Posts by tag: pantah

Ducati March 11, 2021 posted by

Bleautiful: 1988 Ducati Paso 750

Welcome to one of the most polarizing models in Ducati history. Perhaps second to only the 749/999 series, the Paso was a little bit like the un-Ducati. With full bodywork resembling more of a a monolithic, monochromatic sport tourer, the Paso took styling in an entirely new direction. Thankfully under the covers the DNA and performance of the F1 Pantah series remained, ensuring lots of lumpy, torquey goodness.

1988 Ducati Paso 750 for sale on eBay

Strip away the Paso’s fully enclosed bodywork (purported to vent away engine heat in a controlled manner) and you would essentially be looking at a Ducati 750 F1 mill with a reversed rear (upright) cylinder head to allow for both barrels to breathe through an automotive-styled carb between the vee. This also simplified the rear exhaust routing somewhat, although the collector is a work of art. The chassis is not quite what you would expect from a company that built round-tube trellis frames for decades, but all covered up in bodywork you would never know the Paso is based on a square tubing cantilever arrangement utilizing the engine as a stressed member. And speaking of bodywork, you may note similarities between the Paso and the Bimota DB1 – after all, they were both the brain child of designer Massimo Tamburini. All in all, the package worked well, yet was a significant departure from the classic lines of pervious Ducatis. The Paso was loved fervently by some, while hated by others.

From the seller:
Excellent example of the Ducati that is credited for saving the brand from disappearing, desinged by Massimo Tamburini, the legend behind Bimota, Ducati and MV Agusta. Paso 750 is powered by 748 cc Desmodue engine, the same Pantah motor from the Ducati 750 F1. Engine starts easy, runs great without overheating or smoking. Originally powered by a Weber carburator which was often the cause of high engine temps especially in traffic, this Paso has been upgraded to a Keihin 39mm flat slide. It currently retains OEM exhaust but an upgrade to an aftermarket system will allow for much better breathing motor.

The heads have been upgraded to M750 which increase the valve adjustment intervals while offering improved valve guides as the originals had a tendency to wear out rather quickly. The cam belts were replaced approximately 3 years ago and the valves were adjusted at the same time. There is around 2600 miles on the oil and filter. All lights and signals as well as the horn work perfect. Even the clock!

The front forks with anti-dive technology were very advanced for their time. Swing arm is lightweight alloy with concentric chain adjuster. This Paso rides on factory original Marvic aluminum wheels, tires have around 3500 miles but still have plenty of thread and perform fine in the canyons.

More from the seller:
Factory blue color is a rare find for a Paso, with some sources claiming only 50 or so were painted in this color. This Paso has been completely refinished by previous owner with correct decals applied and cleared over to prevent them from fading or pealing. Bike looks like new!

Keep in mind this is a 33 year old bike and it will have few quirks and needs. The fuel gauge works but it tends to bounce a bit, especially if the fuel level is at or below half mark. There is a very minor oil leak coming from what appears to be an oil pan gasket. Due to the conversion to Keihin flat slide, the choke has been disconnected.

Sold with a clean California title. Registration is expiring on 3/10/21 and was changed to non-operational to avoid any back fees. The Paso is sold “as is, where is”. In case of shipping, it will be responsibility of the buyer. I will work with the shipper to accomodate their time schedule. Please make arrangements and ask questions before buying.

The Paso offered here is a great combination of updated pricey mechanical components and cosmetic refresh. The motor is a very desireable Pantah mill that is gaining traction with the collectors. It is rare, it is cool and its very fun bike to ride. Overall this motorcycle is an inexpensive entry into vintage Ducati world!

The Paso lineup has yet to see the light of day when it comes to collectors and appreciating values. With 35 years gone since introduction, there are signs that some of that reticence is beginning to change. To find an exceptionally clean and original anything 33 years later makes it more rare than the day it rolled off the showroom floor. And sadly many of these models – after dropping in value – fell into the hands of those who could not (or would not) give them the care and maintenance they deserved.

To be clear, this particular Paso is not strictly a bone-stock example. The seller does a good job outlining the mods made, and the switch from the stock Weber carb is a popular one (Ducati eventually introduced fuel injection in later models), although pictures of the carb throat sans filter make me nervous. The rest of the bike looks used but clean, and readers should note that it has travelled nearly 24,000 miles. Mileage is not an issue with these models provided proper maintenance has been adhered to, but if you are seeking a zero mile bike look elsewhere. There are lots of good photos provided by the seller, so check out all of the details here. On which side of the Paso debate do you fall? Unloved, or unloveable? Let us know in the comments. Good Luck!!

MI

Bleautiful: 1988 Ducati Paso 750
Ducati March 1, 2021 posted by

New-ish Old School: 1986 Ducati 750 F1

The Ducati 750 F1 is about as old school cool as you can get. Devoid of any wizardry found on more modern motorcycles, the F1 is a basic bare-knuckle brawler with fancy footwork. To call this a race bike for the street would certainly be accurate, given the underlying DNA came directly from the factory TT1 and TT2 racers. Sporting a similar trellis frame and utilizing a Pantah-era engine punched out to 748cc that were both first utilized in the TT1 racer, the F1 offers a no-nonsense riding experience that is raw and pure.

1986 Ducati 750 F1 for sale on eBay

Both the TT1 and the TT2 racers were effective weapons at such iconic places as the Isle of Man. The F1 followed in those footsteps – such that there were three “special edition” models of the bike named after famous racing circuits such as Montjuich (Spain), Stanta Monica (Italy) and Laguna Seca (United States). With about 70 HP on tap, the F1 was not so much a rocket ship as an adequately fast – but extremely nimble – racing sled. With no anti-lock brakes, no anti-wheelie control, no anti-stall device, no traction control and no quick shifter, this relic is missing everything that helps make racing motorcycles fast today. But what remains is the essence of motorcycling, distilled down to only what needs to be there. Creature comforts? Sorry, not on this bike. If it doesn’t make you faster or the bike lighter, it simply isn’t there. THAT is the beauty of the F1 series, in a nutshell.

From the seller:
Selling one of my 750 F1’s, bike got a new paint job, new belts, overall in great shape. Comes with set of original turn signals and a few more parts. Was last on the street probably 20 years ago when I bought it, see manufacturing date from tires. I had the bike for 3 years and only rode it twice, restored it to what you see and now selling it. Needs new tires and the turn signals which I installed are not connected yet, everything else works and bike starts cold and warm very well. The last 4 pictures show the bike as it looked when I got it, from the original ad when I bought the bike: “Rare 1986 Ducati F1B. Super trap tail pipe, repaired gauge mount, last ridden Donner Pass Hwy 40 hill climb 2000. Fresh oil, new battery, petcock eliminated, runs good. Liquidating collection.”.
More information can also be found at raresportbikesforsale.com when you search for Ducati 750 F1B.
Happy to answer any additional question.

The seller is correct in that we at RSBFS have seen a lot of these F1 machines (and more specialized variants) posted on these pages. In fact, this exact bike graced our pages in its earlier tricolore guise back in 2017. Comments were not kind regarding the butchered paint job, and this seller has done a great job restoring the livery to former glory. Here is a link to find other F1s on RSBFS. Researching older posts offers a great way to learn more about the model, but can also help describe the rough historical value of these models over time. Those serious about a bike such as this F1 would be well advised to do their homework.

This particular example looks pretty good in the pictures. It shows a nicely painted F1 in the standard Italian tricolore scheme. Mileage is low (4,200 claimed), however given that this bike had been raced it is possible that the speedo drive has been disconnected at some point in its life. There appear to be other minor foibles that may need to be sorted here as well. Sharp eyes will also spot some non-stock additions, including modifications to the left-side lowers as well as the tail section. But such is the nature of a 35 year old racer that aspired to be a street bike. There is no claim of “all original, zero miles” here, and the seller has been open about the efforts undertaken to bring this classic back to the status it deserves. Bidders have agreed, with decent traffic and action up to $7,300 at the time of writing. Quite a few watchers are standing by, so expect a lot more bidding once the reserve has been met. Check out all of the details and pics on this auction here. Good Luck!!

MI

New-ish Old School: 1986 Ducati 750 F1
Ducati February 24, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE for Sale

Update 2.24.2021: It has come to our attention that the images from this archived Featured Listing may be being utilized with scam listing circulating on CycleTrader. Thanks for the heads up from Mike. -dc

Update 7.26.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

After the flak generated by the controversial 999, the Sport Classic line was a definite win for motorcycle designer Pierre Terblanche, and the bikes effectively combined modern technology with vintage design cues. But although the performance wasn’t up to the standards set by the very best sportbikes of the period, the Sport Classics weren’t aimed at that market. First and foremost, they were meant to look good. And the Paul Smart 1000LE, as seen in today’s Featured Listing, definitely did that, with a blue-green frame and silver bodywork to evoke Ducati’s first v-twin racebikes, one of which won Imola in 1972 with the eponymous Paul Smart at the controls.

But although the Paul Smart looks like it’d be best for posing, it’s almost as if Ducati couldn’t help themselves, and this stylish machine has the handling goods to run with the best. Pricey Öhlins bits adorn both ends, and the traditional trellis frame is wrapped around their proven two-valve, air-cooled Desmo twin, here with two plugs per cylinder in their “Dual Spark” configuration, since apparently Alfa Romeo already trademarked “Twin Spark…” Twin plug heads are especially useful for a v-twin like this, since the two plugs allow more even combustion across the surface of the large pistons.

The quoted output is underwhelming on paper, but the flexible, torque-rich powerband is the perfect choice for a road bike. And keep in mind, the 92hp may have been modest, even by the long, long ago standards of 2006, but the bike is a development of the classic, race-bred Pantah engine that predated the four-valve Desmoquattro. It’s fun, tunable, and surprisingly reliable when properly cared for. Modest power aside, there were some other concessions to style: the spoked wheels aren’t as light as cast or forged items would be, even though they look plenty evocative, and the Phantom tires were designed specifically by Pirelli to complete the classic look with that very vintage tread design. They’re supposedly reasonably competent tires, but you can find stickier rubber for much cheaper.

Of course, the owner of this Featured Listing isn’t worried about tire choice. Or oil or gas. Or even registration. This immaculate machine has turned only three miles since new, making it a time-capsule example of a modern classic Ducati, like an insect perfectly preserved in amber.

From the Seller: 2006 Ducati SportClassic Paul Smart 1000LE for Sale

This gorgeous Paul Smart has only 3 miles and is in perfect stock condition. Comes with both style fairings a $2000. dollar option. All three keys. Never registered. Certificate of origin from the purchasing Ducati Dealer – Eastern Cycle Ducati, Located in Beverly, MA. This bike has been inside my house since purchasing it in 2006. Periodically pushed in gear to keep engine moving and cylinders fogged for lubrication. No fuel inside gas tank. No dents, dings, or scratches. Ready to be a new piece of art in your collection or ridden.

An instant classic and one of the most collectible motorcycles of the last 15 years.

“Want it for Paul’s achievement, want it for Ducati’s heritage, want it for how it looks”. Bike magazine. This Paul Smart 1000 Limited Edition Ducati has never been ridden, and is in excellent condition. It has spent its whole life pampered inside!

Smart’s famous victory in the 1972 Imola 200 riding what would become the 750SS was instrumental in establishing Ducati as a high-performance brand for the modern era. So what better way to celebrate the Bologna marque’s heritage than a limited edition model in the spirit of the iconic, bevel-drive, ‘green frame’ 750SS? And why not duplicate the rest of the original bevel-drive twins line up while you’re about it? That was Ducati’s reasoning behind the launch of its new ‘Sport Classic’ range in 2005. However, none of the three models Paul Smart 1000 LE, Sport 1000 and GT1000 – is in any way a ‘replica’; all are thoroughly modern motorcycles with only the styling and color scheme(s) acknowledging the past. 

The Paul Smart 1000 LE uses the belt drive, desmo, air-cooled, fuel injected, electronic ignition 1000DS (dual spark) 90-degree v-twin engine 992cc, two-valves, a quoted 92bhp at 8,000rpm and enough torque to surprise its four-valve superbike brethren – as found in a number of other Ducatis. All this modern technology is housed in the Italian firm’s trademark trellis frame in a striking shade of ‘green frame’ green – the latter complemented by some top-quality Öhlins suspension, Brembo brakes, a wet clutch, a six-speed gearbox, a curvaceous two pipe exhaust on the right side in black, and wire-spoke wheels beneath a swoopy silver half-fairing and tail hump. ‘After 20 miles I was totally sold on the bike, as I had been after five minutes of looking at it. Exclusivity, style, power, handling… what else could I want?’ queried Bike magazine’s tester at the PS 1000 LE’s launch. A production run of only 2,000 units was planned and few motorcycles of modern times have become as instantly collectible.

As the seller mentions: the entire first run of Sport Classics became instantly collectible, and all of them command shocking prices on the used market, especially when you compare them to Ducati’s 1098 of the same era, a bike that offers far more performance. But obviously, the nods to Ducati’s racing history struck a chord, and values remain high. The asking price for this showroom-quality example? $39,000. There’s obviously not much of a service history to discuss. In fact, there isn’t any service history at all, since the bike has never turned a wheel in anger. This bike is pretty much bone-stock, excepting the lower fairing. The original bike had a half-fairing that matched Ducati’s production 750SS, but the full-fairing was a popular modification and suits the lines of the bike, although it does seem a bit of a shame to cover up that classic, air-cooled engine.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE for Sale
Ducati February 12, 2021 posted by

Isle of Men: 1982 Ducati TT2 ex Tony Rutter racer!

If the RSBFS faithful required additional proof that Ducati is a racing company that also builds street motorcycles, I give you the curious case of the TT2. Wildly popular with racers due to its small and lightweight stature, decent torque and power and impeccable handling, the TT2 was a mere 600cc of Pantah-powered goodness that became the genesis for the fabulous 750cc F1 racer (and street bike) that followed.

1982 Ducati TT2 for sale on eBay

The foundational underpinnings of the TT2 include a surprisingly lightweight frame crafted by Verlicchi. If you look closely you will note several familiar elements, including the straight tubing trellis construction. This should not be shocker given that the entire project was headed up by noted Ducati designer Fabio Taglioni. The resultant package looks not unlike a 1980s Bimota. As a racer the Pantah motor is air cooled, but there is an oil cooler mounted high up behind the fairing to augment temperature control. Standard issue suspension was a very Italian affair: a fully-adjustable Marzocchi fork up front and a Paoli monoshock at the rear. Handling was quickened by the optional use of a 16″ front wheel. If all that goodness isn’t enough, this bike has some honest track creds and star power in the form of Isle of Man expert and 7 time TT race winner Tony Rutter.

From the seller:
Purchased directly from Tony Rutter after the IoM and properly stored for the last 40 years You can look at the head stock VIN stampings this frame has never been repainted. The bike has never been crashed. Underside of fork legs and axle nuts area ll clean no signs of road rash. Bike is full of works details like dished head bolts for example see caliper photo. Please see the photos for details. Note shift linkage is included, it was not installed at time the photos were taken

More from the seller:
I actively raced Ducati TT2’s and TT1’s in US and Europe. The modified 750CC TT1 in US Battle of the Twins from 1982-1986. I purchased bike direct from the factory rider and built up supporting parts inventory accordingly principally from the factory, Sports Motorcycle Racing and NCR. This bike is very special in its own rights with factory racing history. The TT2 was a giant killers in the day. They are the epitome of nimble, lightweight tools with favorable power to weight ratios and just the right amount of chassis compliance harmonics that enable a rider to ‘dance’ with the bike, never a need to fight with your partner here. These bikes went where you wanted to go with a vengeance. Very tractable power delivery made the TT a formidable opponent able to execute and complete a pass at any and all opportunities.

IMPORTANT: note this is a racing vehicle sold with Bill of Sale only. This is the ‘clean title’ referenced above. This is not a street bike conversion therefore there is no conventional title.

Also available but not included in this sale are complete spares suitable to campaign the bike as well as update to NCR clutch and TT1 spec

In the world of used race bikes, this beautiful TT2 has held up amazingly well. It appears to be devoid of major modifications, crash damage, illicit trackside repairs – basically all of the ugliness that racing wreaks on mechanical systems. Instead you see what looks to be totally museum worthy or, if you are of the brave sort, vintage race worthy after a mechanical refresh and safety check. These are wonderful motorcycles that are beautiful to look at, wonderful to hear, and (so I’ve been told) even better to ride. The TT2 was a very successful model for Ducati, and helped spawn both their racing reputation as well as larger capacity racers.

This bike is available in sunny SoCal, but you’d better bring your sponsor along. There is no reserve that I can see, with a $35k ask. These bikes are a little hard to value as they are ex-racers and all potentially different in terms of setup and trim, but that is probably fair number for such a clean example with documented history on the island AND a mountain specialist as the previous owner/rider. Sadly we lost Tony Rutter in 2020, making this a rather difficult to duplicate opportunity. Check out all of the details and beautiful photography here, then Dream, Drool and Decide. Good Luck!!

MI

Isle of Men: 1982 Ducati TT2 ex Tony Rutter racer!
Ducati November 20, 2020 posted by

All Sales Final: 1998 Ducati 900 Final Edition #104

Ducati has a long history of creating some very memorable motorcycles, many of which have been considered rolling artwork. They also have perfected the art of the limited edition, with exclusive models wearing limited and unique number plaques on the headstocks. The purpose of the special, super-exclusive badging is to drive demand via the perception of scarcity – thereby harnessing the law of supply and demand to turn a bigger profit. And in many, many cases the motorcycles wearing the “LE” badge are indeed special bikes (SP, SPS, LTD, Superlight, MH900e all come to mind). And what can be as special as the last model of the vaunted Tamburini-era 900 Supersport?

1998 Ducati 900 Final Edition #104 for sale on eBay

To be sure the 1998 model year was not the last Supersport – for these are still being built today. But the ’98 model was the final year for this particular design, which dates back to the 1980s and the introduction of the Pantah motor. With a big square headlight and both a half-faired as well as fully faired bodywork style available, the Supersport allowed customers who could not afford a 851/88/916 Superbike model a more wallet-friendly way to get into Ducati. And it worked. The air-cooled, two valve, desmo Ducati Supersports became a hot seller, overhauled only by the success of the Monster line. But the big deal here was not the past, but the future. For in 1998 the “new” Supersport design was launched – penned by Pierre Terblanche. Responsible for the polarizing design of the 999, Terblanche’s take on the classic 900 Supersport fell flat. That cliff dive of design continuity is what *really* makes the ’98 900 Final Edition special.

From the seller:
Final Edition – 1998 Ducati Supersport 900FE

To mark the end of its badass Supersport line, Ducati released a one-year run of 800 bikes around the world. They called it the Final Edition, painted it silver, and threw on a couple of goodies like 41mm FCR carbs and Ohlins rear shock. 300 of the 800 examples made it over the US – here’s number 104.

Ducati started with the Superlight variant of the SS, and then in addition to the silver paint, added a whole bunch of carbon: mudguard, chain guard, rear fender, countershaft drive cover, and dashboard cover. In addition, they raised the pipes for more cornering clearance, gave it new cast iron floating rotors, and some new parts (voltage regulator and alternator) were added, too.

Extremely rare Ducati, 14,895 miles in pristine condition. I am the second owner and it has been meticulously maintained.

From an ownership perspective, there is little not to love about the Supersport. Relatively simple, light, torquey and rock solid, the Ducati of this era gave up a little bit of creature comfort and polish to the Japanese competition, but offered the visceral sound and experience for which Ducati is known. Maintenance intervals are reasonable, and the 2v motors are much easier to work on than the desmoquattro Superbikes. All in all, these are reliable machines with a relatively low cost of ownership considering it is an Italian exotic.

From a collector perspective, the 900SS-SP (Sport Production) and 900SS-SL (Superlight) are the top dogs of the Supersport world. The Final Edition is essentially a specially-badged SP variant, which should certainly place it appropriately as unique. These are not necessarily valuable motorcycles as a whole (a basic 900 SS CR model remains a real bargain today), but values are certainly on the rise. Superlights are way up, and SP versions of the 900SS are climbing. This 900SS-FE has been slow on the auction side, and has a Buy It Now price of $9,000. That B.I.N. number is fair money for a clean and well-kept FE, so interested buyers should check out all of the details here. It’s hard to go wrong with a Ducati Supersport, be it bevel or Pantah, Tamburini or Terblanche. What’s your favorite Supersport model? Be sure and let us know in the comments. Stay safe, and good luck!!

MI

All Sales Final: 1998 Ducati 900 Final Edition #104
Ducati November 2, 2020 posted by

Tacit Blue – 1988 Ducati Paso 750 with Just 1,538 Miles !

Rare though they are, the 1986-88 Paso 750’s have their loyal fans, and there have been a half-dozen blue examples profiled on RSBFS.  This one hasn’t but a half an oil change’s worth of miles, and has been beautifully stored and cared for since its return to duty.

1988 Ducati Paso 750 for sale on eBay

Design legend Massimo Tamburini’s first Ducati was the Paso, where he proposed a square-tube chassis enveloped by the soap bar.  Other innovations on board included the belt-driven cams on the 748cc twin, with a single Weber carburetor servicing both cylinders from between them.  A rather forward weight bias steers easily on the 16-inch front radial tire, and the 42mm Marzocchi fork was robust at the time.  Mid-sized 280mm brakes, 5-speed transmission and long alloy swingarm complete the running gear.  Even with its opaque windscreen, the very full fairing provides a generous pocket for the rider.

The seller took a leap of faith several years ago, and went for a NOS twenty-five year old.  No word on how the re-commissioning went or what’s been needed since then.  The condition is hard to believe, in a good way.  Likely the cam belts are again due, but also factor the unobtanium exhaust and slick tail-light mod into the equation.  From the eBay auction:

When I bought the bike it had 154 miles on it and it was 25 years old. A brand new, unrestored antique made in limited numbers and even more rare, it’s blue.

Now the bike has 1,538 miles on it and it’s 32 years old, in like new condition.
 
I bought the new Conti slip-ons out of Australia. These are hard to find. The original exhaust to be included. I removed the old saggy rear blinkers and incorporated the signals into the tail light as was done on models sold in Europe. The only non-factory part is the ring on the tank that the fuel cap installs into. This was made by by hand at Ducati Austin as a replacement.

Before being assigned the Paso, Tamburini had already come and gone from Bimota, and joined Cagiva ( who had just acquired control of Ducati ).  Though it was great on a more open road and handled better than the 904cc models, even when tuned right the Weber was temperature sensitive and made the Paso 750 a finicky commuter.  Either way it never really caught on, and they’re rare without any special editions.  The buy-it-now seems realistic in light of the season and a downright bargain for an afficionado.

-donn

Tacit Blue – 1988 Ducati Paso 750 with Just 1,538 Miles !
Cagiva October 15, 2020 posted by

Alluring: 1985 Cagiva Alazzurra 650

In the twisted family tree that is the Italian motorcycle community, there are many merges and branches. One interesting area is the history of Cagiva and their relationship with Ducati. While Cagiva owned Ducati in the mid-eighties, they were initially a customer as they purchased engines & transmissions to create their own bikes. Today’s Cagiva Alazzurra is such a beast, utilizing a sourced Pantah-based motor for power. In many ways these were seen as a poor man’s Ducati in North America – more exclusive than contemporary Japanese bikes, but with less cachet than other Italian exotics. Today the Cagiva Alazzurra is but a strange footnote for US buyers; once Cagiva took over Ducati they adopted the Ducati name as the stronger brand and the Alazzurra was discontinued.

1985 Cagiva Alazzurra 650 for sale on eBay

The heart of the Alazzurra is very similar to the powerplant that drives the Pantah, such as this week’s 600 model. Ducati produced the Pantah in different displacements, including 500cc, 600cc and 650cc (there was also a 750cc unit built for racing). In many respects, the Alazzurra could be considered a later derivation of the Ducati Pantah, as the 650cc engine was the latest evolution of the unit, with a frame design that was extremely similar to the Ducati bike. With 55 HP pushing 424 lbs (dry) the Alazzurra offered respectable performance for the time, but was typically slower than similarly sized Japanese offerings.

From the seller:
Very good condition. Has collector plates so insurance in BC is 150 bucks per year.New cam belts, braided lines, seals, including crankshaft oil seal, valves checked, oil , filter and plugs replaced, new grips , l.e.d headlight

The legend of the Pantah design long outlived the Cagiva brand in North America. Today the Alazzurra is more an oddity than a true collector’s piece, although time has a tendency to create rarity all on its own. And with 35 years gone by, the pool of well-kept imported Cagivas is shrinking. But the big question is if that helps with appreciation of the model – or its value. This particular example is located in Canada, and is offered for approximately $3,424 USD. That is actually below the MSRP for the bike when it was new. But the Alazzurra does not have as strong a following as other Cagiva/Ducati models; it is seen by many as more of a novelty than an icon. Still for many riders this was a close to a Ducati as finances would permit during this time, creating a bit of nostalgia. Do any RSBFS readers fall into that category? There are not a lot of details available on this one, but you can check it out here. Let us know what you think about the Alazzurra, and good luck!!

MI

Alluring: 1985 Cagiva Alazzurra 650
Ducati October 14, 2020 posted by

Heavy Breather: 1983 Ducati Pantah 600

Behold the wonderous, the cutting edge (while at the same time, archaic) modern interpretation of the new Ducati era. The Pantah represented the next evolution of the already legendary Ducati L-twin, and would being the new phase of the rubber band motor era. Replacing the bevel drive with a toothed belt to drive the desmo valve train, the Pantah simultaneously provided an easier manufacturing solution, a quieter and more efficient mechanical solution, and greatly reduced maintenance requirements. Ducati chose to wrap that new tech in a brand new body style that is unmistakably Italian.

1983 Ducati Pantah 600 for sale on eBay

To be fair, there was nothing really wrong with the bevel-drive round case motors of the past. In fact, the bevel drive continued alongside the new Pantah configuration, available in the larger 900cc and 1000cc variants. However the rubber belt drive for the valve train made the engine easier to assemble and quicker to configure in terms of adjustment. Such an arrangement would continue to be a feature on all Ducati motors right up to the Panigale of late, although there was much technology that was yet to come. For now, the fabled Ducati twin breathed through two valves, fed by carburetors, and made use of simple and lightweight air cooling.

From the seller:
ORIGINAL, UNRESTORED SURVIVOR. ORIGINAL PAINT AND GRAPHICS, ETC. DUCATI’S FIRST DESMODRONIC V-TWIN. FOR SERIOUS DUCATI COLLECTORS ONLY.

This particular Pantah looks very nice, although it is sporting some patina that can split opinions. On one hand, a bike like this is only original once – therefore the original paint, flaws and all, represent originality. Those looking for a perfect specimen that has endured a nut and bolt restoration and fresh paint throughout might wish to look elsewhere. I will correct the seller in that this is not Ducati’s first Desmo twin – that honor came more than a decade previous. However the mistake is somewhat academic given that this was the first desmo twin Ducati where the valve actuation was driven by belt. Still a big deal, but definitely not the first Desmo.

Prices for these Pantahs has gone on the rise over the past years, but these are not Limited Edition models – or particularly rare. Time, however, does take its toll on available stock, and invariably helps with the supply-versus-demand equation. Still, these tend to be a rather affordable way to get into a (almost) classic Ducati. This particular bike looks original, but does show some wear and/or rash. The seller is asking nearly $13k – which is near the top of the range we have been seeing as of late. Check it out here, and good luck!

MI

Heavy Breather: 1983 Ducati Pantah 600