Posts by tag: pantah

Cagiva October 15, 2020 posted by

Alluring: 1985 Cagiva Alazzurra 650

In the twisted family tree that is the Italian motorcycle community, there are many merges and branches. One interesting area is the history of Cagiva and their relationship with Ducati. While Cagiva owned Ducati in the mid-eighties, they were initially a customer as they purchased engines & transmissions to create their own bikes. Today’s Cagiva Alazzurra is such a beast, utilizing a sourced Pantah-based motor for power. In many ways these were seen as a poor man’s Ducati in North America – more exclusive than contemporary Japanese bikes, but with less cachet than other Italian exotics. Today the Cagiva Alazzurra is but a strange footnote for US buyers; once Cagiva took over Ducati they adopted the Ducati name as the stronger brand and the Alazzurra was discontinued.

1985 Cagiva Alazzurra 650 for sale on eBay

The heart of the Alazzurra is very similar to the powerplant that drives the Pantah, such as this week’s 600 model. Ducati produced the Pantah in different displacements, including 500cc, 600cc and 650cc (there was also a 750cc unit built for racing). In many respects, the Alazzurra could be considered a later derivation of the Ducati Pantah, as the 650cc engine was the latest evolution of the unit, with a frame design that was extremely similar to the Ducati bike. With 55 HP pushing 424 lbs (dry) the Alazzurra offered respectable performance for the time, but was typically slower than similarly sized Japanese offerings.

From the seller:
Very good condition. Has collector plates so insurance in BC is 150 bucks per year.New cam belts, braided lines, seals, including crankshaft oil seal, valves checked, oil , filter and plugs replaced, new grips , l.e.d headlight

The legend of the Pantah design long outlived the Cagiva brand in North America. Today the Alazzurra is more an oddity than a true collector’s piece, although time has a tendency to create rarity all on its own. And with 35 years gone by, the pool of well-kept imported Cagivas is shrinking. But the big question is if that helps with appreciation of the model – or its value. This particular example is located in Canada, and is offered for approximately $3,424 USD. That is actually below the MSRP for the bike when it was new. But the Alazzurra does not have as strong a following as other Cagiva/Ducati models; it is seen by many as more of a novelty than an icon. Still for many riders this was a close to a Ducati as finances would permit during this time, creating a bit of nostalgia. Do any RSBFS readers fall into that category? There are not a lot of details available on this one, but you can check it out here. Let us know what you think about the Alazzurra, and good luck!!

MI

Alluring: 1985 Cagiva Alazzurra 650
Ducati October 14, 2020 posted by

Heavy Breather: 1983 Ducati Pantah 600

Behold the wonderous, the cutting edge (while at the same time, archaic) modern interpretation of the new Ducati era. The Pantah represented the next evolution of the already legendary Ducati L-twin, and would being the new phase of the rubber band motor era. Replacing the bevel drive with a toothed belt to drive the desmo valve train, the Pantah simultaneously provided an easier manufacturing solution, a quieter and more efficient mechanical solution, and greatly reduced maintenance requirements. Ducati chose to wrap that new tech in a brand new body style that is unmistakably Italian.

1983 Ducati Pantah 600 for sale on eBay

To be fair, there was nothing really wrong with the bevel-drive round case motors of the past. In fact, the bevel drive continued alongside the new Pantah configuration, available in the larger 900cc and 1000cc variants. However the rubber belt drive for the valve train made the engine easier to assemble and quicker to configure in terms of adjustment. Such an arrangement would continue to be a feature on all Ducati motors right up to the Panigale of late, although there was much technology that was yet to come. For now, the fabled Ducati twin breathed through two valves, fed by carburetors, and made use of simple and lightweight air cooling.

From the seller:
ORIGINAL, UNRESTORED SURVIVOR. ORIGINAL PAINT AND GRAPHICS, ETC. DUCATI’S FIRST DESMODRONIC V-TWIN. FOR SERIOUS DUCATI COLLECTORS ONLY.

This particular Pantah looks very nice, although it is sporting some patina that can split opinions. On one hand, a bike like this is only original once – therefore the original paint, flaws and all, represent originality. Those looking for a perfect specimen that has endured a nut and bolt restoration and fresh paint throughout might wish to look elsewhere. I will correct the seller in that this is not Ducati’s first Desmo twin – that honor came more than a decade previous. However the mistake is somewhat academic given that this was the first desmo twin Ducati where the valve actuation was driven by belt. Still a big deal, but definitely not the first Desmo.

Prices for these Pantahs has gone on the rise over the past years, but these are not Limited Edition models – or particularly rare. Time, however, does take its toll on available stock, and invariably helps with the supply-versus-demand equation. Still, these tend to be a rather affordable way to get into a (almost) classic Ducati. This particular bike looks original, but does show some wear and/or rash. The seller is asking nearly $13k – which is near the top of the range we have been seeing as of late. Check it out here, and good luck!

MI

Heavy Breather: 1983 Ducati Pantah 600
Ducati December 2, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1984 Ducati 650SL Pantah

Update 12.2.2019: This bike is now on eBay. -dc

This is the first of four motorcycles being offered from the Stuart Parr Collection. Thank you for supporting the site and good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Rare to the point where this might be the first 650SL to grace RSBFS, this 1984 model has been restored to museum condition and is ready for spotlights and close-up viewing.

1984 Ducati 650SL Pantah for sale

In an interesting turn of the rulebook, Ducati produced the 650SL to homologate the 61.5mm stroke for the planned 750cc race machine.  The extra torque provided by the lengthened stroke was a welcome addition to the originally 500cc engine, and claimed 63 hp at 8,500 rpm.  Still considered part of the first generation of Ducati belt-driven cam engines, the twin used dual 36mm Dell’Orto carburetors.  The model’s smaller-displacement origins are divulged by the 35mm Marzocchi forks and 260mm dual front disks.  The trellis frame with engine as a stressed member helped keep dry weight under 400 lbs., remarkable for the day.  The very trim monoposto fairing was retained from the 600SL, and finished in Ducati’s yellow over red race livery.

In private hands of Stuart Parr Collection, this 650SL was treated to a comprehensive restoration, and updated with a two-into-one Staintune exhaust.  Comments from the curator:

The 650 Pantah was built specifically to homologate Ducati’s TT1 750 engine which used a 61.5 mm stroke. Instead of producing a production 750 road bike, the 650SL was created with an 82mm bore and the required 61.5mm stroke, thus complying to the governing bodies homologation requirements. The 650’s bodywork is virtually identical to the 600, but it was painted in the now famous TT2 color scheme of red and yellow. Other minor differences were a different instrument layout and some other cosmetic minor changes, but it had far more torque, and that was a big improvement.

Only 288 650SL’s were ever produced; enthusiasts and collectors alike have doubled the 650’s value over the past half a decade alone, actions that have cemented this model’s security as being a sound investment for the future. This example has been restored to stunning condition with gorgeous paintwork and finishes throughout. A Staintune 2=1 exhaust system and corresponding jetting was utilized, otherwise a stock bike. Fresh tires and zero post-restoration mileage.

The 650SL can also be viewed on the collection’s website – here -.

The new two-valve desmo engine sparked the interest of the Castiglioni family, which took an ownership role at Ducati and likely saved the company.  Desmoquattro engines were just around the corner and a string of Superbike World Championships just over the horizon.  Significance and rarity off the scales, the 650SL is the Pantah for a knowledgeable fan.  The collection is selling to make way for new acquisitions.  Inquiries can be directed to Gregory Johnston on (631) 537-1486 or via email – here -.

Featured Listing – 1984 Ducati 650SL Pantah
Bimota August 16, 2019 posted by

Thoroughly Italian: 1986 Bimota DB1 for Sale

The DB1 wasn’t Bimota’s first bike, but it perfectly embodies the company’s philosophy of taking a well-developed engine from an outside manufacturer and putting it into a package that was lighter, sleeker, and better-handling. That wasn’t really all that difficult to do when you’re looking at beasts like the Suzuki GSX1100: just take the good stuff and ditch the rest, then replace it with better, stronger, lighter components. But Ducati’s bikes were already a good bit lighter and more agile to begin with. They had to be, with smaller engines and fewer cylinders.

The DB1 was Bimota’s first Ducati-powered model, and used the two-valve, air and oil-cooled Pantah engine that included a pair of toothed rubber belts to drive the single overhead cams. The arrangement that was still pretty unusual at the time, since most bikes were still using traditional chains in 1985. A 352lb dry weight was claimed, which is pretty outrageously light for a sportbike of the era. Marzocchi suspension meant the light, compact machine would handle and 16″ wheels at both ends that exaggerated the already large front brakes to nearly pie-plate dimensions that were clamped by four-piston Brembo calipers.

Bimotas are famously hard to work on, with the frames so closely wrapped around the mechanicals to save weight, centralize mass, and improve aerodynamics: everything is optimized for performance. The SB3 actually had a frame that unbolted and separated into two sections to free the drivetrain for servicing! Jokes about Italian reliability aside, every single motorcycle will need regular servicing, and removing the fairings of a sportbike is often needlessly tedious. But they make up for that by at least being easy to strip clean of bodywork. Note that the entire tank cover and tail section is just one piece, held in place by just a few fasteners!

So was it really better than the Ducati F1 that donated its engine and five-speed transmission? Probably not, unless you were going racing. As with more modern Bimotas, it was much more expensive with minimal benefits for the average rider, compared to the donor bikes. But the DB1 was impossibly compact and futuristic, with the incredible detailing that Bimota has always been known for. I particularly love the brake and clutch reservoirs incorporated into the tops of the fork tubes.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Bimota DB1 for Sale

1986 Bimota DB1, 5 miles AS New, Very rare-one of 400

First Ducati powered Bimota.

This spectacular DB1 has 5 miles from new, these miles could be factory dyno or road test miles as the bike is new and in brand new condition. Everything is original and untouched, bike has always been in heated storage and shows almost no signs of aging.

This DB1 is nearly flawless, the only flaws I could find is a slight rub mark on the rear of the solo cowl near the tail light (see pic). Second flaw is a super small green paint dot on top of the solo cowl (see pic), this looks like a factory flaw. Other than that the bike is perfect and new.

I am the second owner.

For an indication or reference of value see last picture. That bike had mileage and has been slightly restored. 

This bike is number 203 of 400 produced.

There are no bids yet at the $25,000 opening bid, and there’s a long way to go before the $32,000 asking price. The original listing includes an ad from Bimota Spirit for a similar bike with price of $29,000 and it appears the seller is assuming or hoping that the much lower mileage of his bike will bring a higher price. Unfortunately, although bikes like the DB1 and the original Tesi are rare and desirable, Bimota values in general have remained pretty flat and it looks like the seller may be jumping the gun here slightly, given the overall lack of interest.

-tad

Thoroughly Italian: 1986 Bimota DB1 for Sale
Ducati July 5, 2019 posted by

City Slicker – 1985 Ducati 750 F1 Race Replica

As if a 34 year-old Ducati race replica weren’t rad enough, this 750 F1 has been improved in just about every way to be an up-to-date race shop’s rep.  Developed in NYC and now just a few clicks north, this sparkling 1985 model would be a hit in any concours or vintage race.

1985 Ducati 750 F1 Race Replica for sale on eBay

Ducati was taking on water in the early 1980’s, but had four consecutive F2 championships in the TT series which competed with FIM Grands Prix.  Some privateer successes with F2-based 750cc machines led the factory to developed its own F1 race bike, and the Pantah-engined 750 F1 road machine.  The F1 brought a host of firsts for Ducati – first trellis frame for the road, first monoshock, first floating brake rotors, first 2-into-1 exhaust, first alloy tank.  Though not scary powerful or all that lightweight, it was very sporty for the time and a great basis for a race team’s mods.

Long time previous owner and TT maven Lou Saif curated the long list of updates to this now dedicated race machine.  Suspension was modernized, wheel sizes normalized, and tweaks copied from factory endurance racers.  Soon to be ex-owner Gregory Rathe had these comments on – bikeexif.com –

Lou owned this 750 F1 for almost 20 years, and developed it as a replica of Marco Lucchinelli’s factory bike. “Lou’s intention was to make this bike a street racer, and as light and reliable as possible,” says Rathe. So the motor is mostly original except for the cams, Supermono lightweight gears, and a (very loud) titanium exhaust. The wheels are 17″ x 4.5″/6″ magnesium, and Lou shortened the tail and replicated the lights of the works bikes. The front fairing is also in the racing style, and the headlights are quick release—like those used for night racing. The bike is sprinkled with titanium hardware, and weight was removed from everywhere possible—so it now tips the scales at only 305 pounds. Isn’t it just gorgeous?

The 750 F1’s popularity led to three special editions named for challenging race venues – Montjuich, Laguna Seca, and Santa Monica, and some F1 racers which did well in the Italian TT series.  Meanwhile the new Cagiva management reconsidered their plan to absorb the brand and Ducati rose to the occasion.  An interesting snapshot of the end of an era, and a museum-quality treatment of the subject.

-donn

 

City Slicker – 1985 Ducati 750 F1 Race Replica
Ducati April 23, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE for Sale

Update 7.26.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

After the flak generated by the controversial 999, the Sport Classic line was a definite win for motorcycle designer Pierre Terblanche, and the bikes effectively combined modern technology with vintage design cues. But although the performance wasn’t up to the standards set by the very best sportbikes of the period, the Sport Classics weren’t aimed at that market. First and foremost, they were meant to look good. And the Paul Smart 1000LE, as seen in today’s Featured Listing, definitely did that, with a blue-green frame and silver bodywork to evoke Ducati’s first v-twin racebikes, one of which won Imola in 1972 with the eponymous Paul Smart at the controls.

But although the Paul Smart looks like it’d be best for posing, it’s almost as if Ducati couldn’t help themselves, and this stylish machine has the handling goods to run with the best. Pricey Öhlins bits adorn both ends, and the traditional trellis frame is wrapped around their proven two-valve, air-cooled Desmo twin, here with two plugs per cylinder in their “Dual Spark” configuration, since apparently Alfa Romeo already trademarked “Twin Spark…” Twin plug heads are especially useful for a v-twin like this, since the two plugs allow more even combustion across the surface of the large pistons.

The quoted output is underwhelming on paper, but the flexible, torque-rich powerband is the perfect choice for a road bike. And keep in mind, the 92hp may have been modest, even by the long, long ago standards of 2006, but the bike is a development of the classic, race-bred Pantah engine that predated the four-valve Desmoquattro. It’s fun, tunable, and surprisingly reliable when properly cared for. Modest power aside, there were some other concessions to style: the spoked wheels aren’t as light as cast or forged items would be, even though they look plenty evocative, and the Phantom tires were designed specifically by Pirelli to complete the classic look with that very vintage tread design. They’re supposedly reasonably competent tires, but you can find stickier rubber for much cheaper.

Of course, the owner of this Featured Listing isn’t worried about tire choice. Or oil or gas. Or even registration. This immaculate machine has turned only three miles since new, making it a time-capsule example of a modern classic Ducati, like an insect perfectly preserved in amber.

From the Seller: 2006 Ducati SportClassic Paul Smart 1000LE for Sale

This gorgeous Paul Smart has only 3 miles and is in perfect stock condition. Comes with both style fairings a $2000. dollar option. All three keys. Never registered. Certificate of origin from the purchasing Ducati Dealer – Eastern Cycle Ducati, Located in Beverly, MA. This bike has been inside my house since purchasing it in 2006. Periodically pushed in gear to keep engine moving and cylinders fogged for lubrication. No fuel inside gas tank. No dents, dings, or scratches. Ready to be a new piece of art in your collection or ridden.

An instant classic and one of the most collectible motorcycles of the last 15 years.

“Want it for Paul’s achievement, want it for Ducati’s heritage, want it for how it looks”. Bike magazine. This Paul Smart 1000 Limited Edition Ducati has never been ridden, and is in excellent condition. It has spent its whole life pampered inside!

Smart’s famous victory in the 1972 Imola 200 riding what would become the 750SS was instrumental in establishing Ducati as a high-performance brand for the modern era. So what better way to celebrate the Bologna marque’s heritage than a limited edition model in the spirit of the iconic, bevel-drive, ‘green frame’ 750SS? And why not duplicate the rest of the original bevel-drive twins line up while you’re about it? That was Ducati’s reasoning behind the launch of its new ‘Sport Classic’ range in 2005. However, none of the three models Paul Smart 1000 LE, Sport 1000 and GT1000 – is in any way a ‘replica’; all are thoroughly modern motorcycles with only the styling and color scheme(s) acknowledging the past. 

The Paul Smart 1000 LE uses the belt drive, desmo, air-cooled, fuel injected, electronic ignition 1000DS (dual spark) 90-degree v-twin engine 992cc, two-valves, a quoted 92bhp at 8,000rpm and enough torque to surprise its four-valve superbike brethren – as found in a number of other Ducatis. All this modern technology is housed in the Italian firm’s trademark trellis frame in a striking shade of ‘green frame’ green – the latter complemented by some top-quality Öhlins suspension, Brembo brakes, a wet clutch, a six-speed gearbox, a curvaceous two pipe exhaust on the right side in black, and wire-spoke wheels beneath a swoopy silver half-fairing and tail hump. ‘After 20 miles I was totally sold on the bike, as I had been after five minutes of looking at it. Exclusivity, style, power, handling… what else could I want?’ queried Bike magazine’s tester at the PS 1000 LE’s launch. A production run of only 2,000 units was planned and few motorcycles of modern times have become as instantly collectible.

As the seller mentions: the entire first run of Sport Classics became instantly collectible, and all of them command shocking prices on the used market, especially when you compare them to Ducati’s 1098 of the same era, a bike that offers far more performance. But obviously, the nods to Ducati’s racing history struck a chord, and values remain high. The asking price for this showroom-quality example? $39,000. There’s obviously not much of a service history to discuss. In fact, there isn’t any service history at all, since the bike has never turned a wheel in anger. This bike is pretty much bone-stock, excepting the lower fairing. The original bike had a half-fairing that matched Ducati’s production 750SS, but the full-fairing was a popular modification and suits the lines of the bike, although it does seem a bit of a shame to cover up that classic, air-cooled engine.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE for Sale
Ducati March 24, 2019 posted by

Small Batch: 1989 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca

Behold the mighty Ducati F1 special edition “Laguna Seca.” Essentially a factory hot rod based on the F1 (a 750cc version of the Tourist Trophy), the Laguna Seca shared a special tier with the two other limited edition models, the Santamonica and the Montjuich. All of the special models were named after race tracks where a Ducati rider pulled a first place rabbit out of a hat. In this case, it was Marco “Lucky” Lucchinelli prevailing at the 1986 Battle of the Twins (BOTT) event at the famed California track. The Laguna Seca was closest to the Montjuich in spec, the differences being largely related to the intended target audience: North America. As such, changes were basically limited to emissions and noise controls. The rest is pure 1980s Ducati goodness; rough and ready, light and lean. The seller has written (or copied?) a good story of the Laguna Seca (and the F1 model in general), so I will let him pick up the tale:

1989 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for sale on eBay

From the seller:
1989 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca

Frame no. ZDM750LS*750059*
Engine no. ZDM750L1*750194

Less than 300 examples made

Only 6,500 miles from new

Considered by many enthusiasts to be the last of the ‘real’ Ducatis, the race-styled 750 F1 first appeared in 1985. Ducati had already enjoyed considerable success with its Pantah-derived F2 racers in FIM Formula 2 racing – Tony Rutter winning the championship four-times running between 1981 and 1984 – so a ‘750’ version was the logical next step.

First seen in prototype form in endurance races in 1983, the F1’s 748cc engine was the latest in a long line of stretches applied to the original 500c ‘belt drive’ Desmo unit that had first appeared in the Pantah in 1979 – a street-legal updated version of the mid-’80s TT1. A markedly over-square design of 88×61.5mm bore/stroke, the F1 engine produced around 60bhp and functioned as a stressed element within the frame, the swinging arm pivoting in the rear of the gearbox. Clearly visible above the deliberately cut away fairing sides, the aforementioned frame attracted almost as much attention as the engine: a trellis of short, straight tubes, it has formed the basis of every road-going Ducati since, as well as the first Desmosedici Moto GP racers. In the fashion of the day, the F1 came with a 16-inch front wheel, while braking power was provided by state-of-the-art triple Brembos. The stock F1 was complemented by a series of hand-built, limited edition, race replicas – Montjuich, Santamonica and Laguna Seca – the last inspired by Marco “Lucky” Lucchinelli’s famous ‘Battle of the Twins’ race victory at Daytona in 1986. Today the evocatively named F1 and its derivatives are highly prized by Ducati collectors.

Much like the Montjuich, the Laguna Seca came with bigger Dell’Orto carburetors, higher compression ratio, bigger valves, and straight-cut primary drive gears. And talk of 95bhp at 10,000rpm! But unlike the Montjuich, it came with a larger, quieter muffler.

There were some small changes between the two bikes, namely in the Laguna’s parts from the new Paso. The delta-spoked one-piece 16-inch Oscam wheels and the brake discs, but not the four-piston ‘racing’ Brembo front calipers, came from the 750 Paso, as did the wider front fender. Other changes included a ‘Lucky’ signature steel gas tank, revised foot peg bracketry and a plastic rear sub-fender attached to the swing arm. Most Laguna Secas came with a solo seat and were built in limited numbers (perhaps as few as 296.)

Not a lot of history about this particular example, although the read is a good one (reminds me of Ian Faloon). The only point of note I see on this bike is the non-standard Ohlins external shock reservoir strapped to the left side of the iconic trestle frame chassis (original shock was a Marzocchi PVS 4). Any other changes are unknown with the facts given, and with only 3 pictures to work with there are many questions left unanswered. But with only 6,500 miles, this beauty is undoubtedly clean and very rare. I’m not sure if proper etiquette deems we refer to this as the WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca, nee Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca, nee Laguna Seca Raceway, but the connection is very clear. Also clear is the asking price: a not insignificant $24,900. That is a bit higher than we usually see these bikes offered – although the seller appears open to a lesser figure – so if you’re in the market for one of these beautiful and rare model Pantahs you should act quickly. Check it out here, and then jump back to the comments and share your thoughts on the F1 model Ducatis: are you a fan? Good Luck!!

MI

Ducati December 12, 2018 posted by

#becauseracebike: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart Race Bike for Sale

Ducati’s two-valve engine variants have long been seen as the affordable, low-performance option for novice or “mature” riders and bikes far from the leading edge of performance. Which makes the choice of an air and oil-cooled Ducati Sport Classic as the foundation for a high-performance racing machine like this highly-developed example pretty surprising.

When the liquid-cooled, four-valve Desmoquattro engine was introduced, it instantly relegated the original Pantah engine and its descendants to second-tier status. But in the early 1980s, the oil and air-cooled two-valve v-twin, newly updated with toothed rubber belts to drive the single overhead cams instead of the classic tower shafts and bevel gears, it was their only engine and, as such, it was developed with competition in mind. The main point here being that you shouldn’t dismiss it as a racing powerplant simply because its been surpassed in terms of outright performance.

The Ducati’s Sport Classic line might not have offered up Superbike power-to-weight ratios, but the engine’s durability and the frame’s inherent rightness mean that you can build a pretty competitive machine out of one, assuming you find the right class in which to participate.

The 992cc original engine might be torque-rich and involving, but in order to be competitive, this one has been punched out to a little over 1200cc with a raft of NCR components. The result is a claimed 140hp at the rear wheel, up from 92 in the original.

If you’re not interested in competing on the bleeding edge, either because of the exorbitant costs involved, or simply lack the talent possessed by only a handful of riders worldwide able to to compete at the highest levels and win , this might provide you with a more budget-friendly option, although it’s still pretty far from cheap, at $54,000.

From the original eBay listing: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart Race Bike for Sale

Ducati NCR Paul Smart Road Race Bike

Used in Excellent Condition

Perfect for CCS/ASRA, WERA, AHRMA Racing

140 RWHP

This is a well known national championship winning Ducati NCR Road Race bike created by Chris Boy of Motocorse Performance, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. It was a no expense spared build with all the best internals from NCR; fresh rebuild of the motor in 2017 with 80 km on the clock since; Engine with top performance parts, fully revised and ready to race; Ducati 1100 evo built to 1215cc ; 140 RWHP ; NCR engine, custom MCP throttle bodies, NCR custom heads, NCR lightweight gears, NCR carbon valve covers, NCR oil cooler, Nemesis traction control, fairings in carbon and many other special parts; This is a rare occasion to purchase fresh well sorted championship winning bike; 

auction includes pit bull front and rear track stands & battery charger

Goodies List:  Carbon Fiber Front Fairing, Seat, Belly Pan, Front/Rear Fenders, Fuel Cell Carbon/Kevlar; NCR Front Fairing Bracket,  NCR Adjustable Triple Clamps , Ohlins Steering Damper, Brembo GP Master, Quick Turn Throttle Kit Electric Brake Fade Lever Adjuster, Woodcraft Rear Sets w/ MCP Lowering kit, Ohlins Road and Track Forks with 30mm Kit; Brembo HP Rotors, Brembo Radial Monoblock Calipers, Aluminum Front Axe Kit, BST Carbon Fiber Wheels, NCR Titanium Bolt Kit, MCP Titanium Rear brake Rotor, Ohlins Rear Shock, Quick Change Rear Axle, Titanium front sprocket, EVR3 Chain, PitBull Front/Rear Stand, AIM MXL Dash with GPS, Full Telemetry, LCU, and Smarty  Cam (mounted through front fairing), Nemesis Traction Control, SP Quick Shifter, Hard Wired MyLaps X2 Transponder; 24 volt starter, 2 Lithium batteries, billet Kill Switch, Custom Engine Build by MCP with NCR 1215 Kit, Custom MCP Throttle Bodies Velocity Stack  KN Filters, MCP Stage 7 Heads, Lightweight Gears, NCR Carbon Valve Covers, Zullo Racing Custom Lightweight Wire Harness, Nichols Motor Mount Bolts, NCR Oil Cooler – Oversized, Oversized crank Case Breather Box, Custom Titanium exhaust; MRX-02 Fuel Mapping 140+RWHP SuperFlo Dyno

Extensive spares package is available for addition charge.

VIN number listed is arbitrary; VIN number area has been painted over; sale is without title; eBay requires listing title information otherwise unable to post sale; there is no title offered with this race bike, just bill of sale.

Should you be also interested in the sister bike listed in my other auction, a “race team” deal with spares package can be arranged.

I can arrange free pickup to regional CCS/ASRA, WERA and AHRMA events on the East Coast; I will assist with shipping domestic and foreign.

Please don’t hesitate to contact me with any questions, adjustments in the auction, etc. I pride myself in telling it like it is. If for any reason my description of this item isn’t correct, I will gladly refund your money. Having a perfect feedback rating is very important to me and I plan on keeping it, so I don’t play games.

Looking at that list of go-fast goodies, it’s pretty clear that no expense was spared in building this thundering v-twin racebike. 140 rwhp is nothing to scoff at, especially given the bike’s probable weight: a new Paul Smart weighed in at around 414lbs dry so this one should be a good chunk less without all the lighting and other road gear. And that’s before you even get into lightweight parts that decorate this machine. It’s all top-shelf, and a ridiculous amount of money to throw at an obsolete v-twin sportbike, but if I were a rich guy, it’s exactly the kind of track day toy I’d want in my garage. Liquid-cooled Ducatis might be faster, but I still think that the air-cooled two-valve engines sound much better, and the punchy midrange, here amplified to epic levels, should provide plenty of entertainment for experienced track day riders and racers alike.

-tad

#becauseracebike: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart Race Bike for Sale