corvette Stingray may look impossibly fast, but often try to leave the road at elevated speeds… Racing machines on the other hand are often strange and awkward-looking, designed to perform ahead of all other considerations. The Ducati TT1 may not be the prettiest bike ever built by the company, but you can’t argue with its performance.

1984 Ducati TT1 L Engine
Although the earlier TT2 machine was more successful in terms of race results, the bigger-engine TT1 seen here still has some serious competition credentials and was successful in endurance racing as well. The bike was powered by a bigger 748cc version of the Desmo Pantah engine that used toothed belts to drive the overhead cams instead of the bevel-drive engine’s tower-shaft arrangement. A front-mounted oil-cooler behind the fairing kept temperatures under control, with holes drilled in front to allow sufficient airflow.

1984 Ducati TT1 Dash
This package eventually evolved into the air/oil-cooled L-twin Ducatisti still know and love today, although in this case it was still carbureted, with the rear head rotated 180° from more modern configurations: later bikes had intake for both in the center of the “V,” allowing Cagiva to fit the engine with an automotive-style carburetor in the Paso. The frame was an extremely lightweight, stiff, sculptural masterpiece by Verlicchi and a 16” and 18” wheel combo meant riders could exploit the bike’s extreme lightweight and agility.

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Ducati 750 TT1 for Sale

Unimpeachable provenance and beautiful patina

One of three ex-works 1984-season European endurance race bikes, then bought from the factory direct by American enthusiast Dale Newton for AMA BoTT racing in the USA

Frame no. 6 (on steering head), engine no. DM600L*702481*

Sold on a Bill of Sale. Five miles approx. since restoration.

This well documented TT1 is the rarest of the rare. Three chassis were taken from the production run of 50 600 TT2s and built as endurance racers for the 1984 European championship. Essentially two of the three – this is one of the two – were replicas of Tony Rutter’s factory team TT1. Based on the belt-drive, desmo Pantah, the TT1 had a 88mm bore and a 61.5mm stroke for a capacity of 748cc, with a factory quoted 80 horsepower. At under 300 pounds dry, they were built with Italy’s finest contemporary components such as Marzocchi magnesium forks, wider aluminum (extrusion) cantilever swing arm (with strengthening rub running along the bottom) – one of only two bikes known to have this feature – and Brembo brakes all round. The compact TT1 was both ground breaking fast and exquisitely handsome. It features a unique lower mounting point for the engine vapor catch tank on the right side. As a new bike it attended the Imola test day. The engine has the “Ascension” kit installed that upgraded the TT2 motor to full race 750. The bike retains its endurance racing quick-release rear wheel kit.

American Ducatisti patron Dale Newton (he owned the Phil Schilling/Cook Neilson “California HotRod” Daytona superbike, too) bought the bike from the factory at the ’84 season’s end (still with its headlamp sockets etc. intact; Dale removed the lights as the AMA rules did not require them) and proceeded to run the bike in the USA and was the last bike he restored before his untimely death. Dale’s goal was to beat east coaster Jimmy Adamo in BoTT.

Brian Dietz purchased the bike from the Newton estate in September 1999 selling it on to Ralf Stechow in November 2008. It was acquired by the (private) seller shortly thereafter.

The Newton Ducatis were raced by legendary riders such as Tony Rutter, Kevin Schwantz and John Williams and were featured in Cycle magazine on several occasions. Next is a listing of the articles; January 1984 “Messenger in Red: Ducati TT2 600”; October 1984 “Ducati Pantah TT1”; April 1985 “Aboard Sunday’s Child: Ducati 750 TT1”; April 1985 “Desmo-Ships on a Time Belt: Ducati 750SS and TT1 750 F1”. “Dale Newton’s ex-factory TT-F1 (this bike) is representative of Ducati 750 potential, and on the Axtell dyno it generated 83-86 horsepower.” Kevin Cameron, February 1990.

This bike has also been featured in two of Ian Falloon’s books. “… the diminutive TT2 and TT1 were among the finest of all catalog Ducatis…they epitomized Taglioni’s philosophy of maximum performance through light weight and simplicity.”- Standard Catalog of Ducati Motorcycles, and Ducati Racers. And in Alan Cathcart’s Ducati, the Untold Story.

1984 Ducati TT1 R Engine

This TT1 is from a very limited run of competition-only Ducatis and has a well-documented owner history, the bike is in beautiful cosmetic condition for a race bike and is certainly very rare and valuable, although there’s been no real bidding activity so far and the auction is almost over. The more desirable TT2 might be worth six figures, but it’s pretty clear from the limited interest that the seller is aiming a bit high here.

-tad

1984 Ducati TT1 R Side

#becauseracebike: 1984 Ducati 750 TT1 for Sale