Posts by tag: Genesis

Bimota November 30, 2019 posted by

Underappreciated: 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

This Bimota YB11 Superleggera isn’t just a sportbike, or even an exotic sportbike. It’s a high-performance boutique motorcycle, one of just 650 ever built. Of course, that’s pretty much mass production by Bimota standards. It doesn’t have quite the cachet of Honda’s limited-production homologation superbikes, but consider that Honda made almost 5,000 Honda RC30s, compared to just 650 YB11s. It’s still incredibly rare and plenty fast and, as a bonus, you can take your significant other with you on your high-performance boutique motorcycle: this was one of very few Bimotas ever built with passenger accommodations, although they’re about as comfortable as you’d expect. Still, it’s great to have that spare seat, in case of emergencies…

The “Superleggera” part of Bimota YB11 Superleggera refers to the focus on lightweight construction that allowed huge performance from an existing engine, along with the agile handling you’d expect. At the time, the bike weighed 403lbs dry, a full 80lbs less than the Yamaha YZF1000R that donated its 1002cc five-valve Genesis engine and five-speed transmission. Power was rated at 145hp, with an impressive 80lb-ft of torque that allowed the five-speed box to be fitted to the open-class superbike in the first place, a characteristic it shared with Suzuki’s rival GSX-R1100. The light weight and power were enough to push the bike to nearly 170mph. All the way back in 1997.

Somehow, because of their hand-built nature and flaws, it doesn’t seem all that criminal to modify or improve Bimota’s 1990s motorcycles if it helps sort some of their more annoying quirks: a YZF750R six-speed can replace the original five-speed found in the YB11, and I’m sure somebody can figure out how to fit a stand-alone fuel-injection system to replace the carburetors. This example luckily has the earlier gauges that should hopefully prove more reliable than the later style, while looking better to boot.

It can be tricky to tell if we’ve posted a particular YB11 on the site previously: they all came in the same colors, have low miles, and are generally well cared-for. It’s even trickier when the seller refers to the bike as both a 1997 and a 1998 and appears to have “borrowed” some content from RSBFS in their description… Other than the occasional Termignoni system, aftermarket exhausts and accessories are virtually unheard of, and bolt-on farkles are generally considered undesirable. There appear to have been a few different exhaust hangers used, with and without passenger pegs, although it’s also possible those were fabbed up by the owners when new.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

One of only 650 produced

1998 Bimota 1,002cc YB11 Superleggera 

Frame no. ZESYB1100TR00047

A Rimini-based manufacturer of ducting for heating and ventilation, Bimota soon turned to their first love of motorcycles. Founders Guiseppe Morri and Massimo Tamburrini began manufacturing in the early 1970s and have since built a reputation of exclusive and limited with inimitable Italian styling machines of performance. Using the best cycle parts and an array of the best outside manufacturers’ powerplants, the Bimota was always an uncompromised and expensive foray in to exclusive motorcycling. 

Powered by Yamaha’s superb Thunderace engine, the Superleggera YB11 was Bimota’s last word in Italian exotica of the 1990s. The 131bhp ‘four’ in stock form breathed through a Bimota-designed exhaust system, which could squeeze out a little more power. It was shrouded by the firm’s trademark aluminum beam frame and complemented by some of the finest cycle parts available, including fully adjustable Paioli 51mm forks, fully adjustable Paioli shock, Brembo brakes, 17” Antera wheels and carbon fiber-abound. At 403lbs, the YB11 Superleggera weighed some 80lbs less than the donor bike and its handling and performance were in a different league altogether; as was the price, which at about $20,000, was a staggering 50% more than the Yamaha.

In the late 1990s Bimota went through one of its periodic financial convulsions and production of the YB11 ended in 1999, although a second batch of bikes was completed later using stocks of existing parts. 

The bike offered, an early 1997 example, the 46th built, is presented in excellent condition throughout. With an indicated 8,700 miles, racked up in the first decade of use, the bike has been on static display since 2007, though regularly maintained. A fresh service was performed to ready the bike for sale and no back-fees are due to a California buyer, as the last registration was due over ten years ago.

With only 650 machines produced, this represents a perfect combination of Italian exotica, Japanese reliability, ease of maintenance and power and with such qualifications, is bound to be a future classic.

For additional information, photos, etc. please visit ClassicAvenue.com

Look, the Bimota YB11 is a flawed motorcycle. And maybe the flaws would be unacceptable in a bike that originally sold for the equivalent of $47,000 in today’s money, but they don’t cost that much currently: this one is being offered at $9,900. That seems to be a little bit on the high-side for a 90s Bimota currently, although I doubt that will still be the case in the future. For that kind of money, you’re getting a hell of a lot of exclusivity and performance that will still peel your face back, even today.

-tad

Underappreciated: 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale
Yamaha November 8, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT

Update 11.27.2019: SOLD in less than three weeks! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Say you’re a Yamaha fan and you want to collect something significant. Where do you start? Well, rare homologation machines are always a great place to look. Think you want an OW-01? You might find that mighty machine to be very, very expensive, and not as rare as you think. If you really want to buy the right bike at the right time, the homologation machine to check out is the 1980s FZR750R variants. Built to go AMA Superbike racing, the FZR750R line was fast and trick, and continues to be an affordable collector option today. Take for example today’s Featured Listing: a 1987 Yamaha FZR750R “T” model.

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT

To build the FZR750R, Yamaha invested in new technology. To build the DeltaBox frame, for instance, Yamaha adopted robotic procedures for folding and welding the thin aluminum components. This stiff but light frame housed the all-important, 106 horsepower “Genesis” engine. Sporting a unique valve train consisting of 5 valves per cylinder (3 intake, 2 exhaust), the Genesis engine family also maximized weight bias by canting the cylinder bank forward to place more weight lower and closer to the front tire. Between the high RPM capability offered by the airflow through the head (and straight-shot downdraft carbs) and the handling afforded by the chassis and ideal weight distribution, the FZR750R was a potent competitor on the racetrack.

From the seller:
Original 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT, #2** of 500 Homologation specials for 1987 , this is a Canadian market bike with 26290kms

This bike is a unrestored survivor in excellent overall condition and does not appear to have been raced (no drilled brake caliper bolts, axles etc etc) the exhaust has never been painted from new. There are some scratches to the protruding air intakes on both sides of the fairing as shown, the fairing is not cracked or split in any way in these areas.

This bike is in very original condition, with all the original reflectors, grips, handlebar ends leavers footrests, windshield and trim. The bike has been fully serviced: valve clearances done, carbs serviced and balanced, it has brand new Bridgestone Battleax tires front and rear, everything works as the should.

Comes with the original owners manual in English / French as it is a Canadian.

Asking Price: $5,950 USD

The anecdotal stories suggest that Yamaha dealers were discouraged to offering these homologation machines to buyers intent on utilizing them on the street; after all, Yamaha built these bikes to go racing. And while many FZR750Rs were raced, we have (thankfully) seen a number of these bikes show up on the street. Some have been reconverted from the race bike status. This particular example appears to have been saved the hard life of the race track, and has instead lived its life as a pampered street bike. That is a plus for collectors. That is not to say that this bike has not been used – with 16,000 miles on the all-metric clocks this is not a garage queen, but looks to be in complete and original form.

Yamaha produced but 200 of these particular bikes for the US market, and only 500 world wide. Those are some pretty low numbers by “Limited Edition” standards, and you are looking at the #2 bike in the production series. But before you think “that will cost me an arm and a leg,” the seller is only asking $5,950. That is right in the sweet spot of where these amazing machines are today, and an amazing deal when you consider that this was destined for AMA Superbike competition. The bike is located in Osaka, Japan, and the owner is willing to talk about crating, domestic shipping or (I hear vacation!) local pick up. Check out the picks and then drop Trev a line. Homologation bikes are hot, and the FZR750R has been the underappreciated step child of the genre. These are bound to go up, so we recommend picking up a great example before the market discovers them. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT
Yamaha October 15, 2019 posted by

Cherry Fizzer: 1988 Yamaha FZR400 for Sale

Practical sportbikes like the Yamaha FZR400 generally weren’t babied and pampered, or cherished in the way that seems so common with Italian superbikes: for an FZR400 fan, “to cherish” means to flog mercilessly on a canyon road or tight track, passing bigger bikes around the outside on that skinny 140-section 18″ rear tire… But nice, clean examples still exist, and today’s example has low miles to boot.

The bike followed Yamaha’s formula at the time: an Deltabox frame housing a liquid-cooled inline four, with a six-speed gearbox. It was actually more sophisticated than its bigger 600cc brother, with a frame made from lightweight aluminum, instead of cheaper steel. The engine revved happily to 14,000rpm which isn’t all that unusual today, in a world of 1100cc V4s that can reach similar engine speeds.But the 399cc engine lacked any appreciable power below 5,000rpm and made a claimed 64hp, so extensive use of the shift lever was required to make quick progress. Luckily, that aluminum frame meant claimed weight was just 346lbs dry, so the FZR400 probably still came in under 400lbs with a full tank of gas.

At the time, it was overshadowed a bit by the very exotic V4 Honda NC30, but the FZR400 offered a practical and affordable package, with exemplary handling: many are still used as race and track bikes for riders that believe less is more. In addition to the lower cost, they were actually sold here in the USA new for a while at least, making registration much easier than for some of the other bikes in the 400cc class like the ZXR400, GSX-R400, and aforementioned NC30.

From the original eBay Listing: 1988 Yamaha FZR400 for Sale

1988 FZR400 in excellent running condition with VERY low miles.  I imported about 2 years ago from Japan and rebuilt the carbs with a high quality carb kit about 5 months ago and synced them with the Morgan Carbtune, runs great.  New battery, everything works.  Will need new tires and most likely chain.  Has minor oxidation from the Japan climate but much of it will clean off, some will need repaint.  The body, tank, plastics, seat are excellent original cond.  I prefer to sell it to someone that will actual come see it in person so they know exactly what it is.  I can assist with shipping and know a few shippers.  It has a clear Florida title.  I have it for sale locally and reserve the right to cancel this ad and sell it.  Thank you

With just 2,600 miles on the odometer, this bike is probably one of the lowest-mileage examples on the planet, if that’s your thing. Of course, with an asking price of $6,500 it really should be… It did come from Japan recently, so probably worth it to make sure there will be no problems registering it, if you live someplace with a strict DMV, and as the seller mentions: there is some surface corrosion on some of the metal components, a common issue with bikes stored near large bodies of salt water. Ask me how I know…

-tad

Cherry Fizzer: 1988 Yamaha FZR400 for Sale
Yamaha July 26, 2019 posted by

Summer Fizz – 1989 Yamaha FZR-400

Late July we should be focused on tall drinks with a lot of ice and a splash of seltzer, when a bargain-priced lightweight pops up.  This restorable rider sponsors thoughts of a ( well air conditioned ) van trip to Georgia.

1989 Yamaha FZR-400 for sale on eBay

Yamaha had been pursuing separate F3 and 400cc road bike goals, but joined other manufacturers in the racey replica business in 1986.  The .85 pint-sized inclined four fit snugly in the Deltabox alloy frame, and 60 hp arrived at a lofty 12,500 rpm.  Relaxed geometry made the handling less aggressive than some of the competition, with just preload adjustable on the right side up forks and monoshock.  Brakes are single piston but 298mm dual rotors, muy bueno for the expected use.  16,000 miles and 30 years down the road, the original build quality testifies for the defense.

No word on the chain of custody or originality of some parts, but the FZR appears substantially stock and quite tidy.  The owner has this to say in the eBay auction:

extremely good condition and runs perfect and is surprisingly fast for a 400 – everything works and it has a manual fan switch for hot days – it has brand new shinko podium 006s , a yoshimira exhaust system that sounds great, new regulator rectifier,recent chain and sprockets, and comes with the service and owners manual – also it has the seat strap if you want to remove the solo seat cowl and the rear seat pad is there as well-there is a small crack and scuff on the left mid fairing as seen in the picture but doesn’t affect the rigidity of the fairing – would make a very competitive ahrma vintage race bike in the next gen lightweight superbike class or a fun bike to tear up the curves in the mountains –

Since RSBFS is usually attracted to nicer examples, it bears emphasizing that a real rider has its place in the garage.  It can go to the track, or out in the rain, or be lent to a friend.  Or become the basis for a riding restoration.  This FZR appears to have had attention when needed, but hasn’t been refinished or glossed over.  Some might find the ask a bit much for a generation-old midsize, but if you’re still interested the Make Offer button is lit.

-donn

Summer Fizz – 1989 Yamaha FZR-400
Bimota July 9, 2019 posted by

Classic Looks, [Nearly] Modern Performance: 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

Superleggera means “super light” in Italian, and has been applied to everything from aluminum-bodied Ferraris to modern Ducatis. For the time, the Bimota YB11 offered pretty outrageous performance, compared to mass-produced open-class superbikes. In the YB11’s case, the claimed 403lbs dry is on par with something like a modern superbike, with a bit less power. Actually, performance should be right in line with something like a Yamaha MT10, which means it’s no slouch even by modern standards and shockingly fast for a bike that’s now 22 years old.

Like nearly all Bimotas, the YB11 was powered by an existing engine from an outside supplier. In this case, the 1002cc five-valve Yamaha Genesis inline four from the YZF1000, with airbox and exhaust tweaks to up the power just a bit from 145 to 150 claimed horses. The bike uses right-way-up forks, but they’re massive 51mm Paioli units with carbon-fiber lowers, and Bimota’s signature aluminum beam frame features gorgeous machined details.

As mentioned in our previous post, it appears that the six-speed gear cluster of a YZF750R does fit within the YZF1000’s cases, making it a pretty straightforward upgrade. As fast as it was, plenty of reviews bemoan the lack of a top cog: it doesn’t really need one, the bike just seems to want one. Since Bimotas use relatively ordinary engines and transmissions for motivation, it seems like that kind of modification would be well within the spirit of

As with other Bimotas the bodywork is lightweight and consists of just a few panels. The entire tail section and tank shroud is a single piece, which is obviously great when you need to strip one for maintenance, not so great if you have a minor crash. The riding position is pretty weird, with a long, stretched out reach to the bars, and pegs set uncomfortably high. I’d imagine there’s room for improvement in both areas if you plan to use one on the street and want to play around with adjustable bars and rearsets, although finding parts to fit could be a hassle.

Interestingly, many YB11s came fitted with a passenger pad and footrests, making it one of just a handful of Bimotas that can handle date-night duties. Of course, “superleggera” construction would suggest an aluminum subframe instead of steel to support the weight of an additional person, but apparently the super-light setup was strong enough. For better or for worse, this one lacks those pillion accommodations. That’s probably academic, since almost nobody actually uses passenger seats on uncomfortable exotic Italian superbikes, but it’s always nice to have the option.

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Bimota YB11 for Sale

Up for sale is my 1997 Bimota YB11 from my collection and it is in pristine condition and is listed with an astonishing 2850 miles (yes you read that right). The bike has always stored indoors for 22 years but that a full refresh has already been completed (details below).

Bimota produced only 600 example of this fabulous creation. Named the ‘Superleggera, or Super-light, the YB11 was a tiny 183kg, a full 15kg lighter than the Yamaha YZF1000R from whence came the 11’s engine. 

The Superleggera was spoilt in many way; a sophisticated Paioli rear shock developed specifically to suit Bimota’s new swing-arm design. Paioli also supplied the lightweight carbon-fibre front forks. Although the Thunderace Yamaha engine was unchanged internally, Bimota incorporated a larger ram-air box that together with their four-into-on exhaust and reworked carbys did increase horsepower to up around 150. The Superleggera achieved a power to weight ratio that no mass-produced bike could match.

  • Bimota
  • 407 lbs
  • 150 HP at 10,200 rpm
  • 20 Valve 1000 cc inline 4 from a Yamaha YZF1000R
  • Larger airbag and exhaust system from Bimota
  • High performance suspension
  • 600 Units produced world wide
  • 87 in the Unites States
  • $30,000 MSRP in 1996
  • Key included

Refresh details

  • Flushed brakes, add stainless steel braided brake lines, rebuilt rear master cylinders
  • Lubed and adjusted throttle and clutch cables
  • Flushed cooling system
  • Torqued and checked all chassis fittings and fasteners,  check/tighten steering head bearings,
  • Replaced shock chain
  • Replaced battery, NGK spark plugs, 
  • Performed compression check and full tune, including clean and synch carbs, flush fuel tank and add 1 gallon bath metal rust remover, replace petcock assembly (leaking).  

Added engine top-end oiling kit from Daughtry Motorsports (early VF1000’s were reported to suffer top end oiling deficiency and this kit addresses that fully).  Includes oil filter with adapter for top-end oiling kit.

Replaced original tires (old and cracked) with brand new Bridgestone Battlax BT45’s.  Went to 150/70/17 rear (stock was 140) and 120/80/16 front (stock size).

Not sure where the customer got those tire sizes, since the YB11 wore very ordinary 180/55-17 and 120/70-17 tires at the rear and front, respectively. Considering he also mentions “early VF1000s” I’m assuming he’s mixed up the text from a couple different bikes he’s posting on eBay. Regardless, this looks to be in very good, original condition, with low miles. I’m still shocked that there’s virtually no interest in these bikes, but that can’t last forever, so grab one now!

-tad

Classic Looks, [Nearly] Modern Performance: 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale
Yamaha July 8, 2019 posted by

Grace, Space, and Pace: 1997 Yamaha YZF1000 Thunderace for Sale

I co-opted Jaguar’s old motto for that headline, but it does seem to apply to the short-lived Yamaha YZF1000. Known in some markets as the “Thunderace,” the YZF1000 was quickly superseded by the class-breaking R1, but it was an open-class motorcycle in the GSX-R1100 and ZX-11 mold, offering handling, reasonable comfort, and real-world performance. Weight and power figures aren’t attention-grabbing by today’s standards, but these days you can pick up this handsome and versatile motorcycle for very little cash.

The “Genesis” inline four engine had Yamaha’s distinctive, forward-canted design and an odd 1002cc displacement. It was packed with their signature performance-enhancing technology, including five-valve heads and an EXUP Exhaust Ultimate Power Valve that helped with midrange performance. Pretty much every modern sportbike has some kind of exhaust valve now, but Yamaha were the first to apply the concept to four-stroke engines. The package was good for 145hp and 164mph, which is plenty fast for any roadbike, unless your weekends involve illicit drag races top-gear roll-ons against modern superbikes with extended-swingarms and nitrous on deserted stretches of freeway…

As with some other open-class sportbikes of the era, the “Thunderace” had a five-speed gearbox, since the engine had an ample spread of torque, but the six-speed from a YZF750R apparently will fit into the cases. So you can always bolt that in, if you happen to have one lying around. An updated Deltabox frame from the YZF750R was wrapped around the engine and gearbox, and the Thunderace saw one of the first applications of Yamaha’s famous “blue-spot” calipers that saw use on the original R1.

Today’s example is exceptionally clean, even considering the low miles. As the seller indicates, there are a couple of very minor flaws in the bodywork, but that can be easily overlooked if you just plan to ride it, or corrected if you plan to squirrel it away deep underground in your private, climate-controlled collection.

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Yamaha YZF1000 Thunderace for Sale

1997 Yamaha YZF1000R “Thunderace” 1003cc motorcycle with 8,980 original 2-owner miles with all original plastics and paint. I purchased from the original owner in early 2018. The YZF1000R was last year Yamaha used its bulletproof FZR1000 EXUP engine, stuffing it into a 600cc superbike frame – and this bike was only imported to the U.S. for one year (sold in Europe from 1996-2003). The YZF1000R is the bridge between the FZR1000 and R1 models. 

Perfect addition for ANY collection or to ride for the next 100k miles if you’d like. This bike starts/runs like a sewing machine, dives into corners like a champion, stops on an absolute dime, and rides/feels/looks like a nearly new bike. Maintains operating temperature as she should, pulling hard toward to redline from any RPM and in any gear. The only non-original item I can find on this bike are the installed Helibars, which have completely improved the riding position.

Bike was recently serviced by a former Yamaha mechanic and FZR/YZF1000R expert. New fork seals and oil, carbs cleaned and tuned/adjusted, new spark plugs, EXUP valve serviced, new valve cover gasket, new thermostat, o-ring and coolant. Also, installed new NOS cleaner element, rebuilt clutch using only OEM Yamaha frictions, springs and clutch springs, new OEM Yamaha front and rear brake pads, new OEM Yamaha oil filter, new OEM Yamaha fuel tank petcock (under tank), fresh oil, coolant, brake and clutch fluid. New NOS radiator cap installed, new NOS windscreen recently installed. Tires are nearly new with less than 800 easy miles on them. I’d estimate with the shop rates and parts costs, I’ve got $2000.00+ in the bike over the past year. With that said, she needs nothing else mechanically done to her.

Zero issues with this bike (e.g., does not pop out of gear on hard acceleration, strong clutch lever and grip, does not use or drip oil, etc.). Cooling fan come up when bike reaches proper temperature; she does not overheat in the Texas summers. Has only been fed non-ethanol fuel for the past year + Sta-bill additive = zero carb. issues (I don’t run ethanol-blended fuel in either of my bikes). Two original ignition keys come with the bike.

Winner of the bike will get all the original paperwork from the original owner, including the original sales invoice and other documents. Incredible documented history!

The only cosmetic flaws (see photos) came from shipping the bike. Note the left cowl where it meets the fairing is cracked (repaired inside the cowl – repair is not visible), note the cowl is cracked under/behind the LH mirror, note the fuel tank has a small ding in the top. Also note the original exhaust can has a dent underneath/to the outside (photographed) and scome scratching near the head pipe where your RH boot would be.  

The seller also includes additional pictures here, and a video of the bike running here, along with a video of Richard Hammond’s review. With a starting bid of $4,500 I think the seller might be aiming a bit high with this one, in spite of the low miles and condition. The Thunderace was a bit of a lame-duck bike for Yamaha: with the class-redefining R1 on the horizon, the YZF was soon very obsolete and the bike was only in production a short while, especially here in the US where it was only available for one year. That makes them pretty rare, but rarity doesn’t always equal value. Personally, I really like them, but I think the seller is overestimating its value at the moment.

-tad

Grace, Space, and Pace: 1997 Yamaha YZF1000 Thunderace for Sale
Yamaha May 9, 2019 posted by

Lucky Luc – 1994 Yamaha YZF-750SP

Yamaha continued developing and racing the YZF750 after the hallowed OW-01 with good results, even though the -SP homologation special never made it here with a motor vehicle title, they showed up as race machines on a bill of sale.  This street registered Canadian example has around 25,000 miles but a newly rebuilt engine.

1994 Yamaha YZF750SP ( Quebec ) for sale on eBay

With revised cams and 39mm flat slide carburetors, Yamaha’s 749cc Genesis engine delivered 125 hp, great for the era.  The alloy chassis sports a monoposto alloy seat console, and fully adjustable suspension.  320mm brakes came with 6-piston calipers and reviewed as magical.  “Torn paper” graphics were all the rage and look complete despite a note in the listing.

Just a few pictures will require investigation, but it does look worthy of the time.  With Canadian registry, the owner had the engine done in suburban Montreal, but maybe the Vermont location suggests free delivery to our northern border.  Normally an owner would be advised against refreshing and engine just before a sale, but that makes it intriguing.  Comments from the eBay auction:

Yamaha YZF750sp 1994.

This is the only ONE registered in Canada.

Engine refreshed by Luc Lapièrre from Moto RL in Saint-Jude Quebec.

The motor has less than 1,000 km on it. (600 miles)

The bike has 40,000km and it is all ORIGINAL. (25,000 miles)

Testers gigged the SP for a balky powerband and turn-in that needed a firm hand.  Remembering that this bike was intended for private race teams to acquire and modify to the limits of the rules, it makes more sense.  Engines would be blueprinted to accommodate what the carbs were feeding, and race-tuning the suspension and slick tires made it handle as intended.  But carefully set up for the road ( and with evident engine work ) this one might be all you could ask in a mid-size superbike.

-donn

Lucky Luc – 1994 Yamaha YZF-750SP
Bimota March 18, 2019 posted by

Factory Fresh: Zero-Mile 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

One of the things I love about Italian bikes and cars is that, no matter what, they look like the vision of one person, not a committee. Sure, there may be the occasional stylistic misstep, but oddballs like the Alfa Romeo Milano and Bimota Mantra make a statement, and you can feel the passion in their creation, even if it’s sometimes misguided… Fortunately, the Bimota YB10 Dieci is one of the more timeless Bimota designs, and they obviously knew they had a good thing going, since the bodywork and frame seems to have changed very little between the YB4, YB6, YB7, YB8, and YB10.

The sleek envelope of the bodywork is the first thing you notice, but Bimotas are uncompromising sportbikes and have always been about the frame. Earlier bikes used trellis-style frames, but by the late 80s, they’d moved to lightweight aluminum beam-style designs as seen here, complete with beautiful machined details. This was the 10th Bimota that used a Yamaha engine, hence the name YB10, which has nothing to do with displacement. In this case, it was Yamaha’s smooth and powerful 1002cc five-valve Genesis engine and five-speed gearbox. The package was good for 145hp and 172mph, not world-beating in today’s terms, but still very, very fast. In 1991, this thing was the epitome of speed, and the embodiment of exotic.

Some readers have misunderstood my previous posts featuring Bimotas, thinking that my criticisms indicate a dislike of the brand. I’m a huge fan of Bimota, and Italian vehicles in general, but experience means I’m very familiar with their… peculiarities, their qualities both superlative and frustrating. Bikes like the YB10 embody everything I love and everything frustrating about Italian machines: they’re gorgeous, fast, and full of personality, with a few hand-built details that speak to their low-volume production and some elements of their construction that indicate the clear focus on performance above all else. If you’re looking for authentic race-bike details, they’re easy to find here, from the exquisitely machined frame and top yoke to lightweight bodywork made up of just a few pieces, all connected with quarter-turn fasteners… But it’s a fine line between “race bike” and “kit bike” and these can be frustrating for owners used to more refined machines.

These days, this limited-production, Italian dream machine can be had for relative peanuts, although this particular example calls for a few more of those peanuts, since it’s never actually been registered, or turned a wheel. Personally, I like my bikes to be usable as bikes, but collectors are strange creatures, and unused examples like this usually command premium dollars.

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

Up for bid is a 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci – Rare 1 of only 224 made– Never registered, zero miles! This gorgeous super-bike is part of a collection of fine motorcycles at Formula One Motor Sports in Oakdale New York.

Bimotas are well known for their Italian style, class and over the top engineering. It has a one piece billet machined frame paired with a Yamaha FZR1000 motor, and seamless upper fairing it also comes with billet triple, classic style wheels!

The Bimota Dieci not only offers Italian Style but you get the reliability of a Japanese Motorbike. Don’t miss out on a chance to bid on this museum quality bike it is a must have for any collector.

This may be a museum-quality bike, but the $21,000 the seller is asking is a museum-quality price. There are plenty of lovingly cared-for, low mileage Bimotas out there at literally half the price, so you’d really have to be one of those zero-mile obsessives to want to splash out for this one. “Plenty of” being relative, of course since, as the seller points out, just a little over 200 were made. But they do show up occasionally for sale and, to give you an idea of what they normally go for, the last one we featured had 12,000 miles and an $11,000 asking price.

-tad

 

 

Factory Fresh: Zero-Mile 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale